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Encyclopedia > Cox Report
U.S. Representative Chris Cox (Republican-California) chaired the Committee that produced the report.
U.S. Representative Chris Cox (Republican-California) chaired the Committee that produced the report.

The Report of the Select Committee on U.S. National Security and Military/Commercial Concerns with the People's Republic of China, commonly known as the Cox Report after Representative Chris Cox, is a classified U.S. government document reporting on the People's Republic of China's covert operations within the United States during the 1980s and 1990s. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1454x2003, 2027 KB) See http://cox. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1454x2003, 2027 KB) See http://cox. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Chris Cox For other people named Chris Cox, see Chris Cox (disambiguation). ... Classified information is secret information to which access is restricted by law or corporate rules to a particular hierarchical class of people. ... This law-related article does not cite its references or sources. ... A document contains information. ... Secrecy is the condition of hiding information from others. ...

Contents


Committee created by the U.S. House of Representatives

The report was the work product of the Select Committee on U.S. National Security and Military/Commercial Concerns with the People's Republic of China. This special committee, created by a 409-10 vote of the U.S. House of Representatives on June 18, 1998, was tasked with the responsibility of investigating whether technology or information was transferred to the People's Republic of China that may have contributed­ to the enhancement of the nuclear-armed intercontinental ballistic missiles or to manufacture of weapons of mass destruction. Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is, along with the United States Senate, one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States. ... June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... A Minuteman III missile soars after a test launch. ... Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) generally include nuclear, biological, chemical (NBC) and, increasingly, radiological weapons. ...


A similar investigation had already begun in the U.S. Senate under the leadership of Senator Fred Thompson (Republican-Tennessee). Thompson had opened his hearings on China's influence in America's 1996 presidential and congressional elections 11 months earlier (on July 8, 1997). Seal of the Senate The Senate of the United States of America is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Fred Dalton Thompson (born August 19, 1942) is an American lawyer, actor and former Republican senator from Tennessee. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 36th 109,247 km² 195 km 710 km 2. ... July 8 is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 176 days remaining. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


China's theft of U.S. missile documents

Specifically, the Cox Report (released January 3, 1999) focused on China's theft of design information regarding the U.S.'s most advanced thermonuclear weapons, MIRV, and missile technology. The Chinese government, which had recently fended off accusations that it attempted to influence American politics by donating funds to U.S. politicians and the Democratic Party in violation of U.S. law, called the allegations "groundless" [1]. January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Information as a concept bears a diversity of meanings, from everyday usage to technical settings. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945 lifted nuclear fallout some 18 km (60,000 feet) above the epicenter. ... The MIRVed U.S. Peacekeeper missile, with the re-entry vehicles highlighted in red. ... A Minuteman III missile after a test launch. ... Chinese government can refer to at least two different governments. ... An allegation is a statement of a fact by a party in a pleading, which he or she claims they will prove. ... Influence Science and Practice (ISBN 0321188950) is a Psychology book examining the key ways people can be influenced by Compliance Professionals. The books authors is Robert B. Cialdini, Professor of Psychology at Arizona State University. ... The Federal Government of the United States was established by the United States Constitution. ... Campaign finance in the United States is the financing of electoral campaigns at the federal, state and local levels. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The law of the United States is derived from the common law of England, which was in force at the time of the Revolutionary War. ...


Committee's final report was unanimously approved

The Chairman of the Committee was Republican Rep. Chris Cox of California, whose name became synonymous with the committee's final report. Four other Republicans and Democrats served on the panel, including Representative Norm Dicks, who served as the ranking Democratic member. The committee's final report was approved unanimously by all 9 members. The redacted version of the report was released to the public May 25, 1999. A chairperson is the political correct term for the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... Chris Cox For other people named Chris Cox, see Chris Cox (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Sixth Congressional District of Washington Norman DeValois Dicks (born December 16, 1940), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1977, representing the Sixth Congressional District of Washington. ... Ranking member, in American politics, is a term used to refer to the member of a committee in Congress who is the longest-serving member of the party not in the majority (the longest-serving member of the majority is the chairman). ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Redaction generally refers to the editing of text to turn it into a form suitable for publication, or to the result of such an effort. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


Final report conclusions summarized

While several groups, including the People's Republic of China, contend that the Report is overstated or inaccurate, its authors and supporters maintain that its gist is undeniable. The report's basic findings were as follows, quoted from the above document's opening summary:

The People's Republic of China (PRC) has stolen design information on the United States' most advanced thermonuclear weapons. The Select Committee judges that the PRC's next generation of thermonuclear weapons, currently under development, will exploit elements of stolen U.S. design information. PRC penetration of our national nuclear weapons laboratories spans at least the past several decades and almost certainly continues today.
The PRC has stolen or otherwise illegally obtained U.S. missile and space technology that improves PRC military and intelligence capabilities.

