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Encyclopedia > Corps
This article is about a military unit. For alternative meanings, see Corps (disambiguation).

A corps (plural same as singular; a word that migrated from the French language, pronounced IPA: /kɔər/ (cor), but originating in the Latin "corpus, corporis" meaning body) is either a large military unit or formation, an administrative grouping of troops within an army with a common function (such as artillery or signals), or a formed military or semi-military body (such as the United States Marine Corps, the Corps of Royal Marines, the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms, or the Corps of Commissionaires). The term Corps could refer to several things: a German Student Corps, a unique kind of university corporation an organisation unit of the French Civil Service the commune Corps in the Isère département of France a large military unit (main article for Corps) This is a disambiguation page... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... A military unit is an organisation within an armed force. ... A formation is a high-level military organization, such as a Brigade, Division, Corps, Army or Army group. ... For other uses, see Army (disambiguation). ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ... Her Majestys Bodyguard of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms is a bodyguard to the British Monarch. ...


A corps can also represent a group of personnel with common characteristics, training, and missions, such as volunteer, humanitarian, or social-progam organizations. Some examples are the Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, and the Mercy Corps. It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ... AmeriCorps is an American network of more than 3,000 non-profit organizations, public agencies, and faith-based organizations. ... Mercy Corps logo Mercy Corps is a non-profit organization engaged in humanitarian aid and development activities. ...

Contents

Military formation

Standard NATO symbol for a Corps, the X'es are not substituting the corps' number.
Standard NATO symbol for a Corps, the X'es are not substituting the corps' number.

In many armies, a corps is a battlefield formation composed of two or more divisions, and typically commanded by a lieutenant general. During World War I and World War II, due to the large scale of combat, multiple corps were combined into armies which then formed into army groups. The number of a corps is traditionally indicated in Roman numerals (e.g. XXI Corps), while the number of a division is usually written in Arabic numerals (e.g. 4th Infantry Division) and that of an army written in words (e.g. Seventh Army). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Army (disambiguation). ... An army group is a military organization (formation) consisting of several armies, and is supposed to be self-sufficient for indefinite periods. ... Roman numerals are a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, adapted from Etruscan numerals. ... Initially constituted on December 2, 1943 in the Army of the United States, the XXI Corps was activated on December 6, 1943 at Camp Polk, Louisiana. ... It has been suggested that U.S. 1st Brigade 4th Infantry Division be merged into this article or section. ... The German Seventh Army (German: ) was a World War II field army. ...


Australia

In the later stages of World War I, the five infantry divisions of the First Australian Imperial Force (AIF) — comprised entirely of personnel who had volunteered for service overseas — were united as the Australian Corps, on the Western Front, under Lieutenant General Sir John Monash. The First Australian Imperial Force (1st AIF) was the main expeditionary force of the Australian Army during World War I. It was formed from August 15, 1914, following Britains declaration of war on Germany. ... The Australian Corps was a World War I army corps that contained all five Australian infantry divisions serving on the British army in France. ... Combatants Belgium British Empire Australia[1] Canada[2] India[3] Newfoundland[4] New Zealand[5] South Africa[6] United Kingdom France and French Overseas Empire Portugal[7] United States Germany Commanders No unified command until 1918, then Ferdinand Foch Moltke → Falkenhayn → Hindenburg and Ludendorff → Hindenburg and Groener Casualties ~4,800... Sir John Monash General Sir John Monash, GCMG, KCB, VD (27 June 1865 – 8 October 1931), Australian military commander of the First World War, was born in Melbourne, Victoria, to parents of Prussian-Jewish origin (the family name was originally spelled Monasch). ...


