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Encyclopedia > Covenant (biblical)
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Covenant, meaning a solemn contract, oath, or bond, is the customary word used to translate the Hebrew word berith (ברית, Tiberian Hebrew bərîṯ, Standard Hebrew bərit) as it is used in the Hebrew Bible, thus it is important to all Abrahamic religions. The equivalent word in the Septuagint and the New Testament is diatheke, see also Strong's G1242. Look up covenant in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Bible has been translated into many languages. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... Tiberian Hebrew is an oral tradition of pronunciation for ancient forms of Hebrew, especially the Hebrew of the Bible, that was given written form by masoretic scholars in the Jewish community at Tiberias in the early middle ages, beginning in the 8th century. ... The Modern Hebrew language is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum Hebrew Bible is a term that refers to the common portions of the Jewish canon and the Christian canons. ... map showing the prevalence of Abrahamic (purple) and Dharmic (yellow) religions in each country. ... The Septuagint: A column of uncial text from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brentons Greek edition and English translation. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ...


In theology and Biblical studies, the word "covenant" principally refers to any of a number of solemn agreements made between God and the Israelites in the Hebrew Bible, as well as to the New Covenant, which Christians consider to be the final fulfillment of these. Christians typically use the term "Old Covenant" to collectively refer to the covenants described in the Old Testament. Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Biblical studies is the academic study of the Judeo-Christian Bible and related texts. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... “The Twelve Tribes” redirects here. ... Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ...


God's covenants with the Israelites are foundational to the Torah, as well as to the Tanakh in general, and form the grounds for the claim that the Israelites are God's "chosen people." According to the terms of these covenants, the Israelites were told that they must worship God and obey His Commandments in order to receive spiritual and temporal blessing and avoid exposure to the effects of the curse.[1] When the word "covenant" is used in this sense, the agreement is essentially unilateral, since while the covenant's outworkings are dependent upon human response, its terms are dictated by God. By contrast, at many points in the Hebrew Scripture, human covenants are made - in such covenants, the terms are agreed upon mutually. The Torah () is the most important document in Judaism, revered as the inspired word of G-d (the vocal is never spelled), traditionally said to have been revealed to Moses. ... For the musical collective, see Tanakh (band). ... In Judaism, chosenness is the belief that the Jews are a chosen people: chosen to be in a covenant with God. ... Taken during a Hindu prayer ceremony on the eve of Diwali. ...

Contents

Biblical covenants

Noahic Covenant

The Rainbow set as the symbol of the Covenant with Noah after the Great Flood of the Bible.
The Rainbow set as the symbol of the Covenant with Noah after the Great Flood of the Bible.
See also: Council of Jerusalem and Noahide Laws

The Noahic Covenant, found in Genesis 8-9, applies to the whole of humankind. In this covenant, God: Image File history File links Rainbow123. ... Image File history File links Rainbow123. ... For other uses, see Rainbow (disambiguation). ... This article is about great floods. ... This article is about the 1st century Council of Jerusalem in Christianity. ... The Rainbow is the ancient symbol of the Noahide Movement reminiscing the seven coloured rainbow that appeared after the Great Flood of the Bible. ... For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ...

  1. blesses Noah and his sons, i.e. all modern humankind (9:1)
  2. places all plants and animals under human command (9:2-3)
  3. forbids eating meat with the blood still in it (9:4)
  4. forbids murder (9:5)
  5. commands humankind to practice capital punishment for murderers (9:6)
  6. promises that He will never again destroy all life on earth by flood (9:11)
  7. creates the rainbow as the sign of this covenant for all ages to come (9:12-17)

