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Encyclopedia > Corpus Christi College, Cambridge
Colleges of the University of Cambridge

Corpus Christi College This is a list of the colleges within the University of Cambridge. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ...

Corpus Christi heraldic shield
                     
College name The College of Corpus Christi and the Blessed Virgin Mary in Cambridge
Motto There is a toast, Floreat antiqua domus (Latin: May the old house flourish), from which the college’s nickname, ‘Old House’, is derived
Founders The Guild of Corpus Christi
The Guild of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Established 1352
Previously named Informal: Bene’t College (this seems to have died out in the 1820s)
Location Trumpington Street
Admittance Men and women
Master Prof Oliver Rackham OBE
Undergraduates 250
Graduates 150
Sister college Corpus Christi College, Oxford
Official website
Boat Club website

Corpus Christi College (full name: The College of Corpus Christi and the Blessed Virgin Mary, in daily usage often referred to simply as Corpus) is a College of the University of Cambridge. It is notable for being the only college to have been founded by Cambridge townspeople, having been founded in 1352 by the Guilds of Corpus Christi and the Blessed Virgin Mary. It is the second-smallest college (after Peterhouse). The college visitor is the Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1082x1160, 409 KB)The crest of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Corpus Christi Procession in Germany This article is about the Catholic feast of Corpus Christi. ... Our Lady redirects here. ... Events June 4 - Glarus joins the Swiss Confederation. ... Oliver Rackham is a botanist and a Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. ... Obe can mean: Obe, in Afghanistan Ebenezer Obe, a Nigerian musician. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ... College name Corpus Christi College Named after Corpus Christi, Body of Christ Established 1517 Sister College Corpus Christi College President Sir Tim Lankester JCR President Binyamin Even Undergraduates 239 Graduates 126 Homepage Corpus Christi College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Full name Peterhouse Motto - Named after St Peter Previous names The Scholars of the Bishop of Ely St Peter’s College Established 1284 Sister College(s) Merton College Master The Lord Wilson of Tillyorn Location Trumpington Street Undergraduates 253 Postgraduates 125 Homepage Boatclub The chapel cloisters, through which Old Court... This is a list of Chancellors of the University of Cambridge, from about 1246 to the present day: Hugh de Hotton, c. ... HRH The Duke of Edinburgh His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (Philip Mountbatten), styled HRH The Duke of Edinburgh (born June 10, 1921), is the consort of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. ...

Contents

History

The licence to build an eighth college in the University of Cambridge was granted by Edward III in 1352 to the newly merged guilds of Corpus Christi and St Mary in the parish of St Bene't's. They immediately began the construction of a single modest court near the parish church and in 1356 it was ready to house a Master and two fellows, who drew up the college's statutes. Continuing their studies in theology and Canon law, they served as chaplains to the guild. This article is about the King of England. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Canon Law is the ecclesiastical law of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


The college's first couple of centuries saw its wealth increase, which was put on display as part of the Corpus Christi guild's annual procession. This involved parading through the streets to Magdalene bridge, before returning for an extravagant dinner. The parade continued until Henry VIII put a stop to it in 1535. “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... pie is nice Year 1535 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


Corpus is exceptionally rich in silver, but its greatest treasure is the Parker Library, one of the finest and most important collections of medieval manuscripts in the world. Its most famous possession is the Canterbury Gospels, probably brought to England in 597 AD by St. Augustine, when he was sent by Pope Gregory I to convert the people of Britain. However, it also contains the principal manuscript of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, works by Matthew Paris and Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, to name only a few. The Parker Library is the rare books and manuscripts library for Corpus Christi College, Cambridge; it is known throughout the world due to the invaluable collection over 600 manuscripts, particularly medieval texts, the core of which were bequeathed to the College in 1574 by Archibishop Matthew Parker. ... Folio 125r contains 12 scenes from the Passion The St. ... Events Saint Augustine is created Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Augustine of Canterbury (birth unknown, died May 26, 604) was the first Archbishop of Canterbury, sent to Ethelbert of Kent, Bretwalda (ruler) of England by Pope Gregory the Great in 597. ... “Saint Gregory” redirects here. ... The initial page of the Peterborough Chronicle. ... Self portrait of Matthew Paris from the original manuscript of his Historia Anglorum (London, British Library, MS Royal 14. ... Chaucer redirects here. ... Troilus and Criseyde is Geoffrey Chaucers poem in rhyme royal re-telling the tragic love story of Troilus, a Trojan prince, and Criseyde. ...


