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Encyclopedia > Country house

A country house is a large dwelling, such as a mansion, located on a country estate. A dwelling is a structure in which humans or other animals live. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. ... Estate: The term applies to land under ownership and as such is a generic term for a parcel of land held by an individual or family, common in early British Gentry. ...

Contents

Download high resolution version (1849x1137, 231 KB)Photograph of Woburn Abbey, created by Viki Male 26/08/04 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (1849x1137, 231 KB)Photograph of Woburn Abbey, created by Viki Male 26/08/04 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The layout of Woburn before partial demolition. ... Bedfordshire (abbreviated Beds) is a county in England that forms part of the East of England region. ... The titles of Earl or Duke of Bedford were created several times in the peerage of England. ...

Defining the Country House

The country house evolved from the castle or fortified mansion and from the Mediterranian villa. Historically, a country house was the center of an agricultural estate large enough to provide the landowner with sufficient income to be accepted as a member of either the aristocracy or the gentry. In the 19th century and earlier this generally required an estate of at least a thousand acres (4 km²) of land. A few landowners owned more than a hundred times this minimum, and this inequality within the ruling class is reflected in the range of country houses which were built. In the 19th and 20th centuries wealth from commerce and industry enabled acquisition of some historic country houses, so that they no longer required support of an agricultural operation. New rural country houses often were large villas without traditional farm appendages, or merely token farms, maintained frequently for recreational purposes. Pierrefonds Castle, France. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... A villa was originally an upper-class country house, though since its origins in Roman times the idea and function of a villa has evolved considerably. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The term aristocracy refers to a form of government where power is hereditary, and split between a small number of families. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The term ruling class refers to the social class of a given society that decides upon and sets that societys political policy. ...


A country house may be built in any architectural style. It will probably have at least 25 rooms and at least 8,000 square feet (740 m²) of floor space, including service rooms. There are many designations which are used by a large number of houses, such as "house", "hall", "castle", "park", "palace", "court", "abbey", "priory", or "grange", and this often reveals something about its history, especially if it originated before 1800. On the other hand, the name may have been chosen on the whim of the owner, especially if the house was built after 1800. For example, many country houses which are designated "castle" never had any military purpose. Architectural style is a way of classifying architecture largely by morphological characteristics - in terms of form, techniques, materials, etc. ... A house in Pathanapuram, Kerala (India) A house is a structure used for habitation by people that generally has walls and a roof to shelter its enclosed space from precipitation, wind, heat, and cold. ... A hallway at the Royal York Hotel Look up Hall, hall in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pierrefonds Castle, France. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... A trial at the Old Bailey in London as drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin for Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... A priory is an ecclesiastical circumscription run by a prior. ... Grange stone circle, Ireland A grange was originally an area of land in Ireland some miles away from an urban-based monastery where in mediæval times food was grown for the monastery. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF...


Most country houses have large grounds comprised of a garden in the immediate vicinity of the house, and a larger park beyond the garden which is grazed by animals, but also has aesthetic and recreational purposes. Many of the finest gardens in Europe are country house gardens. A garden is a planned space, usually outdoors, set aside for the display, cultivation, and enjoyment of plants and other forms of nature. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... For the chosen plaintext attack used by the British during World War II, see gardening (cryptanalysis). ...


A country house is typically several hundred metres from any other houses, but it may be close to the center of a village or even close to the center of a small town. (The larger the settlement the larger the house and grounds will need to be to retain its status as a "country house." Alnwick Castle in England is an example of a very large house which is in a town, but is generally perceived to be a country house. Some large houses originally built in rural locations are now surrounded by metropolitan suburbs. These may still be referred to as historical "country houses." Syon Park in the suburbs of London is an example. Masouleh village, Gilan Province, Iran. ... Ronda, Spain Main street in Bastrop, Texas, a small town A town is a community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... Alnwick Castle, from the east, across the pastures and the River Aln Alnwick Castle is a castle and stately home in Alnwick, Northumberland, England (grid reference NU187137). ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Syon House and its 200 acre (800,000 m²) park is in southwest London, in England. ...


