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Encyclopedia > Crossing the floor

In politics, crossing the floor is to vote against party lines, especially where this is considered unusual or controversial. The term originates from the British House of Commons, which is configured with the Government and Opposition facing each other on rows of benches. Votes, or divisions, are taken by entering lobbies to the left and right of the chamber to have one's vote tallied; the "Aye Lobby" is on the Government side and the "No Lobby" on the Opposition side. If one wishes to vote against one's party, one must quite literally cross the floor to get to the other lobby. Politics is the process by which groups make decisions. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Parliamentary Opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. ... It has been suggested that Division of the house be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Interest representation: Academic overview be merged into this article or section. ...


The term has passed into general use in other Westminster parliamentary democracies, such as Australia, Canada, New Zealand or South Africa even though most of these countries have semicircular or horseshoe-shaped debating chambers and mechanisms for voting without members leaving their seats. It is most often used to describe members of the government party or parties who defect and vote with the Opposition against some piece of government-sponsored legislation. The Houses of Parliament in London The Westminster system is a democratic parliamentary system of government modeled after that of the United Kingdom system, as used in the Palace of Westminster, the location of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ...


It is also sometimes used to describe a member who leaves their party entirely and joins the opposite side of the House, such as leaving an opposition party to support the government (or vice versa), or even leaving one opposition party to join another. It involves the person leaving his parliamentary party and joining a new one. This usage exists not only in Westminster system parliaments, but also in legislatures in presidential systems. In Canada, the term "crossing the floor" is used exclusively to refer to switching parties which occurs occasionally at both the federal and provincial levels. A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ... The Houses of Parliament in London The Westminster system is a democratic parliamentary system of government modeled after that of the United Kingdom system, as used in the Palace of Westminster, the location of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... A legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... A presidential system, also called a congressional system, is a system of government where the executive branch exists and presides (hence the term) separate from the legislature, to which it is not accountable, and which cannot in normal circumstances dismiss it. ...


In April 2006, Manitoba's premier Gary Doer (NDP) proposed banning crossing the floor of the Manitoba legislature. The legislation would be the first of its kind in Canada and, according to Mr Doer, it "responds to the concern some voters have expressed over the high-profile defections of three federal MPs from their parties in just over two years" (Michelle Macafee, Proposed reforms would ban floor-crossing in Man., Canadian Press, April 11, 2006) Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Official languages English and French, per mandate of the Constitution Act 1982 Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 14 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of total)  Ranked 8th 647... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The New Democratic Party of Manitoba is a social democratic political party in Manitoba, Canada. ...


In Australia, Senator Barnaby Joyce of the National Party has crossed the floor twice to vote against his coalition colleagues. The first was to vote against a motion concerning the Trade Practices Act and the second was a vote to oppose Voluntary Student Unionism. Barnaby Thomas Gerald Joyce (born 17 April 1967), Australian politician, has been a member of the Australian Senate representing the state of Queensland since July 2005. ... The Trade Practices Act 1974 is an act of the Parliament of Australia. ... Voluntary student unionism (VSU) is a policy under which membership of – and payment of membership fees to – university student organisations is not compulsory. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Crossing the floor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (294 words)
In politics, crossing the floor is to vote against party lines, especially where this is considered unusual or controversial.
Votes, or divisions, are taken by entering lobbies to the left and right of the chamber to have one's vote tallied; the "Ayes Lobby" is on the Government side and the "Noes Lobby" on the Opposition side.
In Canada, the term "crossing the floor" is used exclusively to refer to switching parties.
Avista Home Energy Library (586 words)
In an unheated or vented crawl space, insulation should be installed on the underside of the floor over the crawl space.
Be sure to install the insulation so that the vapor retarder faces up toward the warm-in-winter side (this means that you can't staple the vapor retarder to hold the insulation in place).
Crawl spaces with dirt or gravel floors should have a 4 - 6 mil plastic ground cover to prevent moisture from damaging the insulation or structural materials.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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