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Encyclopedia > County Antrim
County Antrim
Contae Aontroma
Location
Statistics
Province: Ulster
County Town: Antrim
Area: 2,844 km²
Population (est.) 566,000[citation needed]

County Antrim (Contae Aontroma in Irish) is one of the six counties that form Northern Ireland. It is the 9th largest of the 32 traditional counties of Ireland in terms of area, and 2nd in terms of population behind Dublin. It is situated in the north-east of the island of Ireland, in the province of Ulster. It is bounded north and east by the narrow seas separating Northern Ireland from Scotland, the Atlantic Ocean and Irish Sea, south by Belfast Lough and the River Lagan dividing it from County Down, south-west by Lough Neagh, dividing it from County Armagh and County Tyrone, and west by County Londonderry, the boundary with which is the River Bann. Covering an area of 2,844 km², it has a population of approximately 566,000, most of them in and around the Belfast area. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links map File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... During late Gaelic and early historic times Ireland was divided into provinces to replace the earlier system of the tuatha. ... Statistics Area: 24,481 km² Population (2006 estimate) 1,993,918 Ulster (Irish: Cúige Uladh, IPA: ) forms one of the four traditional provinces of Ireland. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... Anthem: UK: God Save the Queen Regional: (de facto) Londonderry Air Capital Belfast Largest city Belfast Official languages English (de facto), Irish, Ulster Scots 3, BSL, NISL, ISL Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Ian Paisley  - Deputy First Minister... For much of its history, the island of Ireland was divided into 32 counties (Irish language contae or condae, pronounced IPA: ). Two historical counties, County Desmond and County Coleraine, no longer exist. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Dublin Code: D Area: 921 km² Population (2006) 1,186,821 County Dublin (Irish: Contae Bhaile Átha Cliath), or more correctly today the Dublin Region[1] (Réigiúin Átha Cliath), is the area that contains the city of Dublin, the capital and largest city... Statistics Area: 24,481 km² Population (2006 estimate) 1,993,918 Ulster (Irish: Cúige Uladh, IPA: ) forms one of the four traditional provinces of Ireland. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots3 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  -  First Minister Jack McConnell... Relief map of the Irish Sea. ... Belfast Lough (Loch Lao in Irish) is a large intertidal sea lough situated at the mouth of the River Lagan on the east coast of Northern Ireland. ... The River Lagan is a major river in Northern Ireland which runs 40 miles (60 km) from the Slieve Croob mountain in County Down to Belfast where it enters Belfast Lough, an inlet of the Irish Sea. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Downpatrick Area: 2,448 km² Population (est. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Armagh Area: 1,254 km² Population (est. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Omagh Area: 3,155 km² Population (est. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Derry Area: 2,074 km² Population (est. ... The River Bann is the largest river in Northern Ireland. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ...


The Glens of Antrim offer isolated rugged landscapes, the Giant's Causeway is a unique landscape and a UNESCO World Heritage site, Bushmills produces legendary whiskey, and Portrush is a popular nightlife zone. The majority of the capital city of Northern Ireland, Belfast, is also in County Antrim, with the remainder being in County Down. The Glens of Antrim, or, simply, the Glens, is a region of County Antrim comprised of nine glens, or valleys, that radiate inward from the coast towards Lough Neagh. ... The Giants Causeway is an area of 40,000 interlocking basalt columns resulting from a volcanic eruption. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Bushmills (IrishHOME OF RICHARD McALLISTER Muileann na Buaise) is a village on the north coast of County Antrim, Northern Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Downpatrick Area: 2,448 km² Population (est. ...

