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Encyclopedia > Cream
Cans of cream.
Cans of cream.

Cream (from Greek chrisma) is a dairy product that is composed of the higher-butterfat layer skimmed from the top of milk before homogenization. In un-homogenized milk, over time, the lighter fat rises to the top. In the industrial production of cream this process is accelerated by using centrifuges called "separators". In many countries, cream is sold in several grades depending on total butterfat content. Cream can be dried to a powder for shipment to distant markets. Look up cream in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Chrism (Greek word literally meaning an anointing), also called Myrrh (Myron), Holy Oil, or Consecrated Oil, is a consecrated oil used in the Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Orthodox churches, in the Assyrian Church of the East, in the Old-Catholic churches, and in Roman Catholic, Anglican and Lutheran churches in... Dairy products are generally defined as foodstuffs produced from milk. ... Butterfat or milkfat is the fatty portion of milk. ... A glass of cows milk. ... Homogenization (or homogenisation) is a term used in many fields such as Chemistry, agricultural science, food technology, sociology and cell biology. ... This article is about the scientific device. ...


Cream produced by cows (particularly Jersey cattle) grazing on natural pasture often contains some natural carotenoid pigments derived from the plants they eat; this gives the cream a slight yellow tone, hence the name of the yellowish-white colour cream. Cream from cows fed indoors, on grain or grain-based pellets, is white. Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Rainbow arching over a paddock of cattle Cattle are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ... A Jersey cow in the western United States. ... Pastureland Pasture is land with lush herbaceous vegetation cover used for grazing of ungulates as part of a farm or ranch. ... The orange ring surrounding Grand Prismatic Spring is due to carotenoid molecules, produced by huge mats of algae and bacteria. ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cream (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Types of cream

In the United States, cream is usually sold as:

  • Half and half (10.5–18% fat)
  • Light, coffee, or table cream (18–30% fat)
  • Medium cream (25% fat)
  • Whipping or light whipping cream (30–36% fat)
  • Heavy whipping cream (36% or more)
  • Extra-heavy or manufacturer's cream (38–40% or more), generally not available at retail except at some warehouse stores.

Not all grades are defined by all jurisdictions, and the exact fat content ranges vary. The above figures are based on the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 21, Part 131 [1][2] and a small sample of state regulations. Half and half refers to a dairy product, an alcoholic beverage, a soft drink, or a curry supplement. ... The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) is the codification of the general and permanent rules and regulations (sometimes called administrative law) published in the Federal Register by the executive departments and agencies of the Federal Government of the United States. ...



In the United Kingdom, the types of cream are legally defined [1] as follows:

Name Minimum
Milk Fat
Additional Definition Main Uses
Clotted cream 55% and heat treated Serve as it is with scones and jam
Double cream 48% Whips the easiest and thickest for puddings and desserts, can be piped
Whipping cream 35% Whips well but lighter, can be piped - just
Whipped cream 35% and has been whipped
Sterilised cream 23% is sterilised
Cream or single cream 18% is not sterilised Poured over puddings, used in coffee
Cream Base [2] 15% contains no stabilisers or preservatives For hot or cold, sweet or savoury dishes
Sterilised half cream 12% is sterilised
Half cream 12% is not sterilised Only used in coffee

Clotted cream on scones with jam, also called Cream Tea. ...

Other cream products

Sour cream in the U.S. is cream (18% or more milk fat) that has been subjected to a bacterial culture that produces lactic acid (0.5%+), which sours and thickens it. Sour cream is a dairy product rich in fats obtained by fermenting a regular cream by certain kinds of lactic acid bacteria. ... Phyla Actinobacteria Aquificae Chlamydiae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Lentisphaerae Nitrospirae Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Verrucomicrobia Bacteria (singular: bacterium) are unicellular microorganisms. ... For the production of milk by mammals, see Lactation. ...


Crème fraîche is a heavy cream (30-40% milk fat) slightly soured with bacterial culture, but not as sour or as thick as American sour cream. Mexican crema (or cream espesa) is similar to crème fraîche. Kysana smetana is a Central and Eastern European sour cream. Containers of crème fraîche Crème fraîche [IPA: krÉ›m frɛʃ] (French for fresh cream) is a heavy cream slightly soured with bacterial culture, but not as sour or as thick as sour cream. ... Smetana is a Central and Eastern European variety of sour cream similar to crème fraîche, much heavier and sweeter than the Western European variety. ...


