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Encyclopedia > Crappie
Wikipedia:How to read a taxobox
How to read a taxobox
Pomoxis
Black (top) & white crappie (P. nigromaculatus & P. annularis)
Black (top) & white crappie
(P. nigromaculatus & P. annularis)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Perciformes
Family: Centrarchidae
Genus: Pomoxis
Rafinesque, 1818,
Species
  • P. annularis - white crappie
  • P. nigromaculatus - black crappie

Pomoxis is a genus of freshwater fish in the sunfish family (family Centrarchidae) of order Perciformes. The type species is P. annularis, the white crappie. The common name crappie (pronounced /ˈkʰrɑ·pi/), [1] [2] refers to either of the Pomoxis species, both of which are extremely popular game fish. Download high resolution version (700x879, 101 KB)Black and white crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus & ) from the USFWS. Artwork by Robert W. Hines. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... Animalia redirects here. ... Typical Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Orders See text The Actinopterygii are the ray-finned fish. ... Families many, see text The Perciformes, also called the Percomorphi or Acanthopteri, include about 40% of all fish and are the largest order of vertebrates. ... Genera  Acantharchus  Ambloplites  Archoplites  Centrarchus  Enneacanthus  Lepomis  Micropterus  Pomoxis Sunfish range The sunfishes are a family (Centrarchidae) of freshwater ray-finned fish belonging to the order Perciformes. ... C. S. Rafinesque Constantine Samuel Rafinesque-Schmaltz (October 22, 1783-September 18, 1840) was a nineteenth-century polymath who led a chaotic life. ... In biology, a species is one of the basic units of biodiversity. ... For other uses of the word, please see Genus (disambiguation). ... For the village on the Isle of Wight, see Freshwater, Isle of Wight. ... A giant grouper at the Georgia Aquarium Fish are aquatic vertebrates that are typically cold-blooded; covered with scales, and equipped with two sets of paired fins and several unpaired fins. ... In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is 1) a rank or 2) a taxon in that rank. ... Genera  Acantharchus  Ambloplites  Archoplites  Centrarchus  Enneacanthus  Lepomis  Micropterus  Pomoxis Sunfish range The sunfishes are a family (Centrarchidae) of freshwater ray-finned fish belonging to the order Perciformes. ... Scientific classification or biological classification refers to how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Families many, see text The Perciformes, also called the Percomorphi or Acanthopteri, include about 40% of all fish and are the largest order of vertebrates. ... Type specimens When a new species is discovered, more important than creating a new and unique name for the species is developing a reasonably detailed description. ... This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... A Game fish is a fish that is pursued for sport, regardless of whether the fisherman ultimately eats the fish. ...


Both species of crappie, as adults, feed predominantly on smaller species, including the young of their own predators (which include the northern pike, muskellunge, and walleye). They have diverse diets, however, including zooplankton, insects, and crustaceans.[3] [4] [5] By day, crappie tend to be less active and to concentrate around weed beds or submerged objects, such as logs and boulders; they feed especially at dawn and dusk, moving then into open water or approaching the shore.[5] [6] [7] caught by an angler in the river Dráva, Hungary. ... // For the American politician, see Edmund Muskie. ... Binomial name Sander vitreus (Mitchill, 1818) Subspecies S. v. ... Photomontage of plankton organisms Plankton is the aggregate community of weakly swimming but mostly drifting small organisms that inhabit the water column of the ocean, seas, and bodies of freshwater. ... Orders See taxonomy Insects (Class Insecta) are a major group of arthropods and the most diverse group of animals on the Earth, with over a million described species—more than all other animal groups combined. ... Classes & Subclasses Branchiopoda Phyllopoda Sarsostraca Remipedia Cephalocarida Maxillopoda Thecostraca Tantulocarida Branchiura Pentastomida Mystacocarida Copepoda Ostracoda Myodocopa Podocopa Malacostraca Phyllocarida Hoplocarida Eumalacostraca The crustaceans (Crustacea) are a large group of arthropods, comprising approximately 52,000 described species [1], and are usually treated as a subphylum [2].They include various familiar animals...