In Britain and Ireland, the term country house is not simply a house in a rural location. It generally refers to a large house, large enough to be regarded as a mansion, which was built on an agricultural estate as the private residence of the landowner. There are several types of smaller houses which are common in the British countryside, but are not "country houses" in the sense in which the term is generally used, these include farmhouses, cottages, rectories, oast houses and barn conversions; anyone who owns one of these is less likely to refer to it as their "country house" than, more modestly, as their "country cottage", although both terms are used for "second homes" in the country. This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. ... FarmHouse Fraternity is an all-male international social fraternity founded at the University of Missouri in 1905. ... 19th century Cottages in the small hamlet of Crafton, Buckinghamshire In modern usage, a cottage is a dwelling, typically in a rural, or semi-rural location (although there are cottage-style dwellings in cities). ... The rectory is the title usually given to the building inhabited, or formerly inhabited, by the rector of a parish. ... Oast House in Tudeley, Kent, now in residential use An oast house is an example of vernacular architecture in England, especially Kent and Sussex. ... 19th century Cottages in the small hamlet of Crafton, Buckinghamshire A cottage is a small house of any period. ...


The term stately home is closely related to "country house," but it does not have quite the same meaning. "Country house" is the term usually preferred by architectural historians and by the owners of the houses. On the other hand, the term "stately home" is frequently used in the media, by tourist operators and members of the public. When someone refers to a "stately home," they are probably thinking of one of the largest and grandest ten per cent of country houses, especially those which are open to the public. The usage of the term "stately home" is discussed in more detail in a separate article. This article will use the term "country house." An invaluable reference is the website The DiCamillo Companion to British & Irish Country Houses, the only known attempt to document every British and Irish house every built, standing or demolished. This seminal project is the work of architectural historian Curt DiCamillo. A stately home is, strictly speaking, one of about 500 large properties built in England between the mid-16th century and the early part of the 20th century, as well as converted abbeys and other church property (after the Dissolution of the Monasteries). ... Tourists on Oahu, Hawaii Tourism is travel for predominantly recreational or leisure purposes or the provision of services to support this leisure travel. ... A stately home is, strictly speaking, one of about 500 large properties built in England between the mid-16th century and the early part of the 20th century, as well as converted abbeys and other church property (after the Dissolution of the Monasteries). ... Before accepting his current position as Executive Director of The National Trust for Scotland Foundation USA in 2004, Curt Jonathan Gough DiCamillo (born June 25, 1961) worked for thirteen years for the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. ...


Who Built the Houses, and Why

The architectural historian Mark Girouard argues in Life in the English Country House. that country houses were essentially "power houses" built to enhance the ability of the owners to influence local and national politics. Some of the great houses, such as Kedleston Hall and Holkham Hall, were certainly built to impress and to dominate the landscape. It should also be noted that not all country house builders had an interest in politics, even in an informal sense. Nevertheless, country houses often served as meeting places for the ruling class to discuss, for example, election campaigns. Also, many country house owners and members of their families served as Lord Lieutenants and Justices of the Peace, and local courts were still sometimes held in country houses well into the 19th century; this practice was a holdover from the Medieval manor courts. Country-house-owning members of the aristocracy and gentry continued, in diminishing degrees, to hold the highest office into the twentieth century. Alec Douglas-Home, 14th Earl of Home, was perhaps the last of this breed. Kedleston Hall was Brettinghams opportunity to prove himself capable of designing a house to rival Holkham Hall. ... Holkham Hall. ... Flag of a Lord-Lieutenant The title Lord-Lieutenant is given to the British monarchs personal representatives around the United Kingdom. ... A Justice of the Peace (JP) is a puisne judicial officer appointed by means of a commission to keep the peace. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The term aristocracy refers to a form of government where power is hereditary, and split between a small number of families. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home1, Baron Home of the Hirsel, KT, PC (July 2, 1903 – October 9, 1995), 14th Earl of Home from 1951 to 1963, was a British Conservative (actually SUP) politician, and served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for a year from October 1963 to October 1964. ...


