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Encyclopedia > Coventry cathedral
The roofless ruins of the old cathedral.
The roofless ruins of the old cathedral.
The exterior of the new Cathedral
The exterior of the new Cathedral

Coventry Cathedral is the seat of the Bishop of Coventry and the Diocese of Coventry, in Coventry, West Midlands, England. Download high resolution version (1000x651, 201 KB)The ruins of the old Coventry Cathedral. ... Download high resolution version (1000x651, 201 KB)The ruins of the old Coventry Cathedral. ... A view of the outside of the new Coventry Cathedral Photo by sannse, 28th August 2003 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A view of the outside of the new Coventry Cathedral Photo by sannse, 28th August 2003 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Bishop of Coventry is the Ordinary of the England Diocese of Coventry in the Province of Canterbury. ... The Precinct in Coventry city centre For alternative meanings see: Coventry (disambiguation) Coventry is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands of England. ... The County of West Midlands is a metropolitan county in western central England, the United Kingdom, formed in 1974. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ...


The city has had three cathedrals. The first was St. Mary's, a monastic building, only a few ruins of which remain. The second was St. Michael's, a Church of England cathedral and now a ruined shell since the Second World War. The third is the new St. Michael's which was built after the destruction of the former and a celebration of 20th century architecture. A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy (such as the Roman Catholic Church or the Lutheran or Anglican churches), which serves as the central church of a bishopric. ... Rocky landscape with ruins, by Nicolaes Berchem, ca. ... The Church of England is the officially gimp established Christian church in England and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


The original St. Michael's Cathedral was largely constructed between the late 14th century and early 15th century but now stands ruined, bombed almost to destruction on November 14, 1940 by the German Luftwaffe. Only the tower and spire along with the outer wall survived. Before 1918 it was the church of St. Michael, the largest parish church in England, but in that year was elevated to cathedral status after the creation of Coventry Diocese. The new St. Michael's cathedral, built next to the remains of the old, was designed by Basil Spence. The ruin of the older cathedral remains hallowed ground. This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right}. It is housed in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was that century which lasted from 1301 to... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... November 14 is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 47 days remaining. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Luftwaffe â–¶(?) (German: air force, IPA: [luftvafÉ™]) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Sir Basil Spence (13 August 1907_19 November 1976 was a notable Scottish architect, most famously associated with the Cathedral in Coventry, but also responsible for numerous other buildings in the Modernist style. ... To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ...


A cross made of nails from the old cathedral was donated to the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church in Berlin, which was destroyed by allied bomb attacks and is also kept as a ruin alongside a newer building. A copy of a graphic by Kurt Reubers that was drawn in 1942 in Stalingrad (now Volgograd) is shown in the cathedrals of all three cities as a sign of the reconciliation of the three countries that were once enemies. The Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church (in German: Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedächtniskirche) is located in Berlin at the Kurfürstendamm. ... // Basic Information Berlin â–¶(?), IPA: , is the capital of Germany and its largest city; the city is now home to 3. ... Stalingrad is the former name of two cities: Volgograd, Russia Karviná-Nové Město, near Ostrava, Czech Republic Other uses: The Battle of Stalingrad (a major turning-point of World War II and arguably the bloodiest battle in human history) Stalingrad (German film set during the above battle) Stalingrad (metro station... Volgograd â–¶(?) (Russian: Волгогра́д) (population: 1,012,000), formerly called Tsaritsyn â–¶(?) (Цари́цын, Caricyn) (1598–1925) and Stalingrad â–¶(?) (Сталингра́д) (1925–1961) is a city on the west bank of Volga river in southwestern Volgograd Oblast (province), Northern Caucasus district, Russia. ...

The old and new cathedrals
The old and new cathedrals

Basil Spence (later knighted for this work) insisted that instead of re-building the old cathedral, it should be kept in ruins as a garden of remembrance and that the new cathedral should be built alongside, the two buildings together effectively forming one church. The selection of Spence for the work was a result of a competition held in 1950 to find an architect for the new Coventry Cathedral; his design was chosen from over two hundred submitted. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 330 KB) Photo showing the old and the new cathedral of Coventry. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 330 KB) Photo showing the old and the new cathedral of Coventry. ... 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...

St Michael's Victory over the Devil, a sculpture by Sir Jacob Epstein.
St Michael's Victory over the Devil, a sculpture by Sir Jacob Epstein.