Christopher Marlowe is perhaps the college's most-celebrated son, having matriculated to Corpus in 1580. Although little is known about his time there, it is often believed that it was during his study for his MA that he began his work as a spy, a claim based on only a single cryptic statement by the Privy Council. In 1953 during renovation of the Master's Lodge a portrait of a man "in the 21st year of his age" was discovered. As the painting is dated 1585, the year Marlowe was 21, it is inevitable that it has been claimed as a portrait of the playwright himself. This article is about the English dramatist. ... Events March 1 - Michel de Montaigne signs the preface to his most significant work, Essays. ... SPY may refer to: SPY (spiders), ticker symbol for Standard & Poors Depository Receipts SPY (magazine), a satirical monthly, trademarked all-caps SPY (Ivory Coast), airport code for San Pédro, Côte dIvoire SPY (Ship Planning Yard), a U.S. Navy acronym SPY, short for MOWAG SPY, a... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... 1585 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. ...


In recent years, the College has spearheaded the Northern Ireland Initiative which was set up to encourage students from Northern Ireland to apply to Oxbridge, but particularly Cambridge. They hold "Cambridge Taster Days" across the province and Dr. Melanie Taylor spends much of her year travelling around Northern Ireland talking to prospective students and allaying their fears over the interviews and other myths that have appeared over the years. Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ...


The college is the venue of the Intelligence History Seminar, a group of postgraduate historians that discuss newly released intelligence documents. These weekly meetings are presided over by the College's current President, Prof. Christopher Andrew. Invited guests occasionally include past members of the British and other intelligence services. At this seminar, views are expressed according to the Chatham House Rule and under an informal agreement with the group's members such views cannot be published. Christopher Maurice Andrew (born 23 July 1941) is a British historian and professor with a special interest in international relations and in particular the history of intelligence services. ... The Chatham House Rule originated at the Royal Institute of International Affairs with the aim of guaranteeing anonymity to those speaking within its walls in order that better international relations could be achieved. ...


In May 2007, following the resignation of Professor Sir Alan Wilson as Master, Professor Paul Mellars, FBA, was appointed acting Master [1]. Professor Oliver Rackham was elected to the position of Master for a period of one year on 15 October 2007. In July 2007, Corpus retained its position of 8th in the Tompkins Table with a score of 65.57% (25.9% firsts). [2] For other persons named Sir Alan Wilson, see Sir Alan Wilson (disambiguation). ... Oliver Rackham is a botanist and a Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. ... The Tompkins Table is an annual ranking that lists the colleges of the University of Cambridge in order of their students performances in that years final examinations. ...


Buildings

Inside the New Court facing the Chapel
Inside the New Court facing the Chapel

Old Court, built in the 1350s, is one of Cambridge's oldest buildings and retains many of its original features, including sills and jambs to hold oil-soaked linen in the days prior to the arrival of glass. The court was possibly built from the core of an even older building and is the oldest courtyard in Oxford or Cambridge (a claim disputed by Merton College, Oxford who say the same of their Mob Quad) as well as, some say, the oldest continually inhabited courtyard in the country. A new library complex, designed by Wright & Wright Architects, is in the process of being built in the building on the corner of Trumptington and Bene't Street that used to house the NatWest Bank. New Court of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge File links The following pages link to this file: Corpus Christi College, Cambridge Categories: User-created public domain images ... New Court of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge File links The following pages link to this file: Corpus Christi College, Cambridge Categories: User-created public domain images ... and of the Merton College College name The House of Scholars of Merton Named after Walter de Merton Established 1264 Sister college Peterhouse, Cambridge Warden Prof. ... An old picture of Mob Quad Mob Quad is a four sided group of buildings in Merton College, Oxford surrounding a small lawn. ...


