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Encyclopedia > County court

Law of England and Wales

This article is part of the series:
Courts of England and Wales Image File history File links Wiki_letter_w. ... English law is a formal term of art that describes the law for the time being in force in England and Wales. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England_(bordered). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Wales_2. ... Schematic of court system for England and Wales The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system—England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland a third. ...

Administration

Department for Constitutional Affairs
Lord Chancellor
Her Majesty's Courts Service

Civil courts The Department for Constitutional Affairs (DCA) is a United Kingdom government department. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Her Majestys Courts Service is an amalgamation of the Magistrates Courts Service and the Court Service. ...

Privy Council
House of Lords
Lords of Appeal in Ordinary
Court of Appeal
Master of the Rolls
Lord Justice of Appeal
High Court of Justice
Chancellor of the High Court
President of the Queen's Bench
President of the Family Division
High Court judge
County Courts
District Judge

Criminal courts The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council is one of the highest courts in the United Kingdom. ... The House of Lords, in addition to having a legislative function, has a judicial function as a court of last resort within the United Kingdom. ... The House of Lords, in addition to having a legislative function, has a judicial function as a court of last resort within the United Kingdom. ... Her Majestys Court of Appeal is the second most senior court in the English legal system, with only the Judicial Committee of the House of Lords above it. ... The Master of the Rolls is the third most senior judge of England, the Lord Chancellor of Great Britain traditionally being first and the Lord Chief Justice second. ... The Lords Justices of Appeal (Judges of the Court of Appeal) of England and Wales: The Rt Hon. ... Her Majestys High Court of Justice (usually known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of England and Wales: see Courts of England and Wales. ... The Chancellor of the High Court is the head of the Chancery Division of the High Court of Justice of England and Wales. ... The President of the Queens Bench Division is the head of the Queens Bench Division of the High Court of Justice. ... Sir Mark Howard ... A judge or justice is an appointed or elected official who presides over a court. ... There are various levels of judiciary in England and Wales — different types of courts have different styles of judges. ...

House of Lords
Lord of Appeal in Ordinary
Court of Appeal
Lord Chief Justice
Lord Justice of Appeal
High Court of Justice
President of the Queen's Bench
High Court judge
Crown Court
Circuit Judge
Recorder
Magistrates' Court
District Judge
Justice of the Peace

Criminal justice The House of Lords, in addition to having a legislative function, has a judicial function as a court of last resort within the United Kingdom. ... Lords of Appeal in Ordinary are Life peers entrusted since the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876 with carrying out the judicial functions of the House of Lords. ... Her Majestys Court of Appeal is the second most senior court in the English legal system, with only the Judicial Committee of the House of Lords above it. ... The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales was, historically, the second-highest judge of the Courts of England and Wales, after the Lord Chancellor. ... The Lords Justices of Appeal (Judges of the Court of Appeal) of England and Wales: The Rt Hon. ... Her Majestys High Court of Justice (usually known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of England and Wales: see Courts of England and Wales. ... The President of the Queens Bench Division is the head of the Queens Bench Division of the High Court of Justice. ... A judge or justice is an appointed or elected official who presides over a court. ... Crown Court and County Court in Oxford. ... A Circuit judge is a position in British Law, in which a Judge moves to different Crown Courts within a certain area. ... A Recorder is a barrister or solicitor of 10 years standing who serves as a part-time Crown court judge. ... Bedford Magistrates Court A Magistrates Court or court of petty sessions, formerly known as a police court, is the lowest level of court in England and Wales and many other common law jurisdictions. ... A federal judge is a judge appointed in accordance with Article III of the United States Constitution. ... A Justice of the Peace (JP) is a puisne judicial officer appointed by means of a commission to keep the peace. ...

Attorney General
Director of Public Prosecutions
Crown Prosecution Service

Barristers and solicitors Her Majestys Attorney General for England and Wales, usually known as the Attorney General, is the chief legal adviser of the Crown in England and Wales. ... The Director of Public Prosecutions is the officer charged with the prosecution of criminal offences in several criminal jurisdictions around the world. ... The Crown Prosecution Service, or CPS, is a non-ministerial department of the Government of the United Kingdom responsible for public prosecutions of people charged with criminal offences in England and Wales. ...

Bar Council
Barrister
Law Society of England and Wales
Solicitor
Solicitor Advocate
Crown Court and County Court in Oxford.
Crown Court and County Court in Oxford.

A bar council in a Commonwealth country is a professional body that regulates the profession of barristers together with the Inns of Court. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Law Society of England and Wales is the professional association that represents the solicitors profession in England and Wales. ... A solicitor is a type of lawyer in many common law jurisdictions, such as the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, Republic of Ireland, Australia New Zealand and Canada, but not the United States (in the United States the word has a quite different meaning—see below). ... A Solicitor Advocate is a solicitor who is qualified to represent clients as an advocate in the higher courts in England and Wales or Scotland. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 380 KB) Summary Crown Court and County Court in Oxford. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 380 KB) Summary Crown Court and County Court in Oxford. ... Crown Court and County Court in Oxford. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ...