Contents

Geology

A large portion of the county is hilly, especially in the east, where the highest elevations are attained, though these are nowhere great. The range runs north and south, and, following this direction the highest points are Knocklayd (1,695 feet), Slieveanorra (1,676 feet), Trostan (1,817 feet), Slemish (1,457 feet) and Divis (1,567 feet). The inland slope is gradual, but on the northern shore the range terminates in abrupt and almost perpendicular declivities, and here, consequently, some of the finest coast scenery in the world is found, widely differing, with its unbroken lines of cliffs, from the indented coast-line of the west. The most remarkable cliffs are those formed of perpendicular basaltic columns, extending for many miles, and most strikingly displayed in Fair Head and the celebrated Giant's Causeway. From the eastern coast the hills rise instantly but less abruptly, and the indentations are wider and deeper. On both coasts there are several resort towns, includingPortrush (with well-known golf links), Portballintrae and Ballycastle; on the east Cushendun, Cushendall and Milltown on Red Bay, Carnlough and Glenarm, Larne, and Whitehead on Belfast Lough. All are somewhat exposed to the easterly winds prevalent in spring. The only island of size is Rathlin Island, off Ballycastle, 6½ miles in length by 1½ in breadth, 7 miles from the coast, and of similar basaltic and limestone formation to that of the mainland. It is partially arable, and supports a small population. Islandmagee is in fact a peninsula separating Larne Lough from the North Channel. Fair Head Fair Head is a rocky headland at the north-eastern corner of Ireland, in County Antrim. ... The Giants Causeway is an area of 40,000 interlocking basalt columns resulting from a volcanic eruption. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Portballintrae (in Irish: Port Bhaile an Trá, ie harbour of the settlement of the shore) is a small village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, seven miles east of Portrush and two miles west of the Giants Causeway. ... Ballycastle (Baile an Chaistil in Irish) is a small town in County Antrim in Northern Ireland. ... Cushendun is a small village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. ... Cushendall or Bun Abhann Dalla(from the Irish: Cois Abhann Dalla meaning foot of the River Dall)is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. ... Carnlough is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland with a picturesque harbour. ... Glenarm (Gleann Airm in Irish or Glen of the Army) is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Whitehead is a large, pretty seaside village on the east coast of County Antrim, Northern Ireland, lying almost midway between the bustling town of Carrickfergus with its mediaeval castle and historic harbour and the busy port of Larne. ... Rathlin Islands location Bird sanctuary on Rathlin Island False-colour NASA Landsat image showing Rathlin, the Antrim coast, and Kintyre Rathlin Island (Irish: Reachlainn) is an island off the coast of County Antrim in Northern Ireland, and is the northernmost point of the region. ... Islandmagee is a peninsula in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom located between two towns: Larne and Carrickfergus. ... Larne Lough is a lough or inlet in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, near the town of Larne along Irelands northeast coast. ...


The valleys of the Bann and Lagan, with the intervening shores of Lough Neagh, form the fertile lowlands. These two rivers, both rising in County Down, are the only ones of importance. The latter flows to Belfast Lough, the former drains Lough Neagh, which is fed by a number of smaller streams. The fisheries of the Bann and of Lough Neagh (especially for salmon and eels) are of value both commercially and to sportsmen, the small town of Toome, at the outflow of the river, being the centre. Immediately below this point lies Lough Beg, the "Small Lake," about 15 feet lower than Lough Neagh. Illustration of a male Coho Salmon The Chinook or King Salmon is the largest salmon in North America and can grow to 1. ... Eels (also sometimes eels or EELS, depending on the album) are an American rock band formed by singer/songwriter Mark Oliver Everett, better known as Mr. ... Toome (in Irish: Tuaim, ie pagan burial place; also called Toomebridge) is a small village bordering County Antrim and County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, on the northwest corner of Lough Neagh. ...


Transport

County Antrim has a number of important air, rail and sea links.


Air

Northern Ireland's main Airport, Belfast International Airport, at Aldergrove is in County Antrim. Belfast International shares its runways with the Royal Air Force base RAF Aldergrove, which otherwise has its own facilities. It is the fifth largest regional air cargo centre in the UK. There are regular services to Britain, Europe and North America. Belfast International Airport (IATA: BFS, ICAO: EGAA) is an airport located some 21 kilometres (13 miles) northwest of Belfast in Northern Ireland. ... The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Aldergrove Crest USAF C-17 operating from Aldergrove in support of U.S. Presidential visit, 2003. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ...


