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Encyclopedia > Cover version

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In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. In its current use, it can sometime have a pejorative meaning - implying that the original recording should be regarded as the definitive version, usually in the sense of an authentic rendition, and all others are merely lesser competitors, alternatives or tributes (no matter how popular). However, Billboard - and other magazines recording the popularity of the musical artists and hit tunes - originally measured the sales success of the published tune not just recordings of it, or later the airplay that it also managed to achieve. In that context - the greater the number of cover versions- the more successful the song. For the music genre, see Pop music. ... Buskers perform in San Francisco A performance, in performing arts, generally comprises an event in which one group of people (the performer or performers) behave in a particular way for another group of people (the audience). ... Historical records of events have been made for thousands of years in one form or another. ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ...


The present view of popular music starts with the recording artists and their material, not the published tune (in search of a popular artist to record it, e.g. from Tin Pan Alley in New York or Denmark Street in London). It is, then, in the light of an earlier, autonomous, poetic minstrel tradition that late twentieth / early twenty-first century singer-songwriter fixations may best be viewed. And with this, the prevailing distaste for artists who perform another's material as cover versions or compositions for produced artists in the Brill Building style (which produced very many tunes that were - and are still - widely covered by many artists in a variety of styles). Tin Pan Alley is the name given to the collection of New York City-centered music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular music of the United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... Denmark Street is a short narrow road in central London, notable for its connections with British popular music, and is known as the British Tin Pan Alley. ... For the 18th century American form of music and performance known as minstrelsy, see minstrel show. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Artists rendition of the Brill Buildings main entrance on Broadway The Brill Building (built 1930) is an office building located at 1619 Broadway in New York City, just north of Times Square. ...


The term cover version originally implied a rival version of a tune recorded by an artist subsequent to an original version, e.g. Paul Williams's 1949 hit tune The Hucklebuck or Hank Williams' 1952 [1] smash Jambalaya (On the Bayou), both crossed over to the popular Hit Parade and had numerous hit versions. Prior to the mid-20th century the notion of an original version of a popular tune would, of course, have seemed slightly odd - the production of musical entertainment being seen essentially as a live event, even if one that was reproduced at home via a copy of the sheet music, learned by heart, or captured on a shellac recording disc. Popular musicians (and especially modern listeners) have now begun to use the word "cover" to refer to any remake of a previously recorded tune. Paul Williams is the name of three popular music musicians: Paul Williams, songwriter for Carpenters and many others, as well as actor in movies and TV. Paul Williams, rhythm and blues saxophonist Paul Williams, one of the lead singers of the popular Motown act The Temptations Other Paul Williams: Paul... See also: 1948 in music, other events of 1949, 1950 in music and the list of years in music. // Events Mitch Miller begins his career as one of the 20th centurys most successful record producers at Mercury Eddie Fisher signs with RCA Bob Hope suggests that Anthony Benedetto change... For other persons named Hank Williams, see Hank Williams (disambiguation). ... Jambalaya (On the Bayou) is a song credited to Hank Williams, released in 1952, which reached great popularity in two genres: country and popular music. ... Music Hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which reached its peak of popularity between 1850 and 1960. ... Sheet music is written representation of music. ... A 12-inch record (left), a 7-inch record (right), and a CD (above) Two 7 singles (left), two colored 7 singles (middle), and two 7 singles with large spindle holes (right). ...


Musicians now play what they call "cover versions" (e.g. the reworking, updating or interpretation) of songs as a tribute to the original performer or group. Using familiar material (e.g. evergreen hits, standard tunes or classic recordings) is an important method in learning various styles of music. Most albums, or long playing records [2], up until the mid-1960s usually contained a large number of evergreens or standards to present a fuller range of the artist's abilities and style [3]. Artists might also perform interpretations ("covers") of a favorite artist's hit tunes [4] for the simple pleasure of playing a familiar song or collection of tunes [5]. A cover band plays such "cover versions" exclusively. A cover band (or covers band) is a band that plays only cover songs. ...


In the contemporary world, there are broadly three types of entertainers who depend upon on cover versions for their principle repertoire:


Tribute acts or bands are performers who make a living by recreating the music of one particular artist. Bands such as Bjorn Again, Dread Zeppelin and the Fab Faux are dedicated to playing the music of ABBA, Led Zeppelin and the Beatles respectively. There are also "tribute acts" that salute the Who, the Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd and many other classic rock acts. Most tribute bands are content to perform copycat versions of the original repertoire. Some tribute bands introduce a twist - eg Dread Zeppelin’s reggae takes on the Zeppelin catalog or Beatallica’s heavy metal fusions of songs by the Beatles and Metallica. A tribute act is a music group, singer, or musician who specifically plays the music of a well-known music act, often one which has disbanded or ceased touring. ... Bjorn Again are an ABBA tribute band, taking their name from Bj rn Ulvaeus, a member of ABBA, and a pun on the phrase Born again. ... Dread Zeppelin is an American band best known for covering the songs of Led Zeppelin in a reggae style sung by an Elvis Presley impersonator named Tortelvis, though their act now encompasses many other songs and other styles of music. ... The Fab Faux is a musical tribute band performing the works of The Beatles. ... Abba redirects here. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... For the magazine, see Classic Rock (magazine). ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ...


Cover acts or bands are entertainers who perform a broad variety of crowd-pleasing material for audiences who enjoy the familiarity of hit songs. Such bands draw from Top 40 hits of different decades to provide a pleasurable nostalgic entertainment in bars, on cruise ships and at events such as weddings, family celebrations and corporate functions. A cover band (or covers band) is a band that plays only cover songs. ...


Revivalist artists or bands are performers who are inspired by an entire genre of music and who are dedicated to curating and recreating that genre and introducing it to younger audiences who have not experienced that music first hand. Unlike Tribute Bands and Cover Bands who rely primarily on audiences seeking a nostalgic experience - Revivalist Bands usually seek new young audiences for whom the music is fresh and has no nostalgic value. For example: Sha Na Na started in 1969 as a celebration of the doo-wop music of the 1950s – a genre of music that was not initially fashionable during the hippie counter-culture era. The Blues Brothers started in 1978 as a living salute to the blues, soul and R&B music of the 1950s and 1960s that was not in vogue by the late 70s. (The Blues Brothers’ creed was that they were “on a mission from God” as evangelists for blues and soul music.) The Black Crowes formed in 1984 - initially dedicated to reviving 1970s style blues-rock. They subsequently started writing their own material in the same vein. A revivalist artist or revivalist band is a musical group, singer, or musician dedicated to reviving interest in a musical genre from an earlier era. ... Sha Na Na Sha Na Na is a rock and roll/comedy group from New York City, who perform covers of doo wop hits from the 1950s, simultaneously reviving and sending up the music, as well as 1950s New York street culture, in their performances. ... Doo-wop is a style of vocal-based rhythm and blues music popular in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s in America. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Black Crowes are a taper-friendly rock and roll jam band, formed in 1985 in Atlanta, Georgia. ...


Early cover versions and the origin of the term

From early in the 20th century it was common practice among phonograph record labels, if any company had a record that was a significant commercial success, that other record companies would have singers or musicians "cover" the "hit" tune by recording a version for their own label in hopes of cashing in on the tune's success. For example, Ain't She Sweet,[6], was first popularized in 1927 by Eddie Cantor (on stage) and by Ben Bernie and Gene Austin (on record), was repopularized through popular recordings by Mr. Goon Bones & Mr. Ford and Pearl Bailey in 1949, and later still revived as 33 1/3 and 45 RPM records by the Beatles in 1964.[7] Since there was little promotion or advertising involved in the earlier days of record production, other than at the local music hall or music store, when the average record buyer went out to purchase a new record, they usually asked for the tune, not the artist. In addition, distribution of records was highly localized in many cases. So, a quickly-recorded version of a hit song from another area could reach an audience before the version by the artist(s) who first introduced the tune in a particular format - the "original", "introductory" or "popularizing" artist - was widely available, and the highly competitive record companies were quick to take advantage of these facts. Tonearm redirects here. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... See also: 1926 in music, other events of 1927, 1928 in music and the list of years in music. Events January 8 - Alban Bergs Lyric Suite is premiered in Vienna July 1 - Béla Bartóks Piano Concerto No. ... One of 12 Eddie Cantor caricatures by Frederick J. Garner for a 1933 Brown & Bigelow advertising card set. ... Gene Austin (June 24, 1900 - January 24, 1972) was an American singer and songwriter who is considered to have been the first crooner. Austin was born as Lemeul Eugene Lucas in Gainesville, Texas (north of Dallas), to Nova Lucas (died 1943) and the former Serena Belle Harrell (died 1956). ... Pearl Bailey in “St. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ...


