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Encyclopedia > Crime Syndicate
Crime Syndicate of America


The Crime Syndicate of America (and counterparts) feature on JLA: Earth 2 cover, art by Frank Quitely. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 180 KB)jla earth-2s villian team, crime syndicate of amerika File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Frank Quitely Frank Quitely (born January 18, 1968) is the professional pseudonym of Scottish comic book artist Vincent Deighan. ...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance Historical Syndicate:
Justice League of America #29, 1964
Modern Syndicate:
JLA: Earth 2, 2000
The Society:

52 Week 52, 2007
Created by Gardner Fox (writer)
Mike Sekowsky (artist)
Base(s) of operations The Panopticon
The Flying Fortress
Roster
Ultraman
Owlman
Superwoman
Johnny Quick
Power Ring

The Crime Syndicate of America, also known as CSA and Crime Syndicate of Amerika, is a fictional team of supervillains from one of DC Comics' parallel universes, and are the evil counterparts of the Justice League of America. The team first appeared in Justice League of America #29 in August 1964. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... The cover of Brave and the Bold #28, 1960, featuring the first appearance of the Justice League and art by Mike Sekowsky. ... Ultraman is a supervillain who appears in stories published by DC Comics. ... Owlman is a fictional supervillain who appears in stories published by DC Comics. ... Superwoman is the name given to several fictional characters published over the years by DC Comics, most of them being, much like the more popular Supergirl, a woman with powers similar to Supermans. ... Johnny Quick is the name of two DC Comics characters, each with the power of superhuman speed. ... Power Ring is the name of several DC Comics supervillains-- counterparts of Green Lanterns Hal Jordan, Kyle Rayner and John Stewart. ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ... In religion evil refers to anything against the will or law of the god(s). ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ...


The Crime Society of America first appeared in 52 Week 52.

Contents

Crime Syndicate of America

Main article: Earth-Three
See also: Multiverse (DC Comics)

The Crime Syndicate originally lived on Earth-Three, a world where history was "reversed" from the world we knew (e.g. President John Wilkes Booth was assassinated by Abraham Lincoln). It initially had no superheroes, only the supervillains of the Crime Syndicate, though this changed with the advent of heroic Alexander Luthor (that world's counterpart of Lex Luthor). Earth-Three was the Earth of an alternate reality in the DC Multiverse. ... The Earths of the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each one. ... Earth-Three was the Earth of an alternate reality in the DC Multiverse. ... John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) was an American actor from Maryland, who fatally shot President of the United States Abraham Lincoln at Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. on April 14, 1865. ... This is an incomplete list of persons that were assassinated for political and other reasons, and who have individual entries. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Lex Luthor is a fictional character and DC Comics supervillain, created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional character and DC Comics supervillain, created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. ...


In their first appearance, the Crime Syndicate, bored with the ease with which they were able to commit crimes on their Earth (and with no one to truly challenge them), discovered the existence of Earth-One and Earth-Two, and set out to challenge the JLA and JSA to a lengthy fight, after which the Syndicate was ultimately defeated. Following this defeat, they were imprisoned in an unbreakable bubble generated by Green Lantern's power ring, and placed in a "limbo" dimension between the Earths. Over the following years, the Syndicate or one of its members would occasionally escape and attempt to wreak havoc on Earth-One and/or Earth-Two. For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... This article is about the theological concept. ...


Earth-Three and the original Crime Syndicate were destroyed along with the rest of DC's parallel worlds in the 1985 twelve-issue maxi-series Crisis on Infinite Earths. The inhabitants of that world were swallowed by an anti-matter wave, with the Crime Syndicate, having decided to be heroic for once, charged straight into the wave defiantly, although Alexander Luthor managed to send his infant son, Alexander Luthor, Jr., to the safety of Earth-One. This was the last appearance of the Syndicate that decade until a new one appeared, apparently from the anti-matter universe. The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... Alexander Luthor, Jr. ...


The original Syndicate made a post-Crisis appearance in Infinite Crisis when Earth-Three temporarily returned, and Ultraman, Superwoman, and Alexander Luthor were almost merged with Superman, Wonder Woman, and Superman of Earth-2 Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Kal-L is the Kryptonian birth name of the Earth-Two Superman, a fictional character who is a superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ...