Responding to the Cox Report

The redacted version of the report used this image, published previously by U.S. News & World Report, to illustrate the classified design of the W87 warhead.
The redacted version of the report used this image, published previously by U.S. News & World Report, to illustrate the classified design of the W87 warhead.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (972x764, 142 KB) // Summary Diagram of the W87, a modern thermonuclear weapon. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (972x764, 142 KB) // Summary Diagram of the W87, a modern thermonuclear weapon. ... Redaction generally refers to the editing of text to turn it into a form suitable for publication, or to the result of such an effort. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Mk21 Re-entry Vehicles shown here for the LGM-118A Peacekeeper contain W87 warheads. ...

China's response

In response, the PRC has maintained that its nuclear technology was indigenously developed and was not the result of espionage. Espionage is the practice of obtaining information about an organization or a society that is considered secret or confidential (spying) without the permission of the holder of the information. ...


Congress' response

The Cox Report's release prompted major legislative and administrative reforms. More than two dozen of the Select Committee's recommendations were enacted into law, including the creation of a new National Nuclear Security Administration to take over the nuclear weapons security responsibilities of the United States Department of Energy. At the same time, no person has ever been convicted of providing nuclear information to the PRC, and the one case that was brought in connection to these charges, that of Wen Ho Lee, fell apart. Bold textJAMES CHECKLEY Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ... Look up Administration in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The United States National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is part of the United States Department of Energy. ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... Wen Ho Lee (Chinese: 李文和; Pinyin: Lǐ Wénhé; born December 21, 1939) is a Taiwanese American scientist who worked for the University of California operated Los Alamos National Laboratory and was accused of stealing secrets about the U.S.s nuclear arsenal for China. ...


Successful prosecutions resulting from the Cox Report

Two of the U.S. companies named in the report – Loral Space and Communications Corp. and Hughes Electronics Corp. – were later successfully prosecuted by the federal government for violations of U.S. export control law, resulting in the two largest fines in the history of the Arms Export Control Act. Loral paid a $14 million fine in 2002[2], and Hughes paid a $32 million fine in 2003.[3] Loral CEO Bernard Schwartz was a large donor to President Clinton's 1996 re-election bid.[4] Both companies' illegal actions led to China improving the reliability of its intercontinental ballistic missiles. Logo of Loral S&C. Usage restricted. ... Hughes Electronics Corporation was formed in 1985 when Hughes Aircraft was sold by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to General Motors for $5 billion. ... A fine is money paid as a financial punishment for the commission of minor crimes or as the settlement of a claim. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Bernard Leon Schwartz is the Chairman of the Board and CEO of Loral Space & Communications, Chairman and CEO of K&F Industries, Inc. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... A Minuteman III missile soars after a test launch. ...


Timeline

See also

The U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence is a committee of the United States House of Representatives, currently chaired by Peter Hoekstra. ... The United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs has jurisdiction over matters related to the Department of Homeland Security and other homeland security concerns, as well as the functioning of the government itself, including the National Archives, budget and accounting measures other than appropriations, the Census, the... The U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives, the lower house of Congress. ... Campaign finance in the United States is the financing of electoral campaigns at the federal, state and local levels. ... Presidents Jiang Zemin of China and Bill Clinton of the U.S. The 1996 United States campaign finance scandal, also known as Chinagate, was an alleged effort by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) to influence domestic American politics prior to and during the Clinton administration as well as... The Timeline of Chinese espionage against the U.S. is a chronology of information relating both to the 1996 U.S. campaign finance scandal (also known as Chinagate) and the Peoples Republic of Chinas alleged nuclear espionage against the United States detailed in the Congressional reports known as... Chris Cox For other people named Chris Cox, see Chris Cox (disambiguation). ... Fred Dalton Thompson (born August 19, 1942) is an American lawyer, actor and former Republican senator from Tennessee. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...

References

  1. ^ "China rejects nuclear spying charge", BBC, April 22, 1999
  2. ^ Mintz, John, "2 U.S. space giants accused of aiding China Hughes, Boeing allegedly gave away missile technology illegally", Washington Post, Jan. 1, 2003
  3. ^ Gerth, Jeff, "2 Companies Pay Penalties For Improving China Rockets", New York Times, March 6, 2003
  4. ^ "Chinese Aerospace Official Denies Giving To Dems", CNN.com, May 21, 1998

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC, sometimes also known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world, founded in 1922. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
WAIS - World Affairs Report - The Cox Report (747 words)
If the Cox report was politically motivated to further discredit the Clinton administration, it would be premature and ill-conceived to dismiss the findings outright.
Reports point to a boiling kettle filled with bad loans, gross unemployment, heightening dissension, and the failure of Socialism as a workable form of government.
My objection to the way in which the Cox Report was disseminated was that it was used to discredit not only Clinton but some highly honorably colleagues, notably former Secretary of Defense William Perry and China expert John Lewis.
The Harvard Crimson :: News :: The Cox Report (768 words)
The Cox Commission has established that the Columbia rebellion was not all due to SDS members and their "exaggeration" of the actual state of affairs.
Archibald Cox likes to recount a tale of the evening he spent at dinner with a group of radical students and how, after a while, they had forgotten he was there and talked of their plans and their politics in front of him.
He and his panel worked hard and their report is valuable in that a respectable body of men who can certainly not be considered radical, after a thorough and careful examination, ended up placing the blame for student discontent and student activism on administrators and faculty members.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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