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Encyclopedia > Croats
Croats
King Tomislav  · Ivan Gundulić  · Andrija Mohorovičić
Miroslav Krleža  · Ivan Meštrović  · Josip Jelačić
Total population

6.2[1] - 9 million (est.)[2] Image File history File links Hrvati1. ... Tomislav was the first king of Croatia. ... Ivan Gundulić Ivan (Dživo Franov) Gundulić (Italian: Giovanni Francesco Gondola(Spanish: Juan Francisco Gondola; January 9, 1589–December 8, 1638) is the most celebrated Croatian Baroque poet from the Republic of Ragusa. ... Andrija Mohorovičić (c. ... Miroslav Krleža (July 7, 1893 - December 29, 1981) was, arguably, the greatest Croatian writer of the 20th century. ... Ivan Meštrović (August 15, 1883 – January 16, 1962) was a Croatian sculptor. ... Baron Josip Jelačić of Bužim (born 1801 in Petrovaradin, Habsburg Monarchy, Hungary; died 1859 in Zagreb, Habsburg Monarchy, Croatia and Slavonia; also spelled Jellachich or Jellačić) was the Ban of Croatia between March 23, 1848 and May 19, 1859. ...

Regions with significant populations
Flag of Croatia Croatia: 3,977,171[3]
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina 571,317 (1996) [4]
Flag of Argentina Argentina 440,000 [5]
Flag of the United States United States 374,241 (2000) [6]
Flag of Germany Germany 227,510 (2006) [7]
Flag of Austria Austria 131,307 [8]
Flag of Chile Chile 130,000 (est.) [9]
Flag of Brazil Brazil 127,765
Flag of Australia Australia 118,046 (2006) [10]
Flag of Canada Canada 97,050 (2001) [11]
Flag of Serbia Serbia 70,602 (2002) [13]
Flag of France France 50,000 [14]
Flag of Switzerland Switzerland 41,900 [15]
Flag of Slovenia Slovenia 35,642 [16]
Flag of Sweden Sweden 26,000 (est.)
Flag of Italy Italy 20,700 [17]
Flag of Hungary Hungary 25,730 [18]
Flag of Belgium Belgium 12,000 [19]
Flag of New Zealand New Zealand 10,000
Flag of the Netherlands Netherlands 10,000
Flag of Spain Spain 10,000
Flag of Montenegro Montenegro 8,000 [20]
Flag of Romania Romania 6,811
Languages
Croatian
Religions
Predominantly Roman Catholic
Related ethnic groups
Slavs
South Slavs

Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. There is a notable Croat diaspora in western Europe, the Americas, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. The Croats are predominantly Roman Catholic and their language is Croatian. Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Chile. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Serbia. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Switzerland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovenia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Montenegro. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... South Slavic populations and tribes (yellow) in the Balkans during the 7th century AD Countries inhabited by South Slavs (in teal) The South Slavs are a southern branch of the Slavic peoples that live in the Balkans, the southern Pannonian Plain and the eastern Alps. ... For other uses, see Diaspora (disambiguation). ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...

Part of a series of articles on
Croats

Culture of Croatia
Literature · Music · Art · Cinema
Cuisine · Costume · Sport Image File history File links Croatia,_Historic_Coat_of_Arms. ... The culture of Croatia has roots in a long history: the Croatian people have been inhabiting the area for thirteen centuries, but there are important remnants of the earlier periods still preserved in the country. ... // (ca. ... The music of Croatia, like the country itself, has three major influences: the influence of the Mediterranean especially present in the coastal areas, of the Balkans especially in the mountainous, continental parts, and of central Europe in the central and northern parts of the country. ... Croatian art describes the visual arts in Croatia from medieval times to the present. ... Croatian cuisine is heterogeneous and is therefore known as the cuisine of regions, since every region has its own distinct culinary traditions. ...

Croats by region or country
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Serbia (Vojvodina · Kosovo)
Montenegro (Boka Kotorska)
Slovakia · Czech Rep. · Hungary · Romania
Italy · Macedonia · Slovenia · Austria Croats are one of ethnic groups in Serbia. ... Croats are the fourth largest ethnic group in the Vojvodina province of Serbia. ... Janjevci are the inhabitants of the Kosovo town of Janjevo and surrounding villages, located near Pristina as well as villages centered on Letnica near Vitina (Papare, Vrmez, Vrnavo Kolo). ... The Croats have a minority in Boka Kotorska (Bay of Kotor), a coastal region in Montenegro, the largest of their kind in Tivat. ...


Croatian diaspora
Australia · Argentina · Canada
Chile · France · Germany · Italy
Sweden · South Africa · United States Croatian Diaspora refers to the Croatian communities that have formed outside the traditional homeland of the Croatian people. ...


Subgroups
Bunjevci · Šokci · Krashovani The Catholic Church in the Bunjevac village of Stari Žednik Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region... Catholic Church in the Å okac village of Sonta, Serbia Å okci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Å okci, singular Å okac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of... The Krashovani (Croatian and Serbian: KraÅ¡ovani, Крашовани, KaraÅ¡ovani or KraÅ¡ovanje, KaraÅ¡evci and KoroÅ¡evci; Romanian: CaraÅŸoveni, CârÅŸoveni, CotcoreÅ£i or CocoÅŸi; also known as Krashovans) are a South Slavic people indigenous to CaraÅŸova and other nearby locations in CaraÅŸ-Severin County within...