Ultraman appears in Kandor, posing as Superman.[1] Saturn Queen, last seen in the "Absolute Power" arc of Superman/Batman, explains how Ultraman and herself arrive in the city. When Alexander Luthor, Jr. brought the multiverse back in Infinite Crisis, her alternate reality (the Earth featuring the original Legion of Super-Villains) was recreated briefly. When the Multiverse collapsed, she found herself stranded in the Phantom Zone, where she found Ultraman. She viewed Ultraman as a suitable replacement for the version of Superman who was her son in her reality and placed him under mind control so that he would believe her to be his mother. She was also able to put Supergirl under her control and initiated plans for the two to marry, but Supergirl was able to break free of her control. After viciously beating Ultraman, Saturn Queen offered information to Supergirl in return for sparing Ultraman. Supergirl accepted, and Ultraman and Saturn Queen remain in Kandor. Ultraman is a supervillain who appears in stories published by DC Comics. ... Superman and the modern Kandor. ... Superman/Batman is a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics that features the publishers two most popular characters: Superman and Batman. ... Alexander Luthor, Jr. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... The Phantom Zone is a fictional prison dimension featured in the Superman comic books and related media. ... Kara Zor-El is a fictional DC Comics superheroine and the cousin of Superman. ...


Crime Syndicate of Amerika

See also: JLA: Earth 2 and JLA/Avengers

A post-Crisis version of the Crime Syndicate, the "Crime Syndicate of Amerika", was eventually introduced. This post-Crisis version was essentially identical to the Earth-Three group and was initially said (in 1992's Justice League Quarterly #8) to be from the antimatter universe of Qward. The 2000 graphic novel JLA: Earth 2 established them as coming from a parallel Earth within the antimatter universe. Qward was retconned to be the center of the antimatter universe, rather than the entire universe itself (an antimatter Oa). JLA/Avengers was a 4-issue comic book mini-series jointly published by Marvel Comics and DC Comics in late 2003 through early 2004. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... For the physics of antimatter, see the article on antiparticles; for other senses of this term, see antimatter (disambiguation). ... Qward is a fictional world existing within an antimatter universe that is part of the DC Comics universe. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses of Oa and oa, see OA. Oa is a fictional planet located at the center of the DC Comics Universe. ...


The Crime Syndicate's post-Crisis antimatter Earth possesses a "reversed" history similar to Earth-Three's and a much darker tone to both the team and its world. JLA Secret Files 2004 provided additional history of this team, showing that they did once resemble the Earth-Three Syndicate. This Crime Syndicate rule their world with an iron fist; (a change from their pre-Crisis counterparts, who were unsuccessful in conquering their world). The modern Syndicate's motto is "Cui Bono?" ("Who profits?"). The only universally respected principle on their world is that of the "favor bank"—if someone does you a favor, you owe them a favor in return that must be repaid whenever the favor is called in. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ...


Along with the heroic analogue Alexander Luthor, other opponents include the heroic "H.I.V.E." (Hierarchy for International Virtuous Empowerment), the Missile Men and the "Justice Underground", a reversed analog of the Legion of Doom and Secret Society of Super-Villains consisting of General Grodd, Lady Sonar, Quizmaster, Q-Ranger, Sir Solomon Grundy and Star Sapphire. The H.I.V.E., which stands for the Hierarchy of International Vengeance and Extermination, is the name of a DC Comics supervillain team. ... The Justice Underground was comprised of heroes of the Anti-Matter Universe in the DC Universe. ... The Legion of Doom was a group of supervillains led by Lex Luthor that appeared in Challenge of the SuperFriends, a animated series that starred superheroes from DC Comics. ... The Secret Society of Super Villains (SSOSV) is a group of comic book villains that exist in the DC Universe. ... Gorilla Grodd is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics, primarily as an opponent of The Flash. ... Sonar is the name of a DC Comics supervillain. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Major Force (Clifford Zmeck) is a fictional character, a comic book supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Solomon Grundy is a DC Comics character, a large, strong zombie supervillain. ... Star Sapphire is the name of several female supervillains in DC Comics, all connected in origin. ...


In an early 2000s issue of Superman, Ultraman and Superwoman appear to have had a child together, the child actually turns out to be a rogue Brainiac.[2]


2003's JLA/Avengers crossover written by Kurt Busiek seemed to involve the destruction of the Crime Syndicate's universe, but this was later reversed when the special's villain, Krona, was defeated. The Crime Syndicate later reappeared in the Syndicate Rules arc. JLA/Avengers was a 4-issue comic book mini-series jointly published by Marvel Comics and DC Comics in late 2003 through early 2004. ... In comic books, an intercompany crossover (also called cross-company or company crossover) is a comic or series of comics where characters published by one company meet those published by another (for example, DC Comics Superman meeting Marvels Spider-Man). ... Kurt Busiek (born September 16, 1960) is a comic book writer. ... Krona is a fictional extraterrestrial villain in the DC Comics universe. ...