The Pomoxis species are highly regarded game fishes and are often considered to be among the best tasting freshwater fishes. Because of their diverse diets, crappie may be caught in many ways, including casting light jigs, trolling with minnows or artificial lures, or using bobbers. Crappie are also popular with ice-fishers, as they are active in winter.[5] [6] [7] [8] In the sport of fishing with a fishing rod, casting is the act of throwing the hook into the water, by quickly flicking the rod from behind the angler toward the water. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Artists conception of tuna trolling operation. ... The word minnow can mean, in decreasing order of specificity: The Eurasian minnow, Phoxinus phoxinus (Linnaeus, 1758) Any, particularly small, fish of the family Cyprinidae Fish of the family Galaxiidae, in particular those of genus galaxiid occurring in the Southern Hemisphere. ... a bobber is a small float used in angling, which suspends the lure at a predetermined depth. ... Ice fishing in the Finnish Miljoonapilkki fishing competition. ...


The genus name Pomoxis derives from the Greek πώμα (cover, plug, operculum) and οξύς (sharp). The common name (also spelled croppie or crappé), derives from the Canadian French crapet, which refers to many different fishes of the family Centrarchidae. Note that the plural form of the name, crappies, tends not to be used, by analogy with fishes, except to refer to types of crappie. Other names for crappies are papermouths, calico bass, strawberry bass, white perch, specks, sac-a-lait, and Oswego bass. The operculum in fish is the hard bony flap covering and protecting the gills of Bony fish. ... Canadian French is an umbrella term for the dialects or varieties of French found in Canada [1] and areas of French Canadian settlement in the United States. ...

Contents

White crappie

The white crappie, Pomoxis annularis Rafinesque, 1818, is native throughout the eastern half of Canada and the United States, and has been widely introduced in the west as well. C. S. Rafinesque Constantine Samuel Rafinesque-Schmaltz (October 22, 1783-September 18, 1840) was a nineteenth-century polymath who led a chaotic life. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ...


The dorsal fin of the white crappie has six spines. The maximum recorded length for a white crappie is 53.0 cm (21 in), with a maximum weight of almost 2.35 kg (more than 5.18 lb); it can live as long as ten years.[3] Dorsal Fin of the Orca A dorsal fin is a fin located on the backs of fishes, whales, dolphins and porpoises. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The U.S. National Prototype Kilogram, which currently serves as the primary standard for measuring mass in the U.S. It was assigned to the United States in 1889 and is periodically recertified and traceable to the primary international standard, The Kilogram, held at the Bureau International des Poids et... The pound (abbreviations: lb or, sometimes in the United States, #) is a unit of mass in a number of different systems, including various systems of units of mass that formed part of English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...


This species prefers slower-moving water, often turbid, whether a backwater of a small creek or a large lake.


When spawning, the white crappie deposits its eggs on plant surfaces[3] or in poorly-defined nests in shallow water.[6]


This very prolific fish may overpopulate small bodies of water under 40 ha (100 acres) in area.[9] A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ...


Black crappie

The black crappie, Pomoxis nigromaculatus (Lesueur, 1829), is very similar to P. annularis in size, shape, and habits, except that it is darker, with a pattern of black spots. It is most accurately identified by the seven or eight spines on its dorsal fin. The oldest recorded age of a specimen is fifteen years, although seven years is a more typical life span for the species.[4] [5] Categories: People stubs | French naturalists | 1778 births | 1846 deaths ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Dorsal Fin of the Orca A dorsal fin is a fin located on the backs of fishes, whales, dolphins and porpoises. ...


The black crappie's range is uncertain, since it has been so widely transplanted, but it is presumed to be similar to the white crappie's; as of 2005, populations existed in all of the lower 48 states.[4] [10] 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The continental United States refers (except sometimes in U.S. federal law and regulations) to the largest part of the U.S. that is delimited by a continuous border. ...


The black crappie tends to prefer clearer water than the white crappie does. Its diet, as an adult, also tends to be less dominated by other fishes than that of the white crappie.[4] [10]


The breeding season varies by location, due to the species’ great range; breeding temperature is 14‒20 °C (58‒68 °F) and spawning occurs between April and June.[5] Spawning occurs in a nest built by the male, who guards the eggs and young.[4] [7] [5] The degree Celsius (°C) is a unit of temperature named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744), who first proposed a similar system in 1742. ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ...