This began to change in the later 1930s, when the average age of the now greatly increased record-buying public began to expand to include a younger age group. During the Swing Era, when a bobby soxer went looking for a recorded tune, say "In the Mood", typically she wanted the version popularized by her favourite artist(s), e.g. the Glenn Miller version (on RCA Victor's cheaper Bluebird label), not someone else's (sometimes presented on a more expensive record company's label). This trend was marked closely by the charting of record sales by the different artists, not just hit tunes, on the music industry's Hit Parades. However, for sound commercial reasons, record companies still continued to record different versions of tunes that sold well. Most audiences until the mid-1950s still heard their favorite artists playing live music on stage or via the radio. And since radio shows were for the most part aimed at local audiences, it was still rare for an artist in one area to reach a mass audience. Also radio stations tended to cater to broad audience markets, so an artist in one vein might not get broadcast on other stations geared to a set audience. So popular versions of Jazz, Country and Western or Rhythm and Blues tunes, and vice versa, were frequent. Consider Mack The Knife: [8] this was a 1956 record Hit Parade instrumental tune, Moritat, for the Dick Hyman Trio, also recorded by Richard Hayman & Jan August,[9] but a hit also for Louis Armstrong 1956/1959, Bobby Darin, 1959, [10] and Ella Fitzgerald, 1960,[11] as vocal versions of Mack The Knife. The Swing Era was the period of time (1935-1946) when big band swing music was the most popular music in America. ... Bobby soxer is a term coined in the 1940s to describe the overly zealous, usually teenage, fans of singer Frank Sinatra. ... In the Mood, a song popularized by the American bandleader Glenn Miller, was one of the best-known arrangements of the big band era. ... This article is about the jazz musician. ... For other uses, see Mack the Knife (disambiguation). ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Louis[1] Armstrong[2] (4 August 1901[3] – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo[4] and Pops, was an American jazz musician. ... Bobby Darin (born Walden Robert Bobby Cassotto, 14 May 1936-December 20, 1973) was one of the most popular American big band performers and rock and roll teen idols of the late 1950s. ... Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as Lady Ella and the First Lady of Song, is considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th Century. ...


Europe's Radio Luxembourg, like many commercial stations, also sold "air time"; so record companies and others bought air time to promote their own artists or products, thus increasing the number of recorded versions of any tune then available. Add to this the fact that many radio stations were limited in their permitted "needle time" (the amount of recorded music they were allowed to play), or were regulated on the amount of local talent they had to promote in live broadcasts, as with most national stations like the BBC in the UK. Radio Luxembourg is a commercial radio station that has broadcast in many languages in conjunction with a television service operated from the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. ... Needle time was created in the United Kingdom by the Musicians Union and Phonographic Performances Ltd. ...


Even to this day, authors and publishers are paid royalty by broadcasters and artists are not, there is an incentive to record numerous versions of a song, particularly in different genres. For example, King records frequently cut both rhythm and blues and country and western versions of novelty songs like "Good Morning, Judge" and "Don't Roll those Bloodshot Eyes at Me". This tradition was expanded when rhythm and blues songs began showing up on pop music charts. For other uses, see Rhythm and blues (disambiguation). ... Country music, once known as Country and Western music, is a popular musical form developed in the southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, spirituals, and the blues. ... A novelty song is a song, usually in a recorded form, that defies the usual categorisation of music, or may not even be music. ... For other uses, see Rhythm and blues (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ...


In the early days of rock and roll, many tunes originally recorded by musicians were re-recorded in a more popular vein by other artists with a more toned-down style. Given the reluctance of radio stations to play formats outside their own target audience group's taste, this was inevitable. By far the most popular style of music in the mid-1950s / mid-1960s was still the professional light orchestral unit, so that was the format sought by popular recording artists. For many purists these popular versions lacked both the raw, often amateurish, earthiness of the original introducing artists. But mostly they did not have the added kudos craved by many rebellious teenagers, the social stigma - or street credibility - of rock and roll music; as most of these were performed by the type of black artists not heard on the popular mass entertainment markets, some having also been written by them. The bowdlerized popular cover versions were considered by most audiences at the time to be more palatable for the mass audience of both parents and children as a group audience. Therefore the artists targeting the white-majority family audience were more acceptable to programmers at most radio and TV stations. For this reason singer-songwriter Don McLean has called the cover version a "racist tool."[12] Many parents in the 1950s - 60s, whether intentionally racists or not, felt deeply threatened by the rapid pace of social change. After all they had for the most part shared entertainments with their parents in ways that their own children had become reluctant to do. The jukebox and the personal record disc player were still relatively expensive pieces of machinery - and the portable radio a great novelty, allowing truculent teenagers to shut themselves off. Tunes by introducing artists which were then successful on the mass audience Hit Parade charts are called crossovers as they "crossed over" from the targeted Country, Jazz or Rhythm audience. Also, many songs originally recorded by male artists were rerecorded by female artists, and vice versa. Such a cover version is sometimes called a cross cover version. Incidentally, up to the mid-1930s male vocalists often sang the female lyrics to popular songs, though this faded rapidly after it was deemed decadent in Nazi Germany. Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... For other people with similar names see Don MacLean. ... A Dansette was a brand of portable mono record player with a built-in speaker. ... Regency TR-1. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Reworking non-English language tunes for the Anglo-Saxon markets was once a popular part of the music business. For example, the 1954 worldwide hit The Happy Wanderer was originally Der fröhliche Wanderer, to this must be added Hymne a l`amour, Mutterlein, Volare, Seeman, Quando, Quando, Quando, L'amour est bleu, etc. The song The Happy Wanderer (Der fröhliche Wanderer or Mein Vater war ein Wandersmann) is often mistaken for a German folk song, but it is actually an original song by Friedrich-Wilhelm Möller, written shortly after WW2. ...


Etymological speculation

While it is now all but impossible to trace the actual history of the term cover version, it was used from the late 1940s to indicate rival versions of a tune competing for placement on the popular Hit Parade charts. One possible origin of the term is that it relates to the record company "covering a bet" by placing a bet on a song someone else has already bet on, hoping to ride the coattails of their good luck. Another commonly-suggested origin, also apocryphal, is that a new recording by a white artist was intended to "cover up the blackness" of the original and make it acceptable to white listeners. Also rumoured is that the term originated in record companies' board rooms: when a song by a rival company began to look like a hit, executives would ask if their A & R men (the forerunners of today's record producers) had any recordings of the song that could be released; the correct response would have been, "We've got that covered." A fourth suggestion is that the term "cover" may have its origins in an attempt by the artist who recorded the newer version of the song to have his/her version literally "cover" the original version in the sales racks. Woolworth, a discount chain store, even had its own label (Embassy) specializing in low-price copies of popular tunes. But seminal U. S. rock-and-roll disc jockey Dick Clark makes the strongest case, however, for the term cover actually being used (once again, quite literally) as a "covering" of one record on a (radio station's) turntable by another record; for example, a black group's recording being "covered" by a white group's rendition, thereby preventing radio play for the original (since only the record "on top" could be played on a broadcast turntable). Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Foot Locker Inc NYSE: FL (formerly Z) is a United States company specialising in athletic footwear and clothing. ... For other persons named Dick Clark, see Dick Clark (disambiguation). ...