In the 19th Century, the political power of the landowning class began its slow decline with the Great Reform Act of 1832, and the new class of industrialists slowly began, in many cases, to eclipse the wealth of the aristocracy and gentry. Many of these men bought or built new country houses, and the previously vital link to land ownership was slowly eroded. Some late 19th- and early 20th-century houses, such as Cragside, were never supported by an agricultural estate. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Reform Act of 1832 (2 & 3 Will. ... Industrialist mainly refers to a person who takes a leading or visionary role in the process of building up an industry over a long time. ... This page deals with property as ownership rights. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with The 20th century in review. ... Cragside is a country house near Rothbury in Northumberland, England. ...


The vast majority of country houses in Britain and Ireland were built before 1914. 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


The Architectural History of the Country House

The headings in this section are merely intended to provide a rough indication of the main periods in the architectural history of the country house: styles did not suddenly come and go in specific years, and many individual houses evolved slowly over several centuries.


The First Country Houses: Before 1500

Baddesley Clinton The moated manor of Baddesley Clinton, just north of the historic town of Warwick in the English county of Warwickshire, was probably established sometime in the 13th century. ...


The Tudor and Jacobean Periods: 1500-1630

Montacute House, the west front. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Oxon Hoath, showing the mansard dome Oxon Hoath is a manor house with 73 acres (295,000 m²) of grounds in Kent (just outside Hadlow, near Tonbridge) in the West Kent Rural Conservation Area. The spelling Oxen Hoath is a common alternative. ...

The Dissolution of the Monasteries

Many country houses in Britain were converted from ecclesiastical properties of the great abbeys and priories following the Dissolution of the Monasteries by the Henry VIII. This article should be transwikied to wiktionary Ecclesiastical means pertaining to the Church (especially Christianity) as an organized body of believers and clergy, with a stress on its juridical and institutional structure. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... dissolution see Dissolution. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 - 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland, later King of Ireland, from 22 April 1509 until his death. ...


Further information:

The layout of Woburn before partial demolition. ...

Prodigy Houses

The term refers to mansions that were "prodigious": "so great in size or force or extent as to elicit awe."

A drawing of Longleat in the early 18th century by Leonard Knyff. ... Wollaton Hall in the late 18th century. ... Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire is one of the most significant Elizabethan country houses in England. ... The great hall. ... Burghley House in 2004 Burghley House is a grand 16th-century country house near the town of Stamford, Lincolnshire, England. ...

The Formal House: 1630-1720

First Palladian Period

Further information:-


Inigo Jones Wilton House Inigo Jones, by Sir Anthony van Dyck Inigo Jones (July 15, 1573–June 21, 1652) is regarded as the first significant English architect. ... Jones and de Causs South Front and the Palladian Bridge (1736/7), in a view of circa 1820 Wilton House is an English country house situated at Wilton near Salisbury in Wiltshire. ...


The Baroque Country House

Main article: English Baroque

The baroque style arrived in England circa 1680. While Sir Christopher Wren and his contemporaries were influenced by baroque architecture from Europe, the first baroque house in England was Chatsworth House, designed by William Talman for the Duke of Devonshire, built during the 1690s. The style was quickly developed by such architects as Sir John Vanbrugh into what became known as English or Queen Anne baroque. The best known baroque house in England is probably Blenheim Palace, completed in the early 1720s. However, the truest example of baroque in England is Vanbrugh's first notable house, Castle Howard, begun in 1699. Baroque never became truly popular in England and by the mid 1720s had been almost completely superseded by the Palladian revival movement. Greenwich Hospital: Sir Christopher Wren, 1694. ... Adoration, by Peter Paul Rubens. ... Sir Christopher Wren, (20 October 1632–25 February 1723) was a 17th century English designer, astronomer, geometrician, and the greatest English architect of his time. ... Baroque architecture, starting in the early 17th century in Italy, took the humanist Roman vocabulary of Renaissance architecture and used it in a new rhetorical, theatrical, sculptural fashion, expressing the triumph of absolutist church and state. ... A view of Chatsworth from the south-west circa 1880. ... The South Front of Chatsworth from Colen Campbells Vitruvius Britannicus. ... The Dukes of Devonshire are members of the aristocratic Cavendish family in the United Kingdom. ... Sir John Vanbrugh in Godfrey Knellers Kit-cat portrait, considered one of Knellers finest portraits. ... The City of Wakefield MDCs Queen Anne style administrative HQ, County Hall, James Gibson and Samuel Russell, architects (1894-98) The Queen Anne Style of British and American architecture reached its greatest popularity in the last quarter of the 19th century, manifesting itself in a number of different ways... Blenheim Palace, The Great Court. ... The garden front of Castle Howard John Vanburghs complete project for Castle Howard, which was not all built. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... // Events January 6 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings February 11 - Sweden and Prussia sign the (2nd Treaty of Stockholm) declaring peace. ...


