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A cousin in kinship terminology is a relative with whom one shares a common ancestor, but in modern usage the term is rarely used when referring to a relative in one's own line of descent, or where there is a more specific term to describe the relationship, e.g., brother, sister, aunt, uncle. The term blood relative can be used synonymously, and underlines the existence of a genetic link. Kinship terminology refers to the words used in a specific culture to describe a specific system of familial relationships. ... Kinship is the most basic principle of organizing individuals into social groups, roles, and categories. ... An ancestor is a parent or (recursively) the parent of an ancestor (i. ...


A system of degrees and removes is used to describe the relationship between the two cousins and the ancestor they have in common. The degree (first, second, third cousin, etc.) indicates the minimum number of generations between either cousin and the nearest common ancestor; the remove (once removed, twice removed, etc.) indicates the number of generations, if any, separating the two cousins from each other. Generations redirects here. ...


For example, a person with whom you share a grandparent is your first cousin; someone with whom you share a great-grandparent is a second cousin someone with whom you share a great-great-grandparent is a third cousin. Where your relationship to the nearest common ancestor is different from your cousin's relationship then the term "removed" is used to indicate this, for example the child of your first cousin is your first cousin once removed because there is a generation between you.


Non-genealogical usage often eliminates the degrees and removes, and refers to people with common ancestors merely as cousins or distant cousins.


The system can handle kinships going back any number of generations (subject to the genealogical information being available). In 2004, genealogists discovered that U.S. Presidential candidates George W. Bush and John Kerry shared a common ancestral couple in the 1500s. It was reported that the two men are sixteenth cousins, three times removed.[1] However, the two are in fact ninth cousins, twice removed.[2] Also, in 2007, it was revealed that U.S. vice president Dick Cheney and senator Barack Obama are eighth cousins.[3] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... “Barack” redirects here. ...


If one goes back far enough, at some point all human beings will be found to be related. It has been estimated that the most recent common ancestor of Western Europeans may have lived as recently as the year AD 1000, or approximately 30 generations ago.[4] The most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of any set of organisms is the most recent individual from which all organisms in the group are directly descended. ... Europe in 1000 The year 1000 of the Gregorian Calendar was the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the first millennium. ...


Cousin chart, or table of consanguinity

A cousin chart, or table of consanguinity, is helpful in identifying the degree of cousin relationship between two individuals using their most recent common ancestor as the reference point. Cousinship between two individuals can be specifically described in degrees and removes by determining how close, generationally, the common ancestor is to each individual. Consanguinity, literally meaning common blood, describes how close a person is related to another in the sense of a family. ...


Additional modifying words are used to clarify the exact degree of relatedness between the two people. Ordinal numbers are used to specify the number of generations between individuals and a common ancestor, and further clarification of exact cousinship is made by specifying the difference in generational level between the two cousins, if any, by using degrees of remove. For example, "first cousins once removed" describes two individuals with one cousin's great-grandparents as the common ancestor but who themselves are one generation different from each other. In English, numbers are pronounced different ways in different regions. ...


Assuming a common ancestor, in principle any two individuals might share a cousin relationship (except as noted above) if the common ancestor and number of generations of descent to each individual from that common ancestor could be determined.


Chart

The closest relationship prevails (nearest common ancestor) - note that cousinship is not calculated between individuals when one is descended from the other, for example, two individuals are not called cousins if they are any degree of grandparent, parent and child. Also cousinship is not calculated between individuals of any degree of aunt/uncle and nephew/niece relationship to each other.

If one person's → Grandparent Great-grandparent Great-great-grandparent Great3-grandparent Great4-grandparent Great5-grandparent
is the other person's
then they are ↘
Grandparent 1st cousins 1st cousins once removed 1st cousins twice removed 1st cousins thrice removed 1st cousins four times removed 1st cousins five times removed
Great-grandparent 1st cousins once removed 2nd cousins 2nd cousins once removed 2nd cousins twice removed 2nd cousins thrice removed 2nd cousins four times removed
Great-great-grandparent 1st cousins twice removed 2nd cousins once removed 3rd cousins 3rd cousins once removed 3rd cousins twice removed 3rd cousins thrice removed
Great3-grandparent 1st cousins thrice removed 2nd cousins twice removed 3rd cousins once removed 4th cousins 4th cousins once removed 4th cousins twice removed
Great4-grandparent 1st cousins four times removed 2nd cousins thrice removed 3rd cousins twice removed 4th cousins once removed 5th cousins 5th cousins once removed
Great5-grandparent 1st cousins five times removed 2nd cousins four times removed 3rd cousins thrice removed 4th cousins twice removed 5th cousins once removed 6th cousins


“Grandfather” redirects here. ...