In the UK, clotted cream (similar to Indian malai) is a very high-fat (55%) product processed with heat. For cooking purposes, both single and double cream can be used in cooking, although the former can separate when heated, usually if there is a high acid content. Most UK chefs always use double cream or full-fat crème fraîche when cream is added to a hot sauce, to prevent any problem with it separating or "splitting". In sweet and savoury custards such as those found in flan fillings, crème brûlées and crème caramels, both types of cream are called for in different recipes depending on how rich a result is called for. It is useful to note that double cream can also be thinned down with water to make an approximation of single cream if necessary. Clotted cream on scones with jam, also called Cream Tea. ... Malai is a South Asian term for clotted cream or Devonshire cream. ...


Butter is made by churning cream. For other uses, see Butter (disambiguation). ... Farmer selling the churned butter (machine in the foreground). ...


Whipped cream

Cream with 30% or more fat can be turned into whipped cream by mixing it with air. The resulting colloid is roughly double the volume of the original cream as air bubbles are captured in a network of fat droplets. If, however, the whipping is continued, the fat droplets will stick together destroying the colloid and forming butter; the remaining liquid is buttermilk. Confectioner's sugar is sometimes added to the colloid in order to stiffen the mixture and to reduce the risk of overwhipping. A Colloid or colloidal dispersion is a type of homogeneous mixture. ... For other uses, see Butter (disambiguation). ... Percentages are relative to US RDI values for adults. ... Confectioners sugar (also called powdered sugar) is sugar that has been powdered to produce a more fluffy, light texture. ...


Whipped cream may be sold ready-to-use in pressurized containers. Nitrous oxide is used as a propellant, and when the cream leaves the nozzle, it produces four times the volume of cream, i.e., twice the volume produced by whipping air into it. Using this technique, it may also be prepared in reusable dispensers, similar to a seltzer siphon bottle, using inexpensive disposable nitrous oxide cartridges. However, the whipped cream produced with nitrous oxide is unstable, and will return to a more or less liquid state within half an hour to one hour. Thus, the method is not suitable for decorating food that will not be immediately served. For other uses, see Nitrous oxide (disambiguation). ... Effervescence from soda. ...


Cool Whip is a brand of imitation (non-dairy) whipped cream called a "whipped topping" by its manufacturer. However it is not truly "non-dairy" as it contains a milk-derived substance, sodium caseinate. Cool Whip logo Cool Whip is a brand of imitation whipped cream called a whipped topping by its manufacturer. ...


Chantilly cream (French: crème Chantilly) is whipped cream with sugar and vanilla. Chantilly cream or crème Chantilly is a sweet, vanilla-flavoured whipped cream. ...


Cream as an ingredient

Cream is used as an ingredient in many foods, including ice cream, many sauces, soups, and some custard bases, and also uses for cakes. Missing image Ice cream is often served on a stick Boxes of ice cream are often found in stores in a display freezer. ... For other uses, see Sauce (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Soup (disambiguation). ... This article focuses on egg-thickened custards. ...


Cream (usually light cream/half-and-half/Single Cream) is often added to coffee. For other uses, see Coffee (disambiguation). ...


Other foods called cream

Some foods or even cosmetics may be labelled cream but not because they are made with cream, but because they make claim to the consistency or richness of cream. In some locations labelling restrictions prevent the use of the word cream to describe such products, so variations such as creme, kreme, creame, or whipped topping may be found. Make-up redirects here. ...

Artificial cream is an imitation of cream made from non-dairy fats. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Icing (food). ... Crème anglaise. ... Pastry cream, also called by its French name crème pâtissière, is a stirred custard, further thickened with starch. ... Fondant is a confection used as a filling or coating for cakes, pastries, and candies or sweets. ... The term confectionery refers to food items rich in sugar. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The Cheese and Cream Regulations 1995 (SI 1995 No. 3240) ISBN 0110538536
  2. ^ QimiQ: http://www.qimiq.com

References

Larousse Gastronomique is the most respected of all the food encyclopedias, produced by the French publishing company founded by Pierre Larousse (1817-1875). ...

See also

Cool Whip logo Cool Whip is a brand of imitation whipped cream called a whipped topping by its manufacturer. ... Kajmak (Kaymak in Turkish) is a creamy dairy product traditional in Southeast Europe, esp. ... Sour cream is a dairy product rich in fats obtained by fermenting a regular cream by certain kinds of lactic acid bacteria. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Creamer was a kick ass band that giged in Stratford-upon-Avon in 2000-2002. ... Missing image Ice cream is often served on a stick Boxes of ice cream are often found in stores in a display freezer. ... Malai is a South Asian term for clotted cream or Devonshire cream. ... A healing cream is a herbal cream normally made with natural and organic ingredients. ... A whipped cream charger is a cartridge designed to deliver nitrous oxide in a whipped cream dispenser. ...

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