Other criminal organizations on the Crime Syndicate's Earth include the Crime Lodge (anti-matter analogues to the Justice Society) and Young Offenders (anti-matter analogues of the Teen Titans/Young Justice). They are mentioned at the end of the Syndicate Rules arc as prepared to take advantage of the Crime Syndicate's weakness, but not seen. The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... Teen Titans redirects here. ... Young Justice was a DC Comics superhero team consisting of teenaged heroes. ...


Superman/Batman Annual #1 (2006) details Superman and Batman's first encounter with Ultraman and Owlman. Set years ago, before Superman and Batman knew each other's identities, a vacationing Clark Kent, Bruce Wayne and Lois Lane meet Ultraman, Owlman, and Superwoman when their antimatter counterparts appear on a cruise ship. This story also features the first appearance of Deathstroke's unnamed antimatter doppelganger. The Ultraman and Owlman presented in the story have the same costumes as the anti-matter universe version of the Syndicate. Superman/Batman is a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics that features the publishers two most popular characters: Superman and Batman. ... For other uses of Wade Wilson, see Wade Wilson Deadpool is a fictional comic book character sometimes depicted as a, mercenary, villain, or anti-hero; who appears in books published by Marvel Comics, usually in the X-Men family of titles. ...


Crime Society of America

Crime Society of America from 52 Week 52, art breakdowns by Keith Giffen.
Crime Society of America from 52 Week 52, art breakdowns by Keith Giffen.
See also: 52 (comic book)

In 52 Week 52, an alternate version of Earth-Three was shown as a part of the new Multiverse. In the depiction were characters that are altered versions of the original Justice League of America, including the Martian Manhunter. The names of the characters and the team are not mentioned in the two panels in which they appear.[3] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... Earth-Three was the Earth of an alternate reality in the DC Multiverse. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ...


Based on comments by Grant Morrison, this alternate universe is not the pre-Crisis Earth-Three, making these new characters unrelated to previous versions. The name of this Earth 3 team has been revealed to be the Crime Society of America.[4][5] Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ...


Members

In both the Crime Syndicate and Crime Society, the five permanent members are:

  • Ultraman: the counterpart of Superman. Pre-Crisis, Ultraman came from a Krypton that hadn't exploded, and who depended on kryptonite to maintain his superpowers, rather than draining them (initially he received a new power through each exposure to kryptonite). Post-Crisis, Ultraman was a human astronaut (Lieutenant Clark Kent) given Anti-Kryptonite-based superpowers after an encounter with aliens. If he is separated from Anti-Kryptonite long enough, his powers fade away; Ultraman combats this by inserting Anti-Kryptonite capsules under his skin which are released gradually over time. This Clark Kent has an unhealthy obsession with the anti-matter universe's Lois Lane, having forced her to marry him and bear him a child.
  • Superwoman: the counterpart of Wonder Woman. Pre-Crisis, Superwoman gained her powers from her world's Amazons, and thus has similar powers to Wonder Woman. Post-Crisis, she is the anti-matter Earth's version of Lois Lane, though she looks like Wonder Woman's alter-ego of Diana Prince. It is not revealed how she got her powers. Her lasso does not compel others to tell the truth, but instead releases inhibitions and forces a victim to reveal secrets which they find especially humiliating. The Post-Crisis Superwoman also has heat vision, and continues a furtive relationship with Owlman, much to the fury of her husband, Ultraman.
  • Owlman: the counterpart of Batman. Pre-Crisis, Owlman possessed a limited range of mind control powers. Post-Crisis, Owlman's origin was fleshed out with his powers enhanced by a range of technological and physical skills, much like Batman. He is the brother of his Earth's Bruce Wayne who was killed along with his mother. Owlman blamed his father, Police Commissioner Thomas Wayne, and this started a personal conflict between them, to the point that Wayne senior is determined to kill his own son. Owlman also increased his IQ with a drug-enhancer for his cerebral cortex. He openly possesses plans to counter his teammates' powers. Owlman uses these counterattacks whenever he chooses, as he causes Quick to have a minor heart attack at the beginning of the "Syndicate Rules" storyline. He has a number of illicit liaisons with Superwoman (the Lois Lane of the anti-matter universe) though it's not clear whether this is a genuine attraction, or just another way of showing his independence from the obsessively jealous and ever-watchful Ultraman.
  • Johnny Quick: the counterpart of the Flash. In post-Crisis continuity Quick maintains his superpowers with the use of "Speed Juice," a powerful narcotic stimulant. Grant Morrison stated in an interview that the Speed Juice was derived from the blood of Quick's murdered predecessor.[citation needed] Quick is not to be confused with the Golden-Age/Earth-Two hero of the same name.
  • Power Ring: the counterpart of Green Lantern. Pre-Crisis, Power Ring gained his magical ring of power from a Tibetan monk named Volthoom, and has powers similar to the Silver Age Green Lantern. Post-Crisis, the original Power Ring (who still got the ring from a Tibetan monk named Volthoom) was an American named Harrolds, but JLA: Earth 2 established that the original Power Ring later gave the ring to a young blond man, the counterpart to Kyle Rayner. His ring was inhabited by the spirit of Volthoom who often spoke on his own, making inane observations; all of which is considered a curse to the ring's wielder. The blond Power Ring's favorite tactic in battle was to use the ring to create living Boschian monstrosities capable of destroying whole city blocks. The Syndicate Rules series showed that after the anti-matter Universe was destroyed by Krona and recreated, certain elements of history had been changed, and now the second Power Ring was a black man and a counterpart to John Stewart. This Power Ring was a Slave Marine for many years. He was tricked by Harrolds into taking the ring by telling him he was the chosen substitute to wield the ring when Harrolds couldn't.

