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Encyclopedia > Cosimo de' Medici
Jacopo Pontormo: posthumous portrait of Cosimo de' Medici, 1518-1519: the laurel branch, il Broncone, was an impresa used also by his heirs.
Jacopo Pontormo: posthumous portrait of Cosimo de' Medici, 1518-1519: the laurel branch, il Broncone, was an impresa used also by his heirs.[1]

Cosimo di Giovanni de' Medici (April 10, 1389August 1, 1464), was the first of the Medici political dynasty, rulers of Florence during most of the Italian Renaissance; also known as "Cosimo 'the Elder'" ("il Vecchio") and "Cosimo Pater Patriae." Download high resolution version (2024x2721, 378 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2024x2721, 378 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Jacopo Carrucci (Pontormo, near Empoli, 1494 - 1557), usually known as Jacopo da Pontormo, or simply Pontormo, was a Florentine painter and portraitist, and one of the classic exemplars of the Mannerist style of the 16th century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 24 - Margaret I defeats Albert in battle, thus becoming ruler of Denmark, Norway and Sweden June 28 - Battle of Kosovo between Serbs and Ottomans. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February - Christian I of Denmark and Norway who was also serving as King of Sweden is declared deposed from the later throne. ... For the board game, see Medici (board game). ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ...

Contents

Biography

Born in Florence, Cosimo inherited both his wealth and his flair for business from his father, Giovanni di Bicci de' Medici. In 1415 he accompanied the Antipope John XXIII at the council of Constance, and in the same year he was named Priore of the Republic. Later he acted frequently as ambassador, showing a prudence for which he became renowned. Giovanni di Bicci de Medici (1360 – February 20 or February 28, 1429) was the founder of the famous and powerful Medici dynasty of Florence and the Medici bank; father of Cosimo de Medici (Pater Patriae), and great-grandfather of Lorenzo de Medici (the Magnificent). ... Events Friedrich I Hohenzollern (b. ... Antipope John XXIII Baldassare Cossa, (about 1370 – November 22, 1419), also known as John XXIII,was Pope or antipope during the Western Schism (1410–1415) and is now officially regarded by the Catholic Church as an antipope. ... The Council of Constance was an ecumenical council considered valid by the Roman Catholic Church. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ...


In 1433 Cosimo's power over Florence, which he exerted without occupying public office, began to look like a menace to the anti-Medici party, led by figures such as Palla Strozzi and Rinaldo degli Albizzi: in September of that year he was imprisoned, accused for the failure of the conquest of Lucca, but he managed to turn the jail term into one of exile. He went to Padua and then to Venice, taking his bank along with him. His grandson Lorenzo joined him after a failed attempt to raise an army to conquer the city by force. Prompted by his influence and his money, others followed him: within a year, the flight of capital from Florence was so great that the ban of exile had to be lifted, making Cosimo return a year later in 1434, to greatly influence the government of Florence (especially through the Pitti and Soderini families) and to lead by example for the rest of his long life. Year 1433 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Albizzi family was a Florentine family based in Arezzo and rivals of the Medici and Alberti families. ... For the Chrono Trigger character, see Lucca (Chrono Trigger). ... Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Lorenzo di Giovanni de Medici (c. ... Events May 30, Battle of Lipany in the Hussite Wars Jan van Eyck paints the wedding of Giovanni Arnoflini The Honorable Passing of Arms at the bridge of Obrigo The Portuguese reach Cape Bojador in Western Sahara. ...


Cosimo's time in exile instilled in him the need to quash the factionalism that resulted in his exile in the first place. In order to do this, Cosimo, with the help of favourable priors in the Signoria, instigated a series of constitutional changes to secure his power through influence.