Modern "cover" versions

Cover versions of many popular songs have been recorded, sometimes with a radically different style, sometimes virtually indistinguishable from the original. For example, Jose Feliciano's version of "Light My Fire" (recorded after the original had disappeared from sales charts) was distinct from The Doors' version, but Carl Carlton's 1974 cover (seven years after the fact) of Robert Knight's 1967 hit single "Everlasting Love" sounded almost identical to the original. Another one of the most recent songs to be covered is the 2007 song "Umbrella" by Rihanna. People such as Scott Simons, Marie Digby, Mandy Moore, and others have covered it in different styles. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... José Montserrate Feliciano (born September 10, 1945 in Lares, Puerto Rico) is a Puerto Rican singer. ... This article is about The Doors song. ... This page is about the rock band. ... Not to be confused with The Simpsons character Carl Carlson or the German band Carl Carlton and the Songdogs. ... // January - The Ramones form. ... Daniel Robert Knight is an Australian politician. ... The year 1967 was an important year for psychedelic music, with releases from Small Faces Itchycoo Park,The Doors (The Doors, Strange Days), Jefferson Airplane (Surrealistic Pillow, After Bathing at Baxters), the Beatles Sgt. ...


Cover versions can also still cross language barriers. Falco's 1982 German-language hit "Der Kommissar" was covered in English by After the Fire, although the German title was retained. The English version, which was not a direct translation of Falco's original but retained much of its spirit, reached the Top 5 on the US charts. The Lion Sleeps Tonight evolved over several decades and versions from a 1939 Zulu a cappella song. Many of singer Laura Branigan's 1980s hits were English-language remakes of songs already successful in Europe, for the American record market. Numerable English-language covers exist of 99 Luftballons by German singer Nena, one having been recorded by Nena herself following the success of her original German version. "Popcorn", a song which was originally completely instrumental, has had lyrics added in at least six different languages in various covers. Johann (Hans) Hölzel (February 19, 1957 – February 6, 1998), better known by his stage name Falco, was a classical music prodigy turned Austrian hip hop-pop and rock star. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... After the Fire (or ATF) was a British rock band that went from playing Christian progressive rock to Christian new wave over the twelve years it was together, while having only one hit in the United States (Der Kommissar) and the UK (One Rule for You). // Keyboard player Peter Banks... The Lion Sleeps Tonight began as a 1939 African popular music hit Mbube that, in modified versions, also became a hit in the US and UK. Mbube (Zulu for lion) was first recorded by its writer, Solomon Linda, and his group, The Evening Birds, in 1939. ... Languages Zulu Religions Christian, African Traditional Religion Related ethnic groups Bantu Nguni Basotho Xhosa Swazi Matabele Khoisan The Zulu (South African English and isiZulu: amaZulu) are a South African ethnic group of an estimated 17-22 million people who live mainly in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ... Laura Branigan (July 3, 1957 – August 26, 2004) was a popular American singer/actress from Brewster, New York, best known in the U.S. for the song Gloria (1982). ... 99 Luftballons is a Cold War-era protest song by the German band Nena. ... Nena (born March 24, 1960 in Hagen, North Rhine-Westphalia) is a German singer who became famous with the New German Wave song 99 Luftballons (99 Red Balloons in the English version). ... Nena (born March 24, 1960 in Hagen, North Rhine-Westphalia) is a German singer who became famous with the New German Wave song 99 Luftballons (99 Red Balloons in the English version). ... Popcorn is a famous early synthpop instrumental. ...


Although modern cover versions are often produced for artistic reasons, some aspects of the disingenuous spirit of early cover versions remain. In the album-buying heyday of the 1970s, albums of sound-alike covers were created, commonly released to fill bargain bins in the music section of supermarkets and even specialized music stores, where uninformed customers might easily confuse them with original recordings. The packaging of such discs was often intentionally confusing, combining the name of the original artist in large letters with a tiny disclaimer like as originally sung by or as made popular by. More recently, albums such as the Kidz Bop series of compact discs, featuring versions of contemporary songs sung by children, have sold successfully. Bargain Bins refer to an unsorted selection of merchandise, particularly CDs, which have been discounted in retail price due to the closure of the record label, the derivation of the music (cover songs), or simply lost popularity after a one-hit single that didnt compare in commercial success with... Packaged food aisles in a Fred Meyer store in Portland, Oregon A supermarket is a departmentalized self-service store offering a wide variety of food and household merchandise. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Customers are waiting in front of a famous fashion shop for its grand opening in Hong Kong. ... The cover for the first Kidz Bop album. ... CD redirects here. ...


Organized crime, or unscrupulous labels, have been known to release original recordings in other markets, without payment of royalties to the writers or artists; these unauthorized releases could not be properly termed "cover" recordings.[citation needed] Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Contemporising older songs

Cover versions (as the term is now used) are often contemporary versions of familiar songs. For example "Singin' in the Rain" was originally introduced in the film The Hollywood Revue of 1929. The famous Gene Kelly version was a revision that brought it up to date for a 1950s Hollywood musical, and was used in the 1952 film Singin' in the Rain. In 1978 it was covered by French singer Sheila accompanied by the B. Devotion group, as a disco song, once more updating it to suit the musical taste of the era. During the disco era there was a brief trend of taking well known songs and recording them in the disco style. More recently "Singin' In the Rain" has been covered and remixed by British act Mint Royale for a television commercial for Volkswagen. Another example of this, from a different angle, is the tune Blueberry Hill,[13] many mistakenly believe the Fats Domino 1956 release to be the original recording and artist. In fact, it was originally introduced on film by Gene Autry and popularised on the record Hit Parade of 1940 by Glenn Miller. The Fats Domino Rock 'n' Roll version is the only one that might currently get widespread airplay on most media - due, no doubt, to the still prevailing prejudice against non-beat music artists or styles. Gene Kelly performing in Singin in the Rain For other meanings, see Singin in the Rain. ... The Hollywood Revue of 1929: One of the earliest ventures into the new talkie format of motion pictures, this film, directed by Charles Riesner for MGM, brought together some top acts in a two-hour vaudeville show hosted by Jack Benny. ... For the similarly-named American actress, see Jean Kelly. ... Sheila Sheila is the stage name of a French pop singer whose real name is Annie (Any) Chancel (she is not related to Jacques Chancel, the TV host). ... This article is about the music genre. ... Mint Royale is an big beat electronica duo from Britain, comprised of Neil Claxton and Chris Baker and who are best known for their remixes. ... Volkswagen AG (ISIN: DE0007664005), or VW, is an automobile manufacturer based in Wolfsburg, Germany. ... Blueberry Hill is: Blueberry Hill, a restaurant/bar in the St. ... Antoine Dominique Fats Domino (born February 26, 1928) is a classic R&B and rock and roll singer, songwriter and pianist. ... Orvon Gene Autry (September 29, 1907 – October 2, 1998) was an American performer who gained fame as The Singing Cowboy on the radio, in movies and on television. ... See also: 1939 in music, other events of 1940, 1941 in music and the list of years in music. // Events January - Frank Sinatra joins the Tommy Dorsey orchestra July 20 - Billboard magazine publishes its first Music Popularity Chart May 27 - Quartetto Egie make their debut performance November 23 - Dmitri Shostakovich...


Director Baz Luhrmann has contemporised and stylised older songs for use in his films. New or cover versions such as John Paul Young's "Love Is in the Air" occur in Strictly Ballroom, Candi Staton's "Young Hearts Run Free" appear in Romeo + Juliet, and adaptations of artists such as Nat King Cole, Nirvana, Kiss, Thelma Houston, Marilyn Monroe, Madonna, T. Rex, David Bowie, Queen and The Police are used in Moulin Rouge! The covers are carefully designed to fit into the structure of each film and suit the taste of the intended audience. The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Baz Luhrmann (born Mark Anthony Luhrmann on September 17, 1962) is an Oscar and Golden Globe-nominated Australian film director, screenwriter, and producer. ... John Paul Young John Paul Young (June 21, 1950–) is an Australian singer. ... Strictly Ballroom is the name of a 1986 play and its 1992 film adaptation. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... William Shakespeares Romeo + Juliet is a 1996 American film adaptation of William Shakespeares play Romeo and Juliet. ... Nathaniel Adams Coles, known professionally as Nat King Cole (March 17, 1919 – February 15, 1965) was a popular American singer, songwriter, and jazz pianist. ... This article is about the American grunge band. ... Kiss is an American rock band formed in New York City in 1971. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson; June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe award winning American actress, model and sex symbol. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ... T. Rex (originally known as Tyrannosaurus Rex, also occasionally spelled T Rex or T-Rex), were an English rock band fronted by Marc Bolan. ... David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 1947 January 8) is an English singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, singer Freddie Mercury and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... The Police was a three-piece British pop band which was strongly influenced by reggae, and came to prominence in the wake of the punk rock phenomenon and rose to become one of the most popular groups in the world from the late 1970s to the mid- 1980s. ... Moulin Rouge is a 2001 Academy Award-winning jukebox musical film directed by Baz Luhrmann. ...


