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Encyclopedia > Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons logo
Founder Lawrence Lessig
Type Non-profit organization
Founded 2001
Focus Expansion of public domain information
Method Creative Commons licenses
Website http://creativecommons.org/

The Creative Commons (CC) is a non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative work available for others legally to build upon and share. The organization has released several copyright licenses known as Creative Commons licenses. These licences, depending on the one chosen, restrict only certain rights (or none) of the work. Image File history File links CC-logo. ... For the computer game previously called Entrepreneur, see The Corporate Machine. ... Note: This article title may be easily confused with Lawrence Lessing. ... A nonprofit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Creative Commons, some rights reserved. ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, typically common to a particular domain name or subdomain on the World Wide Web on the Internet. ... A nonprofit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes. ... Look up Creativity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Creative Commons, some rights reserved. ...

Contents

Aim

No Rights reserved logo
No Rights reserved logo

The Creative Commons licences enable copyright holders to grant some or all of their rights to the public while retaining others through a variety of licensing and contract schemes including dedication to the public domain or open content licensing terms. The intention is to avoid the problems current copyright laws create for the sharing of information. Image File history File links Norights. ... Copyright symbol Copyright is a set of exclusive rights regulating the use of a particular expression of an idea or information. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Open content, coined by analogy with open source, (though technically it is actually share-alike) describes any kind of creative work including articles, pictures, audio, and video that is published in a format that explicitly allows the copying of the information. ... Copyright symbol Copyright is a set of exclusive rights regulating the use of a particular expression of an idea or information. ... The ASCII codes for the word Wikipedia represented in binary, the numeral system most commonly used for encoding computer information. ...


The project provides several free licenses that copyright owners can use when releasing their works on the Web. It also provides RDF/XML metadata that describes the license and the work, making it easier to automatically process and locate licensed works. Creative Commons also provides a "Founders' Copyright" [1] contract, intended to re-create the effects of the original U.S. Copyright created by the founders of the U.S. Constitution. Graphic representation of the world wide web around Wikipedia The World Wide Web (WWW, or simply Web) is an information space in which the items of interest, referred to as resources, are identified by global identifiers called Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI). ... Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a family of World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) specifications originally designed as a metadata model using XML but which has come to be used as a general method of modeling knowledge, through a variety of syntax formats (XML and non-XML). ... The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a W3C-recommended general-purpose markup language that supports a wide variety of applications. ... Metadata (Greek meta after and Latin data information) are data that describe other data. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from...


All these efforts, and more, are done to counter the effects of what Creative Commons considers to be a dominant and increasingly restrictive permission culture. In the words of Lawrence Lessig, founder of Creative Commons and former Chairman of the Board, it is "a culture in which creators get to create only with the permission of the powerful, or of creators from the past".[2] Lessig maintains that modern culture is dominated by traditional content distributors in order to maintain and strengthen their monopolies on cultural products such as popular music and popular cinema, and that Creative Commons can provide alternatives to these restrictions.[3][4] This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Note: This article title may be easily confused with Lawrence Lessing. ... In relation to a company, a director is an officer of the company charged with the conduct and management of its affairs. ...


History

Golden Nica Award for Creative Commons
Golden Nica Award for Creative Commons

The Creative Commons licenses were pre-dated by the Open Publication License and the GNU Free Documentation License (GFDL). The GFDL was intended mainly as a license for software documentation, but is also in active use by non-software projects such as Wikipedia. The Open Publication License is now largely defunct, and its creator suggests that new projects not use it. Both licenses contained optional parts that, in the opinions of critics, made them less "free". The GFDL differs from the CC licenses in its requirement that the licensed work be distributed in a form which is "transparent", i.e., not in a proprietary and/or confidential format. Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 1029 KB) , selfmade File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 1029 KB) , selfmade File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Golden Nica Award The Golden Nica Award is the highest prize that is awarded at Prix Ars Electronica yearly. ... Creative Commons, some rights reserved. ... Open Publication License or OPL is a license used for creating free and open publications created by the Open Content Project. ... GNU logo (similar in appearance to a gnu) The GNU Free Documentation License (GNU FDL or simply GFDL) is a copyleft license for free content, designed by the Free Software Foundation (FSF) for the GNU project. ... Wikipedia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Headquartered in San Francisco, Creative Commons was officially launched in 2001. Lawrence Lessig, the founder and former chairman, started the organization as an additional method of achieving the goals of his Supreme Court case, Eldred v. Ashcroft. The initial set of Creative Commons licenses was published on December 16, 2002 [5]. The project itself was honored in 2004 with the Golden Nica Award at the Prix Ars Electronica, for the category "Net Vision". Nickname: The City by the Bay; Fog City; The City Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area    - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... Note: This article title may be easily confused with Lawrence Lessing. ... Eldred v. ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... The Prix Ars Electronica is a yearly prize in the field of electronic and interactive art, computer animation, digital culture and music. ... The Prix Ars Electronica is a yearly prize in the field of electronic and interactive art, computer animation, digital culture and music. ...