In the political sphere, Cosimo worked to create peace in Northern Italy through the creation of a balance of power between Florence, Naples, Venice and Milan during the wars in Lombardy, and discouraging outside powers (notably the French and the Holy Roman Empire) from interfering. In 1439 he was also instrumental in convincing pope Eugene IV to move the Ecumenical council of Ferrara to Florence. The arrival of figures from the Byzantine Empire, including Emperor John VIII Palaiologos himself, started the boom of culture and arts in the city. This article is about the city in Italy. ... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Type Anti-tank Nationality Joint France/Germany Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA, Bharat Dynamics (under license) Date of design 70s Production period since 1972 Service duration since 1972 Operators 41 countries Variants MILAN 1, MILAN 2, MILAN 2T, MILAN 3, MILAN... The wars in Lombardy between Venice and Milan, lasted from 1425 to the signing of the Treaty of Lodi in 1454. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Events Battle of Grotnik, which ended the hussite movement in Poland Eric of Pomerania, King of Sweden, Denmark and Norway is declared deposed in Sweden. ... Eugenius IV, né Gabriel Condulmer (1383 - February 23, 1447) was pope from March 3, 1431 to his death. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      An... John VIII Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek Ιωάννης Η Παλαιολόγος, IōannÄ“s VIII Palaiologos) (December 18 1392 – October 31, 1448), was Byzantine Emperor from 1425 to 1448. ...


Cosimo was also noted for his patronage of culture and the arts, liberally spending the family fortune (which his astute business sense considerably increased) to enrich Florence. According to Salviati's Zibaldone, Cosimo stated: The Salviati were a prominent Florentine-Roman family. ...

"All those things have given me the greatest satisfaction and contentment (grandissima contentamento e grandissima dolcezza) because they are not only for the honor of God but are likewise for my own remembrance. For fifty years, I have done nothing else but earn money and spend money; and it became clear that spending money gives me greater pleasure than earning it (ed accorgomi che ancora sia maggior dolcezza lo spendere che il guadagnare)."[2]

He also hired the young Michelozzo Michelozzi to create what is today perhaps the prototypical Florentine palazzo, the austere and magnificent Palazzo Medici. He was a patron and confidante of Fra Angelico, Fra Filippo Lippi, Michelangelo and Donatello, whose famed David and Judith Slaying Holofernes were Medici commissions. His patronage enabled the eccentric and bankrupt architect Brunelleschi to complete the dome of Santa Maria del Fiore, and the dome was perhaps his crowning achievement as sponsor. Michelozzo di Bartolommeo (1391 - 1472?) (sometimes called Michelozzo Michelozzi, although some sources say this is an error), Italian architect and sculptor, was a Florentine by birth, the son of a tailor, and in early life a pupil of Donatello. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... The Palazzo Medici, also called the Palazzo Medici-Riccardi, is a Renaissance palace located in Florence. ... Fra Angelico, (c. ... Madonna and Child 1440-45, tempera on panel National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC Fra Filippo Lippi (1406 - October 8?, 1469), commonly called Lippo Lippi, one of the most renowned painters of the Italian quattrocento, was born in Florence; his father, Tommaso, was a butcher. ... Statue of Habacuc (popularly known as Zuccone) for the Giottos Bell Tower. ... Donatellos bronze statue of David (circa 1440s) is notable as the first unsupported standing work in bronze cast since classical times. ... The bronze statue Judith and Holofernes (1460), created by Donatello at the end of his career, can be seen in the Hall of Lilies (Sala dei Gigli), in the Palazzo Vecchio, Florence, Italy. ... Filippo Brunelleschi, 1377 - 1446, was the first great Florentine architect of the Italian Renaissance. ... The Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore is the cathedral church, or Duomo, of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Florence, noted for its distinctive dome. ...


In the realm of philosophy, Cosimo, influenced by the lectures of Gemistus Plethon, established a modern Platonic Academy in Florence. He appointed Marsilio Ficino as head of the Academy and commissioned Ficino's Latin translation of the complete works of Plato (the first ever complete translation). Through Ficino and others associated with the Academy, Cosimo had an inestimable effect on Renaissance intellectual life. Georgius Gemistos (or Plethon, Pletho), (c. ... For other uses, see Academy (disambiguation). ... Marsilio Ficino (Latin name: Marsilius Ficinus; Figline Valdarno, October 19, 1433 - Careggi, October 1, 1499) was one of the most influential humanist philosophers of the early Italian Renaissance, an astrologer, a reviver of Neoplatonism who was in touch with every major academic thinker and writer of his day, and the... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ...

The tomb of Cosimo de' Medici in San Lorenzo, Florence.
The tomb of Cosimo de' Medici in San Lorenzo, Florence.

