FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Corvus (company)

Corvus Systems was a technology company founded by Michael D'Addio and Mark Hahn in 1979 and located in San Jose, Silicon Valley in the U.S.. Corvus was a pioneer when personal computers (PCs) were still considered home computers. Corvus pioneered taking PCs seriously by providing the first harddisk drives, data backup, and networking. Nickname: Capital of Silicon Valley Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California. ... A view of downtown San Jose, the self-proclaimed Capital of Silicon Valley. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... Typical hard drives of the mid-1990s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Network cards such as this one can transmit data at high rates over Ethernet cables. ...


The combination of disk storage, backup, and networking was very popular with primary and secondary education. A classroom would have a single drive and backup with a full classroom of Apple II computers networked together. Students would log in each time they used the computer and accessed their work. A large elementary school in Magome, Japan. ... Secondary education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Apple II was one of the most popular personal computers of the 1980s. ... Note: to sign yourself into Wikipedia, go to the login page. ...


Corvus went public in 1981 and was a moderate success in the stock market. In 1983 Corvus filed for Chapter 11 and "crashed". Its demise was partially caused by the lack of appreciation for standards such as Ethernet, and partially by mismanagement such as purchasing a PC clone company when there were too many clones being made and very few clone companies making money. A public company is a company owned by the public rather than by a relatively few individuals. ... The New York Stock Exchange A stock market is a market for the trading of company stock, and derivatives of same; both of these are securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. ... Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code governs the process of reorganization under the bankruptcy laws of the United States. ... Ethernet is a large and diverse family of frame-based computer networking technologies for local area networks (LANs). ...

Contents

Innovations

Disk Drives and Backup

The company hacked the Apple II OS to enable that home computer to use 5 MB or 10 MB harddisk drives and thus be used in small businesses. The Apple II normally was limited to the usage of 90 KB floppy disks. A typical usage was for storing large mailing lists that couldn't fit on a floppy disk. Many disk drives were initially sold to software engineers inside Apple Computer. A hack in progress in Lobby 7 at MIT. Hack is a term in the slang of the technology culture which has come into existence over the past few decades. ... The Apple II was one of the most popular personal computers of the 1980s. ... An operating system (OS) is a computer program that manages the hardware and software resources of a computer. ... A megabyte is a unit of information or computer storage equal to approximately one million bytes. ... A kilobyte (derived from the SI prefix kilo-, meaning 1000) is a unit of information or computer storage equal to either 1024 or 1000 bytes. ... A floppy disk is a data storage device that comprises a circular piece of thin, flexible (hence floppy) magnetic storage medium encased in a square or rectangular plastic wallet. ... A mailing list is a collection of names and addresses used by an individual or an organization to send material to multiple recipients. ... Software engineering (SE) is the profession concerned with specifying, designing, developing and maintaining software applications by applying technologies and practices from computer science, project management, and other fields. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ...


The drives were made by IMI and Corvus provided the hardware and software to interface them to Apple IIs, Tandy TRS 80s, and S-100 bus systems. Later IBM PCs and Macs were added to the list. These 5 MB and 10 MB drives were twice the size of a shoebox, were roughly as loud as a jet taking off, and cost $4000 and $5000. Corvus sold the drives as fast as they could be made. No other company sold hard-drives for PCs for two or three years. Tandy Corporation is the former name of the parent company of RadioShack Corporation, a Fort Worth, Texas-based company best known for its RadioShack electronics stores. ... TRS-80 Model I. TRS-80 was Tandy Corporations desktop microcomputer model line, and sold through Tandys RadioShack stores, in the late-1970s and 1980s. ... The S-100 bus, IEEE696-1983 (withdrawn), was an early computer bus designed in 1974 as a part of the Altair 8800, generally considered today to be the first personal computer. The S-100 bus was the first industry standard bus for the microcomputer industry, and S-100 computers, processor... IBM PC (IBM 5150) with keyboard and green screen monochrome monitor (IBM 5151), running MS-DOS 5. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ...


The drives offered a tape backup option using a VCR, which was a relatively new technology. Data was backed up at roughly one megabyte per minute which resulted in five or ten minute backup times. Even though Corvus had a patent on this technology, several other computer companies later used this technique. The video cassette recorder (or VCR, less popularly video tape recorder) is a type of video tape recorder that uses removable cassettes containing magnetic tape to record audio and video from a television broadcast so it can be played back later. ... A megabyte is a unit of information or computer storage equal to approximately one million bytes. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a state to a patentee (the inventor or assignee) for a fixed period of time in exchange for the regulated, public disclosure of certain details of a device, method, process or composition of matter (substance) (known as an invention) which...


Networking

In 1980 Corvus came out with the first commercially successful local area network (LAN) called Omninet. Ethernet at that time ran at four megabits/sec and cost one or two thousand dollars per computer. Ethernet also used a thick and heavy cable that felt like a lead pipe when you tried to bend it. The Ethernet cable ran around the ceiling and there was a junction box above each computer with a flat cable running down the wall to the computer. Local area network scheme A local area network (LAN) is a computer network covering a local area, like a home, office, or group of buildings[1]. Current LANs are most likely to be based on switched IEEE 802. ... Ethernet is a large and diverse family of frame-based computer networking technologies for local area networks (LANs). ...


Corvus's Omninet ran at one megabit/sec, used twisted pair cables and had a simple add-in card for each computer. The card cost $400 and could be installed by the end user. At the time, many networking experts said that twisted pair could never work because "the bits would leak off". Twisted-pair is now the networking standard for most LANs. 25 Pair Color Code Chart 10BASE-T UTP Cable Twisted pair cabling is a common form of wiring in which two conductors are wound around each other for the purposes of cancelling out electromagnetic interference known as crosstalk. ... Fitting an expansion card into a motherboard An expansion card in computing is a printed circuit board that can be inserted into an expansion slot of a computer motherboard to add additional functionality to a computer system. ...


Corvus Concept

Corvus also developed a Macintosh competitor called the Corvus Concept. This was the first pizza-box computer with a separate monitor and the Concept had the first monitor that could be rotated between landscape and portrait modes. The failure of the Concept was mostly related to the appearance of the IBM PC which was announced a month after the Concept was announced. Unix was later ported to the Concept at which point it was quite similar to the first Sun computer (developed later). The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... A pizza box is a cardboard box in which pizza is packaged, usually for take-out or pizza delivery. ... A computer display A computer display or computer monitor is an output device that is part of a computers display system. ... Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T employees at Bell Labs including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... Sun Microsystems, Inc. ...


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m