Chart relationships as sentences

Reminder: the closest relationship prevails - note that cousinship is not calculated between individuals when one is descended from the other, for example, two individuals are not called cousins if they are any degree of grandparent, parent and child. Also cousinship is not calculated between individuals of any degree of aunt/uncle and nephew/niece relationship to each other.

  • If we share grandparents but have different parents we are first cousins
  • If we share great grandparents but have different grandparents we are second cousins
  • If we share great-great grandparents but have different great grandparents we are third cousins
  • If we share great-great-great-grandparents but have different great-great-grandparents we are fourth cousins
  • If we share great-great-great-great-grandparents but have different great-great-great-grandparents we are fifth cousins

  • My first cousin's child and I are first cousins once removed (one generation difference between us)
  • My first cousin's grandchild and I are first cousins twice removed (two generations difference between us)

Similarly

  • My parent's first cousin and I are first cousins once removed (one generation difference between us)
  • My grandparent's first cousin and I are first cousins twice removed (two generations difference between us)

  • My second cousin's child and I are second cousins once removed (one generation difference between us)
  • My second cousin's grandchild and I are second cousins twice removed (two generations difference between us)

Similarly

  • My parent's second cousin and I are second cousins once removed (one generation difference between us)
  • My grandparent's second cousin and I are second cousins twice removed (two generations difference between us)

Following this pattern, it can be determined that xth cousin y-times removed means either of the following:

  • The xth cousin of your direct ancestor y generations previously (eg. your great-grandparent's fifth cousin is your fifth cousin thrice removed); or
  • Your xth cousin's direct descendant y generations away (e.g. your fifth cousin's great-grandchild is also your fifth cousin thrice removed)

Determining cousin type

The name of the cousinship is not determined by oneself, but rather is always determined by the generational level of the individual most closely related to the ancestor in common. The following assumes there are no double cousins: For other uses, see Cousin (disambiguation). ...

  1. To work out if two people are first, second, or third cousins, count back the generations to their common ancestor. For example, if the common ancestor is one's grandmother, that is two generations. If it is one's great-grandmother, that is three generations.
  2. Identify the one of the two descendants who is generationally closest to the common ancestor. For example, if one of the cousins is a great-great-grandchild (four generations) and the other is a grandchild, the grandchild is generationally closest to the common ancestor.
  3. If the generationally closest descendant of the common ancestor is a grandchild (two generations), then the cousins are first cousins; if three generations separate the common ancestor and the generationally closest cousin, then the two are second cousins, and so on.
  4. If the cousins are separated from the common ancestor by an equal number of generations, there is no "remove," for instance if both are grandchildren of the common ancestor. But if the number of generations between the common ancestor is different for each cousin, that difference is expressed by using a clarifier, "removed," with the number of removes. For example, if one person is a grandchild of (2 generations from) the common ancestor, and the other person is a great-great-grandchild of (4 generations from) that common ancestor, then the two are first-cousins-twice-removed.

An alternative method is as follows. You and your cousin count the generations between you and the common ancestor. Do not count the common ancestor and do not count yourselves. Thus, if it is a grand parent, this number is one. Let this be X. If X is different for the two of you, then let the difference between be Y. Now, use the smaller X (if there is a difference). You are X cousins, Y times removed. If Y is zero (because the number of generations between you and your ancestor is the same as for your cousin), then you are simply X cousins. X is stated as an ordinarial, i.e. first, second, etc.