Croatian standards and dialects
Croatian ·
Chakavian · Kajkavian · Shtokavian
Burgenland standard · Molise dialect Chakavian (Čakavian, čakavski) dialect is one of the three dialects of Croatian language. ... Location map of Kajkavian Kajkavian (kajkavski) dialect is one of the three dialects of the Croatian language. ... Shtokavian (Å tokavian, Å¡tokavski/штокавски) is the primary dialect of the Central South Slavic languages system, Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian language. ... Burgenland Croatian language or dialect (gradišćanskohrvatski jezik) belongs to the South Slavic branch of the Slavic languages. ... Molise Croatian dialect (also: Molise Slavic, Slavisano, na-naÅ¡o) is spoken in the Campobasso Province in the Molise Region of Italy, in three villages — Montemitro (Mundimitar), Aquaviva Collercroce (Živavoda Kruč) and San Felice del Molise (Å tifilić). These have approximately 3,000 speakers. ...

History · Rulers
Origins of the Croats This is the history of Croatia. ... // The details of the arrival of the Croats are scarcely documented. ... The origin of the Croatian tribe before the great migration of the Slavs is uncertain. ...

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Contents

Locations

Croatia is the nation state of the Croats, while in the adjacent Bosnia and Herzegovina they are one of the three constitutive nations. A nation-state is a specific form of state, which exists to provide a sovereign territory for a particular nation, and which derives its legitimacy from that function. ... More than 95% of population of Bosnia and Herzegovina belongs to one of its three constitutive nations: Bosniaks, Croats and Serbs. ...


Autochthonous Croat minorities exist in or among:

The population estimates are reasonably accurate domestically: around four million in Croatia and nearly 600,000 in Bosnia and Herzegovina, or 15% of the total population. Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Croatian language (hrvatski jezik) is a South Slavic language which is used primarily by the inhabitants of Croatia and Croats in Bosnia and Herzegovina and parts of the Croatian diaspora. ... Catholic Church in the Å okac village of Sonta, Serbia Å okci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Å okci, singular Å okac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of... The Catholic Church in the Bunjevac village of Stari Žednik Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region... Bačka (Serbian: Бачка or Bačka, Hungarian: Bácska, Croatian: Bačka, Slovak: Báčka, German: Batschka) is an area of the Pannonian plain lying between the rivers Danube and Tisa. ... Catholic Church in the Å okac village of Sonta, Serbia Å okci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Å okci, singular Å okac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of... The Catholic Church in the Bunjevac village of Stari Žednik Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region... Bács-Kiskun is a county (megye in Hungarian) located in southern Hungary. ... Boka Kotorska (Bay of Kotor, Bocca di Cattaro) in Montenegro is a winding bay on the Adriatic sea. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... An image of Italian Karst (Monfalcone). ... Trieste (Italian: Trieste; Slovenian, Croatian and Serbian: Trst; German: Triest) is a city and port in northeastern Italy right on the border with Slovenia. ... Slovenian Littoral in Slovenia The Slovenian Littoral (Slovenian: ; Italian: ; German: ) is a traditional region of Slovenia that itself consists of the regions of GoriÅ¡ka and Slovenian Istria (Slovenska Istra). ... The municipalities of Slovenia in Prekmurje Prekmurje is the easternmost region of Slovenia. ... Area: 108,9 km² Population  - males  - females 8. ... Lower Carniola (Slovenian: Dolenjska; German: ) is a traditional region of Slovenia. ... Zala is the name of an administrative county (comitatus or megye) in present Hungary, and also in the former Kingdom of Hungary. ... Baranya (Hungarian, in Croatian and Serbian: Baranja) is the name of an administrative county (comitatus or megye) in present Hungary, in the Baranya region, and also in the former Kingdom of Hungary (see: Baranya, historic county). ... Somogy is the name of an administrative county (comitatus or megye) in present Hungary, and also in the former Kingdom of Hungary. ... The Krashovani (Serbian:Крашовани, also Karashevci/Карашевци) are an ethnic-Serb subgroup living in the Romanian Banat around the town of Caraşova (Serbian: Царашево/Cara... The Croats (Hrvati in Croatian, croaÅ£i in Romanian) are an ethnic minority in Romania, numbering 6786 people according to the 2002 census. ... Burgenland (Hungarian Várvidék, Őrvidék or FelsÅ‘Å‘rvidék, Croatian Gradišće, Slovenian Gradiščansko) is the easternmost and least populous state or Land of Austria. ... VAS is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: Vaccine Associated Sarcoma Value-added service, a telecommunications industry concept Value-added software Vehicle activated sign, road traffic signs triggered by traffic Vermont Astronomical Society Virtual address space, a feature of modern operating systems Virtual-Agent Services, a... GyÅ‘r-Moson-Sopron is the name of an administrative county (comitatus or megye) in north-western Hungary, on the border with Slovakia and Austria. ... Burgenland (Hungarian Várvidék, Őrvidék or FelsÅ‘Å‘rvidék, Croatian Gradišće, Slovenian Gradiščansko) is the easternmost and least populous state or Land of Austria. ... Burgenland Croats (Gradišćanski Hrvati) are ethnic Croats in the Austrian province of Burgenland. ... Kosovo (Albanian: Kosova or Kosovë, Serbian: , transliterated ; also , transliterated ) is a region in southern Serbia which has been under United Nations administration since 1999. ... Janjevci are the inhabitants of the Kosovo town of Janjevo and surrounding villages, located near Pristina as well as villages centered on Letnica near Vitina (Papare, Vrmez, Vrnavo Kolo). ... Molise is a region of central Italy, the second smallest of the regions. ... Molise Croats are Croatian subgroup, found in the Molise region of Italy. ... Photo of Szentendres FÅ‘ tér (Main Square) Szentendre (Medieval Latin: Sankt Andrae; Serbian: Сентандреја or Sentandreja; German: Sankt Andrä; Slovak: Senondrej; Croatian: Sentandrija) is a riverside town in Pest county, Hungary, near the capital city of Budapest. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... Nickname: Location of Bratislava within Slovakia Coordinates: , Country Region Districts Bratislava I-V City subdivisions 17 city boroughs Cadastral areas 20 cadastral areas First mentioned 907 Government  - Type City council  - Mayor (Primátor) Andrej ÄŽurkovský  - Headquarters Primates Palace Area [1]  - City 367. ... Senec District in the Bratislava region Chorvátsky Grob (Croatian Hrvatski Grob) is a village and municipality in western Slovakia in Senec District in the Bratislava region. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Devínska Nová Ves (German: ) is a city part of Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia. ... Rusovce (German: Karlburg, Hungarian: Oroszvár, Kroatian: Rosvar) ist a division South of Bratislava on the right side of the Danube river bordering Hungary. ... Jarovce (German: Kroatisch-Jahrndorf; Croatian: Hrvatski Jandrof; Hungarian: Horvátjárfalu) a division of Bratislava (Slovakia) since January 1st 1972. ... Flag of Moravia Moravia (Czech and Slovak: Morava; German: ; Hungarian: ; Polish: ) is a historical region in the east of the Czech RepublicCzechia. ...


