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Encyclopedia > Covert operation

A covert operation is a military or political activity carried out in such a way that the parties responsible for the action can be an open secret, but cannot be proved. Covert and clandestine are related terms, but not interchangeable. For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... An open secret is a concept or idea (often in, but not necessarily limited to, government and military circles) that is officially secret or restricted in knowledge, but is actually widely known; or refers to something which is widely known to be true, but which none of the people most...

Covert operation: An operation that is so planned and executed as to conceal the identity of or permit plausible denial by the sponsor. A covert operation differs from a clandestine operation in that emphasis is placed on concealment of identity of sponsor rather than on concealment of the operation.[1]

Covert operations are typically performed in secrecy because they break specific laws or compromise policy in another country. Covert operations are generally illegal in the target state and are frequently in violation of the laws of the enacting country. From The U.S. Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms - Joint Publication JP1-02 dated 05 January 2007: Clandestine Operation: An operation sponsored or conducted by governmental departments or agencies in such a way as to assure secrecy or concealment. ...


Covert operations are employed in situations where openly operating against a target would be politically or diplomatically risky, or be counterproductive to the mission's purpose. In the case of enemies, there may be issues regarding violation of neutrality, concerns over military strength, the presence of treaties, laws, moral principles, or aversion to negative media attention. Operations may be directed at or conducted with allies and friends to secure their support or to influence or assist their policy against an enemy. Covert operations may assist espionage efforts, or may diverge from such efforts by attempting to influence events in another country directly. This article is about negotiations. ... Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ...


Covert operations have been employed by many national and sub-national governments and other organizations for centuries, with or without a formal intelligence agency. They are an established and often controversial component of foreign policy throughout the world. The equivalent Soviet terminology would be "active measures". An intelligence agency is a governmental organization that for the purposes of national security is devoted to the gathering of information (known in the context as intelligence) by means of espionage, communication interception, cryptanalysis, cooperation with other institutions, and evaluation of public sources. ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... Active Measures (Russian: Активные мероприятия) are a form of political warfare conducted by the Soviet security services (Cheka, OGPU, NKVD, KGB, and SVR) to influence the course of world events,[1] in addition to collecting intelligence. ...


Law enforcement agencies also use covert operations to infiltrate suspected criminal organizations. Law Enforcement Agency (LEA) is a generic term used for local and state police, as well as federal agencies (such as the FBI, the BATF, DHS, Europol, Interpol, etc. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Organized crime. ...

Contents

Forms of covert and clandestine operations

Covert action takes many different forms reflecting the diverse circumstances in which it is used. There are paramilitary operations, in which a state trains, supports, or advises a military force in another country. There is political subversion, in which a state supports or advises a political group in another country or directs propaganda at its population. In disinformation operations, one government provides information that causes the receiving government to make incorrect assumptions about the first nation's plans. Covert actions are those directed against individuals, such as kidnappings, assassinations, and coups d'état, may violate national or international law, depending on the specific circumstances Paramilitary designates forces whose function and organization are similar to those of a professional military force, but which are not regarded as having the same status. ... Subversion is an overturning or uprooting. ... For other uses, see Propaganda (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Disinformation (disambiguation). ... assassin, see Assassin (disambiguation) Jack Ruby assassinated Lee Harvey Oswald in a very public manner. ... Coup redirects here. ...


A common tactic in covert or clandestine operations is to establish a front business or organization through which agents can operate unrecognized. Air America, the CIA-owned airline that supplied Hmong fighters in Laos during the Vietnam War, is an example of such a front organization. A front organization is any entity set up by and controlled by another organization, such as intelligence agencies, criminal organizations, banned organizations, religious or political groups, advocacy groups, or corporations. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Language(s) Hmong/Mong Religion(s) Shamanism, Buddhism, Christianity, others The terms Hmong (pronounced ) and Mong () both refer to an Asian ethnic group in the mountainous regions of southern China. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


Examples of covert and clandestine operations

Studies and Observation Group (1964-1972)