The JLA: Earth 2 graphic novel featured several costumes in the CSA Watchtower, three of them labeled Doctor Noon (Doctor Mid-Nite's counterpart), White Cat (Black Canary's counterpart) and Spaceman (Starman's counterpart). Ultraman is a supervillain who appears in stories published by DC Comics. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Lara, Jor-El, and Superman on Krypton. ... Lex Luthor in front of a displays of kryptonite and holding Green Kryptonite. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... Astronaut Bruce McCandless II using a manned maneuvering unit outside the U.S. Space Shuttle Challenger in 1984. ... Lex Luthor in front of a displays of kryptonite and holding Green Kryptonite. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Superwoman is the name given to several fictional characters published over the years by DC Comics, most of them being, much like the more popular Supergirl, a woman with powers similar to Supermans. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine created by William Moulton Marston. ... The Amazons (in Greek, ) were a mythical ancient nation of all-female warriors. ... Lois Joanne Lane-Kent is a fictional character who appears in DC Comics’ Superman stories. ... Owlman is a fictional supervillain who appears in stories published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Location of the cerebral cortex Slice of the cerebral cortex, ca. ... Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), more commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ... Johnny Quick is the name of two DC Comics characters, each with the power of superhuman speed. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Superman, the catalyst of the Golden Age, from Superman #14, January-February 1942. ... Power Ring is the name of several DC Comics supervillains-- counterparts of Green Lanterns Hal Jordan, Kyle Rayner and John Stewart. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... Tibet (see Name section below for other spellings) is a plateau region in Central Asia and the indigenous home to the Tibetan people. ... St. ... Showcase #4 (September-October 1956), often thought the first appearance of the first Silver Age superhero, the Barry Allen Flash. ... Kyle Rayner is a fictional character, a superhero from the DC Comics universe, known for most of his publication history as Green Lantern, a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps, and at times as Ion. ... Hieronymus Bosch, (latinized; also Jeroen Bosch or his real name Jeroen van Aken) (c. ... Krona is a fictional extraterrestrial villain in the DC Comics universe. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Doctor Mid-Nite is a DC Comics superhero. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... Several incarnations of Starman. ...


The Crime Syndicate's universe also included counterparts of J'onn J'onzz, Aquaman and Hawkman, known as: Martian Manhunter Real name unpronouncable Publisher DC Comics First appearance Detective Comics #225 ( 1955) Created by Joe Samachson Joe Certa Jonn Jonzz, the Martian Manhunter, is a comic book hero appearing in DC Comics. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, a superhero in DC Comics. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ...

  • White Martian: J'onn's Anti-matter counterpart. After arriving on Earth, became Ultraman's chief rival. Ultraman eventually killed him.[6]
  • Barracuda: Aquaman's counterpart. Last seen leading the armies of Atlantis against the surface world in Florida.[7]
  • Blood Eagle: Hawkman's counterpart. Killed by the Crime Syndicate.[8]

The CSA's Post-Crisis world is primarily governed by the "favor bank"; unofficial but ironically the only rule that is not consistently broken. If any person should grant a favor for someone else, that person is entitled to compensation whenever they see fit, no matter what the cost or hardship to the latter. Failure to pay back a favor results in inordinately harsh consequences; as seen in the beginning of "Syndicate Rules". A mobster, Jackson "Rat-Eyes" Drake, who failed to follow up on a favor owed was put on "trial" by Owlman, who then had him incinerated by Ultraman as a favor.


