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Encyclopedia > Count
Coronet of a count
Coronet of a count

A count is a nobleman in European countries; The word count comes from French comte, itself from Latin comes—in its accusative comitem—meaning "companion", and later "companion of the emperor, delegate of the emperor". The British equivalent is an earl (whose wife is also a "countess", for lack of an Anglo-Saxon term). Alternative "Count" (Hakushaku) status are used in other countries with different names such as during the Empire of Japan. Coin showing a coronet A coronet is a small crown consisting of ornaments fixed on a metal ring. ... Look up count in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A countess is the lady of a count, or in Britain of an earl. ... The Lords and Barons prove their Nobility by hanging their Banners and exposing their Coats-of-arms at the Windows of the Lodge of the Heralds. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Comes,itis (genitive: comitis) is the Latin word for companion, either individually or as a member of a collective known as comitatus (compare comitatenses), especially the suite of a magnate, in some cases large and/or formal enough to have a specific name, such as a cohors amicorum. ... The accusative case (abbreviated ACC) of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a transitive verb. ... For people, see Earl (given name) and Earl (surname). ... Anthem Kimi ga Yo Imperial Reign Capital Tokyo Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor  - 1868–1912 Emperor Meiji  - 1912–1926 Emperor Taishō  - 1926–1989 Emperor Shōwa Prime Minister  - 1885-1888, 1892-1896, 1898, 1900-1901 Itō Hirobumi  - 1888-1889 Kuroda Kiyotaka  - 1889-1891 Yamagata Aritomo  - 1906-1908, 1911-1912 Saionji Kinmochi...

Contents

Definition

Main article: Comes

In the late Roman Empire, the Latin title comes meaning (imperial) 'companion' denoted the high rank of various courtiers and provincial officials, either military or administrative: before Anthemius was made emperor in the West in 467, he was military comes charged with strengthening defenses on the Danube frontier[1]. Comes,itis (genitive: comitis) is the Latin word for companion, either individually or as a member of a collective known as comitatus (compare comitatenses), especially the suite of a magnate, in some cases large and/or formal enough to have a specific name, such as a cohors amicorum. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Comes,itis (genitive: comitis) is the Latin word for companion, either individually or as a member of a collective known as comitatus (compare comitatenses), especially the suite of a magnate, in some cases large and/or formal enough to have a specific name, such as a cohors amicorum. ... Procopius Anthemius (c. ... This article is about the Danube River. ...


Military counts in the Late Empire and the Germanic successor kingdoms were often appointed by a dux and later by a king. From the start the count was in charge, not of a roving warband, but settled in a locality, a countship, his main rival for power being the bishop, whose diocese was often coterminous. This article is about the nobility title. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ...


In many Germanic and Frankish kingdoms in the early Middle Ages, the count might also be a count palatine, whose authority derived directly from the royal household, the "palace" in its original sense of the seat of power and administration. This other kind of count had vague antecedents in Late Antiquity too: the father of Cassiodorus held positions of trust with Theodoric, as comes rerum privatarum, in charge of the imperial lands, then of comes sacrarum largitionum (concerned with the strictly monetary fiscal matters of the realm) [1], Statue of Charlemagne (also called Karl der Große, Charles the Great) in Frankfurt, Germany. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... Late Antiquity is a rough periodization (c. ... Cassiodorus at his Vivarium library ( in Codex Amiatinus, 8th century). ...


The position of comes was originally not hereditary. By holding large estates, many counts were able to make it a hereditary title—though not always. For instance, in Piast Poland, the position of komes was not hereditary, resembling the early Merovingian institution. The title had disappeared by the era of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, and the office replaced with other institutions. Only after the Partitions of Poland did the title of "count" re-surface in the German-derived title hrabia. In the first centuries of its existence, the Polish nation was led by a series of strong rulers who converted the Poles to Christendom, created a strong Central European state, and integrated Poland into European culture. ... For other uses, see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Partitions of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (Polish: Rozbiór Polski or Rozbiory Polski; Lithuanian: Lietuvos-Lenkijos padalijimai, Belarusian: Падзелы Рэчы Паспалітай) took place in the 18th century and ended the existence of the sovereign Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ...