Other English Baroque Houses Include:-

Throughout this period, many smaller country houses continued to be built in semi-vernacular styles with only minimal baroque influence. Seaton Delaval Hall, drawn before completion, as Vanbrugh envisaged the house. ... Easton Neston is a country house near Towcester (pronounced Toaster) in Northamptonshire, England. ... Kemerton Court: baroque west façade Kemerton Court is the principal manor house of the village of Kemerton, near Tewkesbury in Gloucestershire. ...


The Classical Ideal: 1730-1790

The 18th century was the period when academic interest in architecture was at its peak among the British ruling class. The baroque style dominated the first twenty years of the century, but other major movements soon followed. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...


The Palladian Country House: The Second Palladian Period

Further information:-

Lyme Park, Cheshire designed by Giacomo Leoni. ... William Kent William Kent (born in Bridlington, Yorkshire, c. ... Sir Edward Lovett Pearce (1699 - 1733) was an Irish architect, and the chief exponent of palladianism in Ireland. ... Irish Palladianism. ... Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington and 4th Earl of Cork (April 25, 1694 – 1753) , born in Yorkshire, was a descendant of Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork. ... Palladian architecture is a European style of architecture derived from the designs of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580). ... Holkham Hall. ...

The Neoclassical Country House

Further information:-

Robert Adam Robert Adam (3 July 1728 - 3 March 1792) was a Scottish architect, interior designer and furniture designer, born in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. ... Kedleston Hall was Brettinghams opportunity to prove himself capable of designing a house to rival Holkham Hall. ... Syon House and its 200 acre (800,000 m²) park is in southwest London, in England. ...

The Gothic Revival and 19th Century Eclecticism

Tyntesfield, south side Tyntesfield is a Victorian Gothic Revival estate near Wraxall, North Somerset, England, in the Vale of Nailsea, seven miles from Bristol. ... Strawberry Hill is the name of several places: Strawberry Hill, London, England Strawberry Hill (Kansas City, Kansas) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Fonthill Abbey Fonthill Abbey — also known as Beckfords Folly — was a large Gothic-style building built in the turn of the 19th century in Wiltshire, England. ... Cragside is a country house near Rothbury in Northumberland, England. ... Waddesdon Manor. ... Eaton Hall in 1708. ... Wightwick Manor is one of only a few surviving examples of a house built and furnished under the influence of the Arts and Crafts Movement. ... Castle Goring is a country house in Worthing, in Sussex, England. ...

Twentieth Century Postscript

Life in the Country House

Social Structures

The country house was the centre of its own world, providing employment to literally hundreds of people in the vicinity of its estate. In previous eras, when state benefits were unheard of, those working on an estate were among the most fortunate, receiving secured employment and rent free accommodation. At the summit of these fortunate people were the indoor staff of the country house. Until the 20th century, unlike many of their contemporaries, they slept in proper beds, wore well-made, adequate clothes, received three proper meals a day and a small wage. In an era when many still died for lack of medicine or from malnutrition, the long working hours were a small price to pay. The 2001 movie Gosford Park, set in 1932, accurately recreated the stratified and repressed but secure atmosphere of the English country house just surviving into the post-World War I age. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... medicines, see medication and pharmacology. ... Percentage of population affected by malnutrition by country, according to United Nations statistics. ... Gosford Park is a 2001 film, directed by Robert Altman. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