Introduction of new artists

New artists are often introduced to the record buying public with performances of well known, "safe" songs as evidenced in Pop Idol and its international counterparts. It is also a means by which the public can more easily concentrate upon the new performer without the need to judge the quality of the songwriting skills. This article is about the British television series. ...


However, some new artists have chosen to radically rework a popular song to exemplify their approach and philosophy to music. Prime examples include Joe Cocker's soulful reworking of The Beatles' originally-jaunty "With a Little Help from My Friends," and the band Devo's radical reconstruction of the Rolling Stones' "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction". Many musicians have other goals, such as to create publicity as in Sid Vicious' notorious rendition of "My Way," or to personalize a song, such as Johnny Cash reworking Nine Inch Nails's "Hurt" to a devastating acoustic version that reflected upon his ill state. Joe Cocker OBE (born 20 May 1944) is an English rock/blues singer who came to popularity in the 1960s, and is most known for his gritty voice and his cover versions of popular songs. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Sgt. ... Devo (pronounced DEE-vo or dee-VO, often spelled DEVO or DEV-O) is an American New Wave group formed in Akron, Ohio in 1972. ... This article is about the rock band. ... For the professional wrestler, see Sid Eudy. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... NIN redirects here. ...


Tributes, tribute albums and cover albums

Established artists often pay homage to artists or songs that inspired them before they started their careers by recording cover versions, or performing unrecorded cover versions in their live performances for variety. For example U2 has performed ABBA's "Dancing Queen" live, and Kylie Minogue has performed The Clash's "Should I Stay or Should I Go" - songs that would be completely out of character for them to record, but which allow them artistic freedom when performing live. These performances are often released as part of authorised "live recordings" and thus become legitimate cover versions. This article is about the Irish rock band. ... Abba redirects here. ... Dancing Queen is the biggest hit single recorded by Swedish pop group ABBA, and as such is considered to be their signature song. ... Kylie Ann Minogue (IPA: [1]) (born May 28, 1968) is a Brit and Grammy award-winning Australian pop singer-songwriter and occasional actress. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In recent years unrelated contemporary artists have contributed individual cover versions to tribute albums for well established artists who are considered to be influential and inspiring. This trend was spawned by Hal Willner's Amarcord Nino Rota in 1981. Typically, each project has resulted in a collection of the particular artist's best recognised or most highly regarded songs reworked by more current performers. Among the artists to receive this form of recognition are Joy Division, Guns N' Roses, New Order, Rush, Faith No More, Tom Waits, Oingo Boingo, The Bee Gees, ABBA, Fleetwood Mac, Cher, Shania Twain, Kate Bush, Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Rammstein, The Carpenters, Dolly Parton, Nirvana, Nine Inch Nails, Leonard Cohen, U2, Jimi Hendrix, Elton John, Duran Duran, Carole King, Led Zeppelin, Sick Of It All, Metallica, the Ramones, Queen, Sublime, Velvet Revolver, Weezer, the Finn brothers, Bruce Cockburn, Donovan, Harry Chapin and Gordon Lightfoot. A tribute album is a recorded collection of cover versions of a specific artists songs. ... Hal Willner (born 1957, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a music producer working in recording, Films, TV and live events. ... Nino Rota (December 3, 1911 – April 10, 1979) was an Italian composer best known for his work on film scores, notably The Godfather series and the films of Federico Fellini. ... See also: Musical groups established in 1981 Record labels established in 1981 list of years in music // January 10 - Revival of the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta The Pirates of Penzance opens at Broadways Uris Theatre, starring Linda Ronstadt and Rex Smith February 14 - Billy Idol leaves the band Generation... This article is about the band. ... Guns N Roses is an American hard rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1985. ... This article is about the alternative rock/electronic band New Order. ... Rush is a Canadian rock band comprising bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... FNM redirects here. ... Thomas Alan Waits (born December 7, 1949) is an American singer-songwriter, composer, and actor. ... For other uses, see Oingo Boingo (disambiguation). ... The Bee Gees: Maurice, Barry and Robin The Bee Gees were a British and Australian band, originally a pop singer-songwriter combination, reborn as funk and disco. ... Abba redirects here. ... This article is about the band. ... This article is about Cher, the entertainer. ... Shania Twain, OC (born Eilleen Regina Edwards, August 28, 1965, Windsor, Ontario) is a Canadian singer and songwriter in the country and pop music genres. ... Kate Bush (born 30 July 1958) is an English singer, songwriter, musician and record producer. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... For other uses, see Ramstein. ... For other uses, see Carpenter (disambiguation). ... Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is a Grammy-winning and Academy Award-nominated American country singer, songwriter, composer, musician, author, actress, and philanthropist. ... This article is about the American grunge band. ... NIN redirects here. ... Leonard Norman Cohen, CC (born September 21, 1934 in Westmount, Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, poet and novelist. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Duran Duran are an English pop group notable for a long series of popular singles and vivid music videos. ... Carole King (born February 9, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... Sick of It All (SOIA) is a New York Hardcore band formed by brothers Lou Koller (vocals) and Pete Koller (guitar), Armand Majidi (drums) and Rich Capriano (bass) in 1984. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... The Ramones (L-R, Johnny, Tommy, Joey, Dee Dee) on the cover of their debut self-titled album (1976), cementing their place at the dawn of the punk movement. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, singer Freddie Mercury and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... Sublime was a American band that originated in Long Beach, California. ... Velvet Revolver (abbreviated to VR) is a Grammy Award-winning hard rock supergroup with three former members of Guns N Roses — Slash, Duff McKagan, and Matt Sorum — plus Scott Weiland, the former-lead singer of Stone Temple Pilots, and Dave Kushner of the 80s punk band Wasted Youth. ... For the albums, see Weezer (1994 album) and Weezer (2001 album). ... The Finn Brothers is the name of the musical project of New Zealand brothers Neil and Tim Finn. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Donovan (disambiguation). ... Harry Forster Chapin (December 7, 1942 – July 16, 1981) was an American singer, songwriter, and humanitarian. ... Gordon Meredith Lightfoot Jr. ...


The soundtrack to the film I Am Sam is an example of this: it consisted of Beatles songs redone by various modern artists. Some more notable examples are Conception: The Interpretation of Stevie Wonder Songs; Common Thread an album of contemporary country artists performing hit singles by The Eagles; the Rhythm, Country and Blues album where a country artist duets with a Rhythm and blues artist on a standard of either genre. Two notable tribute albums to the Grateful Dead are Wake the Dead, with Celtic-style covers, and Might As Well, by The Persuasions. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Stevie Wonder (born Stevland Hardaway Judkins on May 13, 1950, name later changed to Stevland Hardaway Morris),[1] is an American singer, songwriter, musician, and record producer. ... The Eagles are an American rock music group that originally came together in Los Angeles, California in the early 1970s. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States. ... For other uses, see Rhythm and blues (disambiguation). ... Celtic music is a term utilized by artists, record companies, music stores and music magazines to describe a broad grouping of musical genres that evolved out of the folk musical traditions of the Celtic peoples of Northern Europe. ... The Persuasions are an a cappella group who began singing together in Brooklyn, New York in the early 1960s and went on to produce numerous albums covering a wide range of musical genres. ...


In some cases this proves to be popular enough to spawn a series of cover albums being released for a band, either under a consistent branding such as the two Black Sabbath Nativity in Black cover albums and the Industrial themed "Blackest Album" cover albums of Metallica songs, or in the form of releases from a number of different companies cashing in on the trend such as the many Metallica cover albums released in the late 1990s and early 2000s. For other uses, see Black Sabbath (disambiguation). ... Nativity in Black is the name of a series of Black Sabbath tribute albums that came out in the 1990s and 2000s. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ...