  • The title of Count was also often conferred by the monarch as an honorific title for special services rendered, without an actual feudal estate (countship, county), just a title, with or without a domain name attached to it. In the UK, the equivalent Earl is often a courtesy title for the eldest son of a duke. In the United Kingdom stringent rules apply, often a future heir has a lower ranking courtesy title; in Italy, by contrast, all the sons of certain counts are counts (contini). In Sweden there is a distinction between counts (swedish: greve) introduced before 1809 and after. All children in countship families introduced before 1809 are called count/countess. In families introduced after 1809 only the head of the family is called count, the rest had a status similar to barons and was called Mr. and Ms./Mrs. (before the use of titles was abolished).

A courtesy title is a form of address in systems of nobility used by children, former wives and other close relatives of a peer. ... A courtesy title is a form of address in systems of nobility used by children, former wives and other close relatives of a peer. ...

Comital titles in different European languages

The following lists are originally based on a Glossary on Heraldica.org by Alexander Krischnig. The male form is followed by the female, and when available, by the territorial circonscription


Etymological derivations from the Latin comes

Language Male title Female title / Spouse Territory
Albanian Kont Konteshë
Armenian Կոմս (Koms) Կոմսուհի (Komsuhi)
Catalan Comte Comtessa Comtat
English Count (applies to title granted by monarchies other than UK) Countess (even where Earl applies) Earldom for an Earl; Countship or county for a count, but the last is also, and indeed rather, in Anglo-Saxon countries an administrative district
French Comte — cfr. the variation ?Comtor Comtesse Comté
Irish Cunta; Iarla Cuntaois, Baniarla Honorary title only; iarla does not derive from Latin comes but rather from English "earl".
Italian Conte Contessa Contea, Contado, Comitato
Greek Κόμης (Kómēs) Κόμησσα (Kómēssa) Κομητεία (Komēteía); in the Ionian Islands the respective Italianate terms Kóntes, Kontéssa were used instead
Hebrew Rozen (רוזן) Rozenet (רוזנת) Roznoot (רוזנות); these do not derive from Latin comes.
Latin (feudal jargon, not classical) Comes Comitissa Comitatus
Maltese Konti Kontessa
Monegasque Conte Contessa
Old English Hlaford Hlǣfdiġe These do not derive from Latin comes.
Portuguese Conde Condessa Condado
Polish Komes Komesa Comitates
Romanian Conte Contesă Comitat
Romansh Cont Contessa
Scottish Gaelic Iarla Ban-iarla Honorary title only; iarla does not derive from Latin comes, but rather English "earl".
Spanish Conde Condesa Condado
Turkish Kont Kontes
Welsh Iarll Iarlles Iarllaeth; iarll does not derive from Latin comes but rather English "earl".

Catalan IPA: (català IPA: or []) is a Romance language, the national language of Andorra, and a co-official language in the Spanish autonomous communities of Balearic Islands, Catalonia and Valencia, and in the city of LAlguer in the Italian island of Sardinia. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For article about famous philosopher and sociologist, see Auguste Comte Comte is a title of French nobility. ... Conte is a title of Italian nobility. ... You may have been looking for the pencil manufacturer Conté. Conte is a title of Italian nobility. ... The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek: , Ionioi NÄ“soi) are a group of islands in Greece. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Comes,itis (genitive: comitis) is the Latin word for companion, either individually or as a member of a collective known as comitatus (compare comitatenses), especially the suite of a magnate, in some cases large and/or formal enough to have a specific name, such as a cohors amicorum. ... Monégasque (or Munegascu) is a Romance language based on Zeneize, the modern Ligurian language; it is spoken in Monaco and taught in schools there. ... Old English redirects here. ... Cond is part of the name of several communes in France: Cond -sur-lEscaut, in the Nord d partement Cond sur Ifs, in the Calvados d partement Cond -sur-Marne, in the Ardennes d partement Cond sur Noireau, in the Calvados d partement Cond sur Seulles, in the Calvados... Conte is a title of Italian nobility. ... Not to be confused with Romand which is one of the names for the Franco-Provençal language. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Cond is part of the name of several communes in France: Cond -sur-lEscaut, in the Nord d partement Cond sur Ifs, in the Calvados d partement Cond -sur-Marne, in the Ardennes d partement Cond sur Noireau, in the Calvados d partement Cond sur Seulles, in the Calvados... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Welsh peers hold their titles from a variety of sources. ...