(The region is also served by George Best Belfast City Airport, two kilometres east of Belfast city centre on the Co. Down side of the city, which was renamed in 2006 in honour of footballer George Best.) Belfast City Tower George Best Belfast City Airport (IATA: BHD, ICAO: EGAC) is an airport in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... History Belfast City Centre was originally centred around the Donegall Street area. ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... For the 1987 album by The Wedding Present, see George Best (album). ...


Rail

The main Translink Northern Ireland Railways routes are the major line between Belfast, Antrim, Ballymena, Coleraine and Londonderry, Belfast to Carrickfergus and Larne, the port for Stranraer in Scotland and Coleraine to Portrush. Translink is brand name of the Northern Ireland Transport Holding Company (NITHCo), a public corporation of Northern Ireland charged to oversee the provision of public transport in the country. ... Northern Ireland Railways (NIR or NI Railways) – formerly, and very briefly, known as Ulster Transport Railways (UTR) – is the railway operator responsible for running the railway network in Northern Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 55. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Stranraer (An t-Sròn Reamhar in Gaelic) is a town in the south of Scotland in the west of the region of Dumfries and Galloway and was formerly in the county of Wigtownshire. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ...


See Also:

  • Railway Stations in County Antrim

Sea

Two of Northern Ireland's main ports are in County Antrim, Larne and Belfast. WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ...


Ferries sail from Larne Harbour to destinations including Cairnryan and Troon in Scotland, and Fleetwood in England. Cairnryan is a small Scottish village overlooking Loch Ryan and is notable today for its large modern ferry port, operated by P&O, which links Scotland with Larne in Northern Ireland. ... Troon is a town in South Ayrshire, Scotland (and also a village on the outskirts of Camborne in Cornwall). ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots3 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  -  First Minister Jack McConnell... Fleetwood is a town in Lancashire, England, lying at the northern end of the Fylde peninsula but part of the Wyre local authority area. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area...


The Port of Belfast is Northern Ireland's principal maritime gateway, serving the Northern Ireland economy and increasingly that of the Republic of Ireland. It is a major centre of industry and commerce and has become established as the focus of logistics activity for Northern Ireland. Around two thirds of Northern Ireland's seaborne trade, and a quarter of that for Ireland as a whole, is handled at the port which receives over 9000 vessels each year. The Port of Belfast is Northern Irelands principal maritime gateway, serving the Northern Ireland economy and increasingly that of the Republic of Ireland. ...


Population

The population of County Antrim is 566,000 (estimate).


Religion

Presbyterianism is the largest religious denomination, followed by Catholicism and Anglicanism. Modern logo of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland The Presbyterian Church in Ireland (or PCI) has a membership of 300,000 people in 650 congregations across both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, though the bulk of the membership is in Northern Ireland. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... Church of Ireland The Church of Ireland (Irish: Eaglais na hÉireann) is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion, operating seamlessly across the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ...


Administration

The traditional county town is Antrim. More recently, Ballymena was the seat of county government. (The counties of Northern Ireland ceased to be administrative entities in the 1970s, with the reorganization of local government.) WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ...


In Northern Ireland the county structure is no longer used in local government. Northern Ireland is split into districts. Those in County Antrim are administered by the following nine councils: Northern Ireland is divided into 26 districts for local government purposes. ...

The county contains all of 5 parliamentary constituencies: Antrim Borough Council is a Local Council in County Antrim in Northern Ireland. ... Ballymena Borough Council is a Local Council in County Antrim in Northern Ireland. ... Ballymoney Borough Council is a Local Council in County Antrim in Northern Ireland. ... Belfast City Council is the largest local council serving the largest city in Northern Ireland which has a population of 277,391. ... Carrickfergus Borough Council is a Local Council in County Antrim in Northern Ireland. ... Larne Borough Council is a Local Council in County Antrim in Northern Ireland. ... Lisburn City Council is a Local Council partly in County Antrim and partly in County Down in Northern Ireland. ... Moyle District Council is a Local Council in County Antrim in the north-east corner of Northern Ireland. ... Newtownabbey Borough Council is a Local Council in County Antrim in Northern Ireland. ... The Houses of Parliament, as seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative body in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories. ... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ...

