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Encyclopedia > Croatian dinar
Obverse and reverse of 10 Croatian dinars
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Obverse and reverse of 10 Croatian dinars

Croatian dinar was official currency in Croatia from December 23, 1991 (replacing the Yugoslav dinar) to May 30, 1994 (replaced by the kuna). The currency code was HRD. December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (358th in leap years). ... 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Obverse of 10 Yugoslav Dinars issued by the National Bank of Yugoslavia during 1960s Reverse of 10 Yugoslav Dinars issued by the National Bank of Yugoslavia during 1960s Yugoslav dinar was the official valute in former Yugoslavia. ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... Kuna is the name of the currency used in Croatia. ...


The Croatian dinar was introduced as a transitional currency following Croatian secession from Yugoslavia. It was not divided into smaller units. No coins were ever minted. The modern period in Croatian history begins in 1990 with the countrys change of political and economic system as well as achieving independence from Yugoslavia in 1991. ... 1¢ euro coin A coin is usually a piece of hard material, generally metal and usually in the shape of a disc, which is used as a form of money. ...


The obverse of all banknotes was the same, with the picture of Ragusan scientist Ruđer Bošković. The denominations of 1, 5, 10, 25, 100, 500 and 1000 dinars had the Zagreb cathedral on reverse. The higher denominations of 2000, 5000, 10000, 50000 and 100000 dinars, introduced during the period of high inflation in 1992 and 1993, had a slightly different obverse design and the Ivan Meštrović sculpture History of the Croats on reverse. A £20 Ulster Bank banknote. ... The Republic of Dubrovnik, also known as the Republic of Ragusa, was a maritime city-state that was based in the city of Dubrovnik from the 14th century until 1808. ... Rudjer Joseph Boscovich (first name also sometimes spelled Roger in English; Italian Ruggero Giuseppe Boscovich; Croatian and Serbian RuÄ‘er Josip BoÅ¡ković, Руђер Јосип Бошковић) (May 18, 1711 – February 13, 1787), was a Jesuit, physicist, astronomer, mathematician, philosopher, diplomat and poet from Dubrovnik (or Ragusa, the previously frequently referred to Italian version... 1992 was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Ivan MeÅ¡trović   listen? (August 15, 1883 – January 16, 1962) was a Croatian sculptor. ...

Obverse and reverse of 10000 Croatian dinars
Enlarge
Obverse and reverse of 10000 Croatian dinars

During its existence the Croatian dinar declined in value by a factor of about 70. It converted to the kuna at the rate of 1000:1.


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