This campaign against North Vietnam—the largest and most complex covert/clandestine operation since World War II—was conducted by the Studies and Observation Group (SOG) between 1964 and 1972. SOG reported to the Special Assistant for Counterinsurgency and Special Activities (SACSA) in the Pentagon, since Military Assistance Command Vietnam (MACV) had no border-crossing authority. Anthem Tiến Quân Ca (Army March) Location of North Vietnam Capital Hanoi Language(s) Vietnamese Government Socialist republic First president Ho Chi Minh Historical era Cold War  - Independence proclaimed (from Japan) September 2, 1945  - Recognized 1954  - Disestablished July 2, 1976 Area 157,880 km² Population  -  est. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article needs to be wikified. ... The Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV, pronounced as mac vee) was the United States command structure during the Vietnam War from 1962 until the wars end. ...


SOG had several subgroups, including cross-border special reconnaissance against the Ho Chi Minh trail, attempts to put spies into North Vietnam, and maritime operations. The latter included kidnapping of fishermen followed by their release with propaganda gifts, and direct action raids against North Vietnamese coastal targets. The North Vietnamese may have assumed the SIGINT destroyer patrols in the Gulf of Tonkin Incident were part of the raiding, although they were separate operations.[2] Special Reconnaissance (SR) is conducted by small units of highly trained military personnel, usually from Special Operations Forces (SOF) who avoid combat with, and detection by, the enemy. ... In the context of military special operations, direct action (DA) consists of: Short-duration strikes and other small-scale offensive actions conducted as a special operation in hostile, denied, or politically sensitive environments and which employ specialized military capabilities to seize, destroy, capture, exploit, recover, or damage designated targets. ... For other uses, see Sigint (disambiguation). ...


Operation Wrath of God

Operation Wrath of God was conducted by Mossad and resulted in the assassination of Palestinians who organized the murder of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Olympics in Munich, Germany. While the operation was in process, it was covert at worst (i.e., Palestinians knew someone was assassinating them), but clandestinity was the goal. That the operation was later acknowledged by Israel did not make it covert during execution. The operation was ordered in response to the massacre of 11 Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics. ... For the Haganah branch responsible for coordinating Jewish immigration into the British Mandate of Palestine, see Mossad Lealiyah Bet. ... The operation was ordered in response to the massacre of 11 Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... The Munich massacre occurred during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, when members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage by the Palestinian terrorist group Black September, a group with ties to Yasser Arafat’s Fatah organization. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ...


COINTELPRO (Late 1960s - Mid 1970s)

In Operation COINTELPRO, the FBI infiltrated and disrupted domestic left-leaning political groups during the Cold War. The mission was regarded by the sponsor (the FBI) to be clandestine in nature. When exposed, the activity was eventually declared illegal and led to additional U.S. laws being passed to attempt to prevent further such actions by the U.S. against its own citizens. COINTELPRO (an acronym for Counter Intelligence Program) was a series of covert and illegal projects conducted by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation aimed at investigating and disrupting dissident political organizations within the United States. ... COINTELPRO (an acronym for Counter Intelligence Program) was a series of covert and illegal projects conducted by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation aimed at investigating and disrupting dissident political organizations within the United States. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


J. Edgar Hoover blocked, for bureaucratic reasons, a parallel White House effort, the Huston Plan. John Edgar Hoover (January 1, 1895 – May 2, 1972), known popularly as J. Edgar Hoover, was the first Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) of the United States. ... The Huston Plan was a 43 page report and outline of proposed security operations put together by White House aide Tom Charles Huston in 1970. ...


