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Encyclopedia > Courtauld Institute of Art

The Courtauld Institute of Art is a listed organisation of the University of London specialising in the study of the history of art. The Courtauld Institute is one of the world's leading institutions in this field. It was founded in 1932 by the industrialist and art collector Samuel Courtauld, the diplomat and collector Lord Lee of Fareham, and the art historian Sir Robert Witt. Originally the Courtauld Institute was based in Home House, a Robert Adam-designed townhouse in Portman Square, London. Since 1989 it has been based in Somerset House. Senate House, designed by Charles Holden, home to the universitys central administrative offices and its library The University of London is a federation of colleges and institutes which together constitute one of the worlds largest universities. ... History of art usually refers to the history of the visual arts. ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... Samuel Courtauld (1876-1947) was an English industrialist (great-nephew of textile magnate Samuel Courtauld) who is best remembered as an art collector. ... Arthur Hamilton Lee, 1st Viscount Lee of Fareham (1868-1947) was a British soldier, diplomat, politician and administrator serving in Canada and the USA. His wife Ruth was the daughter of a New York banker, and the couple were prominent in New England society. ... Sir Robert Witt (1872-1952) was a British art historian, who, along with Samuel Courtauld and Lord Lee of Fareham, was a co-founder of the Courtauld Institute of Art in London. ... Robert Adam Kedleston Hall. ... The Houses of Parliament and the clock tower containing Big Ben Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London (see Wiktionary:London for the name in other languages) is the capital of the United Kingdom and England. ... The central courtyard of Somerset House in London. ...

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The Courtauld Gallery

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A Bar at the Folies-Bergère (1882) by Édouard Manet

The art collection at the Institute was begun by its founder, Samuel Courtauld, who presented an extensive collection of mainly French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings in 1932, which was enhanced by further gifts in the 1930s and a bequest in 1948. His collection included such masterworks as Manet's A Bar at the Folies-Bergère and a version of his Déjeuner sur l'Herbe, Renoir's La Loge, landscapes by Claude Monet and Camille Pissarro, a ballet scene by Edgar Degas and a group of eight major works by Cézanne. Other paintings include Van Gogh's Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear and Cherry Orchard, Gauguin's Nevermore and Te Rerioa, as well as important works by Seurat, Toulouse-Lautrec and Modigliani. Image File history File links Edouard Manet. ... Image File history File links Edouard Manet. ... A Bar at the Folies-Bergère (1882) was the last major work by French painter Édouard Manet before he died. ... Impressionism was a 19th century art movement that began as a loose association of Paris-based artists who began publicly exhibiting their art in the 1860s. ... A Hundred Years of Independence by Henri Rousseau Post-impressionism is a term applied to painting styles of the late 19th and early 20th centuries — after impressionism. ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... // Events and trends A public speech by Benito Mussolini, founder of the Fascist movement The 1930s were described as an abrupt shift to more radical lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the global depression. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Édouard Manet (portrait by Nadar) Édouard Manet (January 23, 1832 – April 30, 1883) was a French painter. ... A Bar at the Folies-Bergère (1882) was the last major work by French painter Édouard Manet before he died. ... The Luncheon on the Grass (Le déjeuner sur lherbe), originally titled The Bath (Le Bain), is an oil on canvas painting by Édouard Manet. ... Pierre-Auguste Renoir Pierre-Auguste Renoir (February 25, 1841 – December 3, 1919) was a French artist who painted in the impressionist style. ... Claude Monet. ... The garden at Pontoise, painted 1877. ... Edgar Degas Edgar Degas (July 19, 1834 – September 27, 1917) was a French painter and sculptor. ... Paul Cézanne (January 19, 1839 – October 22, 1906) was a French artist, a painter (Impressionist) whose work laid the foundations of the transition from the 19th Century conception of artistic endeavour to a new and radically different world of art in the 20th. ... Vincent Willem van Gogh (help· info) (March 30, 1853 – July 29, 1890) was a Dutch painter, classified as a Post-impressionist, and is generally considered one of the greatest painters in the history of European art. ... Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (June 8, 1848 – May 9, 1903) was a leading Post-Impressionist painter. ... Le Chahut was painted by Seurat from 1889 to 1890. ... Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. ... Amedeo Clemente Modigliani (July 12, 1884 – January 24, 1920) was a Jewish Italian painter and sculptor. ...