Etymological parallels of the German Graf (some unclear)

Language Male title Female title / Spouse Territory
Belarusian Граф (Hraf) Графiня (Hrafinia) Графствa (Hrafstva)
Bulgarian Граф (Graf) Графиня (Grafinya) Графство (Grafstvo)
Croatian Grof Grofica Grofovija
Czech Hrabě Hraběnka Hrabství
Danish Greve Grevinde Grevskab
Dutch Graaf Gravin Graafschap
English Grave    
Estonian Krahv Krahvinna Krahvkond Butl
Latvian Grāfs Grāfiene Grāfiste
German Graf Gräfin Grafschaft
Finnish Kreivi Kreivitär Kreivikunta
Hungarian Gróf Grófnő, Grófné Grófság
Icelandic Greifi Greifynja
Lithuanian Grafas Grafienė Grafystė
Luxembourgish Grof Gräfin
Macedonian Grof Grofina
Polish Hrabia Hrabina Hrabstwo
Norwegian Greve Grevinne Grevskap
Romanian Grof (also Conte, see above)
Russian Граф (Graf) Графиня (Grafinya) Графство (Grafstvo)
Serbian Grof Grofica Grofovija
Slovak Gróf Grófka Grófstvo
Slovene Grof Grofica Grofija
Swedish Greve Grevinna Grevskap
Ukrainian Ґраф (Graf) Ґрафiня (Grafinya)

Greve is any of the following: Greve municipality, in Roskilde (county) on the island of Zealand (Sjælland) in Denmark Greve station, one of the railway stations in the Danish municipality Greve in Chianti, a town in Tuscany, Italy, at the center of the Chianti wine region Danish, Norwegian and... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Look up Grave in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Graf (disambiguation). ... Graf (from the Latin Grafio scribe from the Greek) is a German noble title equal in rank to a count (derived from the Latin Comes, with a history of its own) or a British earl (an original Anglo-Saxon title). ... Luxembourgish (Luxembourgish: , French: , German: , Walloon: ), also spelled Luxemburgish, is a West Germanic language spoken in Luxembourg. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Hrabina is a Polish female aristocratic title, reffering to the wife of hrabia (eng. ... Conte is a title of Italian nobility. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Greve is any of the following: Greve municipality, in Roskilde (county) on the island of Zealand (Sjælland) in Denmark Greve station, one of the railway stations in the Danish municipality Greve in Chianti, a town in Tuscany, Italy, at the center of the Chianti wine region Danish, Norwegian and...

Compound and related titles

Apart from all these, a few unusual titles have been of comital rank, not necessarily to remain there.