Diaspora

A large number of Croats was forced in the course of the time for economic or political reasons to leave the old homeland, thus today there exists quite a large Croat diaspora outside of their traditional homeland of the Balkans. For other uses, see Diaspora (disambiguation). ...


The first large emigration of Croats took place in the 15th and 16th centuries, at the beginning of the Ottoman conquests in today's Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina. People fled into safer areas within today's Croatia, and other areas of the Habsburg Empire (today's Austria and Hungary). This migration resulted in Croat communities in Austria and Hungary. For other uses, see Ottoman (disambiguation). ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ...

One of many Croatian tombs at the Punta Arenas (Chile) municipial cemetery
One of many Croatian tombs at the Punta Arenas (Chile) municipial cemetery

At the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, larger numbers of Croats emigrated, particularly for economic reasons, to overseas destinations. Some destinations included North America, South America (above all Chile and Argentina), Australia and New Zealand. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 492 KB) en: Punta Arenas, Chile - one of many Croatian tombs at the towns municipial cemetery sl: Punta Arenas, Čile - ena izmed številnih hrvaških grobnic na mestnem pokopališču File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 492 KB) en: Punta Arenas, Chile - one of many Croatian tombs at the towns municipial cemetery sl: Punta Arenas, Čile - ena izmed številnih hrvaških grobnic na mestnem pokopališču File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia... City of Punta Arenas Punta Arenas in Tierra del Fuego Sunrise view of the Strait of magellan Punta Arenas is the main city on the Strait of Magellan and the capital of the Región de Magallanes y la Antártica Chilena, Chile, and depending on the definition of city...


A further larger emigration wave, this time for political reasons, took place immediately after the end of the Second World War. Here fled both collaborators of the Ustaša regime, and refugees who did not want to live under a communist regime. It is estimated that during and immediately after the Second World War (from 1939 to 1948) about 250,000 Croats had to leave the country[citation needed].


In the second half the 20th century numerous Croats, to a large extent due to difficult economic living conditions, left the country as immigrant workers particularly to Germany, Austria and Switzerland. In addition some emigrants left for political reasons. This migration made a lowering of unemployment for communist Yugoslavia possible at that time and created at the same time by the transfers of the emigrants to its families an enormous foreign exchange source of income.


The last large wave of Croat emigration occurred during and after the Yugoslav Wars, when many people from the region (not only Croats but Serbs, Bosniaks and others as well) had to leave as refugees. Migrant communities that were already established in countries such as Australia, the USA, and Germany grew as a result.


Abroad, the count is only approximate because of incomplete statistical records and naturalization, but (highest) estimates suggest that the Croatian diaspora numbers between a third[22] and a half[2] of the total number of Croats. The largest emigrant groups are in Western Europe, mainly in Germany, where it is estimated that there are around 450,000 people with direct Croatian ancestry. In law, naturalization refers to an act whereby a person acquires a citizenship different from that persons citizenship at birth. ...