St Bene't's church next door is itself the oldest building in the city, and served as the college's chapel until one was built in around 1500.


New Court (completed 1827) was designed by William Wilkins, who is buried in the college chapel. New Court is also the site of the Parker Library, which was begun in 1376 and much improved by a bequest from Matthew Parker, the college's Master between 1544 and 1553, who as Archbishop of Canterbury formed a fine collection of manuscripts from the libraries of dissolved monasteries. This court also houses Butler Library, which is the college's main library used by students. Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... William Wilkins (31 August 1778 — 31 August 1839) was an English architect, classicist and archaeologist. ... The Parker Library is the rare books and manuscripts library for Corpus Christi College, Cambridge; it is known throughout the world due to the invaluable collection over 600 manuscripts, particularly medieval texts, the core of which were bequeathed to the College in 1574 by Archibishop Matthew Parker. ... Matthew Parker Matthew Parker (August 6, 1504 - May 17, 1575) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1559. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... For other uses of the term dissolution see Dissolution. ...


There are also several outlying college properties. These include Bene't Street Hostel and Botolph Court, the former being located just above The Eagle These house students of all years, but a large proportion of rooms are occupied by freshers. Newnham House, which is located near to Newnham College, accommodates mostly second-years. The Robert Beldam Building, adjacent to Bene't Street Hostel is a modern accommodation block. There are also 2 houses (Nos 6 & 8) in Trumpington Street which are almost directly opposite the University Engineering Department, though these have been rented to private tenants since 1999. There is also a graduate campus at Leckhampton, which is situated about a mile west of the main college site, just outside the city centre. Here there are playing fields, 9½ acres (38,000 m²) of gardens, an open air swimming pool and some of the best graduate housing in the University. Main signboard of The Eagle, as seen from Corpus Christi College accommodation above The Eagle is a moderately common pub name. ... Full name Newnham College Motto - Named after Its location in the village of Newnham Previous names Newnham Hall Established 1871 Sister College(s) Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford Principal Dame Patricia Hodgson Location Sidgwick Avenue Undergraduates 396 Postgraduates 120 Homepage N/A A view of the Clough and Kennedy buildings of... The Cambridge University Engineering Department (CUED) at the University of Cambridge is the largest department in this university. ... The George Thomson Building and Leckhampton House Henry Moore sculpture at Leckhampton Leckhampton is the residential site for graduate students of Corpus Christi College of the University of Cambridge. ...


Oddities, traditions, myths and legends

Dining hall panorama
Dining hall panorama

As with all old institutions, Corpus has many legends, traditions and general oddities. Here is a sampling: Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 592 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1012 × 1024 pixel, file size: 741 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) dining hall panorama I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 592 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1012 × 1024 pixel, file size: 741 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) dining hall panorama I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