The Creative Commons was first tested in court in early 2006, when podcaster Adam Curry sued a Dutch tabloid who published photos without permission from his Flickr page. The photos were licensed under the Creative Commons NonCommercial license. While the verdict was in favour of Curry, the tabloid avoided having to pay restitution to him as long as they did not repeat the offense. An analysis of the decision states, "The Dutch Court’s decision is especially noteworthy because it confirms that the conditions of a Creative Commons license automatically apply to the content licensed under it, and bind users of such content even without expressly agreeing to, or having knowledge of, the conditions of the license." [6] Adam Curry, circa late 1980s. ...


On December 15, 2006, Professor Lessig retired as chair and appointed Joi Ito as the new chair, in a ceremony which took place in Second Life. Joi Ito at the Ars Electronica Joichi Ito (伊藤穰 Itō Jōichi, born June 19, 1966), more commonly known as Joi Ito, is a Japanese-born, American-educated, activist, entrepreneur, and venture capitalist. ... Second Life (abbreviated to SL) is an Internet-based virtual world which came to international attention via mainstream news media in late 2006 and early 2007. ...


Localization

The original non-localized Creative Commons licenses were written with the U.S. legal system in mind, so the wording could be incompatible within different local legislations and render the licences unenforceable in various jurisdictions. To address this issue, Creative Commons International has started to port the various licences to accommodate local copyright and private law. As of January 2007, there are 34 jurisdiction-specific licences, with 9 other jurisdictions in drafting process, and more countries joining the project. It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: Crystal ball, user has created future months and dates before, and been told not to (See User Talk:Jose and Ricardo). ...


Projects using Creative Commons licenses

Several million pages of web content use Creative Commons licenses. Common Content was set up by Jeff Kramer with cooperation from Creative Commons, and is currently maintained by volunteers.


Sampling of CC adoption scope

Version 2 of Some Rights Reserved logo
Version 2 of Some Rights Reserved logo

This list provides a short sampling of CC-licensed projects which convey the breadth and scope of Creative Commons adoption among prominent institutions and publication modes. Some Rights Reserved logo used with v2. ...


Portals, aggregation, and archives

Flickr, Internet Archive, Wikimedia Commons, Ourmedia, deviantART

Formal publications Flickr is a photo sharing website and web services suite, and an online community platform, which is generally considered an early example of a Web 2. ... Internet Archive headquarters. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Ourmedia logo Ourmedia is a media archive, supported by the Internet Archive, which freely hosts any images, text, and video or audio files which do not violate copyright laws and do not include pornography. ... deviantART is a popular international online artistic community. ...

Public Library of Science, Proceedings of Science

Instructional materials The Public Library of Science (PLoS) is a nonprofit open access scientific publishing project aimed at creating a library of scientific journals and other scientific literature under an open content license. ... Proceedings of Science (PoS) is an electronic journal for publishing the proceedings of scientific conferences. ...

MIT OpenCourseWare, Clinical Skills Online, MIMA Music

Collaborative content MIT OpenCourseWare (MIT OCW) is an initiative of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to put all of the educational materials from MITs undergraduate- and graduate-level courses online, free and openly available to anyone, anywhere, by the year 2007. ... Clinical Skills Online (CSO) is a project, developed by the Educational Technology Unit at St Georges, University of London, UK, aimed at providing online videos demonstrating core Clinical Skills common to a wide range of medical and health-based courses in Higher Education. ... MIMA is a 501(c)3 tax-exempt nonprofit music organization located in Princeton, New Jersey that invites college jazz musicians to give free music lessons to under-served public school children. ...