Overseas, the United States contains the largest Croatian emigrant group (544,270 in the 1990 census; 374,271 in the 2000 census), mostly in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Illinois and California), followed by Australia (105,747 according to 2001 census, with concentrations in Sydney, Melbourne and Perth) and Canada (Southern Ontario, British Columbia, Alberta). Croats have also emigrated in several waves into South America, chiefly Argentina and Chile; estimates of their number wildly vary[23][24]. There are also smaller groups in Peru, Brazil, New Zealand and South Africa. The most important organization of the Croatian diaspora are the Croatian Fraternal Union, Croatian Heritage Foundation and the Croatian World Congress. For other uses, see Diaspora (disambiguation). ... The Croatian Fraternal Union Logo The Croatian Fraternal Union (Hrvatska bratska zajednica) is a fraternal benefit society of the Croatian diaspora based out of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Origins

The origin of the Croatian tribe before the great migration of the Slavs is uncertain. According to the most widely accepted[25], "Slavic" theory, in the 7th century, the Croatian tribe moved from the area north of the Carpathians and east of the river Vistula (referred to as White Croatia) and migrated into the western Dinaric Alps. White Croats formed the Principality of Dalmatia in the upper Adriatic, while their subgroup Red Croats created the Principalities of Red Croatia: Zahumlje, Travunia with Konavle and Duklja. Another wave of Slavic migrants from White Croatia subsequently founded the Principality of Pannonia. The origin of the Croatian tribe before the great migration of the Slavs is uncertain. ... Net migration rates for 2006: positive (blue), negative (orange) and stable (green). ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Satellite image of the Carpathians. ... For other uses, see Vistula (disambiguation). ... Mt Orjen at the Bay of Kotor is the heaviest karstified range of the dinarids View of the central part of the Dinaric Alps (north=down) Valbona pass, northern Albania. ... White Croats migrated to modern Dalmatia (coastal part of Croatia) as part of the migration of the Croats in 610-641 A.D.[1] ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... The Adriatic Sea is an arm of the Mediterranean Sea separating the Apennine peninsula (Italy) from the Balkan peninsula, and the system of the Apennine Mountains from that of the Dinaric Alps and adjacent ranges. ... Red Croats migrated to modern Montenegro as part of the migration of the Croats in 610-641 A.D., as part of the expanding Avar kingdom. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... Zahumlje in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio Zahumlje, also known as the Land of Hum and Chelm, was a medieval South Slavic principality located in todays Herzegovina (modern day Bosnia and Herzegovina), and southern Dalmatia (modern day Republic of Croatia). ... Travunia in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio Travunia (Travunija, Travunja; Latin: Terbounia) was a medieval Slavic realm centered at Trebinje in todays eastern Herzegovina (modern day Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro), and southern Dalmatia (modern day Republic of Croatia). ... Duklja according to De administrando imperio. ... White Croats migrated to modern Dalmatia (coastal part of Croatia) as part of the migration of the Croats in 610-641 A.D.[1] ... Position of the Roman province of Pannonia Pannonia is an ancient country bounded north and east by the Danube, conterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia. ...


According to the "autochthonous" model, mostly promoted by Illyrian Movement in the 19th century and abandoned[25] by the mid-19th century, the homeland of Slavs is actually in the area of southern Croatia, and they spread northwards and westwards rather than the other way round. A revision of the theory, developed by Ivan Muzić [26] argues that Slav migration from the north did happen, but the actual number of Slavic settlers was small and that the Illyrian ethnic substratum was prevalent for formation of Croatian ethnicity. Vlaho Bukovac: Hrvatski narodni preporod, Zastor u HNK Zagreb Illyrian movement (Croatian/Serbian: Ilirski pokret), also Croatian national revival (Hrvatski narodni preporod), was a nationalistic campaign initiated by a group of young Croatian intellectuals during the first half of 19th century, around the years of 1835-1849 (there is some... This article is about an ancient civilization in southeastern Europe; see also Illyria (software), Illyria (character in the TV series Angel). ...


The Iranian origin of the Croats suggests that they are descendants of ancient Persia (cf. Alans), these are perceived appearances of the name for Croatia or Croatians. The earliest claimed mention of the Croatian name, Horouathos, can be traced on two stone inscriptions in the Greek language and script, dating from around the year 200 AD, found in the seaport Tanais on the Azov sea, located on the Crimean peninsula (near the Black Sea). Both tablets are kept in an archaeological museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Whether the term Hourathos is related to the Croat ethnonym is open to conjecture, as the two words may have separate origins. The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... The Alans, Alani, Alauni or Halani were an Iranian nomadic group among the Sarmatian people, warlike nomadic pastoralists of varied backgrounds, who spoke an Iranian language and to a large extent shared a common culture. ... Greek ( IPA: or simply IPA: — Hellenic) has a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single language in the Indo-European language family. ... Technical note: Due to technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... For other uses, see number 200. ... Sarmatian cataphract from Tanais. ... The shallow Sea of Azov is clearly distinguished from the deeper Black Sea. ... Motto: Процветание в единстве - Prosperity in unity Anthem: Нивы и горы твои волшебны, Родина - Your fields and mounts are wonderful, Motherland Location of Crimea (red) on the map of Ukraine. ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and...