  • Corpus owns The Eagle Pub (though it is managed by Greene King). Watson and Crick are said to have refreshed themselves in this pub while deliberating over the structure of DNA.
  • The chapel's three windows by the same stained-glass artist appear at the beginning of a story by M.R. James, The Treasure of Abbot Thomas.
  • In Corpus slang, a bop is called a 'slack', and members of the college often refer to themselves as 'Corpuscles'.[1]
  • Each Lent term, a one day series of competitions is held against Corpus Cambridge's sister college, Corpus Christi College, Oxford. This competition, the Corpus Challenge, encompasses a number of different field and bar sports and is alternately hosted at Cambridge and Oxford. The 2006 challenge was held in Cambridge and was won by Cambridge for the first time since 1998, with victories in mixed lacrosse, badminton, men's hockey, mixed hockey, ladies football and mixed netball. The 2007 challenge was held in Oxford and won by Oxford.
  • The mathematics society is named "T. Batterby" after the last Corpus recipient of the wooden spoon. The spoon is still in the college's possession. and hangs in the Red McCurdy Room
  • The law society is named after Nicholas Bacon.
  • While the College is known for playwright Christopher Marlowe, its drama society is named the Fletcher Players, after John Fletcher.
  • The college Grace is read in Latin at formal dinners in the dining hall. The grace runs as follows: "Benedic, Domine, nobis et his donis tuis, quae de tuae largitate sumus sumpturi, et concede ut, iis salubriter nutriti, tibi debitum obsequium praestare valeamus. Per Christum, Dominum nostrum", to which the response is called out "Amen." When the fellows leave the following is said "Laus Deo, Per Jesum Christum, Dominum nostrum", to which the response is called out "Deo Gratias".
  • On Sundays and Feast Days, the Grace is preceded by the following antiphon: "Mensae caelestis participes faciat nos Rex gloriae aeternae".
  • The College is said to be haunted by a number of ghosts. Most famous, and feared, is the terrifying apparition of Henry Butts, hero of the plague of 1630, who hanged himself with his garters in the then Master's Lodge on Easter Sunday, 1632 [2]. Butts' ghost was subject to an attempted (and purportedly unsuccessful) exorcism by three students in 1904.[3] Another is that of Elisabeth Spencer, daughter of the master, and her young lover (both dead in 1667). Their ghosts are said to walk on Christmas Eve.[2]
  • Corpus was the only college not to sell its silverware in support of either side during the Civil War. That - and its unrivaled collection of manuscripts and massive collection of rare wines and ports - fuels rumours that it is Cambridge's richest college per student. This is a moot point, since these assets cannot be sold and most cannot be valued.[2]
  • Part of one of the college's buildings, Botolph Court, which houses some 30 students, is said to be built on top of a 17th century plague pit and slowly sinking into it. This rumour is supported by the old basement under the building, sloping walls and floors and that the building lies just outside the old city wall. The other part is medieval.[2].
  • The nickname 'Old House' has historically been used to refer to the whole college, but most usually (if, nowadays, at all) to designate the main college buildings, as opposed to outlying places like Leckhampton (e.g. "After my morning swim at Leckers, I'm going to eat lunch at Old House"). It is no longer in common usage among undergraduates (save for in the Latin form, Floreat antiqua domus (i.e. May the old house flourish), in the college toast), but it is occasionally used by fellows, postgraduates and college staff.[4]