Metallica itself is known for doing covers; their original album Kill Em All included a couple of covers (Diamond Head's Am I Evil and Blitzkrieg's Blitzkrieg), the original Garage Days Re-Revisited was a collection of covers paying homage to a number of mostly obscure bands, which were later combined with additional new covers on the 2 disc Garage Inc., which among other things included covers of Black Sabbath, Bob Seger, Blue Öyster Cult, Mercyful Fate, and numerous Motörhead tracks. In an interesting turn around there were even a couple of releases of The Metallic-Era CDs collecting tracks from bands that Metallica had covered, both the original versions of the covered songs, and some additional songs by the same artist. Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... Diamond Head Diamond Head are a British heavy metal band formed in 1976 in Stourbridge, England. ... The $5. ... Garage Inc. ... For other uses, see Black Sabbath (disambiguation). ... Robert Clark Seger (born May 5, 1945) is a Rock and Roll singer, songwriter, and musician from Michigan. ... Blue Öyster Cult is an American rock band formed in New York in 1967 and still active in 2007. ... Mercyful Fate is an influential Danish heavy metal group who are often cited among the influences in the black metal, thrash metal, power metal, and progressive metal genres. ... This article is about the band. ...


A different type of all-covers album occurs when one artist creates a release of covers of songs originally by many other artists, as a way to recognize their influences or simply as a change of pace or direction. An early example of this was David Bowie's album "Pin Ups", featuring songs from groups with which he had shared venues in the 1960s. Since these bands included The Who and The Kinks many of the tracks would have been at least familiar to his audience. Other more recent examples of this type of album include Renegades by Rage Against the Machine featuring covers of songs originally performed by diverse artists including Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones, Afrikaa Bambaataa, and Erik B and Rakim, as well as the EP Feedback by Canadian rock band Rush. Tori Amos's album Strange Little Girls features covers of songs originally performed by male artists sung from the perspective of thirteen female characters she created. Awaken's double album Party In Lyceum's Toilets has a whole CD dedicated to covers of various artists. Manfred Mann did albums with more covers than original songs, following the mould of Vanilla Fudge. More rarely, bands will do an entire album of cover songs originally by a particular artist, such as The The's Hanky Panky, which consists entirely of Hank Williams songs, or Booker T. and the MGs' album McLemore Avenue which was a cover of The Beatles' Abbey Road, or Russ Pay's tribute to Manchester legends Joy Division. David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 1947 January 8) is an English singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ... Pin Ups is a 1973 covers album by David Bowie. ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... Alternate Covers Renegades is the fourth studio album to date by Rage Against the Machine. ... Rage Against the Machine (also Rage and RATM) is an American rock band, noted for their blend of hip hop, heavy metal, punk and funk as well as their revolutionary politics and lyrics. ... // Extended play (EP) is the name typically given to vinyl records or CDs which contain more than one single but are too short to qualify as albums. ... Rush is a Canadian rock band comprising bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... Tori Amos (born Myra Ellen Amos on August 22, 1963) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. ... Strange Little Girls was a concept album released by singer-songwriter Tori Amos in 2001. ... Awaken is an underground rock band / indies music project based in Belgium, Europe. ... Party In Lyceums Toilets is the second album of music project Awaken, released in 2001. ... Cock-A-Hoop Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after its keyboard player, who later led the successful 1970s follow-on group Manfred Manns Earth Band. ... Vanilla Fudge was an American psychedelic band that recorded albums from 1967 to 1970. ... The The are an English musical and multimedia group that have been around since 1979 in various forms, with Matt Johnson being the only constant band member. ... For other persons named Hank Williams, see Hank Williams (disambiguation). ... Booker T. & the M.G.s is a soul band, most prominent in the 1960s and 1970s. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Back cover The back cover of the original 1969 UK LP. Note that Her Majesty is not listed, unlike later reissues and the compact disc version—originally making it a hidden track. ... This article is about the band. ...


There are also bands who create entire albums out of covers, but unlike Tin Pan Alley-style traditional pop singers, they often perform the songs in a genre completely unlike the original songs. Examples include the Moog Cookbook (alternative and classic rock songs done on Moog synthesizers), Richard Cheese and Lounge Against the Machine (top 40, including punk, heavy metal, teen pop and indie rock performed in a Vegas lounge lizard style), and Hayseed Dixie (a play on the name AC/DC, they started covering AC/DC songs and progressed to other classic rock, playing them as bluegrass songs, similar to The Gourds' version of "Gin and Juice.") Also notable are Dread Zeppelin, who take Led Zeppelin songs and cover them in a reggae fashion with the added twist of an Elvis Presley impersonation on the lead vocal; Nine Inch Elvis, who take Elvis Presley songs and rework them in an industrial fashion similar to Nine Inch Nails; and Beatallica, who perform tracks by The Beatles in the style of Metallica. Tin Pan Alley is the name given to the collection of New York City-centered music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular music of the United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... Traditional pop or Classic pop music denotes, in general, Western (and particularly American) popular music that either wholly predates the eruption of rock and roll in the mid-1950s, or to any popular music which exists concurrently to rock and roll but originated in a time before the appearance of... Moog Cookbook is the name of an electronica band made up of Brian Kehew and Roger Joseph Manning Jr. ... The term Moog(pronounced // as in moan) synthesizer can refer to any number of analog synthesizers designed by Dr. Robert Moog or manufactured by Moog Music, and is commonly used as a generic term for analog and digital music synthesisers. ... Richard Cheese & Lounge Against the Machine are a cover band and comedy act based in Los Angeles, California, playing popular rap, rock, metal, and pop songs in a swanky lounge music style. ... Top 40 is a radio format based on frequent repetition of songs from a constantly-updated list of the forty best-selling singles. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Teen pop is a genre of music which is marketed, but not exclusively, to preteens and teenagers. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... Hayseed Dixie is an American band formed in October 2000 that was originally described as A Hillbilly Tribute to AC/DC, recording cover versions of hard rock songs in their own distinctive cross of bluegrass and rock which some have termed rockgrass. The bands sense of humor is evident... This article is about the band. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ... Image:TheGourds. ... Dread Zeppelin is an American band best known for covering the songs of Led Zeppelin in a reggae style sung by an Elvis Presley impersonator named Tortelvis, though their act now encompasses many other songs and other styles of music. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... “Elvis” redirects here. ... “Elvis” redirects here. ... NIN redirects here. ... Beatallica is a parodic band that plays music made from combinations of songs of The Beatles and Metallica. ...


In that same category, the Blues Brothers have made only covers in their 3 most famous albums, Briefcase Full Of Blues, Made In America and the motion picture soundtrack The Blues Brothers. They covered blues, R&B, soul, country and rock'n'roll songs, but with their own particular, fresh and raw style of interpretation, a successful blend of the Memphis Stax sound provided by MGs band members Steve Cropper and Donald Dunn, and the New York City sound from the horn section (Alan Rubin and Lou Marini, for example). The outcome sometimes gave a new life to songs. Some became even more popular after the Blues Brothers had played them, than before. The best example is Soul Man, more remembered as a hit by the Blues Brothers rather than by the original singers, Sam and Dave. The same can be said of She Caught The Katy (originally created by Taj Mahal) and Jailhouse Rock (sung by Elvis Presley) or Sweet Home Chicago (Robert Johnson), acknowledging the fact that covers can become even more famous than original performances. The Blues Brothers: Dan Aykroyd (left) and the late John Belushi The Blues Brothers is the name of a blues band fronted, incognito, by comedians Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi. ... Made in America may mean: Made in America, an album on vinyl by the American performer and recording artist Terry Teene, (Terence B. Knutsen). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Streaming API for XML (StAX) is an application programming interface (API) to read and write XML documents in the Java programming language. ... Steve The Colonel Cropper (born October 21, 1941) is an American guitarist, songwriter, producer, and soul musician. ... Donald Duck Dunn (born November 24, 1941) is a bassist, producer, and songwriter. ... Alan Rubin (born February 11, 1953), also known as Mr. ... Blue Lou Marini is an American saxophone player. ... The Blues Brothers: Dan Aykroyd (left) and the late John Belushi The Blues Brothers is the name of a blues band fronted, incognito, by comedians Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi. ... Soul Man was a hit song by Sam & Dave in 1967 and has inspired the names of: Soul Man a television sitcom starring Dan Aykroyd as Mike Weber, an Episcopal priest and widowed father of four children. ... The Blues Brothers: Dan Aykroyd (left) and the late John Belushi The Blues Brothers is the name of a blues band fronted, incognito, by comedians Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi. ... Sam & Dave were an American soul duo, known as one of the best and earliest soul groups. ... Taj Mahal Location of the Taj Mahal within India The Taj Mahal (Devanagari: ताज महल, Nastaliq: تاج محل) is a mausoleum located in Agra, India. ... Jailhouse rock or JHR is a name which is used to describe a collection of different fighting styles that are alleged to have been practiced and/or developed within urban street gang culture and US penal institutions. ... “Elvis” redirects here. ... Sweet Home Chicago is a popular blues standard in the twelve bar form. ... For other persons named Robert Johnson, see Robert Johnson (disambiguation). ...