Genetically, on the Y chromosome line, a majority (>87%) of Croats belong to one of the three major European Y-DNA haplogroups -- Haplogroup I (38%), Haplogroup R1a 35% and Haplogroup R1b 16%. All three groups migrated to Europe during the upper paleolithic around 30,000-20,000 BC. Later, neolithic lineages, originating in the Middle East and that brought agriculture to Europe, are present in surprisingly low numbers. Haplogroup I is believed to have weathered the last glacial maximum in the southern Balkan peninsula itself, migrating north (including straight to modern day Croatia) as the ice sheets retreated. ...


History

See also: Medieval Croatian state and History of Croatia

The earliest Croatian state was the Principality of Dalmatia. Prince Trpimir of Dalmatia was called Duke of Croats in 852. The nationality of the Red Croats was vague at times, with the Neretvians accepting Croatian identity, while the Zachlumians maintained a Croatian identiy for some time. The Croatian people trace their origins to Slavic peoples which moved into the territory of the former Roman provinces Pannonia and Dalmatia between the 7th and 8th centuries, and formed dukedoms. ... This is the history of Croatia. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... Duke Trpimir was the successor to Prince Mislav and founder of the Trpimirović dynasty. ... A duke is a nobleman, historically of highest rank and usually controlling a duchy. ... Events Boris I Michael succeeds the duumvirate of Malamir and Presian as monarch of Bulgaria. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Zahumlje in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio Zahumlje, also known as the Land of Hum and Chelm, was a medieval South Slavic principality located in todays Herzegovina (modern day Bosnia and Herzegovina), and southern Dalmatia (modern day Republic of Croatia). ...


In 925, Croatian Duke of Dalmatia Tomislav of Trpimir united all Croats. He organized a state by annexing the Principality of Pannonia as well as maintaining close ties with Pagania and Zahumlje. Events Alfonso IV the Monk becomes king of Leon Ha-Mim proclaims himself a prophet among the Ghomara of Morocco Tomislav, duke of the Croatian duchies of Pannonia and Dalmatia, is crowned King of Croatia at Duvno field. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... King Tomislav by Josip Horvat - Međimurec Tomislav (died in 928), was one of the greatest rulers of Croatia in Middle Ages. ... Position of the Roman province of Pannonia Pannonia is an ancient country bounded north and east by the Danube, conterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Zahumlje in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio Zahumlje, also known as the Land of Hum and Chelm, was a medieval South Slavic principality located in todays Herzegovina (modern day Bosnia and Herzegovina), and southern Dalmatia (modern day Republic of Croatia). ...


Since the creation of the personal union with Hungary in 1102, the Croats were at times subjected to forceful Magyarization as well as, since 1527, Germanization. The ensuing Ottoman conquests and Habsburg domination broke the Croatian lands into disunity again—with the majority of Croats living in Croatia proper and Dalmatia. Large numbers of Croats also lived in Slavonia, Istria, Rijeka, Herzegovina and Bosnia. Over the centuries ensued a wave of Croatian emigrants, notably to Molise in Italy, Burgenland in Austria and eventually the United States of America. Events Valencia is captured by the Almoravids. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Ottoman (disambiguation). ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... This is the history of Croatia. ... This is the history of Dalmatia. ... Coat of arms Slavonia (Croatian: Slavonija) is a geographical and historical region in eastern Croatia. ... Istria (Croatian and Slovenian: Istra, Venetian and Italian: Istria), formerly Histria (Latin), is the largest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. ... Rijeka (in local Croatian dialects Rika and Reka; Fiume in Italian and Hungarian. ... This article is about the geographic area of Herzegovina. ... This article is about the country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Molise is a region of central Italy, the second smallest of the regions. ... Burgenland (Hungarian Várvidék, Őrvidék or FelsÅ‘Å‘rvidék, Croatian Gradišće, Slovenian Gradiščansko) is the easternmost and least populous state or Land of Austria. ...