On this topic, Jubilees chapter 7, verses 20-28 (part of the Ethiopian Orthodox Bible but generally considered to be 2nd century BC Jewish apocrypha) states: This article is about the biblical Noah. ... This T and O map, which abstracts that societys known world to a cross inscribed within an orb, remakes geography in the service of Christian iconography and identifies the three known continents as populated by descendents of Shem (Sem), Ham (Cham) and Japheth (Iafeth) The Table of Nations is... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... For other uses, see Rainbow (disambiguation). ... The Book of Jubilees (ספר היובלים), sometimes called the Lesser Genesis (Leptogenesis), is an ancient Jewish religious work. ... The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church (in Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ ኦርቶዶክስ ተዋሕዶ ቤተክርስትያን Yäityopya ortodoks täwahedo bétäkrestyan) is an Oriental Orthodox church in Ethiopia that was part of the Coptic Orthodox Church until 1959, when it was granted its own Patriarch by Coptic Orthodox Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of All... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 2nd century BC started on January 1, 200 BC and ended on December 31, 101 BC. // Coin of Antiochus IV. Reverse shows Apollo seated on an omphalos. ... Apocrypha (from the Greek word , meaning those having been hidden away[1]) are texts of uncertain authenticity or writings where the authorship is questioned. ...

And in the twenty-eighth jubilee [1324-1372 A.M.] Noah began to enjoin upon his sons' sons the ordinances and commandments, and all the judgments that he knew, and he exhorted his sons to observe righteousness, and to cover the shame of their flesh, and to bless their Creator, and honour father and mother, and love their neighbour, and guard their souls from fornication and uncleanness and all iniquity. For owing to these three things came the flood upon the earth ... For whoso sheddeth man's blood, and whoso eateth the blood of any flesh, shall all be destroyed from the earth.

The Jubilee year (every 50th year) and the Sabbatical year (every seventh year) are Biblical commandments concerning ethical ownership of land. ... Anno Mundi (AM, in the year of the world) refers to a Calendar era counting from the creation of the world. ...

Abrahamic Covenant

See also: Abrahamic religions

The Abrahamic covenant is found in Genesis 12-17. In this covenant, God promises: map showing the prevalence of Abrahamic (purple) and Dharmic (yellow) religions in each country. ...

  • To make of Abraham a great nation and to bless those who bless him and curse those who curse him (12:1-3)
  • To give Abraham's descendants all the land from the river (or wadi) of Egypt to the Euphrates (15:18-21)
  • To make Abraham a father of a great many nations (17:1-8)
  • To give Abraham and his male descendants circumcision as the permanent sign of this everlasting covenant (17:9-14)

“Abram” redirects here. ... Wadi alMujib, Jordan A wadi (Arabic: ) is traditionally a valley. ... Surfer Rosa The Euphrates (IPA: /juːˈfreɪtiːz/; Greek: Euphrátēs; Akkadian: Pu-rat-tu; Hebrew: פְּרָת Pĕrāth; Syriac: Prâth; Arabic: الفرات Al-Furāt; Turkish: Fırat; Kurdish: فرهات, Firhat, Ferhat, Azeri: Fərat) is the western of the two great rivers that define Mesopotamia (the other... Circumcision, when practiced as a rite, has its foundations in the Bible, in the Abrahamic covenant, such as Genesis 17, and is therefore practiced by Jews and Muslims and some Christians, those who constitute the Abrahamic religions. ...

Covenant with Lot

The covenant with Lot is a covenant independent of the Abrahamic Covenant. God promises the land of the Moabites (Ar) and the land of the Ammonites to the descendants of Lot as a possession (Deuteronomy 2:9, 2:19). David and Solomon[2] were only allowed to rule over these lands as third and fourth generation descendants of Ruth[3], a Moabite[4]. Lot and his Daughters, Hendrik Goltzius, 1616. ... Moab (מוֹאָב Seed of father/leader, Standard Hebrew Moʾav, Tiberian Hebrew Môʾāḇ) is the historical name for a mountainous strip of land in Jordan running along the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. ... AR, Ar or ar can mean: the letter R // Arabic language (ISO 639 alpha-2 language code) .ar, the ccTLD for Argentina Argentina, ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 and FIPS 10-4 digram country code Appenzell Outer Rhodes, Swiss canton Arkansas (United States postal abbreviations) Applied Relaxation, a form of... For the extinct mollusc see Ammonite. ... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Naomi entreating Ruth and Orpah to return to the land of Moab by William Blake, 1795 Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld: Ruth in Boazs Field, 1828 The Book of Ruth (Hebrew: מגילת רות, Megilat Rut, the Scroll of Ruth) is one of the books of the Ketuvim (Writings) of the Tanakh (the...


