FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Creon" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Creon

There are two kings in Greek mythology named Creon, or Kreeon ("ruler"), and one historical person. The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and their own cult and ritual practices. ...

Contents

Mythological

Son of Menoeceus

Creon, son of Menoeceus, was the king of the city of Thebes and the father of Haemon and Megara by his wife, Eurydice. Creon and his sister, Jocasta, were descendants of Cadmus and of the Spartoi. In Greek mythology, Menoeceus was the father of Jocasta and Creon, and (in a true Greek-drama way) both grandfather and father-in-law of Oedipus. ... In Greek mythology, Menoeceus was the father of Jocasta and Creon, and (in a true Greek-drama way) both grandfather and father-in-law of Oedipus. ... Two important places in antiquity were called Thebes: Thebes, Greece – Thebes of the Seven Gates; one-time capital of Boeotia. ... In Greek mythology, Haemon (bloody) (or Haimon) was the son of Creon and Eurydice. ... In Greek mythology, Megara (in Greek: Μεγάρα) was the oldest daughter of Creon, king of Thebes. ... In Greek mythology, there were several characters named Eurydice (Eurydíkê, Ευρυδικη). // The most famous was a woman — or a nymph — who was the wife of Orpheus. ... In Greek mythology, Jocasta, also Iocaste (Iοκαστη) or Epikastê, was a daughter of Menocenes, Queen of Thebes, who unwittingly married Oedipus, her own son. ... Cadmus Sowing the Dragons teeth, by Maxfield Parrish, 1908 Cadmus, or Kadmos (Greek: Κάδμος), in Greek mythology, was the son of the king of Phoenicia (Currently Lebanon)and brother of Europa. ... In Greek mythology, the Spartes (sown) were the men who grew from the sown teeth of a dragon. ...


Jocasta's husband, Laius, who was the king of Thebes, gave the rule to Creon while he went to consult the oracle at Delphi (See Laius). During Laius's absence, the sphinx came to Thebes. When word came of Laius's death, Creon offered a part of the rule of Thebes, as well as his sister's hand, to anyone who could free the city from the Sphinx. Oedipus answered the Sphinx's riddle and married Jocasta, unaware that she was his mother. (See Oedipus). When this was discovered, Oedipus exiled himself and left the rule of Thebes to Creon. In Greek mythology, Jocasta, also Iocaste (Iοκαστη) or Epikastê, was a daughter of Menocenes, Queen of Thebes, who unwittingly married Oedipus, her own son. ... In Greek mythology, King Laius, or Laios of Thebes was a divine hero and key personage in the Theban founding myth. ... Two important places in antiquity were called Thebes: Thebes, Greece – Thebes of the Seven Gates; one-time capital of Boeotia. ... Delphi (Greek Δελφοί — Delphee) is an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece on the south-western spur of Mount Parnassus in a valley of Phocis. ... In Greek mythology, King Laius, or Laios of Thebes was a divine hero and key personage in the Theban founding myth. ... In Greek mythology, King Laius, or Laios of Thebes was a divine hero and key personage in the Theban founding myth. ... The Great Sphinx of Giza, with the Pyramid of Khafre in the background For other uses, see Sphinx (disambiguation). ... Two important places in antiquity were called Thebes: Thebes, Greece – Thebes of the Seven Gates; one-time capital of Boeotia. ... In Greek mythology, King Laius, or Laios of Thebes was a divine hero and key personage in the Theban founding myth. ... Two important places in antiquity were called Thebes: Thebes, Greece – Thebes of the Seven Gates; one-time capital of Boeotia. ... The Great Sphinx of Giza, with the Pyramid of Khafre in the background For other uses, see Sphinx (disambiguation). ... Oedipus with the Sphinx, from an Attic red-figure cylix from the Vatican Museum, ca. ... The Great Sphinx of Giza, with the Pyramid of Khafre in the background For other uses, see Sphinx (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Jocasta, also Iocaste (Iοκαστη) or Epikastê, was a daughter of Menocenes, Queen of Thebes, who unwittingly married Oedipus, her own son. ... Oedipus with the Sphinx, from an Attic red-figure cylix from the Vatican Museum, ca. ... Oedipus with the Sphinx, from an Attic red-figure cylix from the Vatican Museum, ca. ...


Oedipus's sons, Eteocles and Polynices, shared the rule jointly until they quarreled, and Eteocles expelled his brother. Polynices gathered an army and attacked the city of Thebes. (See Seven Against Thebes). Although both sons of Oedipus were killed, the Thebans won the war, leaving Creon as king once more, serving as regent for Laodamas, the son of Eteocles. Eteocles and Polynices being carried away, dead, after the Battle of Thebes, in an 1897 illustration from Stories from the Greek Tragedians by Alfred Church In Greek mythology, Eteocles was the son of Oedipus and Jocasta, the father of Laodamas. ... In Greek mythology, Polynices was the son of Oedipus and Jocasta. ... Eteocles and Polynices being carried away, dead, after the Battle of Thebes, in an 1897 illustration from Stories from the Greek Tragedians by Alfred Church In Greek mythology, Eteocles was the son of Oedipus and Jocasta, the father of Laodamas. ... In Greek mythology, Polynices was the son of Oedipus and Jocasta. ... Two important places in antiquity were called Thebes: Thebes, Greece – Thebes of the Seven Gates; one-time capital of Boeotia. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Επτά επί Θήβας The Seven Against Thebes is a mythic narrative that finds its classic statement in the play by Aeschylus (467 BCE) concerning the battle between the Seven led by Polynices and the army of Thebes headed by Eteocles and his supporters, traditional Theban... Oedipus with the Sphinx, from an Attic red-figure cylix from the Vatican Museum, ca. ... In Greek mythology, Laódamas referred to three different people. ... Eteocles and Polynices being carried away, dead, after the Battle of Thebes, in an 1897 illustration from Stories from the Greek Tragedians by Alfred Church In Greek mythology, Eteocles was the son of Oedipus and Jocasta, the father of Laodamas. ...