After the First World War, most Croats were united within the Kingdom of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs, created by joining South Slavic lands under the former Austro-Hungarian rule with the Kingdom of Serbia, Croats became one of the constituent nations of the new kingdom. The state was transformed into the Kingdom of Yugoslavia in 1929 and the Croats were melted into the new nation with their neighbour fellow-South Slavs—Yugoslavs. In 1939, the Croats received a high degree of autonomy when the Banovina of Croatia was created, which united almost all ethnic Croatian territories within the Kingdom. In the Second World War, the Axis forces created a puppet state—the Independent State of Croatia, led by the fascist Ustaše movement, which sought to create an ethnically clean Croatian state. In response, many Croats joined the anti-fascist supra-ethnic partisan movement, led by the Communist Party of Yugoslavia. During and after the war, between 40,000 and 200,000 Croats lost their lives. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Bože Pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino and Naprej zastava slave medley Capital (largest city) Belgrade Serbo-Croat and Slovenian Government Constitutional monarchy (1918-1929) Royal dictatorship (1929-1941)  - King Peter I (1918-1921)  - King Alexander I (1921-1934)  - King Peter II... One of the first Serbian states, RaÅ¡ka, was founded in the first half of the 7th century on Byzantine territory by the Unknown Archont, the founder of the House of Vlastimirović; it evolved into the Serbian Empire under the House of Nemanjić. In the modern era Serbia has been... Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander... Yugoslavs (Bosnian: Jugosloveni; Macedonian, Serbian Cyrillic: Југословени; Latinic: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) is an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Banovina of Croatia (1939-1941). ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The Axis Powers is a term for the loose alliance of Germany, Italy, and Japan. ... Capital Zagreb Language(s) Croatian Religion Roman Catholicism Political structure Puppet-state King  - 1941-1943 Tomislav II Poglavnik  - 1941-1945 Ante Pavelić Legislature None Historical era World War II  - Established April 10, 1941  - Disestablished May 8, 1945 Population  - 1941 est. ... An UstaÅ¡e guard pose among the bodies of prisoners murdered in the Jasenovac concentration camp The UstaÅ¡e (also known as Ustashas or Ustashi) was a Croatian extreme nationalist movement. ... Yugoslav Partisan Flag The Yugoslav Partisans were one of the two main resistance movements engaged in the fight against the Axis forces in the Balkans during World War II, alongside rival Chetniks, the Yugoslav Peoples Liberation War. ... SKJ flag in Serbo-Croat, with Cyrillic script SKJ flag in Serbo-Croat, with Latin script SKJ flag in Albanian SKJ flag in Hungarian SKJ flag in Italian SKJ flag in Macedonian SKJ flag in Slovenian The Communist Party of Yugoslavia (after 1952 the League of Communists of Yugoslavia) was...


Post-war Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia became a federation consisting of 6 republics, and Croats became one of two constituent peoples of two—Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (in the latter one of the three since 1968). Croats in Serbia, in autonomous province of Vojvodina never reached that status. Following the democratization of society, accompanied with ethnic tensions that emerged in post-Tito era, in 1990 the Republic of Croatia declared independence, which was followed by war with its Serb minority, backed up by Serbia-controlled Yugoslav People's Army. In the first years of the war, over 200,000 Croats were displaced from their homes as a result of the military actions. In the peak of the fighting, around 550,000 ethnic Croats were displaced altogether during the Yugoslav wars. Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian (spoken throuout the territory), Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian (all official), and languages of other nationalities. ... A map displaying todays federations. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Josip Broz Tito (Cyrillic: Јосип Броз Тито, May 7, 1892 [May 25th according to official birth certificate] – May 4, 1980) was the leader of the Second Yugoslavia, which lasted from 1943 until 1991. ... Combatants Croatian Army Paramilitary organisations Republic of Serb Krajina Army Yugoslav Peoples Army Bosnian Serb Army Republic of Serbia Paramilitary organisations Commanders Franjo TuÄ‘man (President of Croatia) Anton Tus (Chief of Staff of Croatian Army 1991-1992) Janko Bobetko (Chief of Staff of Croatian Army 1992-1995) Atif... The Yugoslav Peoples Army (YPA) (Serbo-Croatian: Jugoslovenska narodna armija or Jugoslavenska narodna armija; Serbian and Macedonian: Југословенска народна армија—JHA; Macedonian and Serbian Latin forms: Jugoslovenska narodna armija; Croatian and Bosnian: Jugoslavenska narodna armija—JNA; Slovene: Jugoslovanska ljudska armada—JLA) was the military force of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ...


During the Bosnian War, which followed the one in Croatia, the Bosnian-Herzegovinian Croats attempted their own independent state inside Bosnia and Herzegovina—the Croatian Community/Republic of Herzeg-Bosnia, but subsequently joined into the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Combatants Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Predominantly Bosniak) Army of Republika Srpska, Yugoslav Peoples Army, various paramilitary units from Serbia and Montenegro (Serbian) Croatian Defence Council, Croatian Army (Croatian) Commanders Alija Izetbegović (President of Bosnia and Herzegovina) Sefer Halilović (Army chief of staff 1992-1993) Rasim... Coat of Arms of Herzeg-Bosnia Flag of Herzeg-Bosnia The Croatian Republic of Herzeg-Bosnia (locally Hrvatska Republika Herceg-Bosna) was an unrecognized entity in present day Bosnia and Herzegovina existing between 1991 and 1994 as a result of secessionist politics during the Bosnian War. ... The location of the FBiH entity as part of the state of Bosnia and Herzegovina in Europe. ...


Post-war government's policy of easing the immigration of ethnic Croats from abroad encouraged a number of Croatian descendants to return to Croatia. The influx was increased by the arrival of Croatian refugees from Bosnia and Herzegovina and from Vojvodina (Bačka and especially Srijem). After the war's end in 1995, most Croatian refugees returned to their previous homes, while some (mostly Croat refugees from Bosnia-Herzegovina and Janjevci from Kosovo) moved into the formerly-held Serb apartments. Bačka (Serbian: Бачка or Bačka, Hungarian: Bácska, Croatian: Bačka, Slovak: Báčka, German: Batschka) is an area of the Pannonian plain lying between the rivers Danube and Tisa. ... Srem District in Vojvodina Vukovar-Srijem county within Croatia Syrmia (Serbian: Срем or Srem, Croatian: Srijem, Hungarian: Szerémség or Szerém, Slovak: Sriem, German: Syrmien, from Latin: Syrmia or Sirmium) is a fertile region of the Pannonian plain in Europe, between the Danube and Sava rivers before they join... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ...