  • Dauphin (anglicized Dolphin, possibly an etymological match; Latin: Delphinus) was a multiple (though rare) comital title in southern France before it became (informally) the courtesy title of the heir to the French royal crown, in chief of the province still known as the région Dauphiné
  • Conde-Duque 'Count-Duke' is a rare title used in Spain, notably by Gaspar de Guzmán y Pimentel, Count-Duke of Olivares who had inherited the title of count of Olivares, but being created Duke of Sanlucar la Mayor by King Philip IV of Spain begged permission to preserve his inherited title in combination with the new honour — according to a practice almost unique in Spanish history; logically the incumbent ranks as Duke (higher than Count) just a he would when simply juxtapositioning both titles.
  • Archcount is a very rare title, etymologically analogous to archduke, apparently never recognized officially, used by or for:
    • the count of Flanders (an original pairie of the French realm in present Belgium, very rich, once expected to be raised to the rank of kingdom); the informal, rather descriptive use on account of the countship's de facto importance is rather analogous to the unofficial epithet Grand Duc de l'Occident (before Grand duke became a formal title) for the even wealthier Duke of Burgundy
    • at least one Count of Burgundy (i.e. Freigraf of Franche-Comté)
  • In German kingdoms, the title Graf was combined with the word for the jurisdiction or domain the nobleman was holding as a fief and/or as a conferred or inherited jurisdiction, such as "Markgraf" (Margrave - see also Marquess), "Landgraf" ('landgrave'), "Freigraf" ('free count'), "Burggraf" ('Burgrave', where burg signifies castle; see also Viscount), Pfalzgraf (see (Count) Palatine), "Raugraf" (Raugrave, see 'graf'. Originally a unique title) and "Waldgraf" (waldgrave (comes nemoris), where wald signifies a large forest).
  • The German Graf and Dutch graaf (Latin: Grafio) stems from the Byzantine-Greek grapheus or suggrapheus "he who calles a meeting [i.e. the court] together").
  • These titles are not to be confused with various minor administrative titles containing the word -graf in various offices which are not linked to nobility of feudality, such as the Dutch titles Pluimgraaf (a court sinecure, so usually held by noble courtiers, may even be rendered hereditary) and Dijkgraaf (to the present, in the Low Countries, a managing official in the local or regional administration of water household trough dykes, ditches, controls etcetera; also in German Deichgraf, synonymous with Deichhauptmann, 'dike captain').

Coat of Arms of the Dauphins of France. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Flag of the Dauphiné Dauphiné (Occitan : Daufinat, Arpitan : Dôfenâ, archaic English: ), usually referred to as the Dauphiné, is a former province in southeastern France, roughly corresponding to the present departments of the Isère (Isera), Drôme (Drôma), and Hautes-Alpes (Hiôtas-Arpes). ... Equestrian portrait of the Count-Duke of Olivares by Diego Velázquez. ... Look up Archduke in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The counts of Flanders ruled over the county of Flanders from the 9th century. ... The French word pairie is the equivalent of the English peerage, in the sense of an individual title carrying the rank of Pair (peer in English), which derives from the Latin par equal, and signifies the members of an exclusive body of noblemen and prelates, considered to be the highest... The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ... Cross of Burgundy Flag The Duchy of Burgundy, today Bourgogne, has its origin in the small portion of traditional lands of Burgundians west of river Saône which in 843 was allotted to Charles the Balds kingdom of West Franks. ... This is a list of the counts of Burgundy from 867 to 1678. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Doubs Haute-Saône Jura Territoire de Belfort Arrondissements 8 Cantons 116 Communes 1,786 Statistics Land area1 16,202 km² Population (Ranked 20th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... For other uses, see Graf (disambiguation). ... Margrave (Latin: marchio) is the English and French form (recorded since 1551) of the German title Markgraf (from Mark march and Graf count) and certain equivalent nobiliary (princely) titles in other languages. ... This article is about a title of nobility. ... Graf is a German noble title equal in rank to a count or an earl. ... Freigraf is a German noble title derived from the German language words frei (free) and the feudal title graf (count). ... A viscount is a member of the European nobility whose comital title ranks usually, as in the British peerage, above a baron, below an earl (in Britain) or a count (his continental equivalent). ... A Pfalzgraf or Count Palatine or Palsgrave functioned, especially in medieval times, as the permanent representative (grafio =scribe rather than Count) of the Frankish king and later Holy Roman Emperor in a pfalz or palatial domain of the crown, of which there were dozens throughout greater Germany. ... For other uses, see Graf (disambiguation). ... A waldgrave (or wildgraf, wildgrave, or waldgraf) was a nobleman of the rank of a graf (earl or count) who had authority over forests or uninhabited areas. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ...

Lists of countships

Territory of today's France

West-Francia proper

Since Louis VII (1137–80), the highest precedence amongst the vassals (Prince-bishops and secular nobility) of the French crown was enjoyed by those whose benefice or temporal fief was a pairie, i.e. carried the exclusive rank of pair; within the first (i.e. clerical) and second (noble) estates, the first three of the original twelve anciennes pairies were ducal, the next three comital comté-pairies: Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... Prince-Bishop was the title given bishops who held secular powers, beside their inherent clerical power. ... The word pair, derived via the French words pair/paire from the Latin par equal, can mean: the French equivalent of peer, holder of a French Pairie, French high title roughly equivalent to a member of the British peerage 2 (number), two of something Couple, various senses for two joined... The French word pairie is the equivalent of the English peerage, in the sense of an individual title carrying the rank of Pair (peer in English), which derives from the Latin par equal, and signifies the members of an exclusive body of noblemen and prelates, considered to be the highest...

