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Encyclopedia > Cosmogony

Cosmogony is descriptive of a theory or belief concerning the coming into existence, the creation or origin of the universe and existence; it systematically depicts an origin belief about how reality came to be. The word derives from the Greek Kosmogonia - from Kosmos "the world", and the root of gineō "to be born". In the specialized context of space science and astronomy, the term is used to refer to theories of creation of the Solar System and their study (for example, the Solar Nebula theory). Theory has a number of distinct meanings in different fields of knowledge, depending on the context and their methodologies. ... Look up belief on Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... ... Look up Creation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Creation is the following: Generally, creation is the act or result of bringing something into existence from nothing at all. ... Cosmology, from the Greek: κοσμολογία (cosmologia, κόσμος (cosmos) world + λογια (logia) discourse) is the study of the universe in its totality and by extension mans place in it. ... This article needs to be updated. ... ... An origin belief is any story or explanation that describes the beginnings of humanity, earth, life, and the universe (cosmogony). ... Reality in everyday usage means everything that exists. ... Space science, or the space sciences, are fields of science that are concerned with the study or utilization of outer space. ... Lunar astronomy: the large crater is Daedalus, photographed by the crew of Apollo 11 as they circled the Moon in 1969. ... Presentation of the solar system (not to scale) The solar system comprises the Earths Sun and the retinue of celestial objects gravitationally bound to it. ... ã ...


Cosmogony can be contrasted with cosmology, which studies the universe at large and throughout its existence and technically does not inquire directly about the source of its origins. There is some ambiguity between the two terms, for example, the cosmological argument from theology regarding the existence of God is technically an appeal to cosmogonical ideas rather than cosmological ones. In practice, there is a scientific distinction that can be made between cosmological and cosmogonical ideas. Physical cosmology is the science that attempts to explain all observations relevant to the development and characteristics of the universe as a whole. Questions regarding why the universe behaves in such a way have been described by physicists and cosmologists as being extra-scientific, though speculations are made from a variety of perspectives which include extrapolation of scientific theories to untested regimes and philosophical or religious ideas. Cosmology, from the Greek: κοσμολογία (cosmologia, κόσμος (cosmos) world + λογια (logia) discourse) is the study of the universe in its totality and by extension mans place in it. ... The cosmological argument is an argument for the existence of God, also traditionally known as an argument from universal causation, an argument from first cause, and also as the uncaused cause argument. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It can also refer to the study of other religious topics. ... Michelangelos depiction of God in the painting Creation of the Sun and Moon in the Sistine Chapel This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and derived henotheistic forms. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Science For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). ... Cosmology, as a branch of astrophysics, is the study of the large-scale structure of the universe and is concerned with fundamental questions about its formation and evolution. ... Observation is an activity of an intelligent living being, to sense and assimiliate the knowledge of a phenomenon in its framework of previous knowledge and ideas. ... Speculation involves the buying, holding, and selling of stocks, bonds, commodities, currencies, collectibles, real estate, derivatives or any valuable thing to profit from fluctuations in its price as opposed to buying it for use or for income ( via dividends, interest etc). ... In mathematics, extrapolation is a type of interpolation. ... Philosophy (from the Greek words philos and sophia meaning love of wisdom) is understood in different ways historically and by different philosophers. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Attempts to create a naturalistic cosmogony are subject to two separate limitations. One is based in the philosophy of science and the epistemological constraints of science itself, especially with regards to whether scientific inquiry can ask questions of "why" the universe exists. Another more pragmatic problem is that there is no physical model which can explain the earliest moments of the universe existence (Planck time) due to a lack of a consistent theory of quantum gravity. Naturalism is any of several philosophical stances, typically those descended from materialism and pragmatism, that do not distinguish the supernatural from nature. ... The philosophy of science is the branch of philosophy that studies the philosophical assumptions, foundations, and implications of science, including the formal sciences, natural sciences, and social sciences. ... Epistemology is an analytic branch of philosophy which studies the nature, origin, and scope of knowledge. ... Scientific method as envisaged by one of its early exponents, Sir Isaac Newton, is fundamental to the investigation and acquisition of new knowledge based upon physical evidence. ... Pragmatism is a collection of many different ways of thinking. ... This is an incomplete list of some of the unsolved problems in physics. ... The Planck time is the natural unit of time, denoted by tP. It is considered the smallest possible measurement of time. ... Quantum gravity is the field of theoretical physics attempting to unify the theory of quantum mechanics, which describes three of the fundamental forces of nature, with general relativity, the theory of the fourth fundamental force: gravity. ...