Main signboard of The Eagle, as seen from Corpus Christi College accommodation above The Eagle is a moderately common pub name. ... Greene King is a brewery in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, UK. There is a visitor centre next door to the brewery. ... Watson and Crick refers to the duo of James D. Watson and Francis Crick, who, with the work of Rosalind Franklin, discovered the structure of the DNA molecule in 1953 and for this discovery were awarded the 1962 Nobel Prize award, along with Maurice Wilkins. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ... Montague Rhodes James, (August 1, 1862–June 12, 1936). ... Bop is a term often used at Universities within the United Kingdom to indicate a club-night. ... College name Corpus Christi College Named after Corpus Christi, Body of Christ Established 1517 Sister College Corpus Christi College President Sir Tim Lankester JCR President Binyamin Even Undergraduates 239 Graduates 126 Homepage Corpus Christi College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... A wooden spoon is a mock or real award, usually given to an individual or team which has come last in a competition, but sometimes also to runners-up. ... Sir Nicholas Bacon (Unknown artist, 1579) Sir Nicholas Bacon (1509–February 20, 1579) was an English politician during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England, notable as Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, and as the father of philosopher/statesman Sir Francis Bacon. ... This article is about the English dramatist. ... John Fletcher (1579-1625) was a Jacobean playwright. ... Look up plague in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Events February 22 - Native American Quadequine introduces Popcorn to English colonists. ... Easter (also called Pascha) is generally accounted the most important holiday of the Christian year, observed March or April each year to celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus from the dead (after his death by crucifixion; see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year, almost two... See also: 1632 (novel) Events February 22 - Galileos Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems is published July 23 - 300 colonists for New France depart Dieppe November 8 - Wladyslaw IV Waza elected king of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth after Zygmunt III Waza death November 16 - Battle of Lützen... Saint Francis exorcised demons in Arezzo, fresco of Giotto Exorcism (from Late Latin exorcismus, from Greek exorkizein - to adjure, correctly pronounced exercism) is the practice of evicting demons or other evil spiritual entities from a person or place which they are believed to have possessed (taken control of). ... // Events January 20 - Poland cedes Kyiv, Smolensk, and eastern Ukraine to Russia in the Treaty of Andrusovo that put a final end to the Deluge, and Poland lost its status as a Central European power. ... The Christmas Eve (1904-05), watercolor painting by the Swedish painter Carl Larsson (1853-1919) Christmas Eve, the evening of December 24th, the preceding day or vigil before Christmas Day, is treated to a greater or a lesser extent in most Christian societies as part of the Christmas season. ...

Famous alumni

Name Birth Death Career
St Richard Reynolds 1535 Catholic Martyr
Matthew Parker 1504 1575 Archbishop of Canterbury
Nicholas Bacon 1509 1579 Politician
John Jewel 1522 1571 Bishop of Salisbury; leader in the English Reformation
Thomas Cavendish 1555 1592
John Greenwood 1593 Puritan and Separatist
Christopher Marlowe 1564 1593 Dramatist, poet, translator
Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork 1566 1643
John Fletcher 1579 1625 Playwright
Thomas Tenison 1636 1715 Archbishop of Canterbury
Stephen Hales 1677 1761 Physiologist, chemist and inventor
William Stukeley 1687 1765 Antiquary
Richard Rigby Paymaster of the Forces
Richard Gough 1735 1809 Antiquarian
John James Stewart Perowne 1823 1904 Thelogian
John Cowper Powys 1872 1963 Writer, lecturer, philosopher
Llewelyn Powys 1884 1939 Writer
B.H. Liddell Hart 1895 1970 Military historian
Edward Upward 1903 Novelist
Christopher Isherwood 1904 1986 Novelist
John Chadwick 1920 1998 Classicist and decipherer of Linear B
Campbell Adamson 1922 2000 Director General of the CBI
E.P. Thompson 1924 1993 Historian, socialist, peace campaigner
Alistair Macdonald 1925 1999 Politician
Michael Mayne 1929 Dean of Westminster Abbey (1986-1996)
Alan Wilson 1939 Scientist, Former Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge
Neil Hamilton[3][4] 1947 Conservative MP (1983-1997)
Francis Maude 1953 Chairman of the Conservative Party
Peter Luff 1955 Conservative MP (1992-present)
Scott H. MacKenzie 1958 Historian, Scholar
Bernard Jenkin 1959 Shadow Minister for Trade and Industry and Deputy Chairman of the Conservative Party
Simon Heffer 1960 Journalist
Makhdoom Shah Mahmood Qureshi 1956 former minister of finance, planning and development & law, Government of Pakistan