Later other countships (and duchies, even baronies) have been raised to this French peerage, but mostly as apanages (for members of the royal house) or for foreigners; after the 16th century all new peerages were always duchies and the medieval countship-peerages had died out, or were held by royal princes The Bishop of Beauvais-Noyons-Senlis is a suffragan of the Archbishop of Reims. ... The French Catholic diocese of Châlons-sur-Marne comprises the department of Marne, excluding the arrondissement of Reims. ... Noyon is a small but historic French city in the Oise département, Picardie, on the Oise Canal, approximately 60 miles north of Paris. ... After the Visigothic Kings of Aquitaine (409-508), the Merovingian kings were kings and dukes in Aquitaine and dukes of Toulouse. ... The counts of Flanders ruled over the county of Flanders from the 9th century. ... The Counts of Champagne ruled the region of Champagne, France from 1022 to 1314. ... The system of appanage has greatly influenced the territorial construction of France and explains the flag of many provinces of France. ...


Other French countships of note included those of:

Angouleme (Angoumois) in western France was part of the Carolingian empire as the kingdom of Aquitaine. ... // Counts of Anjou, c. ... This is a list of the various rulers of Auvergne. ... In the middle of the 10th century, the territory of Bar (Barrois) formed a dependency of the Holy Roman Empire. ... The County of Blois was centred on Blois, south of Paris. ... Boulogne-sur-Mer became the centre of the County of Boulogne in the 9th century. ... County of Foix coat of arms The county of Foix was an independent medieval fief in southern France, and later a province of France, whose territory corresponded roughly the eastern part of the modern département of Ariège (the western part of Ariège being Couserans). ... The French lordship of Montpensier (départment of Puy-de-Dôme), which became a countship in the 14th century, was sold in 1384 by Bernard and Robert de Ventadour to John, duke of Berry, whose daughter Marie brought the countship to her husband, John I, Duke of Bourbon, in... Among the men who have borne the title of Count of Poitiers (or Poitou, in what is now France but in the Middle Ages became part of Aquitaine) are: Guerin (or Warin[us]) (638–677) Renaud (795–843) Bernard I (815–844) Emenon or Emeno (828 – 839), Ranulph I (835...

Parts of today's France long within other kingdoms of the Holy Roman Empire

Coat of Arms of the french town Mersuay and of the Free County of Burgundy until the 13th century. ... The now-extinct title of Count of Provence belonged to local families of Frankish origin, to the House of Barcelona, to the House of Anjou and to a cadet branch of the House of Valois. ...

The Holy Roman Empire

See also above for parts of present France


In Germany

See also Graf for various comital and related titles; especially those actually reigning over a principality that can be rendered as countship: Gefürsteter Graf, Landgraf, Reichsgraf; compare Markgraf, Pfalzgraf

For other uses, see Graf (disambiguation). ... Graf is a German noble title equal in rank to a count (derived from the Latin Comes, with a history of its own) or a British earl (an Anglo-Saxon title derived from the Viking title Jarl). ... Graf is a German noble title equal in rank to a count or an earl. ... Graf is a German noble title equal in rank to a count (derived from the Latin Comes, with a history of its own) or a British earl (an Anglo-Saxon title derived from the Viking title Jarl). ... MARGRAVE is the English and French form of the German title Markgraf (from mark march + Graf) and certain equivalent nobiliary (princely) titles in other languages. ... A Pfalzgraf or Count Palatine or Palsgrave functioned, especially in medieval times, as the permanent representative (grafio =scribe rather than Count) of the Frankish king and later Holy Roman Emperor in a pfalz or palatial domain of the crown, of which there were dozens throughout greater Germany. ...