Note that the above system is symmetric; if person A is person B's second cousin once removed, then person B is person A's second cousin once removed as well, even though the relationship between them is not symmetric (since the two are not from the same generation). Symmetry is a characteristic of geometrical shapes, equations and other objects; we say that such an object is symmetric with respect to a given operation if this operation, when applied to the object, does not appear to change it. ...


Also note that much of this terminology is variable; for example, many dictionaries give "a child of one's first cousin" as a secondary sense for the term second cousin (the primary sense being "a child of a first cousin of one's parent").


A different and partly conflicting system that is sometimes used is asymmetric (i.e. it mirrors the fact that aunt/uncle and niece/nephew are asymmetric names). With this system to work out what cousinage X is to Y, identify the descendant or ancestor of X that is the same generation as Y (i.e. the same number of generations from the common ancestor), then count how many generational removes there are up or down the tree from those same-generation cousins. In other words go across the family tree first, then up or down. For example take X and Y who have common ancestors who are X's great grandparents and Y's grandparents. From Y's point of view, X is Y's first cousin's child, and thus is Y's first cousin once removed (downwards), but from X's point of view Y's child is X's second cousin, and Y therefore is X's second cousin once removed (upwards).


Double cousins

Generally, one's cousinship to another is determined by a connection through only one parent's biological family. But an individual's cousinship to another individual may be determined by a connection through both of one's parents. These cousins are biologically connected to both the maternal and paternal family trees and that cousinship is termed a double cousin. Another term used to describe this is cousins on both sides. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


If a pair of siblings from one family each form a couple with a pair of siblings from another family, then the children of these two couples will be double first cousins to one another. The children of the couples would already automatically be first cousins because they are children of one of their parent's siblings, but in this case the children of their mother's sibling, are also the children of their father's sibling, and thus they are double first cousins. Such cousins have double the consanguinity of ordinary cousins and are as related as half-siblings. Instead of the 12.5% consanguinity that simple first cousins share with each other, double first cousins share a 25% consanguinity with each other. Further, if identical twins form a coupling with a corresponding set of identical twins, the children of these two couples, though legally (double) first cousins to one another, would genetically be as closely related to each other as ordinary full siblings. Consanguinity, literally meaning common blood, describes how close a person is related to another in the sense of a family. ... A half-sibling is a sibling with one shared parent, i. ... Consanguinity, literally meaning common blood, describes how close a person is related to another in the sense of a family. ... Consanguinity, literally meaning common blood, describes how close a person is related to another in the sense of a family. ... Fraternal twin boys in the tub The term twin most notably refers to two individuals (or one of two individuals) who have shared the same uterus (womb) and usually, but not necessarily, born on the same day. ... This article is about the domestic group. ...


Half cousins

Half-siblings share only one parent. Extrapolating from that, if one of John's parents and one of Mary's parents are half-siblings, then John and Mary are half-first cousins. The half-sibling of each of their respective parents would be their half-aunt or half-uncle but these terms, although technically specific, are rarely used in practise. While it would not be unusual to hear of another's half-brother, or half-sister, so described, in common usage one would rarely hear of another's half-cousins or half-aunt, so described, and instead hear them described simply as the other's cousin or aunt. And children of half-first cousins are half-second cousins and so on because they would share only one common great-grandparent instead of two. Brother and Sister redirect here. ...


Mathematical definitions

The family relationship between two individuals a and b, where Ga and Gb respectively are the number of generations between each individual and their nearest common ancestor, can be calculated by the following: // Traditionally, a generation has been defined as “the average interval of time between the birth of parents and the birth of their offspring. ... An ancestor is a parent or (recursively) the parent of an ancestor (i. ...

x = min (Ga,Gb)
y = |Ga − Gb|
  • If x = 0 and y = 0 then they are the same person.
  • If x = 0 and y = 1 then they are parent and child.
  • If x = 0 and y = 2 then they are grandparent and grandchild.
  • If x = 0 and y > 2 then they are great ... great-grandparent and great ... great-grandchild, with y − 2 greats.
  • If x = 1 and y = 0 then they are siblings (brothers or sisters).
  • If x = 1 and y = 1 then they are uncle/aunt and nephew/niece.
  • If x = 1 and y > 1 then they are great ... great-granduncle/great-grandaunt and great ... great-grandnephew/great-grandniece, with y-1 greats.
  • If x > 1 and y = 0 then they are (x − 1)th cousins.
  • If x > 1 and y > 0 then they are (x − 1)th cousins y times removed.