The richer aristocrats owned more than one country house and would visit each according to the season (grouse shooting in Scotland, and pheasant shooting and fox hunting in England). The Earl of Rosebery, for instance, had Dalmeny in Scotland, Mentmore Towers in Buckinghamshire and another near Epsom just for the racing season. Genera Tetrao Lagopus Falcipennis Centrocercus Bonasa Dendrapagus Tympanuchus Grouse are from the order Galliformes which inhabit temperate and subarctic regions of the northern hemisphere. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II... Genera Ithaginis Catreus Rheinartia Crossoptilon Lophura Argusianus Pucrasia Syrmaticus Chrysolophus Phasianus † See also partridge, quail Pheasants are a group of large birds in the order Galliformes. ... A fox hunt Fox hunting is a form of hunting for foxes using a pack of scent hounds. ... The title Earl of Rosebery was created in the Peerage of Scotland for Archibald Primrose, 1st Viscount of Rosebery. ... Dalmeny Kirk Dalmeny is a village and parish in Scotland. ... Mentmore in the 1990s Mentmore Towers is a large English country house in the village of Mentmore in Buckinghamshire. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Epsom is a town in the borough of Epsom and Ewell in Surrey, England, to the south of Greater London. ...


Old and New Money

Changes in the Country House Lifestyle Since 1830

In 1830 the first passenger railway in England was opened, and within twenty years, most Britons had access to passenger train service. This was an important event in the history of the country house because travelling times within Britain began to fall sharply. The introduction of the motor car in the 20th century would accelerate this trend. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


The country house served as a wonderful place for relaxing, hunting, and running the country with one's equals at the end of the week. So necessary was the country house deemed to be, that following the election of the first Labour Government in 1921, Lord Lee of Farham donated his country house Chequers to the nation for the use of a Prime Minister who might not possess one of his own. Chequers still fulfils that need today as do both Chevening House and Dorneywood country houses, donated for sole use of high ranking ministers of the crown. “Hunter” redirects here. ... Chequers, or Chequers Court, is a large house to the south east of Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire, England, that sits at the foot of the Chiltern Hills. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Chevening, also known as Chevening House, is a country house in Chevening, Kent, in the United Kingdom. ... Dorneywood is a moderately large Queen Anne style house built in 1920, near Burnham in Buckinghamshire. ...


The Decline of the Country House

The decline of the English country house began during the Agricultural Depression of the 1870s and was dramatically accelerated by World War I. The huge staff required to maintain them had either left to fight and never return, departed to work in the munitions factories, or to fulfil the void left by the fighting men in other work places. On the cessation of war, of those who returned, many left the countryside for better paid jobs in towns. The final blow for many country houses came following World War II, when many houses which had been requisitioned by the government for use as barracks, hospitals and the like were returned to the owners in poor repair. Many of these had lost their heirs, if not in the immediately preceding war, then in World War I. They were now paying far higher rates of tax, while agricultural incomes from the accompanying estates had dropped. The solution appeared to be to demolish the house and sell its stone, fireplaces, and panelling. And this is exactly what happened to many of Britain's finest houses. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... A tax is a financial charge or other levy imposed on an individual or a legal entity by a state or a functional equivalent of a state (for example, tribes, secessionist movements or revolutionary movements). ... A natural gas fireplace with a burning fire. ... Panelling is a wallcovering constructed from interlocking wooden components. ...


The majority have fallen to the deprivations of modern life and become schools, hospitals, and prisons. Reduced from being 'Stately Homes', they are neither stately nor homes. Many, for example Cliveden and Hartwell House, have become luxury hotels, and many more, less luxurious hotels. These are among the fortunate few. In Britain during the 1950s and early 1960s more than 1,000 country houses were demolished. Students in Rome, Italy. ... For the record label, see Hospital Records. ... Look up home in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... View looking north from the Ring in the Parterre showing Terrace Pavilion and Clock Tower to the left with Lower Terrace and Borghese Balustrade below Cliveden should not be confused with Clevedon in Somerset Cliveden as seen from its lawn. ... Hartwell is a village in central Buckinghamshire, England. ... Dariush Grand Hotel,Kish island, Iran The 4-star Manor House Hotel at Castle Combe, Wiltshire, England. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ...