In Italy

The title of Conte is very prolific on the peninsula, and modern counts occupy the position in rural society comparable to an English squire, members of rural gentry. In the eleventh century however, conti like the Count of Savoia or the Norman Count of Apulia, were virtually sovereign lords of broad territories. Even apparently "lower"-sounding titles, like Viscount, could describe powerful dynasts, such as the Visconti family who ruled a major city such as Milan. The essential title of a feudatory, introduced by the Normans, was signore, modelled on the French seigneur, used with the name of the fief. By the fourteenth century, conte and the Imperial title barone were virtually synonymous, but some titles of count, according to the particulars of the patent, might be inherited by the eldest son of a Count. Other younger brothers might be distinguished as "X dei conti di Y" ("X of the counts of Y"). However if there is no male to inherit the title and the count has a daughter, she can inherit the title: for example the Countess Luisa Gazelli di Rossana e di Sebastiano, mother of Queen Paola of Belgium. The Papacy and the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies might appoint counts palatine with no particular territorial fief. Until 1812 in some regions, the purchaser of land designated "feudal" was ennobled by the noble seat that he held and became a conte. This practice ceased with the formal abolition of feudalism in the various principalities of early-19th century Italy, last of all in the Papal States. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A viscount is a member of the European nobility whose comital title ranks usually, as in the British peerage, above a baron, below an earl (in Britain) or a count (his continental equivalent). ... Coat of Arms of the Visconti of Milan depicting the biscione, a serpent who appears to be swallowing a human, but is actually giving birth to it. ... Type Anti-tank Nationality Joint France/Germany Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA, Bharat Dynamics (under license) Date of design 70s Production period since 1972 Service duration since 1972 Operators 41 countries Variants MILAN 1, MILAN 2, MILAN 2T, MILAN 3, MILAN... Under the system of feudalism, a fiefdom, fief, feud or fee, consisted of heritable lands or revenue-producing property granted by a liege lord in return for a vassal knights service (usually fealty, military service, and security). ... Paola, Queen of the Belgians, born Donna Principessa Paola Margherita Maria Antonia Consiglia dei Principi Ruffo di Calabria (born September 11, 1937, Forte dei Marmi, Italy), is the queen consort of Albert II of Belgium. ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ...


Many Italian counts left their mark on Italian history as individuals, yet only a few contadi (countships; the word contadini for its inhabitants remains the Italian word for "peasant") were politically significant principalities, notably :

This article is bad because of the Italian region. ... The House of Savoy or in Italian, La Casa di Savoia, or simply Casa Savoia, (or Savoie, French) is a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region that includes present-day Piemonte, other parts of Northern Italy, and a smaller region in France. ... Asti is a city and comune in the Piemonte or Piedmont region, in north-western Italy, about 80 kilometres east of Turin in the plain of the Tanaro River. ... For other uses, see Montferrat (disambiguation). ... Montefeltro is the name of an historical Italian family who ruled Urbino. ... Tusculum, an ancient city of Latium, situated in a commanding position on the north edge of the outer crater ring of the Alban volcano, 18 km (11 miles) north-east of the modern Frascati. ...

Roman count

Count is one of the nobiliary titles granted by the Pope as temporal sovereign (of the Papal State), and is thus often known as Roman count, its holder signified as Cavaliere (Cav., literally Knight). The title, which can be for life or hereditary, has been awarded since the Middle Ages, mostly to foreigners, and the pope continued to grant titles even after 1870 and the loss of most of the Papal territory. By the Lateran Accord of 1929, the Italian government recognized and confirmed the pope's power to grant titles, and the titles granted by the Pope were considered equivalent to Italian titles, contrary to which it had never been abolished. However, the title has not been granted since Pope Pius XII, John McCormack being the last to receive this honor. For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Louis XIV, king of France and Navarre (Painting by Hyacinthe Rigaud, 1701). ... The State of the City of the Vatican or the Vatican City (Latin: Status Civitatis Vaticanae, Italian Stato della Città del Vaticano) is the smallest independent state in the world (both in area and in population), a landlocked enclave surrounded by the city of Rome in Italy. ... Knights Dueling, by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ... Pius XIIs signature Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the human head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death. ... John McCormack John McCormack (14 June 1884 - 16 September 1945), was a world-famous Irish tenor in the fields of opera and popular music, and renowned for his flawless diction and superb breath control. ...