England and Wales

The County Court is the workhorse of the civil justice system in England and Wales. See Courts of England and Wales for a full list of the types of courts, and List of Courts in England and Wales for the locations of County Courts in England and Wales. There are 218 county courts which deal with the majority of civil cases, as well as some family and bankruptcy hearings[1]. This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Schematic of court system for England and Wales The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system—England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland a third. ... This is a list of Courts in England and Wales. ...


The government administrative agency for the courts in England and Wales is Her Majesty's Courts Service (HMCS)[2] which is an executive agency of the Department for Constitutional Affairs (DCA)[3]. The governing statute is the County Courts Act 1984 and procedure is governed by the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (CPR), which are common to all English civil law courts. The County Courts Act 1984 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (citation 1984 c. ... The Civil Procedure Rules 1998 came into force in England & Wales on 26 April 1999, largely replacing and significantly overhauling the previous Rules of the Supreme Court (applicable to the High Court of Justice) and the County Court Rules. ... In the common law, civil law refers to the area of law governing relations between private individuals. ...


The County Court system in its present form has existed for about 150 years. The County Courts generally hear matters with a financial value of £50,000 or under (US$80,000 and 80,000). The present system is entirely statutory in origin and should not be confused with the medieval system of county courts held by the High Sheriff of each county. For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation) or EUR (disambiguation). ... The High Sheriff is, or was, a law enforcement position in Anglosphere countries. ...


County Court matters can be lodged at a court in person, by post or via the internet in some cases. Cases are normally heard at the court having jurisdiction over the area where the defendant lives. Most matters are decided by a District Judge or Circuit Judge sitting alone. Civil matters in England (with minor exceptions, e.g. in some actions against the police) do not have juries. Judges in the County courts are either former barristers or solicitors, whereas in the High Courts they are more likely to have formerly been a barrister. A federal judge is a judge appointed in accordance with Article III of the United States Constitution. ... A Circuit judge is a position in British Law, in which a Judge moves to different Crown Courts within a certain area. ... English barrister A barrister is a lawyer found in many common law jurisdictions who employ a split profession (as opposed to a fused profession) in relation to legal representation. ...


Civil claims under £5,000 are dealt with in the County Court under the 'Small Claims Track'. This is generally known to the lay public as the 'Small Claims Court' but does not exist as a separate court. Claims between £5,000 and £15,000 that are capable of being tried within one day are allocated to the 'Fast Track' and claims over £15,000 to the 'Multi Track'. These 'tracks' are labels for the use of the court system - the actual cases will be heard in the County Court or the High Court depending on their value.


For Personal Injury, Defamation cases and some Landlord and Tenant disputes the thresholds for each track have different values.


Appeals are to a higher judge (Circuit Judge hears District Judge appeals), the High Court of Justice or to the Court of Appeal. Her Majestys High Court of Justice (usually known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of England and Wales: see Courts of England and Wales. ... Her Majestys Court of Appeal is the second most senior court in the English legal system, with only the Judicial Committee of the House of Lords above it. ...


In debt cases, the aim of a plaintiff taking County Court action against a Defendant is to secure a County Court Judgment. This is a legal order to pay the full amount of the debt. Judgments can be enforced at the request of the plaintiff in a number of ways, including requesting the Court Bailiffs to seize goods, the proceeds of any sale being used to pay the debt, or an Attachment of Earnings Order, where the defendant's employer is ordered to make deductions from the gross wages to pay the plaintiff.


County Court Judgments are recorded in the Registry of Judgments, Orders and Fines (England and Wales)[4] and in the defendant's credit records held by credit reference agencies. This information is used in Credit scoring systems, making it difficult or more expensive for the defendant to obtain credit. A credit score is a number that represents an estimate of an individuals financial creditworthiness as calculated by a statistical model. ...


Australia

County Court is the name given to the intermediate court in some Australian States (see for example County Court of Victoria). They hear indictable (serious) criminal offences excluding treason, murder and manslaughter. Their civil jurisdiction is also intermediate, typically being for civil disputes where the amount claimed is greater than a few tens of thousands of dollars but less than a few hundreds of thousands of dollars. The limits vary between States. In some States the same level of Court is called a District Court. Below them are the Magistrates' (or Local) Courts. Above them are the State Supreme Courts. Australia, having a federal system of government, is divided into states and territories. ... The County Court of Victoria is located in the legal precinct of Melbournes central business district, on the corner of William Street, and Lonsdale Street opposite the Supreme Court and Melbourne Magistrates Court. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
County Courts (213 words)
To be eligible for the office of county judge, a person must be an elector of the county and must have been a member of The Florida Bar for five years; in counties with a population of 40,000 or less, a person must only be a member of The Florida Bar.
County judges are eligible for assignment to circuit court, and they are frequently assigned as such within the judicial circuit that embraces their counties.
The county courts are sometimes referred to as "the people's courts," probably because a large part of the courts' work involves voluminous citizen disputes, such as traffic offenses, less serious criminal matters (misdemeanors), and relatively small monetary disputes.
Colorado State Judicial Branch - County Courts (120 words)
County courts handle civil cases involving no more than $15,000, misdemeanor cases, felony advisements, bond setting, preliminary hearings, and traffic cases.
County judges also issue search warrants as well as restraining orders in cases involving domestic violence arrest.
More information is available on Colorado's court system and on the Denver County Court, which is not part of the state court system.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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