Following the death of the eminent art critic Roger Fry in 1934, the Institute received his collection of 20th-century art. Further bequests were added after the Second World War, most notably the collection of Old Master paintings assembled by Lord Lee. This included Cranach's Adam and Eve and a sketch in oils by Peter Paul Rubens for what is arguably his masterpiece, the Deposition altarpiece in Antwerp Cathedral. Sir Robert Witt was also an outstanding benefactor to the Courtauld and bequeathed his important collection of Old Master and British drawings in 1952. In 1966 Mark Gambier-Parry bequeathed the diverse collection of art formed by his grandfather which ranged from Early Italian Renaissance painting to majolica, medieval enamel and ivory carvings and other unusual art forms. Roger Eliot Fry (14 December 1866 - 9 September 1934) was an English artist and critic, and a member of the Bloomsbury group. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... An Old Master (or old master) is one of the great European painters who lived 1500 through 1800, or a painting by one of these painters. ... A self portrait Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472 – October 16, 1553) was a German painter. ... The Adoration of the Magi, painted 1624. ... An altarpiece is a picture or relief representing a religious subject and suspended in a frame behind the altar of a church. ... The Cathedral of our Lady (Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal, Antwerp) in the Handschoenmarkt, in the old quarter of Antwerp is the largest cathedral in the Low Countries and home to a number of triptychs by Belgian Baroque painter Rubens. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Portrait of Giovanni Arnolfini and Wife by Jan van Eyck (1434). ... Majolica is earthenware with a white tin glaze, decorated by applying colorants on the raw glazed surface. ... In a discussion of art technology, enamel (or vitreous enamel, or porcelain enamel in American English) is the colorful result of fusion of powdered glass to a substrate through the process of firing, usually between 750 and 850 degrees Celsius. ... An elaborately carved ivory decoration Ivory is a hard, white, opaque substance that is the bulk of the teeth and tusks of animals such as the elephant, hippopotamus, walrus, mammoth, narwhal, etc. ...


In 1974 a group of thirteen watercolours by Turner was presented in memory of Sir Stephen Courtauld, famous for restoring Eltham Palace. In 1978 the Courtauld received the Princes Gate Collection of Old Master paintings and drawings formed by Count Antoine Seilern. It includes paintings by Bruegel, Quentin Matsys, Van Dyck and Tiepolo and rivals the Samuel Courtauld Collection in splendour, being strongest in the works of Rubens.The bequest also included a group of 19th- and 20th-century works by Pissarro, Degas, Renoir and Oskar Kokoschka. More recently the Lilian Browse and Alastair Hunter collections have given the Courtauld more late 19th- and 20th-century paintings, drawings and sculptures. 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1974 calendar). ... J. M. W. Turner, English landscape painter The fighting Temeraire tugged to her last berth to be broken up, painted 1839. ... Stephen Courtauld (1883-1967) was a member of the wealthy English Courtauld textile family. ... Eltham Palace is an Art Deco house in Eltham, London, currently owned by English Heritage and open to the public. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... Bruegels The Painter and The Connoisseur drawn c. ... The Ugly Duchess by Quentin Matsys (1525-30) Oil on wood, 64 x 45,5 cm National Gallery, London Quentin Matsys, also known as Quentin Massys, Quentin Metsys or Kwinten Metsys (1466 - 1530), was a painter in the Flemish tradition, founder of the Antwerp school. ... Self Portrait With a Sunflower Sir Anthony (Antoon) van Dyck (*March 22, 1599 - December 9, 1641) was a Flemish painter — mainly of portraits — who became the leading court painter in England. ... The Death of Hyacinth Giovanni Battista Tiepolo (also known as Gianbattista or Giambattista Tiepolo) (March 5, 1696 - March 27, 1770) was a Venetian painter. ... The garden at Pontoise, painted 1877. ... Oskar Kokoschka (March 1, 1886-February 22, 1980) was an Austrian artist and poet of Czech origin, best known for his intense expressionistic portraits and landscapes. ...


The Courtauld Gallery is open to the public and housed in The Strand Block of Somerset House, which was the first home for the Royal Academy upon its foundation in 1768. The entrance to 'The Great Room', which housed the annual Summer Exhibition, has the formidable inscription 'Let no stranger to the Muses enter' in Ancient Greek. Strand is a famous road in London, linking Trafalgar Square to Fleet Street and the City of London. ... This article refers to an art institution in London. ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Royal Academy during the 2004 summer exhibition The Summer Exhibition is an art exhibition held annually by the Royal Academy in Burlington House, Piccadilly in central London. ... MuSE is an acronym that stands for Multiple Streaming Engine. ... Greek (, IPA — Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of 3,500 years. ...