Wikinews, Wikitravel, Memory Alpha, Uncyclopedia, Jurispedia, Microsoft Developer Network and many other wikis

Blogs, Videoblogs, and Podcasts Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ... Memory Alpha (often abbreviated to MA) is a collaborative project to create the most definitive, accurate and accessible encyclopedic reference for topics related to the Star Trek fictional universe. ... Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia that anyone can edit, is a satirical parody of Wikipedia. ... JurisPedia Jurispedia is an Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Spanish and Dutch language WikiWiki academic law encyclopedia. ... The Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) is the portion of Microsoft responsible for managing the firms relationship with developers. ... Look up Wiki in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about a type of web application. ... An orange square with waves was introduced by Mozilla Firefox to indicate that an RSS feed is present on a webpage. ...

Groklaw, This Week in Tech, : Rocketboom, Jet Set Show, newspaperindex

Journalism Groklaw is a blog that was started May 16, 2003 by Pamela Jones (posting as PJ) at Radio UserLand. ... . The initial letter is shown capitalized due to technical restrictions. ... Rocketboom, produced and directed by Andrew Baron, is a three-minute daily vlog (videoblog) which is often presented in the format of a newscast, usually with a comedic slant. ...

20 minutes newspaper

Progressive culture 20 Minuten is a free daily newspaper in Switzerland, distributed to commuters in more than 150 train stations. ...

Jamendo, BeatPick, Revver, GarageBand.com, blip.tv

Counterculture Jamendo is a music platform and community combining: Creative Commons licensed music BitTorrent and eDonkey for full album downloads Ogg Vorbis and MP3 encoded audio files An integrated rating and recommendation system Tags and reviews to discover artists Voluntary donations to artists through Paypal All music on Jamendo is licensed... Revver is a video sharing website that hosts user-generated content. ... GarageBand. ... Blip. ...

Star Wreck

Movies It has been suggested that Star Wreck 4½: Weak Performance be merged into this article or section. ...

Elephants Dream

Bumper stickers Elephants Dream is a computer-generated short film made entirely[1] using open source applications and premiered on March 24, 2006 after about 8 months of work. ...

Bumperactive

Sample 3 inch by 11 inch bumper sticker from Bumperactive, Barack for the Future, with the logo bubble including the sites URL (see Unique Sticker Design) Bumperactive is a make-your-own-bumper-sticker ecommerce web site and pop culture blog. ...

Notable works

The book cover Free Culture: How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity (2004) is a book by law professor Lawrence Lessig that was released on the Internet under the Creative Commons Attribution/Non-commercial license (by-nc 1. ... Yochai Benkler speaking at UC Berkeley Boalt Hall School of law on 27 April 2006. ... The book cover The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom is a book by law professor Yochai Benkler published by Yale University Press on April 3, 2006. ... Dan Gillmor is a noted American technology writer and former columnist for the San Jose Mercury News. ... We the Media is a book written by Dan Gillmor, published in 2004 by OReilly (ISBN 0596007337). ... Cory Doctorow (born July 17, 1971) is a blogger, journalist and science fiction author who serves as co-editor of the blog Boing Boing. ... Eric S. Raymond (FISL 6. ... The Cathedral and the Bazaar (abbreviated CatB) is an essay by Eric S. Raymond on software engineering methods, based on his observations of the Linux kernel development process and his experiences managing an open source project, fetchmail. ... Programming Perl is a classic OReilly book. ... The Jargon File is a glossary of hacker slang. ... The Art of Unix Programming is a book written by Eric Raymond about the history and culture of Unix programming from its earliest days to the current work on Linux. ... Davis Guggenheim (1964-) is an Academy Award-winning American film director and producer. ... Cactuses [sic] is a 2006 motion picture created by the Arc2 Project, which consisted of twenty-four High School school students and five college students based in Manteca, CA. This movie is unique in its content, creation, and distribution. ... Elephants Dream is a computer-generated short film made entirely[1] using open source applications and premiered on March 24, 2006 after about 8 months of work. ... This article is about free software as defined by the sociopolitical free software movement; for information on software distributed without charge, see freeware. ... Open source software refers to computer software available with its source code and under an open source license. ... MariposaHD is the first high definition television program made to be distributed directly over the internet. ... High-definition television (HDTV) means broadcast of television signals with a higher resolution than traditional formats (NTSC, SECAM, PAL) allow. ... The Good Girl (2004) is Spanish indie porn short film directed by Erika Lust and produced by Lust Films[1]. Story is traditional pizza delivery guy -cliche, but on female perspective point of view and film style is very feel good and natural. ... The Good Girl (2004) is Spanish indie porn short film directed by Erika Lust and produced by Lust Films[1]. Story is traditional pizza delivery guy -cliche, but on female perspective point of view and film style is very feel good and natural. ...