On his death in 1464 at Careggi, Cosimo was succeeded by his son Piero 'the Gouty', father of Lorenzo the Magnificent. After his death the Signoria awarded him the title Pater Patriae, "Father of his Country", an honor once awarded to Cicero, and had it carved upon his tomb in the Church of San Lorenzo. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1997 KB) San Lorenzo church Cosimo de Medici il Vecchio, tomb in Florence, Italy File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Cosimo de Medici Metadata This file... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1997 KB) San Lorenzo church Cosimo de Medici il Vecchio, tomb in Florence, Italy File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Cosimo de Medici Metadata This file... Villa Medici in Careggi. ... Piero de Medici (the Gouty), Italian Piero il Gottoso (1416 – December 2, 1469), was the de facto ruler of Florence from 1464 to 1469, during the Italian Renaissance. ... For other uses, see Lorenzo de Medici (disambiguation). ... The Signoria was the government of medieval and renaissance Florence. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Cicero (disambiguation). ... Exterior from the Piazza San Lorenzo. ...


Issue

Cosimo married Contessina de' Bardi (the daughter of Giovanni, count of Vernio, and Emilia Pannocchieschi). They had two sons:

Cosimo also had an illegitimate son by a Circassian slave; Carlo (c. 1428 - 1492) became a prelate. Piero de Medici (the Gouty), Italian Piero il Gottoso (1416 – December 2, 1469), was the de facto ruler of Florence from 1464 to 1469, during the Italian Renaissance. ... Giovanni de Medici (riding the brown horse) with his brother Piero, Benozzo Gozzolis frescoes in the Magi Chapel of Palazzo Medici, Florence. ... Circassians is a term derived from the Turkic Cherkess (Çerkes), and is not the self-designation of any people. ...


See also

The Medici coat of arms The Medici family was a powerful and influential Florentine family from the 13th to 17th century. ... The History of Florence // Roman Origins Florences recorded history began with the establishment in 59 BCE of a settlement for Roman former soldiers, with the name Florentia. ... Lorenzo di Giovanni de Medici (c. ...

References

  1. ^ After the return of the Medici in 1512, Lorenzo di Piero formed a compagnia for carnival 1513, and called it Broncone; the Pontormo portrait was commissioned by Goro Gheri, Lorenzo's scretary. (John Shearman, "Pontormo and Andrea Del Sarto, 1513" The Burlington Magazine 104 No. 716 [November 1962:450, 478-483] p. 478).
  2. ^ Taylor, F. H. (1948). The taste of angels, a history of art collecting from Rameses to Napoleon. Boston: Little, Brown. pgs.65-66
  • Francesco Guerrieri, Patrizia Fabbri, (photography Stefano Giraldi), "Palaces of Florence" (Rizzoli, 1996), for the Palazzo Medici.
  • Tim Parks Medici Money: Banking, Metaphysics, and Art in Fifteenth-Century Florence.
  • Jacob Burkhardt, The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy (1860) 1878.
  • William Connell Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence 2002.
  • Dale Kent Cosimo De'Medici and the Florentine Renaissance.

Jakob Burckhardt (May 25, 1818–August 8, 1897) was a Swiss historian of art and culture. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Cosimo de' Medici
  • "PBS Medici: Godfathers of the Renaissance
Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
THE MEDICI FAMILY (604 words)
While the Medici family was predominant, Florence became the cultural center of Europe and also became the cradle of new Humanism.
Giovanni's son, Cosimo de Medici, was to be the real founder of the family's fortune.
The Medici family members were very interested in the rebirth of learning in Europe and under their patronage the Renaissance flourished.
The Medici, Michelangelo, and the Art of Late Renaissance Florence (2703 words)
In 1537 the young Cosimo de’ Medici (1519–1574) was plucked from relative obscurity in the Tuscan countryside to lead Florence after the assassination of his cousin Duke Alessandro de’ Medici (1511?–1537).
Cosimo’s control of Florence was equally ruthless, but he eventually won the grudging support of the Florentine citizenry––not simply for the economic and political expansion he had garnered for the city but for its greater military security.
Cosimo appointed Niccolò Tribolo to redesign the gardens of the Medici villa at Castello (outside of Florence) and the Boboli Gardens (behind the Palazzo Pitti) with fountains, grottoes, water tricks, and areas of trimmed and wild plantings.
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