Other study resources

The Courtauld has two photographic libraries which started as the private collections of two ennobled benefactors: the Conway library, covering architecture, architectural drawings, sculpture and illuminated manuscripts, named after Lord Martin Conway and the Witt library, covering paintings, drawings and engravings, after Sir Robert Witt. The Book Library is one of the UK's largest archives of art-historical books, periodicals and exhibition catalogues. There is a Slide Library which also covers films, and an IT suite. Architectural history studies the evolution and history of architecture across the world through a consideration of various influences- artistic, socio-cultural, political, economic and technological. ... In the strictest definition of illuminated manuscript, only manuscripts decorated with gold or silver, like this miniature of Christ in Majesty from the Aberdeen Bestiary (folio 4v), would be considered illuminated. ... Sir William Martin Conway (April 12, 1856 - April 19, 1937), English art critic and mountaineer, was the son of Reverend William Conway, afterwards canon of Westminster. ... Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. ...


Alumni and people associated with the Courtauld

Anthony Frederick Blunt (September 26, 1907 – March 26, 1983) was an English art historian and the Fourth Man of the Cambridge Five, a group of spies working for the Soviet Union during the Cold War. ... Anita Brookner (born July 16, 1928) is an English novelist and art historian born in London. ... Andrew Graham-Dixon read English at Oxford University and graduated in 1981 is a well-known British art critic. ... Robert Neil MacGregor (born 1946) is an art historian and museum director. ... Vincent Price on Broadway as Mr. ... Nicholas Serota Sir Nicholas Serota (born 1946) is a curator, and is currently Director of the Tate Gallery, the United Kingdoms national gallery of modern and British art. ... Brian Sewell is an influential English art critic. ...

External link

  • Courtauld Institute of Art website
  • Courtauld Institute of Art prints
Recognised bodies of the University of London

Birkbeck | Goldsmiths | Heythrop | Imperial | Institute of Cancer Research | Institute of Education | King's | London Business School | LSE | London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine | Queen Mary | Royal Academy of Music | Royal Holloway | Royal Veterinary College | St George's | SOAS | School of Pharmacy | UCL Senate House, designed by Charles Holden, home to the universitys central administrative offices and its library The University of London is a federation of colleges and institutes which together constitute one of the worlds largest universities. ... The façade of the main building of Birkbeck, University of London (formerly Birkbeck College). ... Goldsmiths College (founded in 1891 by the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths as Goldsmiths Technical and Recreative Institute) has been a part of the federal University of London since 1904, when it took its current name. ... Heythrop College is a college of the University of London situated in Kensington Square, Kensington, London. ... Imperial College London is one of the colleges of the University of London (although negotiations with regard to its withdrawal from the University are underway) and primarily focuses on science, engineering and medicine, complemented by a business school. ... The Institute of Cancer Research is a college within the University of London. ... The Institute of Education (IoE) is a postgraduate college and part of the University of London. ... Kings College London in London is the largest and second longest serving member college in the federal University of London, with 21,300 registered students (2003-04). ... London Business School, in London (UK), established in 1965, is an international business school providing postgraduate degrees in management, including MBA (Master of Business Administration) courses, as well as non-degree courses for business executives. ... The London School of Economics and Political Science, often referred to as the London School of Economics or simply the LSE, is a specialist university and a constituent college of the federal University of London, located on Houghton Street in Central London, off the Aldwych and next to the Royal... Categories: Stub | University of London | Schools of Medicine | Health in London ... Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL) (until recently Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London and still called that in its charter and occasionally still abbreviated to QMW) is the fourth largest College of the University of London. ... The Royal Academy of Music is a music school in London, England and one of the leading music institutions in the world. ... Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) is one of the seven larger colleges of the University of London. ... The Royal Veterinary College is the oldest and largest veterinary school in the United Kingdom. ... St Georges, University of London (SGUL) is, a specialist medical college of the University of London. ... // School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) Motto Knowledge is Power Crest Patron HM The Queen President Baroness Helena Kennedy QC Director & Principal Prof. ... School of Pharmacy The School of Pharmacy is a constituent college of the University of London. ... University College London, commonly known as UCL, is one of the colleges that make up the University of London. ...

Listed bodies

University of London Institute in Paris | Courtauld Institute of Art | School of Advanced Study | University Marine Biological Station, Millport The University of London Institute in Paris (often abbreviated ULIP) is a remote college of the University of London located in Paris. ... The School of Advanced Study is a listed organisation of the University of London. ... Great Cumbrae and other south-west coast islands Great Cumbrae (also known as Cumbrae or the Isle of Cumbrae) is the larger of the two islands known as The Cumbraes in the lower Firth of Clyde in western Scotland (at Grid reference NS169566). ...