The Country House in Recent Years

It seemed as though the precipitous decline of the British country house would continue until there were very few survivors, none of them occupied as private residences. But in the seventies, the fortunes of the country house began to be change: The exhibition The Destruction of the Country House at the Victoria and Albert Museum in 1974 did much to focus attention on the disappearing country house, and the election of the Thatcher government in 1979 led to reductions in taxes on the rich. The role of the country house has continued to evolve, however, and the link between country houses and agriculture, the activity that gave birth to them, grows less significant each year. The Victoria and Albert Museum viewed from Thurloe Square. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC (born October 13, 1925), former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ... For the song by the Smashing Pumpkins, see 1979 (song). ...


Today in Britain, country houses are in a variety of ownerships and serve a variety of functions. Many, such as Montacute House, West Wycombe Park, and Lyme Park, are owned by public bodies including the National Trust and are open to the public as museums as part of the "Stately home industry". Some, including Wilton House and Chatsworth House and many smaller houses such as Pencarrow in Cornwall and Rousham House in Oxfordshire, are still owned by the families who built them, retain their treasures and are open during summer months to the public. A large number are still owned by an individual and are not open to the public, but some of these have been separated from their agricultural estates, and few houses of the highest architectural or historic importance fall into this category. Compton Wynyates and Badminton House are exceptions. Easton Neston in Northamptonshire, one of the last of the architecturally important country houses never to have been opened to public viewing, was sold by Lord Hesketh in 2005. Montacute House, the west front. ... The double colonnade on the south front of West Wycombe is highly unusual in English architecture. ... The south front of Lyme Park, Cheshire as rebuilt by Giacomo Leoni. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ... A stately home is, strictly speaking, one of about 500 large properties built in England between the mid-16th century and the early part of the 20th century, as well as converted abbeys and other church property (after the Dissolution of the Monasteries). ... Jones and de Causs South Front and the Palladian Bridge (1736/7), in a view of circa 1820 Wilton House is an English country house situated at Wilton near Salisbury in Wiltshire. ... A view of Chatsworth from the south-west circa 1880. ... Pencarrow A stately house in Cornwall, in the United Kingdom, Pencarrow is situated between Bodmin and Wadebridge, the house is approached down a long drive, almost 1 mile long. ... Cornwall (Cornish: ) is a county in South West England, United Kingdom, on the peninsula that lies to the west of the River Tamar and Devon. ... Rousham House is a Jacobean style country house in Oxfordshire, England. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... Treasure Originates from the Greek work the(from Greek θησαυρος; thesaurus, meaning a treasure of words, is a cognate) is a concentration of riches, often one which is considered lost or forgotten until being rediscovered. ... Compton Wynyates, Warwickshire, circa 1925 Compton Wynyates is a country house in Warwickshire, England. ... Badminton House is a large country house in Gloucestershire, England, and has been the principal seat of the Dukes of Beaufort since the late 17th century. ... Easton Neston is a country house near Towcester (pronounced Toaster) in Northamptonshire, England. ... Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ... Baron Hesketh is a peerage title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


According to "The Latest Country Houses" by John Martin Robinson (1984), between 1875 and 1975 1,116 country houses in the United Kingdom were destroyed, some quarter of the total. The worst periods were after the First World War and after the Second World War. The peak was in 1955, when 76 houses were destroyed. Dr John Martin Robinson, FSA, (b. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


However, a number of country houses have been built since 1945 (more than 200 according to Robinson's estimate, perhaps one third of the number lost in that time). Most have a functioning agricultural estate, varying in size from a few hundred acres to several thousands or more.


Few of these new houses have been distinguished either by great size or architectural merit. However, important examples include Eaton Hall, Cheshire (1971-1973 for the Duke of Westminster), Garrowby Hall, Yorkshire (1982 for the Earl of Halifax), and Sunninghill Park, Ascot (1988-1990 for the Duke of York). Eaton Hall is a mansion set within a large park near Chester in England. ... The Cheshire Plain - photo taken adjacent to Beeston Castle The Cheshire Plain - photo taken towards Merseyside The Cheshire Plain panorama - photo taken from Mid-Cheshire Ridge Cattle farming in the county Black-and-white timbered buildings on Nantwich High Street Cheshire (or, archaically, the County of Chester)[1] is a... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Charles Edward Peter Neil Wood, 3rd Earl of Halifax (14 March 1944 - ). His son and heir is James Charles Wood, known as Lord Irwin, (24 August 1977 - ). Categories: 1944 births | Peers ... Sunninghill Park is the official residence of the Duke of York. ... Statistics Population: Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SU925685 Administration District: Windsor and Maidenhead Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Berkshire Historic county: Berkshire Services Police force: Thames Valley Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Central Post office and telephone Post town: ASCOT... The title Duke of York is a title of nobility in the British peerage. ...