Parts of the following constituencies are also in County Antrim: Belfast North is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... Creation 1922 MP Gerry Adams Party Sinn Féin Type House of Commons Districts Belfast, Lisburn EP constituency Northern Ireland Belfast West is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... East Antrim is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... North Antrim is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... South Antrim is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ...

Creation 1922 MP Alasdair McDonnell Party Social Democratic and Labour Type House of Commons Districts Belfast, Castlereagh EP constituency Northern Ireland Belfast South is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... East Londonderry is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... Lagan Valley is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... Upper Bann is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ...

Settlements

The principal towns are Antrim, Ballymena, Ballymoney, Carrickfergus, Larne and Portrush. Belfast and Lisburn are split between County Antrim and County Down. Ballyclare, Bushmills, Crumlin, Portglenone and Randalstown are among the lesser towns. Belfast and Larne are the chief ports. WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 55. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Downpatrick Area: 2,448 km² Population (est. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Bushmills (IrishHOME OF RICHARD McALLISTER Muileann na Buaise) is a village on the north coast of County Antrim, Northern Ireland. ... Crumlin (in Irish: Cromghlinn, ie crooked glen) is a large village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, situated near Lough Neagh 20 miles west of Belfast city centre. ... Portglenone is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, 14 km west of Ballymena, at latitude 54:51:40N and longitude 6:30:46W. It had a population of 1,219 people in the 2001 Census. ... Randalstown is a small town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, located in the north-east of Ireland between Antrim Town and Toome. ...


See Also:

This is a list of cities, towns and villages in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. ...

History

At what date the county of Antrim was formed is not known, but it appears that a certain district bore this name before the reign of Edward II (early 14th century), and when the shiring of Ulster was undertaken by Sir John Perrot in the 16th century, Antrim and Down were already recognized divisions, in contradistinction to the remainder of the province. The earliest known inhabitants were of Celtic origin, and the names of the townlands or subdivisions, supposed to have been made in the 13th century, are all of Gaelic derivation. Antrim was exposed to the inroads of the Danes, and also of the northern Scots, who ultimately effected permanent settlements. In ancient times, it was inhabited by a Celtic people called the Darini. In the early Middle Ages, southern County Antrim was part of the Kingdom of Ulidia, ruled by the Dál Fiatach clans O'Haughey/O'Hoey and MacDonlevy/McDunlavey; the north was part of Dal Riada, which stretched into western Scotland over the Irish Sea. Dal Riada was ruled by the O'Lynch clan, who were vassals of the Ulidians. Besides the Ulidians and Dal Riada, there were the Dal nAraide of lower County Antrim, and the Cruithne, who were not Gaelic Celts but Picts. In the late Middle Ages, it was divided into three parts: northern Clandeboy, the Glynnes and the Route. The Cambro-Norman MacQuillans were powerful in the Route. A branch of the O'Neills of Tyrone migrated to Clandeboy in the 1300s, and ruled it for a time. Their family was called O'Neill Clannaboy. A galloglass sept, the MacDonnells, became the most powerful in the Glynnes in the 1400s. Edward II, (25 April 1284 – 21 September? 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Sir John Perrot (c. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... This article is about the European people. ... A townland is the lowest-level geographical unit of land used in Ireland, smaller than a Parish or County. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...