Like P. annularis, P. nigromaculatus is very prolific and can tend to overpopulate its environment, with negative consequences both for the crappie and for other fish species.[5] A commercial supplier of the fish, however, claims that it can be safely stocked in ponds as small as one acre (0.4 ha) in area.[9]


Crappie Angling

Angling (or Fishing) for Crappie is popular throughout much of North America. Methods vary, but among the most popular is called "Spider Rigging," a method characterized by a fisherman in a boat with many long fishing rods pointing away from the angler at various angles like spokes from a wheel.[11] Anglers who employ the Spider Rigging method may choose from among many popular baits. Some of the most popular are plastic jigs with lead jig heads, crankbaits or live minnows. Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering animals not classifiable as insects which breathe in water or pass their lives in water. ... A fiberglass spinning rod and reel circa 1997. ... A Crankbait is a type of fishing lure that dives under the surface and wiggles from side to side when pulled through the water. ... The word minnow can mean, in decreasing order of specificity: The Eurasian minnow, Phoxinus phoxinus (Linnaeus, 1758) Any, particularly small, fish of the family Cyprinidae Fish of the family Galaxiidae, in particular those of genus galaxiid occurring in the Southern Hemisphere. ...


References

  1. ^ "Crappie". American Heritage Dictionary (4th ed.). Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  2. ^ "Crappie". Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary. Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  3. ^ a b c "Pomoxis annularis". FishBase. Ed. Ranier Froese and Daniel Pauly. March 2006 version. N.p.: FishBase, 2006.
  4. ^ a b c d e "Pomoxis nigromaculatus". FishBase. Ed. Ranier Froese and Daniel Pauly. March 2006 version. N.p.: FishBase, 2006.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Adams, Robert. Pomoxis nigromaculatus: Information. Animal Diversity Web. Retrieved on 2006 June 29.
  6. ^ a b c "Comprehensive Report Species - Pomoxis annularis". NatureServe Explorer. Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  7. ^ a b c "Comprehensive Report Species - Pomoxis nigromaculatus". NatureServe Explorer. Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  8. ^ Black Crappie. Florida Museum of Natural History Ichthyology Department. Retrieved on 2006 June 29.
  9. ^ a b Types of Fish: Black Crappie. Dunn’s Fish Farm. Retrieved on 2006 June 29.
  10. ^ a b Black Crappie. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Retrieved on 2006 June 29.
  11. ^ Super Crappie Systems. In-Fisherman. Retrieved on 2007 February 23.

The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (AHD) is a dictionary of American English published by Boston publisher Houghton-Mifflin, the first edition of which appeared in 1969. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... Merriam-Webster, originally known as the G. & C. Merriam Company of Springfield, Massachusetts, is a United States company that publishes reference books, especially dictionaries that are descendants of Noah Websters An American Dictionary of the English Language (1828). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... FishBase is a comprehensive database of information about fish. ... FishBase is a comprehensive database of information about fish. ... Animal Diversity Web (ADW) is an online database that collects the natural history, classification, species characteristics, conservation biology, and distribution information of thousands of species of animals. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... NatureServe is a non-profit environmental conservation organization. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... NatureServe is a non-profit environmental conservation organization. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... The Florida Museum of Natural History is located at the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, Florida. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... FishBase is a comprehensive database of information about fish. ... Please note that the ITIS system URL has changed (25 September 2006). ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Pictures


  Results from FactBites:
 
Crappie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (538 words)
Crappie of both species are sometimes referred to as papermouths, calico bass, and strawberry bass.
Crappie create a nest in fine silt or gravel, and the nests are often congregated in very high densities in shallow waters.
The white crappie, Pomoxis annularis Rafinesque, 1818, is native throughout the eastern half of Canada and the United States, and has been widely introduced in the west as well.
Crappie Fishing (311 words)
There are two crappie species, white and fl, distinguished by six dorsal fin spines for the white and seven or eight for the fl.
Crappie move into shallow water from April through June, depending on the part of the country you live in, and when water temperature is 55 to 70 degrees.
Crappie are attracted to brush and anglers often build brush piles by sinking Christmas trees wired together and anchored with a concrete block.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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