Iran-Contra Affair (1980s)

The Iran-Contra Affair, also known as "Irangate" and "Contragate", took place in Nicaragua. Former National Security Advisor Marine Colonel Oliver North, retired General Richard Secord, Robert McFarlane, and Admiral John Poindexter helped the National Security Council raise private and foreign funds. North and Secord set up companies to buy and transport arms, working with reputed international arms dealer Adnan Khashoggi. The Iran-Contra affair was a political scandal which was revealed in 1986 as a result of earlier events during the Reagan administration. ... In the Iran-Contra Affair, United States President Ronald Reagans administration secretly sold arms to Iran, which was engaged in a bloody war with its neighbor Iraq from 1980 to 1988 (see Iran-Iraq War), and diverted the proceeds to the Contra rebels fighting to overthrow the leftist and... The Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, commonly referred to as the National Security Advisor, serves as the chief advisor to the President of the United States on national security issues. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Oliver Laurence North (born October 7, 1943 in San Antonio, Texas) is most well known for his involvement in the Iran-Contra Affair. ... Major General Richard V. Secord, Retired, was a United States Air Force officer convicted for his involvement with the Iran-Contra scandal. ... Robert Carl Bud McFarlane (born July 12,1937), was National Security Advisor to President Ronald Reagan from 1983 to late 1985 and became one of the administration’s primary scapegoats during the Iran-Contra Affair. ... Rear Admiral John Poindexter USN (Ret. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The AK-47 has been produced in greater numbers than any other assault rifle and has been used in conflicts all over the world. ... Adnan Khashoggi (or Kashoggi) (Arabic:عدنان خاشقجي, Turkish: Adnan Kaşıkçı) (born 25 July 1935 in Mecca) is a billionaire Saudi arms-dealer and businessman. ...


North, Secord, McFarlane, and Pointdexter's activities were under the umbrella of then–CIA Director William Casey's secret effort to establish an "off the shelf" covert action capability for President Ronald Reagan, separate from the existing national security apparatus[3] The Office of Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) was established on January 23rd 1946 with Adm. ... William Joseph Casey (March 13, 1913 – May 6, 1987) was the Director of Central Intelligence from 1981 to 1987. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Reagan redirects here. ... Logo used on the Intelligence Community web site. ...


The Reagan administration, in contravention to the Boland Amendment (which ended funding of the Contras), sold military arms to the Contras for three main reasons: first, to aid the Contras against the Sandinista government in Nicaragua; second, to use the weapons sale proceeds to fund the exchange of various U.S. hostages held in the Middle East; and third, to hinder the advancement of communism. The United States Presidency of Ronald Reagan, also known as the Reagan Administration, lasted from 1981 until 1989 and was conservative, steadfastly anti-communist, employed a foreign policy of “peace through strength,” and favored tax cuts and smaller government. ... The Boland Amendment was the name given to three U.S. legislative amendments between 1982 and 1984, all aimed at limiting US government assistance to the rebel Contras in Nicaragua. ... For other uses, see Contra. ... Sandinista redirects here. ... Nicaragua is a constitutional democracy with executive, legislative, judicial, and electoral branches of government. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... This article is about the form of society and political movement. ...


Notable covert operators

The following persons are known to have participated in covert operations, as distinct from clandestine intelligence gathering (espionage) either by their own admission or by the accounts of others: Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ...