Covenant with Jacob

God specifies a continuation of the Abrahamic covenant with Jacob in a dream, and promises: This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Jacob Wrestling with the Angel – Gustave Doré, 1855 Jacob or Yaakov, (Hebrew: יַעֲקֹב, Standard  Tiberian ; Arabic: يعقوب, ; holds the heel), also known as Israel (Hebrew: יִשְׂרָאֵל, Standard  Tiberian ; Arabic: اسرائيل, ; Struggled with God), is the third Biblical patriarch. ...

  • To give him and his descendants the land on which he is lying.
  • That his descendants will be like the dust of the earth.
  • That all peoples on earth will be blessed through him and his offspring.
  • To watch over him wherever he goes.

Genesis 28:12-15


Mosaic Covenant

The Ten Commandments on a monument on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol
The Ten Commandments on a monument on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol

The Mosaic Covenant, beginning in Exodus 19-24, contains the foundations of the Torah. In this covenant, God promises: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (596x817, 135 KB)Ten Commandments Monument from the grounds of the Texas State Capitol, Austin, Texas. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (596x817, 135 KB)Ten Commandments Monument from the grounds of the Texas State Capitol, Austin, Texas. ... Covenant, meaning a solemn contract, is the customary word used to translate the Hebrew word berith (ברית, Tiberian Hebrew bərîṯ, Standard Hebrew bərit) as it is used in the Hebrew Bible. ... Exodus is the second book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... The Torah () is the most important document in Judaism, revered as the inspired word of G-d (the vocal is never spelled), traditionally said to have been revealed to Moses. ...

  • To make the Children of Israel His special possession among all people if they obey God and keep His covenant (19:5)
  • To make the Children of Israel a kingdom of priests and a holy nation (19:6)
  • To give the Children of Israel the Sabbath as the permanent sign of this covenant (31:12-17)

As part of the terms of this covenant, God gives Moses the Ten Commandments. These will later be elaborated in the rest of the Pentateuch. The fullest account of the Mosaic Covenant is given in the book of Deuteronomy, the form of which resembles a Ancient Near Eastern suzerainty treaty [5]. Many Christians believe that the Sermon on the Mount is a form of commentary on the Ten Commandments. See also Old Testament#Christian view of the Law. The Children of Israel, or Bnei Yisrael (בני ישראל) in Hebrew (also Bnai Yisrael, Bnei Yisroel or Bene Israel) is a Biblical term for the Israelites. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... This article is about a list of ten religious commandments. ... Look up Pentateuch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Suzerainty refers to a situation in which a region or people is a tributary to a more powerful entity which allows the tributary some limited domestic autonomy but controls its foreign affairs. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The Sermon... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ...


The Israel Covenant

The Israel Covenant is a conditional covenant enlarging upon the Abrahamic Covenant promising the seed of Abraham eternal possession of Canaan.[6] This covenant says that Israel will be dispersed among the nations, but when Israel repents, returns to God, and obeys his commandments, then God promises: // [[Image:]] Map of Canaan For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ...

  1. To regather Israel from its dispersion.
  2. To bring the Israelites to the land which their fathers possessed.
  3. To prosper the Israelites above their fathers.
  4. To restore the Israelites spiritually so that Israel will love the Lord with all their heart and soul.
  5. To put all the curses of Israel upon Israel's enemies.

Davidic Covenant

The Davidic covenant, found in 2 Samuel 7, establishes David and his descendants as the rightful kings of Judah. In Christian theology, the Davidic covenant is an important element of Jesus's claim to be the Messiah. This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... Kingdom of Judah (Hebrew מַלְכוּת יְהוּדָה, Standard Hebrew Malḫut YÉ™huda, Tiberian Hebrew Malḵûṯ YÉ™hûḏāh) in the times of the Hebrew Bible, was the nation formed from the territories of the tribes of Judah, Simeon, and Benjamin after the Kingdom of Israel was divided, and was named after Judah... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ...


National Covenants

National covenants by the nations of Israel and Judah can be found in texts such as Exodus 19:8; Joshua 24:24; 2 Kings 23:3 (Josiah), 2 Chronicles 15:8-15, 23:16; 34:31-32; Nehemiah 10:29; Jeremiah 50:5. National covenants were often associated with times of spiritual renewal or revival.