In Austria

The principalities tended to start out as margraviate and/or (promoted to) duchy, and became nominal archduchies within the Habsburg dynasty; noteworthy are:

  • Count of Tyrol
  • Count of Cilli
  • Count of Schaumburg

Celje (German Cilli, Hungarian Cille) (46. ...

In Poland

Numerous small ones, particularly:

  • Counts of Galicia and Poland
  • Count Zaleski

Aleksandrowicz of Kruki. ...

In Galicia (Central Europe)

particularly see:

  • Counts of Galicia

Aleksandrowicz of Kruki. ...

In the Low Countries

Apart from various small ones, significant were :

  • in present Belgium :
    • Count of Flanders (Vlaanderen in local Dutch), but only the small part east of the river Schelde remained within the empire; the far larger west, an original French comté-pairie became part of the French realm
    • Count of Hainaut
    • Count of Namur, later a margraviate
    • Count of Leuven (Louvain) soon became the Duke of Brabant
  • in the present Dutch kingdom of the Netherlands:

The counts of Flanders ruled over the county of Flanders from the 9th century. ... The French word pairie is the equivalent of the English peerage, in the sense of an individual title carrying the rank of Pair (peer in English), which derives from the Latin par equal, and signifies the members of an exclusive body of noblemen and prelates, considered to be the highest... The virtually independent county of Hainaut emerged from chaotic conditions at the end of the 9th century as a semi-independent state, at first a vassal of the crown of Lotharingia. ... The following is a list of Marquis or Margraves of Namur. ... The Counts of Holland ruled over the county of Holland in the Low Countries between the 10th and the 16th century. ... The Counts of Zeeland were also count of Holland. ... The title of Count of Zutphen historically belonged to the ruler of the Dutch province of Gelderland (Zutphen being one of the major cities in the province during the medieval period). ...

In Switzerland

Location within Switzerland Neuchâtel 47. ... The Counts of Toggenburg (Grafen von Toggenburg) ruled the Toggenburg region of todays Canton of St. ... Kyburg is a small municipality of the Canton of Zurich (population 367 as of 2003), overlooked by the Kyburg castle from which it takes its name. ... Jerome, Count De Salis Image:Wappen-Salis. ...

In other continental European countries

In Iberia

As opposed to the plethora of hollow 'gentry' counts, only a few countships ever were important in medieval Iberia; most territory was firmly within the Reconquista kingdoms before counts could become important. However, during the 19th century, the title, having lost its high rank (equivalent to that of Duke), proliferated. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Iberian Peninsula, or Iberia, is located in the extreme southwest of Europe, and includes modern day Spain, Portugal, Andorra and Gibraltar. ... For other uses, see Reconquista (disambiguation). ... This article is about the nobility title. ...


Portugal

Portugal itself started as a countship in 868, but became a kingdom in 1139 (see:County of Portugal). Throughout the History of Portugal, especially during the Constitutional Monarchy many other countships were created (see: List of Countships in Portugal). History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... There are two Counties of Portugal in different periods of the History of the Iberian Peninsula: First County of Portugal formed by Vímara Peres that lasted from 868 to 1071. ... Portugal is a European nation whose origins go back to the Early Middle Ages. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... This is a List of Countships in Portugal: // Conde de Abrantes Conde de Agarez Conde de Agrolongo Conde de Águeda Conde de Aguiar Conde de Albuquerque Conde das Alcáçovas Conde de Alcântara Conde de Alcoutim Conde de Alegrete Conde de Alentém Conde de Alferrarede Conde de Alhandra...


Spain

In Spain, no countships of wider importance exist, except in the former Spanish march[citation needed].