Culture and traditions

Main article: Culture of Croatia

The area settled by Croats has a large diversity of historical and cultural influences, as well as diversity of terrain and geography. The coastland areas of Dalmatia and Istria were subject to Roman Empire, Venetian and Italian rule; central regions like Lika and western Herzegovina were a scene of battlefield against Ottoman Empire, and have strong epic traditions. In the northern plains, Austro-Hungarian rule has left its marks. The culture of Croatia has roots in a long history: the Croatian people have been inhabiting the area for thirteen centuries, but there are important remnants of the earlier periods still preserved in the country. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... Istria (Croatian and Slovenian: Istra, Venetian and Italian: Istria), formerly Histria (Latin), is the largest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The Republic of Venice was a city-state in Venetia in Northeastern Italy, based around the city of Venice. ... Lika is a mountainous region in central Croatia, roughly bound by the Velebit mountain from the southwest and the Plješevica mountain from the northeast. ... This article is about the geographic area of Herzegovina. ... For other uses, see Ottoman (disambiguation). ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ...


Despite that, Croats have maintained a strong, distinctive culture and sense of national identity. The most distinctive features of Croatian folklore include klapa ensembles of Dalmatia, tamburitza orchestras of Slavonia. Folk arts are performed at special events and festivals, perhaps the most distinctive being Alka of Sinj, a traditional knights' competition celebrating the victory against Ottoman Turks. The epic tradition is also preserved in epic songs sung with gusle. Various types of kolo circular dance are also encountered throughout Croatia. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The music of Croatia, like the country itself, has three major influences: the influence of the Mediterranean especially present in the coastal areas, of the Balkans especially in the mountainous, continental parts, and of central Europe in the central and northern parts of the country. ... The tamburitza (tamburica; diminutive of tambura) is the most popular instrument in Croatian folk music. ... Coat of arms Slavonia (Croatian: Slavonija) is a geographical and historical region in eastern Croatia. ... Sinj (Croatia) Sinj is a town in the continental part of Split-Dalmatia county, Croatia, at . ... Serbian Gusle The gusle or gusla (Albanian: Lahuta, Bulgarian: Гусла, Croatian: Gusle, Serbian: Гусле, Gusle) is a single-stringed instrument used in the Balkans and on the Dinarides area. ... Kolo (Serbian Cyrillic: Коло , Croatian Latin: Кolo) is a collective folk dance, where a group of people (usually several dozen, at the very least three) hold each other by the hands or around the waist dancing, ideally in a circle, hence the name. ...


Croatian language has the longest written tradition of all South Slavic languages, with documents like Baška Tablet dating as early as 1100. The modern standard language is based on ijekavian shtokavian dialect (like Serbian and Bosnian, with which it's mutually intelligible). There are two other dialects, chakavian (spoken in Istria and Dalmatia) and kajkavian, (spoken in Zagorje and wider Zagreb area), which to an extent have been influenced and superseded by the standard, yet they still color the respective vernacular speeches. Despite that diversity, Croats take their language as a strong issue of national consciousness and are fairly negative towards foreign influences. Croatian language (hrvatski jezik) is a South Slavic language which is used primarily by the inhabitants of Croatia and Croats in Bosnia and Herzegovina and parts of the Croatian diaspora. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... BaÅ¡ka tablet (Bašćanska ploča) is one of the first monuments of Croatian language. ... Shtokavian (Štokavian, štokavski) is the primary dialect of the Central South Slavic languages system, Serbian, Bosnian and Croatian. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Chakavian (Čakavian, čakavski) dialect is one of the three dialects of Croatian language. ... Kajkavian (kajkavski) dialect is one of the three dialects of Croatian language. ... Categories: Geography stubs | Counties of Croatia ... Location of Zagreb within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia RC diocese 1094 Free royal city 1242 Unified 1850 Government  - Mayor Milan Bandić Area [1]  - City 641. ...


Croats are vastly Roman Catholic, and the church has had a significant role in fostering of the national identity. The confession played a significant role in the Croatian ethnogenesis. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Ethnogenesis is the process by which a group of human beings comes to be understood or to understand themselves as ethnically distinct from the wider social landscape from which their grouping emerges. ...