So two people sharing a pair of grandparents have x = 2 and y = 0 and are described as being first cousins.


If x/v and they only share one nearest common ancestor rather than two, then the word "half" is sometimes added at the beginning of the relationship.


The mathematical definition is more elegant if you always express consanguinity as the ordered pair of natural numbers (x, y) as defined above. In that case, the relationship one has with oneself is (0, 0), the relationship between parent and child is (0, 1), and the relationship between grandparent and grandchild is (0, 2). The relationship between siblings is (1, 0); and between aunt/uncle and nephew/niece is (1, 1). First cousins are (2, 0). The first number expresses how many generations back the two people's most recent common ancestor is, while the second number expresses the generation difference between the two people. The most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of any set of organisms is the most recent individual from which all organisms in the group are directly descended. ...


Alternative canon law charts

Canon Law Relationship Chart. See an example of how to use chart.
Canon Law Relationship Chart. See an example of how to use chart.

Another visual chart used in determining the legal relationship between two people who share a common ancestor (blood) is based upon a diamond shape, and is usually referred to as a canon law relationship chart. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Canon law is the term used for...


The chart is used by placing the "Common Progenitor" (the person from which both people are descended) in the top space within the diamond shaped chart, and then following each line down the outside edge of the chart. Upon reaching the final place along the opposing outside edge for each person, the relationship is the determined by following that line inward to the point where the lines intersect. The information contained in the common "intersection" defines the relationship.


For a simple example, in the illustration to the right, if two siblings wanted to use the chart to determine their relationship using the chart to the right, their common parents would be placed in the top most position and each child assigned the space below and along the outside of the chart. Then, following the spaces inward, the two would meet in the "brother (sister)" diamond. If their children would want to determine their relationship, they would follow the path established by their parents, but descend an additional step below along the outside of the chart (showing that they are grandchildren of the "Common Progenitor"; following their respect lines inward, they would come to rest in the space marked "1st cousin." In cases where one side descends the outside of the diamond further than the other side because of additional generations removed from the "Common Progenitor," following the lines inward shows both the cousin rank (1st cousin, 2nd Cousin) plus the number of times (generations) "removed."


In the example provided at the right, generations one (child) through ten (8th Great Grandchild) from the Common Progenitor are provided, however the format of the chart can easily be expanded to accommodate any number of generations needed to resolve the question of relationship.


See also

Consanguinity, literally meaning common blood, describes how close a person is related to another in the sense of a family. ... A cousin couple is a pair of cousins with a romantic or sexual relationship. ... Parallel cousin is an anthropological term denoting consanguinial kin who are in the same descent group as the subject and are from the parents same-sexed sibling. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... For other uses, see Family (disambiguation). ... There are several widely adopted genealogical numbering systems for depicting a family tree or pedigree chart in text format. ... Kinship terminology refers to the words used in a specific culture to describe a specific system of familial relationships. ... The most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of any set of organisms is the most recent individual from which all organisms in the group are directly descended. ... Parallel cousin is an anthropological term denoting consanguinial kin who are in the same descent group as the subject and are from the parents same-sexed sibling. ...

References

  1. ^ Bush vs. Kerry? They’re distant cousins - Genealogy - MSNBC.com
  2. ^ http://msn.ancestry.com/landing/strange/bush4/tree.htm
  3. ^ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21340764/>
  4. ^ Rohde DLT, Olson S, Chang JT (2004) "Modelling the recent common ancestry of all living humans". Nature 431: 562-566.

External links

Look up cousin in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... For other uses, see Family (disambiguation). ... -1... For other uses, see Father (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Son (disambiguation). ... An expecting couple with their daughter A daughter is a female offspring; a girl, woman, or female animal in relation to her parents. ... Brother and Sister redirect here. ... “Grandfather” redirects here. ...

 
 

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