During World War II, the Australian I Corps was formed to co-ordinate three Second Australian Imperial Force (2nd AIF) units: the 6th, 7th and 9th Divisions, as well as other Allied units on some occasions, in the North African campaign and Greek campaign. Following the commencement of the Pacific War, there was a phased withdrawal of I Corps to Australia, and the transfer of its headquarters to the Brisbane area, to control Allied army units in Queensland and northern New South Wales (NSW). II Corps was also formed, with Militia units, to defend south-eastern Australia, and III Corps controlled land forces in Western Australia. Sub-corps formations controlled Allied land forces in the remainder of Australia. I Corps headquarters was later assigned control of the New Guinea campaign. In early 1945, when I Corps was assigned the task of re-taking Borneo, II Corps took over in New Guinea. I Corps of the Australian Army was the main frontline corps of the army during World War II. Various Australian and other Allied divisions came under its control at various times. ... A Second AIF recruiting poster The Second Australian Imperial Force (2nd AIF) was the name given to the volunteer personnel of the Australian Army in World War II. Under the Defence Act (1903), neither the part-time Militia nor full-time the Permanent Military Force (PMF) could serve outside Australia... The 6th Division of the Australian Army was a unit in the Second Australian Imperial Force (2nd AIF) during World War II. It served in the North African campaign, the Greek campaign and the New Guinea campaign, including the crucial battles of the Kokoda Track, among others. ... December 27, 1943. ... My God, I wish we had [the] 9th Australian Division with us this morning. ... During World War II, the North African Campaign, also known as the Desert War, took place in the North African desert from September 13, 1940 to May 13, 1943. ... Combatants Germany Italy Bulgaria Albania Greece United Kingdom Australia New Zealand Commanders Wilhelm List Alexander Papagos, Henry Maitland Wilson, Bernard Freyberg Thomas Blamey Strength Germany:[1] 680,000 men, 1200 tanks 700 aircraft 1Italy:[2] 565,000 men 1Greece:[3] 430,000 men British Commonwealth:[4] 262,612 men 100... For other uses, see Pacific War (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Brisbane (disambiguation). ... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd... NSW redirects here. ... The Australian II Corps was an Australian Army corps. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... III Corps was an Australian Army unit during World War II. It was responsible for the defence of Western Australia in 1942-45. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person... The New Guinea campaign was one of the major military campaigns of World War II. Fighting in the Australian mandated Territory of New Guinea (the north-eastern part of the island of New Guinea and surrounding islands) and Dutch New Guinea, between Allied and Japanese forces, commenced with the Japanese... The Borneo campaign of 1945 was the last major Allied campaign in the South West Pacific Area, during World War II. In a series of amphibious assaults between May 1 and July 21, the Australian I Corps, under General Leslie Morshead, attacked Japanese forces occupying the island. ...


Canada

Canada first fielded a corps sized formation in the First World War; the Canadian Corps was unique in that its composition did not change from inception to the war's end, in contrast to British corps in France and Flanders. The Canadian Corps consisted of four Canadian divisions. After the Armistice, the peacetime Canadian militia was nominally organized into corps and divisions but no full time formations larger than a battalion were ever trained or exercised. Early in the Second World War, Canada's contribution to the British-French forces fighting the Germans was limited to a single division. After the fall of France in June 1940, a second division moved to England, coming under command of a Canadian corps headquarters. This corps was renamed I Canadian Corps as a second corps headquarters was established in the UK, with the eventual formation of five Canadian divisions in England. I Canadian Corps eventually fought in Italy, II Canadian Corps in NW Europe, and the two were reunited in early 1945. After the formations were disbanded after VE Day, Canada has never subsequently organized a corps headquarters. Canadian Forces Land Force Command (LF) is responsible for army operations within the Canadian Armed Forces. ...


France

The French Army under Napoleon used corps-sized formations (French: Corps d'Armée) as the first formal combined-arms groupings of divisions with reasonably stable manning and equipment establishments. Napoleon first used the Corps d'Armée in 1805 . The use of the Corps d'Armée was a military innovation that provided Napoleon with a significant battlefield advantage in the early phases of the Napoleonic Wars. This innovation stimulated other European powers to adopt similar military structures. The corps has remained an echelon of French Army organization to the modern day. The French Army, officially the Armée de Terre (Army of the land), is the land-based component of the French Armed Forces and the largest. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... This article is about the arithmetic operation. ... Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack...


United Kingdom

The British Army still has a corps headquarters for operational control of forces. I Corps of the British Army of the Rhine was redesignated the Headquarters Allied Command Europe Rapid Reaction Corps in 1994 . It is no longer a purely British formation, although the UK is the 'framework nation' and provides most of the staff for the headquarters. A purely national corps headquarters could be quickly reconstituted if necessary. The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The British I Corps has a long history, and was in existence as an active formation in the British Army for longer than any other corps. ... There have been two formations named British Army on the Rhine (BAOR). ... The Headquarters Allied Command Europe Rapid Reaction Corps, (HQ ARRC or ARRC) was created in 1992 in Bielefeld based on the former British I Corps (or I (BR) Corps ). It was originally created as the rapid reaction corps sized land force of the Reaction Forces Concept that emerged after the...