Some cover albums take the unusual tack of doing classical versions of rock and metal songs. The unusual band Apocalyptica which comprises four classical cellists started out performing classical arrangements of Metallica songs. In a similar vein, there have also been many string quartet tributes to popular rock and metal bands, most notably Tool, Black Sabbath, New Order/Joy Division, the Cure, Muse, the Beatles, and even Coldplay among others. Apocalyptica is a Finnish musical group consisting of three, formerly four, classically trained cellists and, since 2005, a drummer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tool is a Grammy-award winning American rock band, formed in 1990 in Los Angeles, California. ... For other uses, see Black Sabbath (disambiguation). ... This article is about the alternative rock/electronic band New Order. ... This article is about the band. ... This article is about the band. ... For other uses, see Muse (disambiguation). ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... Coldplay are an English rock band. ...


One more type of cover album is when a cover of the entire album is done, rather than a collection of songs. A notable band to earn acclaim this way are the Easy Star All-Stars, who covered The Dark Side of the Moon by Pink Floyd in their album Dub Side of the Moon and OK Computer by Radiohead in their album Radiodread. Both albums were radical departures from the original albums, being redone in reggae/dub. Another album cover to radically remake the original in a new genre is the 2001 Rebuild the wall, where Luther Wright & the Wrongs covered the entire double-album The Wall by Pink Floyd as a country/bluegrass opus. A daring undertaking blessed by members of Pink Floyd, it is faithful to both the story line, concept, and feel of the original and the musical depth possible within the new genre. Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... Radiohead are an English rock band. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ...


British pop group No Way Sis, released a single in 1996 which heavily borrowed from the Oasis hit Shakermaker. The song was often referred to as No Way Sis plagiarizing Oasis, plagiarizing The New Seekers, plagiarizing The Beatles. No Way Sis were the official Oasis tribute band who Noel Gallagher heralded as the second best band in the world. ... No Way Sis were the official Oasis tribute band who Noel Gallagher heralded as the second best band in the world. ...


Most covered songs

There are several songs that have been said to have the most cover versions, but for various reasons it is difficult to accurately determine what song has the most cover versions. Databases attempting to do so may be incomplete or flawed with regard to songs from the developing world. In addition to that older songs may have cover versions that are no longer well documented.


Certain songs are largely known for having a large number of cover versions and are called "standards." In musical forms like blues or particularly jazz it is not uncommon for musicians to have albums or CDs made up primarily of standards. For more on this see Blues standard, Jazz standard, and the Great American Songbook. Blues music redirects here. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... A blues standard, much like a jazz standard or pop standard, refers to a song that is widely known, performed, and recorded among blues musicians. ... Jazz standard refers to a tune that is widely known, performed, and recorded among jazz musicians. ... Songwriter Harold Arlen (right) with singer Bing Crosby (left) and Decca Records owner Jack Kapp (center) Great American Songbook is an informal term referring to the interrelated music of Broadway musical theater, the Hollywood musical, and Tin Pan Alley, in a period that begins roughly in the 1920s and tapers...


The Beatles' "Yesterday" is often called the most covered song in popular music history; some allege there are over three thousand different versions, although no evidence has been provided. An online cover song database lists a little over a hundred covers for the song,[14] but places Eleanor Rigby as being more covered than it.[15] The Beatles' "Come Together" has also been covered numerous times. George Gershwin's "Summertime" (from Porgy and Bess) is considered a standard (see jazz standard) so has been performed in enough versions that an accurate number might be difficult to ascertain. Irving Berlin's "White Christmas" (from the film Holiday Inn) is well known for having been covered, and what is more a popular hit record, numerous times. According to one estimate "Cry Me a River", written by Arthur Hamilton, had 115 cover versions.[16] Music sample Yesterday Problems? See media help. ... For the novel by Douglas Coupland, see Eleanor Rigby (novel). ... For other uses, see Come Together (disambiguation). ... Gershwin redirects here. ... Summertime is the name of an aria composed by George Gershwin for the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess. ... The cast of Porgy and Bess during the Boston try-out prior to the Broadway opening. ... Jazz standard refers to a tune that is widely known, performed, and recorded among jazz musicians. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ... White Christmas is an Irving Berlin song whose lyrics reminisce about White Christmases. ... Holiday Inn is a 1942 film starring Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire, which featured the music of Irving Berlin. ... White Christmas is an Irving Berlin song whose lyrics reminisce about White Christmases. ... Cry Me a River is a popular song. ...