In later history, texts such as these have been used to justify political alliances such as that between the Scottishl Covenanters and the English Parliamentarians, memorialized in the Solemn League and Covenant. This article is about the country. ... James VI of Scotland (James I of England) was opposed by the Covenanters in his attempt to bring the Anglican Church into Scotland The Covenanters formed an important movement in the religion and politics of Scotland in the 17th century. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... The Solemn League and Covenant was an agreement between the Scottish Covenanters and the leaders of the English Parliamentarians. ...


Personal Covenants

Personal covenants or commitments abound in the Scriptures and are prominent in the Psalms. They may be prefaced with expressions such as "I will". One example is: "I will praise thee, O LORD, with my whole heart; I will shew forth all thy marvellous works" (Psalm 9:1). Another is: "I will extol thee, my God, O king; and I will bless thy name for ever and ever. Every day will I bless thee; and I will praise thy name for ever and ever" (Psalm 145:1-2).


New Covenant

Main article: New Covenant

The New Covenant has never been a significant feature of Jewish eschatology, other than the belief that eventually all Jews will know and follow the Torah without the need to study (Jer 31:32-33). For example, the article Jewish Encyclopedia: New Testament states: "The idea of the new covenant is based chiefly upon Jer. xxxi. 31-34 (comp. Heb 8:6-13 x. 16). That the prophet's words do not imply an abrogation of the Law is evidenced by his emphatic declaration of the immutability of the covenant with Israel (Jer 31:35-36; comp. 33:25); he obviously looked for a renewal of the Law through a regeneration of the hearts of the people." Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Torah () is the most important document in Judaism, revered as the inspired word of G-d (the vocal is never spelled), traditionally said to have been revealed to Moses. ... Antinomianism (from the Greek αντι, against + νομος, law), or lawlessness (in the Greek Bible: ανομια, which is unlawful), in theology, is the idea that members of a particular religious group are under no obligation to obey the laws of ethics or morality as presented by religious authorities. ...

Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). His famous sermon from a hill representing Mount Zion is considered by many Christian scholars to be the antitype of the proclamation of the Old Covenant by Moses from Mount Sinai.
Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). His famous sermon from a hill representing Mount Zion is considered by many Christian scholars to be the antitype [7] of the proclamation of the Old Covenant by Moses from Mount Sinai.

Christians claim that they are God's New Covenant people, on the basis of prophecies such as Jeremiah 31:31-34 and Isaiah 49:8. At the Last Supper, Jesus alludes to these prophecies, saying that the cup of the Passover meal is "the cup of the New Covenant in [his] blood" [8] This is an eschatological claim, since he is implicitly asserting that the Old Testament rituals of atonement are fulfilled in him [9]. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The Sermon... Mount Zion (Hebrew: ‎ transliteration: Har Tziyyon - Height) is the ancient name of a mountain in jerusalem southe of the old city. ... Typology is a theological doctrine or theory of types and their antitypes found in scripture. ... This article is about a list of ten religious commandments. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... For the Biblical Mount Sinai, and a discussion of its possible locations, see Biblical Mount Sinai. ... The Last Supper was the last meal Jesus shared with his apostles before his death. ... Pasch redirects here. ... For the book by Pope Benedict XVI, see Eschatology (book). ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ... For other uses, see Atonement (disambiguation). ...


The Epistle to the Hebrews, of the books of the New Testament, is the most explicit about how the Death and Resurrection of Jesus inaugurates the New Covenant. Throughout the book, the covenants prior to Christ's coming, and their associated rituals and sacrifices, are contrasted with the state of affairs promised in passages such as Jer. 31:31-34 [10]. Christ's death and resurrection is portrayed as a priestly work which puts an end to sacrifice [11], thus bringing permanent peace whereas previous covenants could not eliminate bloodguilt [12]. Most Christians believe the era of permanent peace (see also Messianic Age) will be initiated with Jesus' Second Coming. The Epistle to the Hebrews (abbr. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The Resurrection—Tischbein, 1778. ... Messianic Age is a theological term referring to a future time of peace and brotherhood on the earth, without crime, war and poverty. ... For other uses, see Second Coming (disambiguation). ...


