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Encyclopedia > Cranial nerve VIII

The vestibulocochlear nerve is the eighth of twelve cranial nerves, and also known as the auditory nerve. It emerges from the medulla oblongata and enters the internal acoustic meatus in the temporal bone, along with the facial nerve.


The vestibular nerve goes to the semicircular canals via the vestibular ganglion. It receives positional information.


The cochlear nerve goes to the cochlea and transmits information on sound to the brain.


  Results from FactBites:
 
HyperBrain Chapter 1 (2068 words)
Cranial nerves associated with the pons (V, VI, VII, VIII): Along the border of the pons and medulla, and in line with rootlets of XII, are the roots of cranial nerve VI (abducens nerve) (#5776).
Cranial nerve II is developmentally a cerebral vesicle evagination, not a peripheral nerve.
The cranial nerves pierce the meninges to leave the cranial cavity (#15245) and the spinal nerves pierce the meninges to exit from the vertebral canal (#51286, #5400).
Neurological Examination - Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (1021 words)
This nerve is responsible for the pupil size and the movement of the eye.
This nerve is involved in the movement of the shoulders and neck.
The final cranial nerve is mainly responsible for movement of the tongue.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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