History of Spain series Prehistoric Spain Roman Spain Medieval Spain - Visigoths - Al-Andalus - Age of Reconquest Age of Expansion Age of Enlightenment Reaction and Revolution First Spanish Republic The Restoration Second Spanish Republic Spanish Civil War The Dictatorship Transition to Democracy Modern Spain Topics Economic History Military History Social History... Coat of arms The Kingdom of Aragon at its greatest extent, c. ... Here is a list of the rulers of Aragon, now a region of north-eastern Spain. ... ... ... Count Cassius (8th century), also Count Casius, kumis Kasi or kumis Qasi, was a Hispano-Roman or Visigoth nobleman that originated the Banu Qasi dynasty. ... The Banu Qasi were a Muslim dynastic family that ruled the region of the Ebro Valley in Spain. ... County of Urgel an important medieval feudal fief in Northern Spain. ... This article is about the Spanish Autonomous Community. ... History of Spain series Prehistoric Spain Roman Spain Medieval Spain - Visigoths - Al-Andalus - Age of Reconquest Age of Expansion Age of Enlightenment Reaction and Revolution First Spanish Republic The Restoration Second Spanish Republic Spanish Civil War The Dictatorship Transition to Democracy Modern Spain Topics Economic History Military History Social History... Coat of arms The Kingdom of Aragon at its greatest extent, c. ... Pallars is one of the historical Catalan counties, collindant with the county of Ribagorça and the county of Urgell. ... Coat of arms of Roussillon - see also senyera Flag of Roussillon Mount Canigou (2785m), a Catalan landmark Roussillon (French: Roussillon, pronounced ; Catalan: Rosselló, pronounced ) is one of the historical counties of the former Principality of Catalonia, corresponding roughly to the present-day southern French département of Pyrénées...

Crusader states

The County of Edessa was one of the Crusader states in the 12th century, in a city with an ancient history and an early tradition of Christianity (see Edessa). ... Armenian Cilicia and Crusader States The County of Tripoli was the last of the four major Crusader states in the Levant to be created. ...

Equivalents

Like other major Western noble titles, Count is sometimes used to render certain titles in non-western languages with their own traditions, even though they are as a rule historically unrelated and thus hard to compare, which are considered 'equivalent' in relative rank. For other uses, see Peerage (disambiguation). ...


This is the case with:

  • the Chinese (伯), hereditary title of nobility ranking below Hóu (侯) and above (子)
  • the Japanese equivalent Hakushaku (伯爵), adapted during the Meiji restoration
  • the Korean equivalent Baekjak or Poguk
  • in Vietnam, it is rendered Ba, one of the lower titles reserved for male members of the Imperial clan, above Tu (Viscount), Nam (Baron) and Vinh phong (lowest noble title), but lower than — in ascending order — Hau (Marquis), Cong (Prince), Quan-Cong (Duke) and Quoc-Cong (Grand Duke), all under Vuong (King).

The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to enormous changes in Japans political and social structure. ...

See also

A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ...

References

  1. ^ An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors. University of South Carolina. Retrieved on 2008-04-10.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sources

  • Labarre de Raillicourt: Les Comtes Romains
  • Westermann, Großer Atlas zur Weltgeschichte (in German)

External links

Look up Count in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

(incomplete) Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ...

Pauly-Wissowa is the name commonly used for the Realencyclopädie der classischen Altertumswissenschaft, 1894ff, a German encyclopedia of classical scholarship. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
PBS - JAZZ A Film By Ken Burns: Selected Artist Biography - Count Basie (586 words)
Count Basie was a leading figure of the swing era in jazz and, alongside Duke Ellington, an outstanding representative of big band style.
After studying piano with his mother, as a young man he went to New York, where he met James P. Johnson, Fats Waller (with whom he studied informally), another pianist of the Harlem stride school.
The contract expanded and within a year the Count Basie Orchestra, as it had become known, was one of the leading big bands of the swing era.
Count - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1333 words)
Military counts in the Late Empire and the Germanic successor kingdoms were often appointed by a dux and later by a king.
From the start the count was in military charge, not of a roving warband, but settled in a locality, a countship, his main rival for power being the bishop, whose diocese was often coterminous.
In many Germanic and Frankish kingdoms in the early Middle Ages, the count might also be a count palatine, whose authority derived directly from the royal household, the "palace" in its original sense of the seat of power and administration.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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