Saint Richard Reynolds (died May 4, 1535) was an English Brigittine monk executed in London for refusing the Oath of Supremacy to King Henry VIII of England. ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... Matthew Parker Matthew Parker (August 6, 1504 - May 17, 1575) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1559. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Sir Nicholas Bacon (Unknown artist, 1579) Sir Nicholas Bacon (1509–February 20, 1579) was an English politician during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England, notable as Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, and as the father of philosopher/statesman Sir Francis Bacon. ... John Jewel (sometimes spelled Jewell) (May 24, 1522 - September 23, 1571), bishop of Salisbury, son of John Jewel of Buden, Devon, was educated under his uncle John Bellamy, rector of Hampton, and other private tutors until his matriculation at Merton College, Oxford, in July 1535. ... Arms of the Bishop of Salisbury The Bishop of Salisbury is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Salisbury in the Province of Canterbury. ... This box:      King Henry VIII of England. ... Thomas Cavendish (1555-1592) was born in Trimley St. ... see also 1. ... This article is about the English dramatist. ... Sir Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork, 1st Viscount Dungarvan, 1st Baron Boyle of Youghal, Lord High Treasurer of the Kingdom of Ireland. ... John Fletcher (1579-1625) was a Jacobean playwright. ... Thomas Tenison (September 29, 1636 – December 14, 1715) was an English church leader, Archbishop of Canterbury from 1694 until his death. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Stephen Hales (September 17, 1677 - January 4, 1761) was an English physiologist, chemist and inventor. ... The Rev. ... Richard Rigby, Secretary of Ireland, Paymaster of the Forces, was a member of the Rigby family also known as Rigby of Mistley Hall in Essex, the site of their manor. ... The Paymaster of the Forces was a British government position. ... Richard Gough (October 21, 1735 - February 20, 1809) was an English antiquarian, born in London. ... John James Stewart Perowne (March 3rd 1823 - November 6th 1904) was an English bishop. ... John Cowper Powys (October 8, 1872 - June 17, 1963) was a British (English-Welsh) writer, lecturer, and philosopher. ... Llewelyn Powys (August 13, 1884 - December 2, 1939), was a British writer, a younger brother of John Cowper Powys and T F Powys. ... Basil Henry Liddell Hart (October 31, 1895 _ January 29, 1970) was a military historian and is considered among the great military strategists of the 20th century. ... Edward Falaise Upward is a British novelist and short story writer, born Romford, England, 9 September 1903. ... Christopher Isherwood (left) and W.H. Auden (right), photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Christopher Isherwood (prior to 1946 Christopher William Bradshaw-Isherwood) (August 26, 1904 – January 4, 1986), Anglo-American novelist, was born in the ancestral seat of his family, Wybersley Hall, High Lane, in the north west of... John Chadwick (21 May 1920 – 24 November 1998) was an English linguist and classical scholar most famous for his role in deciphering Linear B, along with Michael Ventris. ... This article is about the ancient syllabary. ... CBI logo The Confederation of British Industry is a not for profit organisation incorporated by Royal charter[1] which promotes the interests of its members, some 200,000 British businesses, a figure which includes some 80% of FTSE 100 companies and around 50% of FTSE 350 companies. ... Edward Palmer Thompson (1924-1993) was a historian probably best known for his work The Making of the English Working Class, which included his reassessment of the Luddite movement. ... Alistair Huistean Macdonald (18 May 1925 – 6 February 1999) was a British Labour Party politician. ... Michael Mayne KCVO (b. ... For other persons named Sir Alan Wilson, see Sir Alan Wilson (disambiguation). ... Mostyn Neil Hamilton (born March 9, 1949) is a former barrister, teacher and Conservative Member of Parliament in the United Kingdom. ... Francis Anthony Aylmer Maude (born 4 July 1953) is a British politician, the Conservative Member of Parliament for Horsham, Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office, Shadow Minster for the Black Country and a member of the Privy Council. ... Peter James Luff (born 18 February 1955) is a British politician. ... The Honourable Bernard Christison Jenkin (born 9 April 1959) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... Simon James Heffer (born July 18, 1960) is an English journalist and writer. ...