Epistemological limitations to cosmogony

The assumptions of naturalism that underly the scientific method have led some scientists, especially observationalists to question whether the ultimate reason or source for the universe to exist can be answered in a scientific fashion. In particular, the Principle of Sufficient Reason seems to indicate that there should be such an explanation, but whether a satisfactory explanation can be obtained through scientific inquiry is debatable. Theistic explanations for origins indicate that one or more deity is the explanation, though some atheistic commentators point to this as an argument from ignorance or a God of the gaps fallacy. Naturalism is any of several philosophical stances, typically those descended from materialism and pragmatism, that do not distinguish the supernatural from nature. ... Scientific method as envisaged by one of its early exponents, Sir Isaac Newton, is fundamental to the investigation and acquisition of new knowledge based upon physical evidence. ... Observation is an activity of an intelligent living being, to sense and assimiliate the knowledge of a phenomenon in its framework of previous knowledge and ideas. ... The principle of sufficient reason, usually attributed to Gottfried Leibniz, states in rough terms that anything that happens, does so for a definite reason. ... Theism is the belief in one or more gods or goddesses. ... A deity or a god, is a postulated preternatural being, usually, but not always, of significant power, worshipped, thought holy, divine, or sacred, held in high regard, or respected by human beings. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub | Philosophy of science | Religious Philosophy | Theology ... Atheism, in its broadest sense, is an absence of belief in the existence of gods. ... The argument from ignorance, also known as argumentum ad ignorantiam or argument by lack of imagination, is a logical fallacy wherein a claim is made that lack of evidence for scenario A is instead evidence for scenario B, without additional evidence for scenario B. Two common forms of the argument... The god of the gaps argument is one used to contrast faith-based explanations for nature with those derived from science. ...


As a result of this, scientific cosmogonies are often supplemented by reference to metaphysical and theistic belief systems, through three classical paradoxes. These paradoxes (discussed by both Kierkegaard and Leibniz) are: Metaphysical may refer to: Metaphysics, a branch of philosophy dealing with the ultimate nature of reality; or The Metaphysical poets, a poetic school from seventeenth century England who correspond with baroque period in European literature. ... Theism is the belief in one or more gods or goddesses. ... Robert Boyles self-flowing flask fills itself in this diagram, but perpetual motion machines cannot exist. ... Søren Kierkegaard Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (May 5, 1813 - November 11, 1855), a 19th century Danish philosopher, has achieved general recognition as the first existentialist philosopher, though some new research shows this may be a more difficult connection than previously thought. ... Gottfried Leibniz Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (July 1, 1646 in Leipzig - November 14, 1716 in Hannover) was a German philosopher, scientist, mathematician, diplomat, librarian, and lawyer of Sorb descent. ...

  1. reconciling a doctrine of causation (similar to the 13th century proof of God posed by Thomas Aquinas);
  2. reconciling the conservation law ("something for nothing");
  3. reconciling issues of temporal (as in Zeno's paradoxes) and logical regression.

A scientific examination of cosmogony using existing physical models would face many challenges. For example, equations used to develop models of the origin do not in themselves explain how the equations came to be in the first place. It has been suggested that Causalism be merged into this article or section. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas [Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino] (c. ... In physics, a conservation law states that a particular measurable property of an isolated physical system does not change as the system evolves. ... Zenos paradoxes are a set of paradoxes devised by Zeno of Elea to support Parmenides doctrine that all is one and that contrary to the evidence of our senses, the belief in plurality and change is mistaken, and in particular that motion is nothing but an illusion. ...


Planck time limitations to cosmogony

Planck time (10-43s) is the time it would take a photon travelling at the speed of light to cross a distance equal to the Planck length. This is the "quantum of time", the smallest measurement of time that has any meaning. Within the framework of the laws of physics as we understand them today, we can neither measure nor discern any difference between the universe at the time it first came into existence and the universe anything less than 1 Planck time later. Thus, it exceeds the limitations of an empirically-based science to find evidence of the nature of the origin of the universe. The Planck time is the natural unit of time, denoted by tP. It is considered the smallest possible measurement of time. ... In physics, the photon (from Greek φως, phōs, meaning light) is the quantum of the electromagnetic field; for instance, light. ... Prism splitting light Light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength that is visible to the eye (visible light) or, in a technical or scientific context, electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength. ... The Planck length is the natural unit of length, denoted by . ... The word quantum, pl. ... ...