Robert Bobby Baer (born July 1, 1952) is an author and former case officer at the Central Intelligence Agency. ... Colonel Aaron Bank (November 23, 1902 – April 1, 2004) was the founder of the US Army Special Forces, commonly called Green Berets. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was a United States intelligence agency formed during World War II. It was the wartime intelligence agency and was the predecessor to the Central Intelligence Agency, the Special Forces, and Navy SEALs. ... For other uses, see Colonel (disambiguation). ... Blue Light redirects here. ... SAS in their armed jeeps, during the North African campaign The Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) is a special forces unit of the British Army. ... The 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta (1st SFOD-D) — commonly known as Delta in the U.S. Army, Delta Force by civilians, and Combat Applications Group by the Department of Defense — is a Special Operations Force (SOF) and an integral element of the Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC). ... Gary Berntsen is a decorated former Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in de broek career officer who served in the Directorate of Operations between October 1982 and June 2005. ... Combatants United States, Poland, France, Canada, Pakistan, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines (in the Philippines theatre only), Northern Alliance, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Ethiopia, Somalia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Romania, Portugal, Bulgaria, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Georgia Taliban, al-Qaeda, Abu Sayyaf, Jemaah... Mohammad Oudeh, commonly known as Abu Daoud, is the leader of the Black September, the Palestine Liberation Organisation splinter group that carried out the 1972 Munich massacre. ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic Munazzamat al-Tahrir Filastiniyyah منظمة تحرير فلسطينية ) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinian Arabs dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state to consist of the area between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea, with an intent to destroy Israel. ... The expression Black September may refer to: Black September in Jordan, the conflict between Palestinian guerrilla organizations and King Hussein of Jordan that began in September 1970 and ended in July 1971 with the expulsion of the PLO to Lebanon. ... Wendell Fertig (b. ... Virginia Hall receiving the Distinguished Service Cross in 1945 Virginia Hall MBE DSC (April 6, 1906 - July 14, 1982) was an American spy during World War II. She was also known by many aliases: Marie Monin, Germaine, Diane, and Camille. ... The Special Operations Executive (SOE), sometimes referred to as the Baker Street Irregulars after Sherlock Holmess fictional group of spies, was a World War II organization initiated by Winston Churchill and Hugh Dalton in July 1940 as a mechanism for conducting warfare by means other than direct military engagement. ... The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was a United States intelligence agency formed during World War II. It was the wartime intelligence agency and was the predecessor to the Central Intelligence Agency, the Special Forces, and Navy SEALs. ... The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest military decoration of the United States Army, awarded for extreme gallantry and risk of life in actual combat with an armed enemy force. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta (1st SFOD-D) — commonly known as Delta in the U.S. Army, Delta Force by civilians, and Combat Applications Group by the Department of Defense — is a Special Operations Force (SOF) and an integral element of the Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC). ... Michael Mike Harari (born 1927) was a member of the Mossad who directed the failed Lillehammer affair, and later became an arms-dealer and high level advisor for General Manuel Noriega in Panama. ... The operation was ordered in response to the massacre of 11 Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics. ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic Munazzamat al-Tahrir Filastiniyyah منظمة تحرير فلسطينية ) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinian Arabs dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state to consist of the area between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea, with an intent to destroy Israel. ... The Munich massacre occurred during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, when members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage by the Palestinian terrorist group Black September, a group with ties to Yasser Arafat’s Fatah organization. ... Thomas Edward Lawrence (August 16, 1888 – May 19, 1935), also known as Lawrence of Arabia, and (apparently, among his Arab allies) Aurens or El Aurens, became famous for his role as a British liaison officer during the Arab Revolt of 1916–1918. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Mafart was a DGSE agent and deputy commander of the Navy Frogmen Training Centre in Corsica. ... The Direction Générale de la Sécurité Extérieure (generally known as DGSE) is Frances external intelligence agency. ... Greenpeace protest against Esso / Exxon Mobil. ... Major Richard J. Meadows (June 16, 1931 - July 29, 1995) was a U.S. Army Special Forces officer who saw combat in U.S. wars from Korea to the Iran Hostage Rescue mission in 1980. ... This article is about the U.S. Special Operations Force. ... Son Tay prison camp from late 1970 The Son Tay prison camp was a POW camp operated by North Vietnam in the late 1960s through late 1970. ... Belligerents United States Iran Commanders Col. ... Richard Henry Meinertzhagen (March 3, 1878 - June 17, 1967) was a British soldier and intelligence officer with an interest in birds, bird lice and Zionism. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Jaime Ramón Mercader del Río Hernández (February 7, 1914 - October 18, 1978) was a Spanish Communist who served as an foreign agent of the NKVD during Joseph Stalins time as ruler of the USSR. In that role, he became famous as the murderer of Stalins... Leon Trotsky (Russian:  , Lev Davidovich Trotsky, also transliterated Leo, Lyev, Trotskii, Trotski, Trotskij, Trockij and Trotzky) (November 7 [O.S. October 26] 1879 – August 21, 1940), born Lev Davidovich Bronstein (), was a Ukrainian-born Bolshevik revolutionary and Marxist theorist. ... Pavel Sudoplatov 1907 - 1996 Pavel Sudoplatov (1907 - September, 1996) was a member of the intelligence services of the Soviet Union who rose to the rank of major general. ... Omar Nasiri (b. ... Noor Inayat Khan Noor-un-Nisa Inayat Khan, GC, MBE, (January 1, 1914, Moscow - September 13, 1944, Dachau concentration camp), usually known as Noor Inayat Khan, was a British Special Operations Executive agent in World War II of Indian origin and the first female radio operator to be sent into... The Special Operations Executive (SOE), sometimes referred to as the Baker Street Irregulars after Sherlock Holmess fictional group of spies, was a World War II organization initiated by Winston Churchill and Hugh Dalton in July 1940 as a mechanism for conducting warfare by means other than direct military engagement. ... Yolande Beekman (1911 - September 11, 1944) is a heroine of World War II. Born as Yolande Elsa Maria Unternahrer to an educated family in Paris, Beekman moved as a child to London and grew up fluent in the English, German, and French languages. ... Eliane Plewman (1917-1944) was a French SOE agent and member of French resistance. ... Charles Patrick Chuck Pfarrer, III (born April 13, 1957, Boston, Massachusetts) is an American novelist, screenwriter, and former U.S. Navy SEAL. He now lives in Michigan with his wife and child. ... SEALs in from the water. ... Prieur was a DGSE controller in the intelligence-gathering and evaluation wing, acting as Christine Cabons controller. ... The Direction Générale de la Sécurité Extérieure (generally known as DGSE) is Frances external intelligence agency. ... Greenpeace protest against Esso / Exxon Mobil. ... Operation Pastorius was a failed Nazi attack on the United States staged in June 1942. ... Holding The Court upheld the jurisdiction of a United States military tribunal over the trial of several German saboteurs in the United States. ... Ali Hassan Salameh (Arabic: , transliteration: ) (‎) (died January 22, 1979) was the chief of operations — code name Abu Hassan - for Black September, the organization responsible for the Munich massacre (1972) and other attacks; he was also the founder of Force 17. ... The expression Black September may refer to: Black September in Jordan, the conflict between Palestinian guerrilla organizations and King Hussein of Jordan that began in September 1970 and ended in July 1971 with the expulsion of the PLO to Lebanon. ... Johnny Micheal Spann Johnny Micheal Spann (March 1, 1969 - November 25, 2001) was the first American killed in combat after the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan. ... Combatants United States, Poland, France, Canada, Pakistan, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines (in the Philippines theatre only), Northern Alliance, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Ethiopia, Somalia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Romania, Portugal, Bulgaria, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Georgia Taliban, al-Qaeda, Abu Sayyaf, Jemaah... Gary C. Schroen is a former Central Intelligence Agency field officer who was in charge of the initial CIA incursion into Afghanistan in September 2001 to topple the Taliban regime and destroy Al Qaeda. ... Combatants United States, Poland, France, Canada, Pakistan, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines (in the Philippines theatre only), Northern Alliance, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Ethiopia, Somalia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Romania, Portugal, Bulgaria, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Georgia Taliban, al-Qaeda, Abu Sayyaf, Jemaah... Otto Skorzeny (June 12, 1908 – July 6, 1975[1]) was a Standartenführer[2] in the German Waffen-SS during World War II. After fighting on the Eastern Front, he is known as the commando leader who rescued Italian dictator Benito Mussolini from imprisonment after his overthrow. ... Benito Mussolini created a fascist state through the use of propaganda, total control of the media and disassembly of the working democratic government. ... For the 1965 film, see Battle of the Bulge (film). ... Pavel Sudoplatov 1907 - 1996 Pavel Sudoplatov (1907 - September, 1996) was a member of the intelligence services of the Soviet Union who rose to the rank of major general. ... Jesus Villamor was a Philippine pilot who fought the Japanese in World War Two. ... SGM William Billy Waugh (US Army-Ret. ... For other uses of the phrase, see Green Berets. ...