Other songs which have been released many times as cover versions include "Popcorn" by Gershon Kingsley (which has been covered over 200 times,[17]) "Rock Around the Clock",[18], , "Eres tu" by Mocedades, [19]"Billie Jean by Michael Jackson, "Over the Rainbow" by Judy Garland, "Blue Monday" (New Order), "White Christmas" (Bing Crosby), "Louie Louie" (Richard Berry), "Sunny" (Bobby Hebb), "Fever" (Otis Blackwell),"Across the Universe" (The Beatles), "Baby It's You" (The Shirelles), "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" (Jimmy Webb), "Helter Skelter" (The Beatles), "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" (Bob Dylan), "Twist and Shout" (Isley Brothers), "We Will Rock You" (Queen), "Besame Mucho" (Consuelo Velázquez), "Free Bird" (Lynyrd Skynyrd), "When I Fall In Love" (Doris Day), "Love Will Tear Us Apart" (Joy Division), "Stardust" (Bing Crosby), "Garota de Ipanema" (Tom Jobim/Vinicius de Moraes), "Feelings" (Morris Albert), "No Woman No Cry" (Bob Marley & the Wailers), "Dirty Old Town" (Ewan MacColl), "I Fought the Law" (Sonny Curtis), "Axel F" (Harold Faltermeyer), "Roll Over Beethoven" (Chuck Berry), "How Deep Is Your Love" (The Bee Gees), "Something" (The Beatles), "Soul Man" (Sam & Dave) and many of the less recent works of Bob Dylan (such as "Knocking on Heaven's Door" and "All Along the Watchtower") "Paranoid" (Black Sabbath) and Leonard Cohen (as of December 5, 2004, there were at least 940 published cover versions of Cohen songs.[20]) The Australian television program The Money or the Gun featured for every episode a new cover of Stairway to Heaven, played in versions ranging from a Wagnerian opera to a Beatles melody. [citation needed] Popcorn is a reasonably famous early synthpop instrumental. ... Gershon Kingsley, (b. ... Rock Around the Clock is a rock n roll song from 1952, written by Max C. Freedman and James E. Myers (the latter under the pseudonym Jimmy De Knight). Although first recorded by Sonny Dae & the Knights, the more famous version by Bill Haley & His Comets is not, strictly speaking... Mocedades performing at the Eurovision Song Contest 1973 Mocedades are a Spanish Basque singing group, probably best known for representing Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest in 1973 with the song Eres Tú. // In the year 1967 in the Spanish city of Bilbao, eight Basque students decided to form a... This article is about the Michael Jackson song. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... For other uses, see Over the Rainbow (disambiguation). ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Audio sample Blue Monday is a dance pop song recorded and released as a single in 1983 by British band New Order. ... This article is about the alternative rock/electronic band New Order. ... White Christmas is an Irving Berlin song whose lyrics reminisce about White Christmases. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... For the American singer, see Louie Louie (musician). ... Richard Berry (April 11, 1935–January 23, 1997) was an American singer and songwriter. ... Sunny is the name of a song written by Bobby Hebb. ... Bobby Hebb is an African American singer and songwriter, best known for his 1966 recording of Sunny. Hebbs parents, William and Ovalla Hebb, were both blind musicians. ... Fever is a song credited to Eddie Cooley and John Davenport (a pseudonym for Otis Blackwell). ... Otis Blackwell (16 February 1931 - 6 May 2002) was a songwriter, singer, and pianist whose work significantly influenced rocknroll in the 1950s. ... This article is about the song by The Beatles. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Please Please Me track listing Side one I Saw Her Standing There Misery Anna (Go to Him) Chains Boys Ask Me Why Please Please Me Side two Love Me Do P.S. I Love You Baby Its You Do You Want to Know a Secret A Taste of Honey... The Shirelles were an influential American girl group in the early 1960s. ... By the Time I Get to Phoenix is an American pop song written by Jimmy Webb and made famous by Glen Campbell, whose version reached #3 on the U.S.Pop charts in 1967. ... Jimmy Webb (born August 15, 1946 in Elk City, Oklahoma) is an idiosyncratic American popular music composer. ... This article is about the Beatles song. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... For other uses, see Knockin on Heavens Door (disambiguation). ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Please Please Me track listing Side one I Saw Her Standing There Misery Anna (Go to Him) Chains Boys Ask Me Why Please Please Me Side two Love Me Do P.S. I Love You Baby Its You Do You Want to Know a Secret? A Taste of Honey... The Isley Brothers are an American pop, R&B, funk and soul group who began their musical career in Cincinnati in the early 1950s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, singer Freddie Mercury and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... B same Mucho, which translates to Kiss Me a Lot in English, is a Spanish song written in 1940 by Consuelo Velazquez before her sixteenth birthday. ... Consuelo Velázquez Consuelo Velázquez (1916?-January 22, 2005), was a Mexican songwriter. ...   is an anthemic song by the American Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd. ... Lynyrd Skynyrd (pronounced lÄ•h-nérd skin-nérd) (pronounced ) is an iconic U.S. Southern rock band. ... When I Fall in Love is a popular song, written by Edward Heyman and Victor Young. ... Doris Mary Ann von Kappelhoff (born April 3, 1924)[1] is an American singer, actress, and animal welfare advocate known as Doris Day. ... Love Will Tear Us Apart Original single sleeve Love Will Tear Us Apart is the best known song by the band Joy Division. ... This article is about the band. ... Stardust may refer to several concepts: In space and aviation: another name for cosmic dust Stardust (spacecraft), a comet coma sample return spacecraft Star Dust (aeroplane), a British airliner that vanished in 1947 In music: Stardust (song), a 1927 jazz-pop song by Hoagy Carmichael Stardust (album), a record album... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... The Girl from Ipanema (A Garota de Ipanema) is considered the best-known bossa nova song ever written, and was a worldwide hit in the mid-1960s. ... Antonio Carlos Jobim (born Antonio Carlos Brasileiro de Almeida Jobim, January 25, 1927 - December 8, 1994), also called Tom Jobim, was a Brazilian composer, arranger, singer, pianist and one of the greatest legends of bossa nova. ... Vinicius de Moraes (October 19, 1913 - July 9, 1980), born Marcus Vinícius da Cruz de Melo Morais in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was a seminal figure in contemporary Brazilian music. ... Feelings is a song by Morris Albert, first recorded by him as the title track of his 1975 debut album. ... Morris Albert Kaisermann is a Brazilian singer. ... No Woman No Cry was a song written by Bob Marley. ... Bob Marley Robert Nesta Marley (February 6, 1945 - May 11, 1981), better known as Bob Marley, was a singer, guitarist, songwriter and Rastafarian from the ghettos of Jamaica. ... Dirty Old Town is a song written by Ewan MacColl in 1949, and made popular by The Dubliners. ... Ewan MacColl (25 January 1915 - 22 October 1989) was a British folk singer, songwriter, socialist, actor, poet, playwright, and record producer. ... The Clash (US ver. ... Sonny Curtis (born May 9, 1937, in Meadow, Texas) is an American singer and songwriter. ... Axel F is the electronic instrumental theme from the 1984 film Beverly Hills Cop performed by Harold Faltermeyer. ... Harold Faltermeyer (born October 5, 1952 in Munich) is a German musician and moreover composer. ... Roll Over Beethoven is a 1956 hit single by Chuck Berry // The song is notable as one of the earliest definitive rock and roll recordings. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ... How Deep Is Your Love is a song recorded by the Bee Gees in 1977. ... The Bee Gees: Maurice, Barry and Robin The Bee Gees were a British and Australian band, originally a pop singer-songwriter combination, reborn as funk and disco. ... For other uses, see Something (disambiguation). ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Soul Man was a hit song by Sam & Dave in 1967 and has inspired the names of: Soul Man a television sitcom starring Dan Aykroyd as Mike Weber, an Episcopal priest and widowed father of four children. ... Samuel David Moore (b. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Knockin on Heavens Door is a song written by Bob Dylan from Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid, the soundtrack of the 1973 film of the same name. ... For the Scottish TV comedy series, see All Along the Watchtower (TV series) All Along the Watchtower is a song written by folk-rock singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... Paranoid is a song by Black Sabbath that appears on the bands breakthrough album Paranoid. ... For other uses, see Black Sabbath (disambiguation). ... Leonard Norman Cohen, CC (born September 21, 1934 in Westmount, Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, poet and novelist. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Money or the Gun was an Australian comedy / talk-show on the ABC network in 1989-1990, with occasional specials until 1994. ... For other uses of Stairway to Heaven, see Stairway to Heaven (disambiguation). ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was an influential German composer, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ...


Covers in particular genres

Metal

Many up and coming bands in the metal genre cover songs by their predecessors to gain public interest, although more established bands have also recorded covers. Metallica, Napalm Death, Entombed, Iced Earth and Slayer have released entire albums of covers, for example. In specific subgenres of metal, covers generally reflect the genre the band is in. The Norwegian black metal band Mayhem have recorded several Venom covers, while Mayhem themselves have been covered many times, their song Deathcrush has been covered around 140 times, according to Encyclopedia Metallum. Heavy metal redirects here. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... Napalm Death are a grindcore/death metal band from Birmingham, England. ... Entombed is a Swedish metal band which formed in 1987 (see 1987 in music) under the name of Nihilist. ... Iced Earth is an American heavy metal band that combines influences from thrash metal, power metal, progressive metal, opera, Speed metal and NWOBHM. In 1999 their leader and songwriter Jon Schaffer teamed up with Blind Guardian vocalist Hansi Kürsch to form a side project called Demons & Wizards. ... For other uses, see Slayer (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musical genre. ... Mayhem (often called The True Mayhem) is a black metal band, formed in 1984[1] in Oslo, Norway. ... Venom are a heavy metal band, formed in late 1979 in Newcastle upon Tyne, England. ... Deathcrush is the first studio release by the seminal Norwegian black metal band Mayhem. ... Encyclopaedia Metallum (also known as The Metal Archives) is a large website which attempts to list every metal band, with additional information on each band, such as a discography, a short history and user-submitted reviews. ...


Another approach taken by several metal bands, including Children of Bodom, is to cover songs generally not listened to by metal fans, such as pop, punk, or classic rock songs. Children of Bodom's cover of Britney Spears' "Oops I Did It Again" was originally recorded as an in-joke amongst the band members but ended up being released as a bonus track on one of their EPs, as well as Andrew WK's "She is Beautiful." Blind Guardian have covered several surf-rock songs, such as "Mr. Sandman", "Barbara Ann" and "Long Tall Sally". This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Hip-hop

In recent years, artists have begun covering hip hop songs, most frequently in concert. A notable such cover recorded in a studio and released commercially is bluegrass version of "Gin and Juice" by Snoop Doggy Dogg, as performed by The Gourds. Ben Folds, Tori Amos, Nina Gordon, Jonathan Coulton, Luka Bloom, Ben Kweller, Dynamite Hack, and Keller Williams have also recorded covers of hip-hop songs. Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ... Gin and Juice is a 1993 single by rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg, from his debut solo album Doggystyle. ... Snoop Dogg Calvin Cordozar Broadus (born October 20, 1971 in Long Beach, California) is a rap musician and actor. ... Image:TheGourds. ... Benjamin Scott Folds (born September 12, 1966, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina[1]) is an American singer-songwriter and the former frontman of the musical group Ben Folds Five. ... Tori Amos (born Myra Ellen Amos on August 22, 1963) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. ... Nina Gordon (full name Nina Rachel Shapiro Gordon) was born November 14, 1967 and is an American rock singer. ... Jonathan Coulton is a folk rock singer-songwriter. ... Luka Bloom, born Barry Moore, is an accomplished Irish folk-rock singer-songwriter. ... Ben Kweller (born 16 June 1981, San Francisco, California) is an American rock musician. ... Dynamite Hack is a post-grunge band, formed in 1997. ... Keller Williams (also known as K-Dub) (Born February 4, 1970) is a musician from Fredericksburg, Virginia who began performing in the early 1990’s. ...