Today owning a 'Country House' can be a mixed blessing. Usually listed as a building of historic interest, they can only be maintained under Government supervision, often interpreted by the owners as interference as it is usually the most costly method that the Government inspectors insist upon. This system does, however, ensure that all work is correctly and authentically done; the negative side is that many owners cannot afford the work, so a roof remains leaking for the sake of a cheap roof tile. A roof tiled in imitation of thatch at Croyde, north Devon, England Rooftops in Vietnam Snow on the roof The roof, the top covering of a building, is one of the universal structures found on all buildings. ... Mission, or barrel, roof tiles A tile is a manufactured piece of hard-wearing material such as ceramic, stone, porcelain, metal or even glass. ...


For all the hardships of owning a country house, many people still aspire to own one. Those that do often labour night and day to retain the houses they feel privileged to have inherited.


Country Houses Around the World

Europe

Welsh country houses were perhaps only different from their English counterparts in minor ways, but Scottish, Irish, and Continental European country houses differed more substantially. Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II... This article is about the continent. ...


While almost all European countries possessed wealthy and powerful, landowning elites in past centuries, and probably all of them contain large houses located in the country, the social and architectural history of landowners' houses in these countries was generally very different from what happened in Britain and Ireland, where primogeniture has ensured that the entire estate passes entact from father to eldest son.


Houses with many similarities to the British country house can also be found outside Europe.


Russia

In Russia, the second homes of urban residents that are located in the countryside are called dacha. This term also applies to large country houses of the Russia's nouveau-riche. 19th century Cottages in the small hamlet of Crafton, Buckinghamshire A cottage is a small house of any period. ... Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. ... Dacha of Boris Pasternak in Peredelkino. ... For bands under the name Nouveau Riche, see Nouveau Riche (band). ...


See Also

A stately home is, strictly speaking, one of about 500 large properties built in England between the mid-16th century and the early part of the 20th century, as well as converted abbeys and other church property (after the Dissolution of the Monasteries). ... A historic house can be a stately home, the birthplace of a famous person, or a house with an interesting history. ... Holkham Hall, one of the grandest English country houses not only displayed the owners fashionable and cultivated tastes, but was the epicentre of a vast landed estate, providing employment to hundreds The English country house is generally accepted as a large house or mansion, once in the ownership of an... List of historic houses is a link page for any stately home or historic house. ... Ightham Mote For the London district, see Manor House, London. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ... The Historic Houses Association is a British non profit making organisation concerned with the preservation of privately owned country houses. ... The Treasure Houses of England is a heritage consortium founded in the early 1970s by ten of the foremost stately homes in England still in private ownership, with the aim of marketing and promoting themselves as tourist venues. ... Buitenplaats Frankendael in the Watergraafsmeer, near Amsterdam A buitenplaats (literally outside place) was a summer residence for rich townspeople in the Netherlands. ... Country House is a song by the band Blur. ...

External Links


  Results from FactBites:
 
English country house - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1862 words)
Country houses and stately homes are sometimes confused—while a country house is always in the country, a stately home can also be in a town.
The country house was not just a weekend retreat for aristocrats, but often a full time residence for the minor gentry who were a central node in the "squirearchy" that ruled Britain until the Reform Act of 1832 (as documented in The Purefoy Letters, 1735-53 by L G Mitchell).
Wilton House, one of England's grandest houses, is in a remarkably similar vein.
Country house - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2486 words)
The country house evoloved from the castle or fortified mansion and from the Mediterranian villa.
Historically, a country house was the centrepiece of an agricultural estate large enough to provide the landowner with sufficient income to be accepted as a member of either the aristocracy or the gentry.
Also, many country house owners and members of their families served as Lord Lieutenants and Justices of the Peace, and local courts were still sometimes held in country houses well into the 19th century; this practice was a holdover from the Medieval manor courts.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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