Antrim is divided into 16 baronies. Lower Antrim, part of Lower Clandeboy, was settled by the sept O'Flynn/O'Lynn. Upper Antrim, part of Lower Clandeboy, was the home of the O'Keevans. Belfast was part of Lower Clandeboy and was held by the O'Neill-Clannaboys. Lower Belfast, Upper Belfast, and Carrickfergus were also part of Lower Clandeboy. Cary was part of the Glynnes; ruled originally by the O'Quinn sept, the MacDonnell galloglasses from Scotland took power here in the late Middle Ages and some of the O'Haras also migrated from Connaught. Upper and Lower Dunluce were part of the Route, and were ruled by the MacQuillans. Upper and Lower Glenarm was ruled by the O'Flynn/O'Lynn sept, considered part of the Glynns. In addition to that sept and that of O'Quinn, both of which were native, the Scottish gallowglass septs of MacKeown, MacAlister, and MacGee, are found there. Kilconway was originally O'Flynn/O'Lynn territory, but was held by the MacQuillans as part of the Route, and later by the gallowglass sept of MacNeill. Lower Massereene was part of Lower Clandeboy and was ruled by the O'Flynns and the O'Heircs. Upper Massereene was part of Lower Clandeboy, ruled by the O'Heircs. Upper and Lower Toome, part of the Route, were O'Flynn/O'Lynn territory. Misc was first ruled by the MacQuillans. Later, the Scottish gallowglass MacDonnells and MacAlisters invaded. The MacDonnells were a branch of the Scottish Clan MacDonald; the MacAlisters traced their origin back to the Irish Colla Uais, eldest of the Three Collas. Islandmagee had, besides antiquarian remains, a notoriety as a home of witchcraft, and was the scene of an act of reprisal against the Catholic population during the Irish Rebellion of 1641 for the massacre of Protestants, by the Scottish Covenanter soldiery of Carrickfergus. The Irish Rebellion of 1641 began as an attempted coup détat by Irish Catholic gentry, but rapidly degenerated into bloody intercommunal violence between native Irish Catholics and English and Scottish Protestant settlers. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... James VI of Scotland (James I of England) was opposed by the Covenanters in his attempt to bring the Anglican Church into Scotland The Covenanters formed an important movement in the religion and politics of Scotland in the 17th century. ...


Historic Monuments

The antiquities of the county consist of cairns, mounts or forts, remains of ecclesiastical and military structures, and round towers. The principal cairns are: one on Colin mountain, near Lisburn; one on Slieve True, near Carrickfergus; and two on Colinward. The cromlechs most worthy of notice are: one near Cairngrainey, to the north-east of the old road from Belfast to Templepatrick; the large cromlech at Mount Druid, near Ballintoy; and one at the northern extremity of Islandmagee. The mounts, forts and entrenchments are very numerous. For the magazine see Cairn Magazine. ... The round tower at Glendalough, Ireland, is approximately thirty metres tall A round tower was primarily a bell tower, or belfry, as the Irish form of the name cloictheach clearly indicates, and as was proved by George Petrie as long ago as 1845 and never seriously challenged since. ... T shaped Hunebed D27 in Borger-Odoorn, Netherlands, recent. ... Templepatrick is a large village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, about 10 miles northwest of Belfast, and approximately equidistant from the towns of Ballyclare and Antrim. ... The harbour at Ballintoy. ...


There are three round towers: one at Antrim, one at Armoy, and one on Ram Island in Lough Neagh, only that at Antrim being perfect. There are some remains of the ecclesiastic establishments at Bonamargy, where the earls of Antrim are buried, Kells, Glenarm, Glynn, Muckamore and Whiteabbey. Armoy is a small village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, 9 kms south west of Ballycastle adjacent to the A44 road between Ballymena and Ballycastle. ... Kells/Connor (in Irish: Na Cealla, ie the monastic cells/churches) is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, near Ballymena. ... Cnwb 12:54, 15 July 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ...


The noble castle of Carrickfergus is the only one in perfect preservation. There are, however, remains of other ancient castles, as Olderfleet, Cam's, Shane's, Glenarm, Garron Tower and Red Bay, but the most interesting of all is Dunluce Castle, remarkable for its great extent and romantic situation. The ruin of Olderfleet Castle tower house built by the Scots Bisset family in the 13th Century. ... Dunluce Castle. ...


The UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Giant's Causeway, is in Antrim. UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... The Giants Causeway is an area of 40,000 interlocking basalt columns resulting from a volcanic eruption. ...


See Also:

  • Castles in County Antrim

Saint Patrick

Slemish, about 8 miles east of Ballymena, is notable as being the scene of St Patrick's early life. According to tradition Saint Patrick was a slave for seven years, near the hill of Slemish, until he escaped back to Great Britain. Slemish is the remains of a dormant volcano near Ballymena, Co. ... For information about the holiday, see: Saint Patricks Day Saint Patrick (Latin: , Irish: Naomh Pádraig) was a Christian missionary and is the patron saint of Ireland along with Brigid of Kildare and Columba. ...