Dubrovnik Republic and Dalmatia are the homeland of Croatian literature. It was developed largely in the renaissance period, with works of Dalmatian and Ragusan authors like Marko Marulić and Marin Držić, and continued through baroque with Ivan Gundulić, romanticism with Ivan Mažuranić and August Šenoa up to the modern days. The Republic of Dubrovnik, also known as the Republic of Ragusa, was a maritime city-state that was based in the city of Dubrovnik from the 14th century until 1808. ... // (ca. ... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... Ragusa can refer to: The city of Ragusa in Sicily, Italy. ... Marko Marulić (Split, August 18, 1450 - Split, January 5, 1524), Croatian poet, apologist and Christian humanist is generally considered the father of vernacular Croatian literature. ... Marin Držić Marin Držić (1508-1567) is considered the finest Croatian Renaissance playwright and prose writer. ... Adoration, by Peter Paul Rubens. ... Ivan Gundulić Ivan (Dživo Franov) Gundulić (Italian: Giovanni Francesco Gondola(Spanish: Juan Francisco Gondola; January 9, 1589–December 8, 1638) is the most celebrated Croatian Baroque poet from the Republic of Ragusa. ... Wanderer above the Sea of Fog by Caspar David Friedrich Romanticism is an artistic, literary, and intellectual movement that originated around the middle of the 18th century in Western Europe, during the Industrial Revolution. ... Ivan Mažuranić (1814-1890) was a Croatian poet, linguist and politician—probably the most important figure in Croatias cultural life in the mid-19th century. ... August Å enoa (November 14, 1838 – died December 13, 1881) was a Croatian novelist, critic, editor, poet, and dramatist. ...


Symbols

The current flag of Croatia, including the current coat of arms
The current flag of Croatia, including the current coat of arms
The grb (traditional shield)
The grb (traditional shield)

The Flag of Croatia consists of a red-white-blue tricolor, and in the middle is the Coat of Arms of Croatia. The red-white-blue tricolor was chosen, as it was the colors of Pan-Slavism, popular in the 19th Century. Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... Image File history File links Croatia,_Historic_Coat_of_Arms. ... Image File history File links Croatia,_Historic_Coat_of_Arms. ... National flag. ... The Croatian coat of arms consists of one main coat of arms and five smaller ones that crown the main one. ... National flag. ... Tricolour - a flag or banner having three colours Tricolor (ship) - a ship that sunk in the English Channel This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Croatian coat of arms consists of one main coat of arms and five smaller ones that crown the main one. ...


The coat of arms consists of the traditional red and white squares or "grb", which simply means 'coat of arms'. It has been used to symbolise Croats for centuries; some speculate that it was derived from Red and White Croatia, historic lands of the Croatian tribe. The current design added the five crowning shields which represent the historical regions from which Croatia originated.
The Croatian coat of arms consists of one main coat of arms and five smaller ones that crown the main one. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... White Croatia is the area of modern-day Poland, Bohemia (Czech Republic) and Slovakia from which the White Croats migrated in the 7th century into Dalmatia, Croatia. ...


References

  1. ^ Croatian language on Ethnologue.com
  2. ^ a b Hrvatski Svjetski Kongres (Croatian World Congress)
  3. ^ Demographics of Croatia
  4. ^ CIA World Factbook: Bosnia and Herzegovina
  5. ^ Marko Sinovčić, Hrvati u Argentini i njihov doprinos hrvatskoj kulturi
  6. ^ Official Results of United States 2004 census
  7. ^ (German)[1]
  8. ^ (German) Statistic Bureau of Austria
  9. ^ (Croatian)Hrvati u Čileu, životopisi, Dane Mataić Pavičić
  10. ^ [2]
  11. ^ Results of 2006 Australia census
  12. ^ Statistics Canada, Census of Canada, 2001
  13. ^ (Serbian) Official results of 2002 Census in Serbia
  14. ^ (German)Croats in France
  15. ^ as of 2004
  16. ^ (Slovenian)Official results of Slovenian census 2002
  17. ^ Italy
  18. ^ Hungary
  19. ^ (Croatian)Croatians in Belgium
  20. ^ (Croatian)Croatians in South Africa and their clubs
  21. ^ (Romanian)Census in Romania
  22. ^ (Croatian) Hrvati u svijetu, Croatian Radio Television archive
  23. ^ (Croatian)Croatian Heritage Foundation Većeslav Holjevac in his book Hrvati izvan domovine estimates the number of Croatian emigrants in South America at 180,000 in 1932.
  24. ^ (Croatian) Croatian Emmigrant Adresary places the total number of Croats in South America as high as 500,000
  25. ^ a b (Croatian) O porijeklu Hrvata, Radoslav Katičić, re-published on hercegbosna.org website
  26. ^ (Croatian) Ivan Muzić, O hrvatskoj historiografiji i autohtonosti u Hrvata, foreword to the book "Hrvati i Autohtonost"

Croatia is inhabited mostly by Croats, while minority groups include Serbs, Bosniaks, Hungarians, Italians, Germans, Czechs, Roma people and others. ...

See also

This is a list of well-known Croatian people. ... // (ca. ... Croatian Australian is the seventh largest ethnic group in Australia, numbering 105,747 or 0. ...

External links

  • (Croatian) Matica Hrvatska
  • Review of Croatian History at Central and Eastern European Online Library
  • Croats of Bosnia and Herzegovina: History
  • The Croatian nation at the beginning of the 20th century
    • Famous Croats and Croatian cultural heritage
    • Croatian Heritage Foundation Hrvatska matica iseljenika
    • Croatians in Arizona

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