Record labels

Loca Records is an independent electronica and post rock record label based in Brighton, UK. All the music, artwork and videos are released under Copyleft licenses and distributed physically on Vinyl, CD, and cassette. ... Magnatune is a small Berkeley, California–based independent record label, founded in spring 2003 by John Buckman, then-CEO of e-mail software company Lyris. ... OnClassical is a small independent record label based in Bassano del Grappa, Italy. ... Opsound calls itself a gift economy in action, an experiment in applying the model of free software to music. ... Kahvi Collective is an internet based netlabel. ... Small Brain Records is an open source record label started in 1993 in Traverse City, Michigan, by Jim Ryan, and Sheamas ODonnel, of the infamous group Joey. ... Krayola Records is a record label that offers music, draw-it-yourself covers and videos. ...

Tools for discovering CC-licensed content

The title of this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... The folder fetched files contains automatically downloaded music. ... Open content, coined by analogy with open source, (though technically it is actually share-alike) describes any kind of creative work including articles, pictures, audio, and video that is published in a format that explicitly allows the copying of the information. ... Jamendo is a music platform and community combining: Creative Commons licensed music BitTorrent and eDonkey for full album downloads Ogg Vorbis and MP3 encoded audio files An integrated rating and recommendation system Tags and reviews to discover artists Voluntary donations to artists through Paypal All music on Jamendo is licensed... Mozilla Firefox (abbreviated as Fx, fx (prescribed[2]), or FF) is a graphical web browser developed by the Mozilla Corporation. ... Examples of clip art from the Open Clip Art Library The Open Clip Art Library project aims to create a collection of vector clip art that can be used for free for any use. ... Internet Archive headquarters. ... For other uses of the word Archive, see Archive (disambiguation) Archives refers to a collection of records, and also refers to the location in which these records are kept. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ourmedia logo Ourmedia is a media archive, supported by the Internet Archive, which freely hosts any images, text, and video or audio files which do not violate copyright laws and do not include pornography. ... Internet Archive headquarters. ... Yahoo! Inc. ...

Criticism

During its first year as an organization, Creative Commons experienced a "honeymoon" period with very little criticism. Recently though, critical attention has focused on the Creative Commons movement and how well it is living up to its perceived values and goals. The critical positions taken can be roughly divided up into complaints of a lack of:

  • An ethical position - Those in these camps criticize the Creative Commons for failing to set a minimum standard for its licenses, or for not having an ethical position to base its licenses. These camps argue that Creative Commons should define, and should have defined, a set of core freedoms or rights which all CC licenses must grant. These terms might, or might not, be the same core freedoms as the heart of the free software movement.[7] [8] In particular, Richard Stallman has criticised the newer licenses for not allowing the freedom to copy the work for noncommercial purposes, and has said he no longer supports Creative Commons as an organisation, as the licenses no longer provide this as a common basic freedom[9].
  • A political position - Where the object is to critically analyze the foundations of the Creative Commons movement and offer an eminent critique (e.g. Berry & Moss 2005, Geert Lovink, Free Culture movements).
  • A common sense position - These usually fall into the category of "it is not needed" or "it takes away user rights" (see Toth 2005 or Dvorak 2005).
  • A pro-copyright position - These are usually marshalled by the content industry and argue either that Creative Commons is not useful, or that it undermines copyright (Nimmer 2005).