A team of Qwardians based on the then current Justice League International roster appeared on the Post-Crisis Earth, although they did not call themselves the Crime Syndicate.[9] Its members were: Built in the 1987 company-wide crossover limited series, Legends, this new Justice League was given a less America-centric mandate than before, and was dubbed the Justice League International (or JLI for short). ...

It is not clear if any of these characters exist in Post-Zero Hour or Post-Infinite Crisis continuity. Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... Fire is a fictional superheroine published by DC Comics. ... Ice (Tora Olafsdotter) is a fictional character, a superheroine in publications from DC Comics. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... The Elongated Man is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC universe. ... Metamorpho (Rex Mason) is a fictional character, a superhero appearing in comic books published by DC Comics. ...


Similar groups in other media

  • "Universe of Evil", an episode of the 1970s animated series Super Friends features Superman encountering evil versions of the rest of the team from an alternate universe, called the "Super Enemies" (he temporarily swapped places with his own evil counterpart, who wrecked havoc and almost defeated the rest of the Super Friends until they swapped back, just in time). This universe's version of the Hall Of Justice is called the Hall Of Evil, and a demonic-looking face is on the outside of the building. The Super Enemies themselves appear almost identical to the Super Friends, although their version of Aquaman has an eyepatch, Batman's costume is red rather than blue, and Robin has a moustache.
  • In the animated series Justice League, a team called the Justice Lords, who combine elements of the Crime Syndicate and Wildstorm Comics' the Authority (a morally-ambiguous take on the Justice League concept), appears as the League's counterparts from an alternate universe. Unlike the Crime Syndicate, the Justice Lords are not simply evil opposites of their good counterparts; rather, they rule their world with an iron fist in order to end war and crime. The death of their Flash set a chain of events in motion that ended with the death of the alternate Lex Luthor at the hands of the alternate Superman. It was the government's fears that the Justice League might one day become like the Justice Lords that sparked Project Cadmus. The Justice Lords' first appearance was in the two-part Justice League episode "A Better World". Robotic doubles of the Justice Lords are created as a diversion by the newly combined Lex Luthor/Brainiac in the Justice League Unlimited episode "Divided We Fall".
  • "A Better World" was originally going to be a Crime Syndicate story.[10]
  • A Justice League DTV was planned, called Justice League: Worlds Collide, in which the Crime Syndicate would have been the main villains and which would have taken place during the gap between seasons 2 and 3.[11]

This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Super Friends is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1973 to 1986 on ABC as part of its Saturday morning cartoon lineup. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, a superhero in DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... The Justice Lords. ... Wildstorm Wildstorm Productions, or simply WildStorm, is an American publisher of comic books. ... The Authority is a superhero comic book published by DC Comics under the Wildstorm imprint. ... Project Cadmus is a fictional government genetic engineering project in the DC Comics Universe. ...

References

  1. ^  Supergirl v5 #7 (Jun 2006)  DC Comics
  2. ^ As seen in Adventures of Superman #604 - 605, July - August 2002
  3. ^  52 #52 (May 2, 2007)  DC Comics (11/3-4)
  4. ^ Brady, Matt (2007-05-08). The 52 Exit Interviews: Grant Morrison. Newsarama. Retrieved on 2007-05-12.
  5. ^ http://www.comicbookresources.com/news/newsitem.cgi?id=11396
  6. ^  JLA: Earth 2 (2000)  DC Comics
  7. ^  JLA #114 (Jul 2005)  DC Comics
  8. ^  JLA #112 (May 2005)  DC Comics
  9. ^  Justice League Quarterly #8 (Summer 1992)  DC Comics
  10. ^ "A Better World" (#37-38). Toon Zone. Retrieved on 2007-07-03.
  11. ^ http://jl.toonzone.net/episodeC/episodeC.htm

  Results from FactBites:
 
organized crime: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (4036 words)
The era of the 1920s had taught organized crime leaders the value of strong political connections and the disadvantages of internecine warfare, but it was not until the 1930s that Lucky Luciano (with Mafia connections) and Louis Lepke Buchalter created a tight interstate criminal organization called the Syndicate.
Furthermore, organized crime using the Internet is much harder to trace down for the police (even though they increasingly deploy cybercops) since policeforces and law enforcement agencies in general operate on a national level while the Internet makes it even more simple for criminal organizations to cross boundaries and even to operate completely remotely.
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