Museums and Galleries in London

British Museum | Churchill Museum & Cabinet War Rooms | Design Museum | Dulwich Picture Gallery | Estorick Collection | Freud Museum | Geffrye Museum | Hayward Gallery | HMS Belfast | Horniman Museum | Imperial War Museum | London's Transport Museum | Museum of London | Museum of Performance | National Gallery | National Maritime Museum | National Portrait Gallery | Natural History Museum | Royal Academy of Arts | Saatchi Gallery | Science Museum | Sir John Soane's Museum | Somerset HouseCourtauld Gallery, Gilbert Collection, Hermitage Rooms | Tate Britain | Tate Modern | Victoria and Albert Museum | V&A Museum of Childhood | Wallace Collection | Whitechapel Art Gallery The main entrance to the British Museum. ... The public entrance to the Churchill Museum and Cabinet War Rooms is a small hole on the corner of a very grand building. ... The Design Museum is a museum in Shad Thames, near Tower Bridge in central London. ... Dulwich Picture Gallery is an art gallery in Dulwich, London. ... The Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art is a museum in Canonbury Square in the district of Islington on the northern fringes of central London. ... In 1938 the founder of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud left Vienna after the Nazi annexation of Austria and moved to London, taking up residence at 20 Maresfield Gardens in Hampstead, Londons most intellectual suburb. ... Geffrye Museum frontage. ... Hayward Gallery, London The Hayward Gallery is an art gallery within the South Bank Centre, situated on the South Bank of the River Thames, in central London, England. ... HMS Belfast (C35) is an Edinburgh-class light cruiser of the Royal Navy. ... Categories: Museum stubs | London attractions ... Imperial War Museum, Lambeth, London The original location of the Imperial War Museum was the Crystal Palace, located at the top of Sydenham Hill. ... Metropolitan Railway steam locomotive number 23, the only surviving locomotive from the worlds first underground railway, is preserved in the museum Londons Transport Museum, formerly known as the London Transport Museum, is a museum which seeks to conserve and explain the transport heritage of London, the capital city... The Museum of London documents the history of London from the Palaeolithic to the present day. ... The Museum of Performance (formerly the Theatre Museum) in the Covent Garden district of London is the United Kingdoms national museum of the performing arts. ... The National Gallery from Trafalgar Square The National Gallery is an art gallery in London, located on the north side of Trafalgar Square. ... The National Maritime Museum, Greenwich The National Maritime Museum (NMM) is the leading maritime museum of the United Kingdom, and one of the most important in the world. ... The National Portrait Gallery is an art gallery in central London which was opened in 1856. ... The Natural History Museum from the south east The Natural History Museum, one of three large museums on Exhibition Road, Kensington, London (the others are the Science Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum), is home to life and earth science collections comprising some 70 million items. ... This article refers to an art institution in London. ... The Saatchi Gallery building in Chelsea opens in early 2007 The Saatchi Gallery, a London gallery for contemporary modern art, was opened by Charles Saatchi in order to show his sizeable (and changing) collection to the public. ... The National Science Museum in London The Science Museum on Exhibition Road, Kensington, London, is part of the National Museum of Science and Industry. ... The Soane Museum is a museum of architecture, and was formerly the house and studio of Sir John Soane. ... The central courtyard of Somerset House in London. ... The Gilbert Collection was formed by the English businessman Sir Arthur Gilbert, who made most of his fortune in the property business in California. ... The Hermitage Rooms at Somerset House in London are a venue for temporary exhibitions of items from the collections of the Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg in Russia. ... Tate Britain is a part of the Tate Gallery in Britain, along with Tate Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate St Ives. ... Tate Modern from the Millennium Bridge Tate Modern from St Pauls Cathedral. ... The Cromwell Road entrance to the Victoria and Albert Museum The Victoria and Albert Museum viewed from Thurloe Square The main interior courtyard of the Victoria and Albert Museum in 2004. ... Exterior of the museum The official opening of the Bethnal Green Museum by the Prince of Wales in 1872. ... The Wallace Collection is a national art museum located in London. ... The Whitechapel Gallery, founded 1901, was one of the first publicly-funded galleries for temporary exhibitions in London. ...


See here for full list There are over 240 museums in London. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Courtauld Institute of Art - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (634 words)
The Courtauld Institute of Art is a listed organisation of the University of London specialising in the study of the history of art.
It was founded in 1932 by the industrialist and art collector Samuel Courtauld, the diplomat and collector Lord Lee of Fareham, and the art historian Sir Robert Witt.
The art collection at the Institute was begun by its founder, Samuel Courtauld, who presented an extensive collection of mainly French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings in 1932, which was enhanced by further gifts in the 1930s and a bequest in 1948.
Samuel Courtauld (art collector) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (314 words)
He founded the Courtauld Institute of Art in London in 1932 and, after a series of gifts during the 1930s, bequeathed his collection to it upon his death.
Samuel Courtauld took charge of the firm from 1908 as general manager and as chairman from 1921 to 1946.
Courtauld was one of the first collectors to display interest in French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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