List of Masters of Corpus Christi

Name Start of service End of Service
Thomas de Eltisle 1352 1376
Richard Treton 1376 ?
John Kynne ? 1389
John de Necton 1389 1398
Richard de Billingford 1398 1432
Walter Smyth 1443 1474
Simon Grene 1474 1477
Thomas Cosyn 1487 1515
John Edyman 1515 1516
Peter Nobys 1516 1523
William Sowode 1523 1544
Matthew Parker 1544 1553
Lawrence Moptyd 1553 1557
John Porie 1557 1569
Thomas Aldrich 1569 1573
Robert Norgate 1573 1587
John Copcot 1587 1590
John Jegon 1590 1602
Thomas Jegon 1602 1618
Samuel Walsall 1618 1626
Henry Butts 1626 1632
Richard Lowe 1632 1661
Peter Gunning 1661 1661
Francis Wilford 1661 1667
John Spencer 1667 1693
William Stanley 1693 1698
Thomas Greene 1698 1716
Samuel Bradford 1716 1724
Matthias Mawson 1724 1744
Edmund Castle 1744 1750
John Green 1750 1764
John Barnardiston 1764 1778
William Colman 1778 1795
Philip Douglas 1795 1822
John Lamb 1822 1850
James Pullin 1850 1879
Edward Henry Perowne 1879 1906
Robert Townley Caldwell 1906 1914
Edmund Courtenay Pearce 1914 1927
Sir William Spens 1927 1952
Sir George Paget Thomson 1952 1962
Sir Frank Godbould Lee 1962 1971
Sir Archibauld Duncan Wilson 1971 1980
Michael William McCrum 1980 1994
Sir Anthony Wrigley 1994 2000
Haroon Ahmed 2000 2006
Alan Wilson 2006 2007
Paul Mellars (Acting Master) 2007 2007
Oliver Rackham 2007

Matthew Parker Matthew Parker (August 6, 1504 - May 17, 1575) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1559. ... George Paget Thomson (May 3, 1892 – September 10, 1975), British physicist and son of Nobel Prize winning physicist J. J. Thomson. ... Michael William McCrum CBE (23 May 1924–February 16, 2005) was an English academic and ancient historian who served as Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge and Head Master of Eton College. ... Haroon Ahmed is Master of Corpus Christi College, University of Cambridge and Professor of Microelectronics at the Cavendish Laboratory. ... For other persons named Sir Alan Wilson, see Sir Alan Wilson (disambiguation). ... Oliver Rackham is a botanist and a Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. ...

See also

Corpus Christi College Boat Club (often shortened to Corpus) is the rowing club for members of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. ...

References

  1. ^ Life at Corpus - Glossary. Retrieved on 7 February 2007.
  2. ^ a b c d Rackham, Oliver (2002). Treasures of Silver at Corpus Christi College. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 052181880X. 
  3. ^ http://www.corpus.cam.ac.uk/about/history.htm#11
  4. ^ The Main College ("Old House"). Corpus Christi College MCR. Retrieved on 2007-10-01.

is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • http://www.corpus.cam.ac.uk/ - Corpus Christi College main page
  • http://www.corpus.cam.ac.uk/jcr - JCR page
  • http://www.corpus.cam.ac.uk/mcr - MCR page

  Results from FactBites:
 
Corpus Christi College, Cambridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1669 words)
The licence to build an eighth college in the University of Cambridge was granted by Edward III in 1352 to the newly merged guilds of Corpus Christi and St Mary in the parish of St Bene't's.
Corpus is exceptionally rich in silver, but its greatest treasure is the Parker Library, one of the finest and most important collections of medieval manuscripts in the world.
Christopher Marlowe was perhaps the college's most-celebrated son, having matriculated to Corpus in 1580.
Corpus Christi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (149 words)
Corpus Christi (feast), a Christian feast commemorating the institution of the Holy Eucharist.
The Corpus Christi Monastery in the Bronx, New York City.
Corpus Christi Elementary School, a Catholic school in Chambersburg, PA This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title.
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