The foundation stone of the new cathedral was laid by the Queen on March 23, 1956. It was consecrated on May 25, 1962, on the same day as the new Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church, and — like its German counterpart — its modern design caused much controversy. The unconventional spire (known as a flèche) was lowered onto the flat roof by helicopter. The interior is notable for a large tapestry of Christ, designed by Graham Sutherland and for the Baptistry window designed by John Piper. This is a stained glass window of abstract design which occupies the full height of one wall. It is compounded from 195 elemental panes of startlingly bright primary colours. Also worthy of note is the Great West Window known as the "Screen of Saints and Angels", engraved by John Hutton. Although referred to as the West Window, this is the ecclesiastical west as it lies at the opposite end from the altar which is traditionally at the east end of a church. Due to the unorthodox orientation of this cathedral, the altar is actually at the north end. Image File history File links Cathedral_St_Michaels_Victory. ... Image File history File links Cathedral_St_Michaels_Victory. ... Guido Renis archangel Michael (in the Capuchin church of Sta. ... Jacob Epstein photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 Sir Jacob Epstein (10 November 1880 - 19 August 1959) was an American-born sculptor who worked chiefly in England, where he pioneered modern sculpture, often producing controversial works that challenged taboos concerning what public artworks appropriately depict. ... Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926, is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (83rd in Leap years). ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... A modern spire on the Lancaster University Chaplaincy Centre A spire is a tapering conical or pyramidal structure on the top of a building, particularly a church tower. ... View of Notre Dame showing its flèche A flèche (from the French for arrow) is used in French architecture to refer to a spire and in English to refer to a lead-covered timber spire. ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ... Graham Vivian Sutherland (August 24, 1903 – February 17, 1980) was an English artist. ... John Egerton Christmas Piper (1903–1992) was an artist. ... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ...


The cathedrals of St. Michael were Coventry's second and third in its history. The first cathedral in Coventry was St. Mary's priory and cathedral, which held such status from some time between 1095 and 1102 when the infamous Bishop Robert de Limesey moved the Bishop's see from Lichfield to Coventry, until 1539 when it fell victim to King Henry VIII's Dissolution of the Monasteries. Prior to 1095, it had been a small Benedictine monastery, (endowed by Earl Leofric and Lady Godiva in 1043) but shortly after this time rebuilding began and by the middle of the 13th century it was cathedral of 425 feet in length and included many large outbuildings. It was recorded that Leofric and Godiva were buried together inside. Events The county of Portugal is established for the second time. ... Events Valencia is captured by the Almoravids. ... Lichfield Cathedral June 2005 Lichfield is a small city in Staffordshire, 110 miles northwest of London and 14 miles north of Birmingham. ... Events May 30 - In Florida, Hernando de Soto lands at Tampa Bay with 600 soldiers with the goal to find gold. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... The Dissolution of the Monasteries (referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries) was the formal process, taking place between 1538 and 1541, by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the Roman Catholic monastic institutions in England and took them to himself, as the... Leofric was a common name in Anglo-Saxon England and may refer to: Leofric, Bishop of Exeter Leofric, Earl of Mercia This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Lady Godiva by John Collier, ca 1898 Godiva (sometimes Godgifu) (c. ... // Events Edward the Confessor crowned King of England at Winchester Cathedral. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...


See also:

  • Benjamin Britten's War Requiem, premiered in the new cathedral to mark its consecration
  • A television documentary on Coventry Cathedral, narrated by Leo Genn, was broadcast on British televison in the 1960's

Edward Benjamin Britten, Baron Britten of Aldeburgh, OM (November 22, 1913 – December 4, 1976) was a British composer, conductor and pianist. ... The War Requiem is a requiem composed by Benjamin Britten for the reconsecration of Coventry Cathedral on May 30, 1962 following its destruction during World War II. A mourning song for the victims of war, Britten’s War Requiem is considered one of the great heartrending choral-orchestral works of... Leo Genn (August 9, 1905 – January 26, 1978) was a British actor on stage and in films who had studied law at Cambridge and qualified as a barrister. ...

Other images

The exterior of the modern Coventry Cathedral. ... The Baptistry window at Coventry Cathedral Photo by sannse, 28th August 2003 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Coventry Cathedral font Photo by sannse, 28th August 2003 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Church of the Nativity, a Bethlehem Landmark Bethlehem (Arabic بيت لحم Bayt Laḥm [▶] house of meat; Standard Hebrew בית לחם house of bread, Bet léḥem / Bet láḥem; Tiberian Hebrew Bêṯ léḥem / Bêṯ lāḥem) is a Palestinian city in the West Bank and a hub of Palestinian cultural and... The cross in the apse of the old Coventry Cathedral, made from burnt wood from the destroyed roof. ...

External links

  • The cathedral's official website
  • Further reading about Coventry's three Cathedrals

  Results from FactBites:
 
Coventry - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1797 words)
Coventry is the ninth largest city in England with a population of 304,746 (2002 estimate).
Coventry is home to Coventry University, and the University of Warwick which is several miles to the south of the city centre, mostly within the city boundaries, on the border with Warwickshire.
Coventry's most famous resident was Lady Godiva, who according to legend, rode through the city naked on horseback (actually, she likely rode the horse bareback, not barenaked), in protest at high taxes being waged on the cityfolk by her husband Leofric.
Coventry Cathedral, Death and Resurrection, A History of the Cathedral in Coventry (376 words)
Coventry Cathedral, Death and Resurrection, A History of the Cathedral in Coventry
It was the air raid on Coventry on the night of the 14th November 1940 that destroyed the medieval Cathedral of the city and 568 of its citizens.
The empty shell of the old Cathedral, still standing adjacent to the glory of the new, is a stark reminder of that event.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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