Representations of covert operations in popular culture

Covert operations have often been the subject of popular novels, films, TV series, comics, etc.


Literature

See Spy fiction. For the video game, see Spy Fiction (video game). ...


Film

See Spy film. The spy film genre deals with the subject of fictional espionage, either in a realistic way or as a basis for fantasy. ...


Television

For the music band, see The Spooks. ... The I-SPY books were spotters guides written for British children, and particularly successful in the 1950s and 60s. ... Mission: Impossible is the name of an American television series which aired on the CBS network from September 1966 to September 1973. ... This article is about the TV show. ... Nikita (re-titled La Femme Nikita in the United States and other international markets) is a television spy drama based upon the French film directed by Luc Besson (see Nikita). ... Alias was an American Spy-fi television series created by J. J. Abrams which was broadcast on ABC from September 30, 2001 to May 22, 2006, spanning five seasons. ... 24 is an Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning American action drama television series. ... Burn Notice is an American television comedy-drama series created for the USA Network. ... The Unit is an American action-drama television series that focuses on a top-secret military unit modeled after the real life Delta Force. ...

Games

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Top Secret (role-playing game). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Top Secret (role-playing game). ... An image from the original Splinter Cell Splinter Cell is a series of video games endorsed by American author Tom Clancy. ...

See also

HUMINT, a syllabic abbreviation of the words HUMan INTelligence, is a category of intelligence gathering disciplines that encompasses all gathering of intelligence by means of interpersonal contact. ... Counterintelligence or counter-espionage is the act of seeking and indentifying espionage activities. ... Military intelligence (abbreviated MI, int. ... The term black op has two related meanings: Black operation which is a type of covert operation. ... False colors redirects here. ... SO10 was the Specialist Operations designation for the Metropolitan Polices Crime Operations Group. ... Counterintelligence Field Activity (CIFA) is a US Department of Defense (DoD) agency whose size and budget are classified. ... COINTELPRO (an acronym for Counter Intelligence Program) was a series of covert and illegal projects conducted by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation aimed at investigating and disrupting dissident political organizations within the United States. ... For other uses, see Chaos (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Covert Warfare: Intelligence, Counterintelligence and Military Deception During the World War II Era is an eighteen volume book edited by John Mendelsohn and published in 1989 by Garland. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A covert mission is an action taken, normally as part of a covert operation, that is so planned and executed as to conceal the identity of the sponsor. ...

References

  1. ^ US Department of Defense (12 July 2007). Joint Publication 1-02 Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. Retrieved on 2007-11-21.
  2. ^ Shultz, Richard H., Jr. (1999). The Secret War against Hanoi: Kennedy's and Johnson's Use of Spies, Saboteurs, and Covert Warriors in North Vietnam. HarperCollins. 
  3. ^ Woodward, Bob (1987). Veil: the secret wars of the CIA, 1981-1987. Simon & Schuster. 

The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bob Woodward signs his book State of Denial after a talk in March 2007. ...

External links

  • Statutory Procedures Under Which Congress Is To Be Informed of U.S. Intelligence Activities, Including Covert Actions by Alfred Cumming, January 18, 2006 (HTML) - Congressional Research Service via thewall.civiblog.org
  • Richard Hersh Statement to House Judiciary Democratic Congressional Briefing, January 20, 2006 (HTML) via thewall.civiblog.org
  • Full Transcript, House Judiciary Democratic Membership Briefing "Constitution in Crisis: Domestic Surveillance and Executive Power" January 20, 2006 (HTML) via thewall.civiblog.org
  • "Big Brother is Watching You Part 1 - 902 MI Group TALON Project Summary, Spreadsheet, Rep. Wexler response, and News Coverage collection (includes Shane Harris's "TIA Lives On") via thewall.civiblog.org
is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

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