The Apostle Paul, in his letters, also considers Christ's death to mark the beginning of a new covenant era. In this era, he claims, the traditional barriers between Jew and Gentile are broken down. Both are approved by God on the basis of faith [13]. However, he also warns Gentile believers in Jesus (whom he views as the Jewish Messiah) not to boast in their newfound acceptance by God, for they have been "grafted in" to the covenantal tree whose root is in the promises to national Israel [14]. Paul of Tarsus (b. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ...


Sometimes the New Covenant is referred to as the New Testament, on the basis of passages such as Heb. 9:16, in its traditional translation. This usage reflects the Vulgate, in which the word "covenant" was translated testamentum. Biblical scholars, such as O. Palmer Robertson, have argued against this translation, however, since the word testamentum, in Latin, expresses the concept of a "last will," not an agreement between two parties sealed with a self-maledictory oath [15] See also Jewish Encyclopedia: Covenant: The Old and the New Covenant. This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The Vulgate Bible is an early 5th century version in Latin, partly revised and partly translated by Jerome on the orders of Pope Damasus I in 382. ...


References

  1. ^ Lev 26
  2. ^ Numbers 25:1-3, Ruth 1:4, Ezra 9:1-2, 1 Kings 11:1-13
  3. ^ Ruth 1:1-13,17,21-22
  4. ^ cf. Deuteronomy 23:3-6, Jeremiah 48, Numbers 24:17
  5. ^ Kline, Meredith. "Deuteronomy". The Zondervan Pictorial Bible Dictionary. http://www.covopc.org/Kline/Deuteronomy_Zondervan_Dictionary.html
  6. ^ Deuteronomy 30:1-10
  7. ^ See also Antithesis of the Law.
  8. ^ 1 Cor. 11:23-26
  9. ^ Barker, Margaret. The Temple Roots of the Liturgy. http://www.marquette.edu/maqom/roots
  10. ^ Heb. 8
  11. ^ Heb. 9:11-28
  12. ^ Heb. 12:24
  13. ^ Rom. 3:28-30
  14. ^ Rom. 11:16-24
  15. ^ "Covenant." Theopedia. http://www.theopedia.com/Covenant

The Book of Numbers is the fourth of the books of the Pentateuch, called in the Hebrew ba-midbar במדבר, i. ... For other uses, see Ezra (disambiguation). ... The Books of Kings (Hebrew: Sefer Melachim ספר מלכים) is a part of Judaisms Tanakh, the Hebrew Bible. ... For other uses, see Jeremiah (disambiguation). ... The Expounding of the Law (KJV:Matthew 5:17-48), sometimes called the Antithesis of the Law, is a less well known but highly structured (Ye have heard . ...

Further reading

  • Truman G. Madsen and Seth Ward (2001). Covenant and Chosenness in Judaism and Mormonism. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press. ISBN 0838639275. 

See also

Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In Christianity, there are... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... Covenant Theology is not to be confused with the Covenanters For Covenantal Theology in the Roman Catholic perspective, see Covenantal Theology (Roman Catholic). ... Leaders and teachers in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints encourage the members of the LDS Church to make and keep several covenants as a part of the new and everlasting covenant of the gospel. ... Covenantal Nomism is the belief that first century Palestinian Jews did not believe in works righteousness. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Biblical Covenant and Christian Worship - by Richard C. Leonard, Ph.D., Laudemont Ministries (5208 words)
Although the concept of the covenant in general has continuously informed Christian theology, especially the Reformed tradition, the distinctive structure and terminology of the biblical covenant were recovered only in the twentieth century through archaeological discoveries.
But covenant structure and terminology are equally evident in the psalms of petition, in which the servant pledges his commitment to the great King, and appeals to him in turn to honor the agreement between them.
The Lord's covenant is with a people, the "royal priesthood." Christian worship is corporate, an action of the body, in which each worshiper has a role according to his or her gifts, but in which the focus is always upon the action of the community as the servant of the Lord.
Implications of Biblical Covenants (2126 words)
The purpose of the covenant was to emphasize the goodness and kindness of the lord to his vassal with a view to cause the vassal to accept his responsibilities and obligations gladly.
The Land Covenant was given to reaffirm the title deed of Israel to her promised land as originally given in the Abrahamic Covenant.
The importance of this covenant is to amplify the seed aspect of the Abrahamic Covenant.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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