Creon denied burial to Polynices. However, Antigone, the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta, who was betrothed to Creon's son, Haemon, defied him, and was entombed alive. Creon finally relented, but found that Antigone and Haemon had killed themselves, and that his wife, Eurydice, had stabbed herself in grief. Creon was forced to allow burial for the Argives by an army led by Theseus. In Greek mythology, Polynices was the son of Oedipus and Jocasta. ... Antigone by Frederic Leighton Antigone (Eng. ... Oedipus with the Sphinx, from an Attic red-figure cylix from the Vatican Museum, ca. ... In Greek mythology, Jocasta, also Iocaste (Iοκαστη) or Epikastê, was a daughter of Menocenes, Queen of Thebes, who unwittingly married Oedipus, her own son. ... In Greek mythology, Haemon (bloody) (or Haimon) was the son of Creon and Eurydice. ... Antigone by Frederic Leighton Antigone (Eng. ... In Greek mythology, Haemon (bloody) (or Haimon) was the son of Creon and Eurydice. ... In Greek mythology, there were several characters named Eurydice (Eurydíkê, Ευρυδικη). // The most famous was a woman — or a nymph — who was the wife of Orpheus. ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night. ...


In Creon's old age, a descendant of an earlier king of Thebes, named Lycus invaded Thebes and after killing Creon, took the rule. Two important places in antiquity were called Thebes: Thebes, Greece – Thebes of the Seven Gates; one-time capital of Boeotia. ... A son of Lycus (brother of Nycteus), Lycus appears in Euripides Heracles. ... Two important places in antiquity were called Thebes: Thebes, Greece – Thebes of the Seven Gates; one-time capital of Boeotia. ...


Creon is featured in many Greek tragedies, including Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus, Antigone, and Phoenician Women. Oedipus the King (Greek , Oedipus Tyrannos), also known as Oedipus Rex, is a Greek tragedy, written by Sophocles and first performed in 428 BC. The play was the second of Sophocles three Theban plays to be produced, but comes first in the internal chronology of the plays, followed by Oedipus... Oedipus at Colonus (also Oedipus Coloneus, and in Greek Οἰδίπους ἐπὶ Κολωνῷ) is one of the three Theban plays of the Athenian tragedian Sophocles. ... Antigone by Frederic Leighton Antigone (Eng. ... The Phoenician Women (Also known by the Greek title, Phoenissae) is a tragedy by Euripides based on the same story as Aeschylus play Seven Against Thebes. ...


Father of Creusa

Creon was a King of Corinth and father of Creusa or Glauce, Jason's second wife whom Medea murdered. Medea presented Creusa with a cursed dress, as a wedding gift, that stuck to her body and burned her to death as soon as she put it on. Creon burnt to death with his daughter as he tried to save her. Creon's wife sold Tisiphone into slavery. In Greek mythology, four people had the name Creusa. ... Temple of Apollo at Corinth Corinth, or Korinth (Κόρινθος) is a Greek city, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the original isthmus, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... In Greek mythology, four people had the name Creusa. ... In Greek mythology, Glauce refers to two different people: Daughter of Creon, Glauce married Jason. ... Jason (Greek: Ιάσων, Etruscan: Easun) is a hero of Greek mythology who led the Argonauts in the search of the Golden Fleece. ... Medea by Evelyn De Morgan. ... Tisiphone can mean:- Two figures in Greek mythology:- One of the Erinyes (or Furies). ...


Historical

Creon was also the first Archon of Athens after the position was limited to a term of one year, in 683 BC. This is a list of the eponymous archons of Athens. ... Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 730s BC 720s BC 710s BC 700s BC 690s BC - 680s BC - 670s BC 660s BC 650s BC 640s BC 630s BC Events and Trends 689 BC - King Sennacherib of Assyria sacks Babylon 687 BC - Gyges becomes king of...


  Results from FactBites:
 
CREON (217 words)
With particular regard to cystic fibrosis patients, pancreatic enzymes are a cornerstone of their treatment.
Creon® is designed to enable a simultaneous passage through the stomach and further into the duodenum together with the food, and a rapid release of the digestive pancreatic enzymes in the duodenum.
Creon is registered in more than 80 countries and helps thousands of patients worldwide.
Creon (267 words)
Creon was launched 24 August 1944 by Boston Navy Yard; sponsored by Mrs.
Clearing Norfolk 4 March 1945, Creon arrived at Biak, Shouten Islands, 4 May. Moving to Morotai the next day, she conducted amphibious training exercises, and on 1 July took part in the invasion of Balikpapan.
Creon returned to San Diego 4 March and there was placed out of commission in reserve 8 June 1949.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m