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Encyclopedia > Croom
Croom
Cromadh
Location
WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates:
52°31′17″N 8°43′14″W / 52.5213, -8.7205
Irish Grid Reference
R509411
Statistics
Province: Munster
County: County Limerick
Population (2006) 1,045

Croom (Cromadh in Irish) is a village in County Limerick, Republic of Ireland. It is located just off the N20 (which was recently routed around the town as a bypass) on the River Maigue. It is 8km southeast of Adare on the N20. Bullet for locations in Ireland, displays location and not area. ... Image File history File links Ireland Map with County Limerick Magnified. ... GPS redirects here. ... The Irish national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Ireland. ... When under Gaelic rule, Ireland was divided into provinces to replace the earlier system of the túatha. ... Statistics Area: 24,607. ... For much of its history, the island of Ireland was divided into 32 counties (Irish language contae or condae, pronounced IPA: ). Two historical counties, County Desmond and County Coleraine, no longer exist, while several county names have changed. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: Limerick Code: LK Area: 2,686 km² Population (2006) 183,863 (including Limerick City); 131,303 (without Limerick City) Website: www. ... Masouleh village, Gilan Province, Iran. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: Limerick Code: LK Area: 2,686 km² Population (2006) 183,863 (including Limerick City); 131,303 (without Limerick City) Website: www. ... The N20 road is a National Primary Route in Ireland, connecting the cities of Limerick and Cork. ... The River Maigue rises in the Ballyhoura Mountains of north County Cork, Ireland, and flows through Croom and Adare in County Limerick before entering the estuary of the River Shannon just north of Askeaton. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Munster County: Dáil Éireann: Limerick West Dialling Code: 061-39 Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural:   2,012  580 Brightly coloured houses and shops line Adares main street. ...

Contents

Places of interest

Croom is home to Castle Croom, also known as home of the fairies which was restored in the 19th century. In the 18th century, it was the meetingplace of the "Maigue poets." West of Croom are the ruins of a 15th century church (National Monument) and a round tower (12th century), the top part of which is missing. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Photo of a notice at a ring fort near Lough Gur, typical of those at a national monument in Ireland. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ...


Name

Many Americans with the surname Croom believe they can trace their ancestry to this town. This may be a misconception. In fact, the last name Croom is rarely found among the Irish. Instead, it is much more likely the name derives from Scotland or England, where it is much more common. However, it is believed that a small band of Crooms fled to North America during the first Danish invasion and later the English, the most popular being that of Cromwell who defeated the Irish in the battle of Dunbar on September 3, 1650. Some genealogists believe the name Croom is of Anglo-Saxon origins and most likely was derived from the an early gaelic word meaning curved, bent or crooked, like the shape of the curved moon. Thus, it is probably pure coincidence that the town name and surname Croom are the same. Scotland and Ireland share Gaelic roots, and therefore the Croom names likely developed separately. This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


Coat of Arms

The Croom Coat of Arms is described as: "Gules, a chevron ermine between three fleur d lis argent." The crest (on top of the helmet) is describe as: "A lion rampant argent holding in dexter paw a fleur de lis argent."


Terminology describing the Croom coat of arms:


Gules: Red - One of the 5 principal heraldic colors; represents fire. In military application it signifies fortitude.


Chevron - adapted from the bow of the war saddle which rose high in front.


Ermine - one of the 7 furs used in coats of arm. In the Croom example it is white with black spots (track of the ermine) in the shape of a chevron. Ermine was the luxury fur of the Middle Ages.


Fleur de Lis - The three leaves are said to represent faith, wisdom, and valor. This is one of the most highly regarded charges among royalty and those of nobility. The charge is an adaptation of the lily.


Argent: Silver - This metal represents nobility, peace, and serenity.


Helmet - Showed rank. The Croom example denotes Peer.


OR: Gold - Represents the most excellent metal and exceeds all other in value, purity, and fineness; the bearer surpassing all others in valor. A gold crown rests on the helmet in the Croom coat of arms.


Lion - Used as an emblem of strength, courage, and generosity, as well as power and strength. In the Croom coat of arms, the lion is correctly erect in rampant position.


Transport

Croom railway station opened on 1 August 1862, closed for passenger traffic on 31 December 1934 and for goods traffic on 9 September 1963, finally closing altogether on 27 March 1967.[1] is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


Sport

The well known througbred horse stud Islanmore Stud is on the south side of the village, the original 18th century house was built for a younger brother of the Earl of Dunraven. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Earldom of Dunraven and Mount-Earl (sometimes spellt Mount Earl or Mountearl) was created in the Peerage of Ireland in 1822. ...


See also

This is a link page for cities and towns in the Republic of Ireland, including larger villages, and villages and townlands of note, as well as towns, townships or urban centres in Dublin. ...

References

  1. ^ Croom station. Railscot - Irish Railways. Retrieved on 2007-09-23.

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