It took command of the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan on 4th May 2006. Previously, it was deployed as the headquarters commanding land forces during the Kosovo War in 1999 and also saw service in Bosnia and Herzegovina, commanding the initial stages of the IFOR deployment prior to that in 1996 . Otherwise, the only time a British corps headquarters has been operationally deployed since 1945 was II Corps during the Suez Crisis. The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... The acronym IFOR may also refer to the International Fellowship of Reconciliation. ... The British II Corps was formed in both World War I and World War II. During WWII its first assignment was to the British Expeditionary Force where it was commanded by Alan Brooke (from whose name it took its insignia of a red leaping salmon upon three wavy blue bands... Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1...


United States

The first corps in the United States Army were legalized during the American Civil War by an Act of Congress on July 17, 1862, but Major General George B. McClellan designated six corps organizations within his Army of the Potomac that spring. Prior to this time, groupings of divisions were known by other names, such as "wings" and "grand divisions". The terminology "Army Corps" was often used. These organizations were much smaller than their modern counterparts. They were usually commanded by a major general, were composed of two to six divisions, although predominantly three, and typically included from 10,000 to 15,000 men. Although designated with numbers that are sometimes the same as modern U.S. Army corps, there is no direct lineage between the 43 U.S. corps of the Civil War and those with similar names in the 20th century due to Congressional legislature caused by the outcry from Grand Army of the Republic veterans during the Spanish-American War. In the Confederate States Army, corps were authorized in November 1862. They were commanded by lieutenant generals and were usually larger than their Union Army counterparts because their divisions contained more brigades, each of which could contain more regiments. All of the Confederate corps at the Battle of Gettysburg, for instance, exceeded 20,000 men. However, for both armies, unit sizes varied dramatically with attrition throughout the war. The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... For the 1960s commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, see George McClellan (police commissioner). ... Generals Burnside, Hancock, Couch, Ferro, Patrick, Wilcox, Cochrane, Buford and others. ... Stephenson GAR Memorial, Washington, D.C. The Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) was a fraternal organization composed of veterans of the Union Army who had served in the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties... A group of Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government during the American Civil War. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921[1] 71,699[2] Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing)[1] 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing...


As of 2003, the United States Army has four field corps. The structure of a field corps is not permanent; many of the units that it commands are allocated to it as needed on an ad hoc basis. On the battlefield, the field corps is the highest level of the forces that is concerned with actually fighting and winning the war. (Higher levels of command are concerned with administration rather than operations, at least under current doctrine.) The corps provides operational direction for the forces under its command. Corps are designated by consecutive Roman numerals. The present active corps in the US Army are I Corps ("eye core"), III Corps, V Corps (scheduled to deactivate in 2008 or 2009), and XVIII Airborne Corps; their numbers derive from four of the 30-odd corps that were formed during World War II. It also refers to a grouping of specialized troops such as the Army Corps of Engineers and the United States Marine Corps. The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The system of Roman numerals is a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, and was adapted from Etruscan numerals. ... The I Corps (First Corps) aka (eye core), nicknamed Americas Corps, is a corps of the United States Army with headquarters in Fort Lewis, Washington. ... For the III Corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War, see III Corps (ACW). ... The V Corps (Fifth Corps)—nicknamed the Victory Corps—is a corps of the United States Army. ... XVIII ABC Background Trim The XVIII Airborne Corps is the corps of the United States Army designed for rapid deployment anywhere in the world. ... United States Army Corps of Engineers logo The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 military men and women. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ...


Soviet Union

Type Soviet Tank Corps and Tank Army of 1942 and 1943 using symbols.
Type Soviet Tank Corps and Tank Army of 1942 and 1943 using symbols.

The pre-World War II Red Army of the former USSR had rifle corps much like in the Western sense—with about three divisions to a Corps.[1] However, after the war started, the recently-purged Soviet senior command (Generals) structure was apparently unable to handle the formations, and the Armies and Corps were integrated into new, smaller "Armies" and those into fronts. Rifle Corps were re-established during the war after Red Army commanders had gained experience handling larger formations. Before and during World War II, however, Soviet armored units were organized into corps. The pre-war Mechanized Corps were made of divisions. In the reorganizations, these "corps" were reorganized into tank brigades and support units, which in terms of actual strength were equivalent to armored divisions in most other armies. Due to this, they are sometimes, informally, referred to as "Brigade Buckets". Download high resolution version (1978x2465, 78 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Military history of the Soviet Union Categories: U.S. Army images ... Download high resolution version (1978x2465, 78 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Military history of the Soviet Union Categories: U.S. Army images ... Formations of the Soviet Army included: Strategic Directions. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other organizations known as the Red Army, see Red Army (disambiguation). ... A rifle corps (Russian: ) was a Soviet military organization of the mid-twentieth century. ... A Front (фронт) was a major military organization in the Soviet Army, roughly equivalent to an army or army group in British or American military terminology. ... For other organizations known as the Red Army, see Red Army (disambiguation). ... A Mechanized Corps was a Soviet armoured formation used since before the beginning of World War II. // In Soviet Russia, the so-called armored forces (Bronevyye sily) preceded the mechanized corps. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ...