Many of these tracks rely on the incongruity of a white artist performing music normally thought of as "black" for comic effect or shock value, though some (such as Luka Bloom's acoustic version of LL Cool J's "I Need Love" and Tori Amos's harrowing remake of Eminem's "'97 Bonnie and Clyde") are played entirely "straight." The 2000 compilation Take a Bite Outta Rhyme consists entirely of covers of this type, performed by various artists to various degrees of seriousness. LL Cool J (born James Todd Smith III on January 14, 1968 in New York, New York) is a legendary American hip hop artist and actor. ... Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), better known as Eminem or Slim Shady, is a Grammy and Academy Award-winning American rapper, record producer and actor from the Detroit, Michigan area. ...


Run-D.M.C.'s 1986 cover of Aerosmith's Walk This Way, which featured the original band, is a notable example of a hip-hop group remaking a popular song from another genre; most of what passes for "cover" versions in the new millennium should indeed be termed "remakes" in this respect. Run-DMC is a famous hip hop crew founded by Jason Mizell (Jam Master Jay) and includes Joseph Run Simmons and Darryl DMC McDaniels, all from Hollis, Queens. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... Walk This Way is a song by American hard rock group Aerosmith. ...


The band Mindless Self Indulgence recorded a cover of the song "Bring the Pain" by Method Man in which they completely change the entire rhythm and sound of the song. The only original part of their cover is the lyrics. Mindless Self Indulgence (commonly referred to as MSI) is an American-based band. ... This article is about Method Man. ...


Swamp pop

A type of cover version that existed from the early 1950s to the late 1970s in Louisiana was known as swamp pop. Contemporary and classic rock, R&B, and country songs were re-recorded with Cajun audiences in mind. Some lyrics were translated to French, and some were recorded with traditional Cajun instrumentation. Several swamp pop songs charted nationally, but it was mostly a regional niche market. This article is about the U.S. State. ... Swamp pop musician Jivin Gene, circa 1959. ... Cajuns are an ethnic group mainly living in Louisiana, consisting of the descendants of Acadian exiles and peoples of other ethnicities with whom the Acadians eventually intermarried on the semitropical frontier. ...


New Age

The Taliesin Orchestra specializes in remaking famous songs into orchestra-style melodies. Their debut album, Orinoco Flow: The Music of Enya, was a collection of songs originally created and sung by Enya. Felicica Sorensen, lead vocalist for the Enya remakes. ... For the letter Ñ pronounced Enye, see Ñ. Enya (born Eithne Patricia Ní Bhraonáin[2] on 17 May 1961), sometimes presented in the media as Enya Brennan, is an Irish singer and songwriter. ...


Indie

As heard on the television series, The O.C., independent artists create covers for songs done by other independent artists. Petra Haden has done several song covers, most notably, the song Yellow by Coldplay. Youth Group did a cover for Alphaville with the song Forever Young. The O.C. was an American teen drama television series that originally aired on FOX in the United States from August 5, 2003, to February 22, 2007, running a total of four seasons. ... Petra Haden Petra Haden (born New York City, October 11, 1971) is an American violinist and singer. ... Youth Group is a rock band from Sydney, Australia signed to Ivy League Records. ... Alphaville is a German synthpop/-rock music group which gained popularity in the 1980s. ... Forever Young was the title track from German rock/synthpop group Alphavilles 1984 debut album. ...


Singer-songwriter Chan Marshall (a.k.a. Cat Power) is known for covering other musicians' songs in her own, unique style. Cat Power is the stage name of American singer/songwriter Charlyn Chan Marshall (born Charlyn Marie Marshall on 21 January 1972). ...


Best cover versions

In 2007, British newspaper The Observer ran a poll to find the best ever cover versions.[1] Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Samples

  • Bob Marley's "Redemption Song" contains samples of numerous covers. Covers and remakes, however, shouldn't be confused with the practice of sampling.

This article is about the reggae musician. ... Album cover of Uprising Redemption Song was the last track on Bob Marleys ninth Island music album, Uprising. ...

See also

A budget cover album is an album of cheap, often poorly made covers of popular songs. ... A compulsory license is a license to use a patent, copyright, or other exclusive right that a government forces the holder to grant to others. ... This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy certain standards for completeness. ... The term pop standards refers to an American songwriting, arranging, and singing style that is widely considered as the high point of Western vocal popular music. ... Jazz standard refers to a tune that is widely known, performed, and recorded among jazz musicians. ... A blues standard, much like a jazz standard or pop standard, refers to a song that is widely known, performed, and recorded among blues musicians. ... A remix is an alternative version of a song, different from the original version. ... This article is about reusing existing sound recordings in creating new works. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Joe Cocker OBE (born 20 May 1944) is an English rock/blues singer who came to popularity in the 1960s, and is most known for his gritty voice and his cover versions of popular songs. ... Ed Starink (born December 17, 1952 / also known as ) is a Dutch composer, arranger, session musician and music producer. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...

References

  1. ^ The OMM top 50 covers The Observer accessed 11 August 2007

Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

External links

  • retroCRUSH's Top 100 Cover Songs, a countdown featuring video and audio links of the 100 greatest spanning many decades
  • Fan Cover Songs, An amateur artist's community for cover versions. Upload and share cover videos and more.
  • They Did it Their Way, the 50 greatest cover songs of all time, as selected by The Telegraph (November 23, 2004)
  • The Covers Project, an online database of cover versions, searchable by artist. (Probably inactive)
  • The Originals, the origins of numerous popular songs (update in English of the Belgian reference book)
  • Second Hand Songs, a database of over 60,000 cover versions.
  • coverinfo.de, German database of over 160,000 cover versions or musical quotations.
  • Cover-Version.com, German Website about the book resp. dissertation "Von der Coverversion zum Hit-Recycling" (2004).
  • The Originals Project, the originals of popular and hit songs.
  • List of 10 Great Cover Versions with individual commentary on each track, from CLUAS.com, the Irish music webzine
  • The Ten Best Cover Songs You've Never Heard, an article describing a selection of obscure cover songs.
  • PopArchives.com.au, "Where Did They Get That Song?" - the sources of Australian pop records.
  • Elvis Presley: The Originals, the histories of songs recorded by Elvis.
  • List of hardrock and heavy metal covers
  • List of punk covers
  • List of salsa covers
  • List of Reggae and Ska covers
  • The Punk Cover As A Sharing Of Taste, analyses the institution of the punk cover through the Jam's 'Batman Theme'.
  • Using cover song versions legally, US Music Copyright Laws
  • Must you get permission to record someone else's song?, Straight Dope column
  • Copy, Right? Blog featuring mp3s of cover versions.
  • Cover Freak, website with mp3s of cover versions.
  • Coverville, a podcast which focuses on cover songs.
  • Songfacts, a website with song cover information and trivia
  • Mywayonline, Italian website with song cover database
  • List of Top 10 Cover Versions from Sample as that, a blog on covers, samples & remixes

  Results from FactBites:
 
iTunes Visualizer: Cover Version (639 words)
“Cover Version” displays artwork and lyrics as they are embedded within the iTunes audio track.
Since “Cover Flow” also uses advanced graphics systems and techniques, resource claims may conflict between the OpenGL based “Cover Version” visualizer and the built-in browse mode “Cover Flow”.
The core engine of “Cover Version” is published as an open source project called “VizKit”.
PULP LYRICS - Bad Cover Version (223 words)
And every time he kisses you it leaves behind the bitter taste of saccharine.
A bad cover version of love is not the real thing.
Bikini-clad girl on the front who invited you in.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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