Linen

The linen manufacture was an important industry in the County. At the time Ireland produced a large mount of flax. Cotton-spinning by jennies was first introduced by Robert Joy and Thomas M'Cabe of Belfast in 1777; and an estimate made twenty-three years later showed upwards of 27,000 hands employed in this industry within 10 miles of Belfast. Women were employed in the working of patterns on muslin. Torn linen cloth, recovered from the Dead Sea Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax plant. ... Binomial name Linum usitatissimum Linnaeus. ... Model of the spinning jenny in a museum in Wuppertal, Germany The spinning jenny is a multi-spool spinning wheel. ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Muslin is a type of finely-woven cotton fabric, introduced to Europe from the Middle East in the 17th century. ...


Notable residents

James Adair (circa 1709-1783) was a native of County Antrim, Ireland, who came to North America, and became a trader with the Native Americans of the southern states. ... John Bodkin Adams, (January 21, 1899–July 4, 1983) was a general practitioner in Eastbourne cleared of murdering one of his patients. ... Randalstown is a small town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, located in the north-east of Ireland between Antrim Town and Toome. ... Shown within East Sussex Geography Status: Borough Region: South East England Historic County: Sussex Admin. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Baptist is a term describing a tradition within Christianity and may also refer to individuals belonging to a Baptist church or a Baptist denomination. ... see also Holy Orders The following terms have traditional meanings for the Anglican Church, and possibly beyond: A churchman is in principle a member of a church congregation, in practice someone in holy orders. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Official language(s) English Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  Ranked 1st  - Total 663,267 sq mi (1,717,855 km²)  - Width 808 miles (1,300 km)  - Length 1,479 miles (2,380 km)  - % water 13. ... John OKane Murray (December 12, 1847-July 30, 1885) was a noted physician and author. ...

Flora and Fauna

Flora

Records of the seaweeds of Co. Antrim were brought together and published in 1907 by J. Adams [3] who notes that the list contains 211 species. Batter's list, of 1902,[4] contained 747 species from the British Isles and Channel Islands. Seaweed covered rocks in the UK Phycologists consider seaweed to refer any of a large number of marine benthic algae that are multicellular, macrothallic (large-bodied), and thus differentiated from most algae that tend towards microscopic size (Smith, 1944). ... Location of the British Isles The British Isles are a group of islands off the north west coast of continental Europe comprising Great Britain, Ireland and a number of smaller islands. ... This article is about the British dependencies. ...


See Also:

  • People from County Antrim

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
    1. ^ a b c (1967) Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 
  • ^ Cullen, Pamela V., "A Stranger in Blood: The Case Files on Dr John Bodkin Adams", London, Elliott & Thompson, 2006, ISBN 1-904027-19-9
  • ^ Adams, J. 1907. The Seaweeds of the Antrim Coast. Scient. Pap. Ulster Fish. Biol. Ass. Vol.1: 29 - 37
  • ^ Batters, E.A.L. 1902. A catalogue of the British marine algae being a list of all the species of seaweed known to occur on the shores of the British Islands, with the localities where they are found. J. Bot., Lond. 40 (suppl.): (2) + 107.

External links

  • Castle FM - County Antrim Radio Station
  • The Northern Ireland Guide: For information and reviews for locals and tourists alike

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Antrim, Ireland (County) - LoveToKnow 1911 (1918 words)
ANTRIM, a county in the north-east corner of Ireland, in the province of Ulster.
The chief routes are: - Belfast, Antrim, Ballymena (and thence to Coleraine and Londonderry); a line diverging from this at White Abbey to Carrickfergus and Larne, the port for Stranraer in Scotland; branches from Ballymena to Larne and to Parkmore; and from Coleraine to Portrush.
The county is divided between the Protestant dioceses of Derry and Down, and the Roman Catholic dioceses of Down and Connor, and Dromore.
County Antrim - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1394 words)
County Antrim (Contae Aontroma in Irish) is one of the six counties that form Northern Ireland.
It is situated in the north-east of the island of Ireland, in the province of Ulster.
The population of County Antrim is 566,000 (estimate).
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