Although the laws of physics lose experimental support at the Planck time, modern science has sought to clarify the nature of these paradoxes, so far with only limited success. For example, one can apply the current understanding of grand unified theories (GUTs) – both quasi-classical (such as general relativity) and modern (such as quantum gravity, superstring, and M-theories) – to these three primary cosmogonic paradoxes in thought experiments. While these result in some inconsistencies and lack completeness in a mathematical sense (being based on axioms that are 'merely' self-evident, but not robust under the stresses of radical scepticism) these paradoxes can nonetheless be analyzed rationally using the subatomic applications of quantum cosmology, particularly through the employment of the Schrödinger wave equations. Scientific method as envisaged by one of its early exponents, Sir Isaac Newton, is fundamental to the investigation and acquisition of new knowledge based upon physical evidence. ... Grand unification, grand unified theory, or GUT is a theory in physics that unifies the strong interaction and electroweak interaction. ... General relativity (GR) is the geometrical theory of gravitation published by Albert Einstein in 1915. ... Quantum gravity is the field of theoretical physics attempting to unify the theory of quantum mechanics, which describes three of the fundamental forces of nature, with general relativity, the theory of the fourth fundamental force: gravity. ... Superstring theory is an attempt to explain all of the particles and fundamental forces of nature in one theory by modeling them as vibrations of tiny supersymmetric strings. ... M-theory is a solution proposed for the unknown theory of everything which would combine all five superstring theories and 11-dimensional supergravity together. ... In philosophy, physics, and other fields, a thought experiment (from the German Gedankenexperiment) is an attempt to solve a problem using the power of human imagination. ... In theoretical physics, quantum cosmology is a young field attempting to study the effect of quantum mechanics on the earliest moments of the universe after the Big Bang. ... Erwin Schrödinger, as depicted on the former Austrian 1000 Schilling bank note. ... The wave equation is an important partial differential equation which generally describes all kinds of waves, such as sound waves, light waves and water waves. ...


In each case, where general relativity fails as the curvature of space-time invokes singularities from its equations at t=0, the statistically "grey" nature of quantum cosmology tends to allow a scientific rationale to account for each paradox, and in so doing allows for a scientific perspective on previously theistic terrain. For example, application of quantum "fuzziness" (per the Wheeler-DeWitt application of subatomic position and momentum equations to universal radius and expansion) avoids boundary issues, as developed in the Hawking-Hartle Wave Function. General relativity (GR) is the geometrical theory of gravitation published by Albert Einstein in 1915. ... In theoretical physics, quantum cosmology is a young field attempting to study the effect of quantum mechanics on the earliest moments of the universe after the Big Bang. ... In theoretical physics, the Hartle-Hawking state, named after James Hartle and Stephen Hawking, is a hypothetical vector in the Hilbert space of a theory of quantum gravity that describes the wave function of the Universe. ...


All such equations are based on differentials, which assume a continuum, where in our universe, affected by the Planck length and other minimum scales, this continuum has only limited meaning, about which philosophy remains in a state of semantic flux. A differential can mean one of several things: Differential (mathematics) Differential (mechanics) Differential signaling is used to carry high speed digital signals. ... Look up Continuum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Discrete mathematics, sometimes called finite mathematics, is the study of mathematical structures that are fundamentally discrete, in the sense of not supporting or requiring the notion of continuity. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cosmogony - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (938 words)
Cosmogony is descriptive of a theory or belief concerning the coming into existence, the creation or origin of the universe and existence; it systematically depicts an origin belief about how reality came to be.
Cosmogony can be contrasted with cosmology, which studies the universe at large and throughout its existence and technically does not inquire directly about the source of its origins.
As a result of this, scientific cosmogonies are often supplemented by reference to metaphysical and theistic belief systems, through three classical paradoxes.
Cosmogony - definition of Cosmogony in Encyclopedia (500 words)
So a cosmogony is an account of how the Universe came to be; hence, the creation story in the book of Genesis is one such cosmogony, and there are many others, both scientific and mythological.
Because of this, scientific cosmogonies are challenged by metaphysics and theistic belief systems, through three classical paradoxes of "causation," "conservation," and "time regression".
The equations used to develop models of the origin do not in themselves explain how the equations, for exampe the Schrodinger equation, came to be to allow quantum fuzziness in the first place.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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