The free software movement began in 1983 when Richard Stallman announced the GNU project. ... Richard Matthew Stallman (nickname RMS) (born March 16, 1953) is an acclaimed software freedom activist, hacker, and software developer. ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2005-12-11, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... The content industry is an umbrella term that encompasses companies owning and providing media, and media metadata. ...

See also

Creative Commons, some rights reserved. ... // Projects and works using Creative Commons licenses Several million pages of web content use Creative Commons licenses. ... The reversed c in a full circle is the copyleft symbol (left). ... FairShare is an idea for a voluntary investment-based patronage system to replace intellectual property and copyright while still insuring that artists are fairly compensated. ... Free content is any kind of functional work, artwork, or other creative content upon which no legal restriction has been placed that significantly interferes with peoples freedom to use, understand, redistribute, improve, and share the content. ... This article is about free software as defined by the sociopolitical free software movement; for information on software distributed without charge, see freeware. ... Gratis versus Libre is the distinction between zero price and freedom. ... Open content, coined by analogy with open source, (though technically it is actually share-alike) describes any kind of creative work including articles, pictures, audio, and video that is published in a format that explicitly allows the copying of the information. ... Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Science Commons is a new project of Creative Commons and will launch early in 2005. ... A share-alike copyright license clause requires that any improved version of the work be shared on like terms with everyone else—that is, share and share alike. ...

References

  1. ^ Founder's Copyright. Creative Commons. Retrieved on 2006-04-07.
  2. ^ Lessig, Lawrence (2004). Free Culture. New York: Penguin Press, 8. 
  3. ^ Ermert, Monika (2004). "Germany debuts Creative Commons". Register. 
  4. ^ Lessig, Lawrence (2006). Lawrence Lessig on Creative Commons and the Remix Culture (mp3). Talking with Talis. Retrieved on 2006-04-07.
  5. ^ Creative Commons Unveils Machine-Readable Copyright Licenses. Creative Commons (2002-12-16). Retrieved on 2007-02-09.
  6. ^ Creative Commons License Upheld by Dutch Court. Groklaw (2006-03-16). Retrieved on 2006-09-02.
  7. ^ Benjamin Mako Hill, Towards a Standard of Freedom: Creative Commons and the Free Software Movement
  8. ^ the writings of Richard Stallman[1]
  9. ^ Free Software Foundation blog

For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Groklaw is a blog that was started May 16, 2003 by Pamela Jones (posting as PJ) at Radio UserLand. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Benjamin Mako Hill (b. ... Richard Matthew Stallman (nickname RMS) (born March 16, 1953) is an acclaimed software freedom activist, hacker, and software developer. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... June 15 is the 166th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (167th in leap years), with 199 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Image File history File links Information_icon. ... Image File history File links En-Creative-Commons. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Internet Archive headquarters. ... Mozilla Firefox (abbreviated as Fx, fx (prescribed[2]), or FF) is a graphical web browser developed by the Mozilla Corporation. ...

Articles


  Results from FactBites:
 
Frequently Asked Questions - CcWiki (8020 words)
Creative Commons licenses are designed to be applied to your work and to be binding upon people who use your work based on their notice of the Creative Commons “Some Rights Reserved” (or “No Rights Reserved” in the case of the public domain dedication) button and the statement that the work is Creative Commons-licensed.
Creative Commons is reaching out to collecting societies in those jurisdictions where this problem arises to try to find a solution that enables creators to enjoy the benefits both systems offer.
Creative Commons International and the volunteer project leads are independent and separate entities although both work in collaboration to promote the adoption of Creative Commons licenses and tools.
Creative Commons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1827 words)
The Creative Commons website enables copyright holders to grant some of their rights to the public while retaining others through a variety of licensing and contract schemes including dedication to the public domain or open content licensing terms.
Common Content was set up by Jeff Kramer with cooperation from Creative Commons, and is currently maintained by volunteers.
Lawrence Lessig on Creative Commons and the Remix Culture.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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