After the war, the Tank and Mechanized Corps were re-rated as divisions. Several years later, most of the corps were again disbanded to create the new Combined Arms and Tank Armies. A few Corps were nevertheless retained, of both patterns. The Vyborg and Archangel Corps of the Leningrad Military District were smaller armies with three low-readiness motorized rifle divisions each. The Category A Unified Corps of the Belarussian Military District (Western TVD/Strategic Direction) and Carpathian Military District (also Western TVD) were of the brigade pattern. The Leningrad Military District is a military district of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. ... The Belarussian Military District was a military district of the Military of the Soviet Union, activated in the 1920s, active as the Western Special Military District just before Operation Barbarossa, reformed in 1943 initially at Smolensk, with its HQ moved to Minsk in 1944, and disbanded after the fall of... The Carpathian Military District was a military district of the Soviet Armed Forces from 1945 after the conclusion of the Second World War to 1990-91. ...


The Soviet Air Force used ground terminology for its formations down to squadron level. As intermediates between the Division and the Air Army were Corps—these also had three Air Divisions each.


Administrative corps

In the British Army and the armies of many Commonwealth countries, a corps is also a grouping by common function (e.g. Intelligence Corps, Royal Logistic Corps, Royal Corps of Signals), performing much the same function as a ceremonial infantry or cavalry regiment, with its own cap badge, stable belt, and other insignia and traditions. The Royal Armoured Corps and the Corps of Infantry are looser groupings of independent regiments. The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2007 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Kamalesh Sharma Appointed 24 November 2007 Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... The Intelligence Corps (also known as Int Corps) is one of the corps of the British Army. ... The Royal Logistic Corps is the British Army corps that provides the logistic support for the Army. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... British regiment A regiment is a military unit, consisting of a variable number of battalions - commanded by a colonel. ... A cap badge, also known as head badge or hat badge, is a badge worn on uniform headgear and distinguishes the wearers organisation. ... Clip art of a pre-2007 Stable Belt of the Royal Air Force. ... The Royal Armoured Corps (RAC) is currently a collection of ten regular regiments, mostly converted from old horse cavalry regiments, and four Yeomanry regiments of the Territorial Army. ...


In Australia, soldiers belong foremost to a Corps which defines a common function or employment across the army. The Australian Army has a system of coloured lanyards, which each identify a soldier as part of a specific corps (or sometimes individual battalion). This lanyard is a woven piece of cord which is worn on ceremonial uniforms and dates back to the issue of clasp knives in the early 20th century which were secured to the uniform by a length of cord. If a soldier is posted to a unit outside of their parent corps, except in some circumstances the soldier continues to wear the hat badge and lanyard of their corps (e.g. a Clerk posted to an infantry battalion would wear the lanyard of the Royal Australian Ordnance Corps) The Australian Army is Australias military land force. ...


In Canada, with the integration of the Canadian army into the Canadian Forces, the British Corps model was replaced with personnel branches, defined in Canadian Forces Administrative Orders (CFAOs) as "...cohesive professional groups...based on similarity of military roles, customs and traditions." CFAO 2-10)[1] However, the Armour Branch has continued to use the title Royal Canadian Armoured Corps, the Infantry Branch continued to use the Royal Canadian Infantry Corps designation, and the Artillery Branch uses the term Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery. The Canadian Forces (CF) (French: Forces canadiennes (FC)) are the unified armed forces of Canada, governed by the National Defence Act, which states: The Canadian Forces are the armed forces of Her Majesty raised by Canada and consist of one Service called the Canadian Armed Forces. ... Personnel branch, in the Canadian Forces (CF), refers to a grouping of related military occupations. ... Canadian Forces Administrative Orders (CFAOs) are issued to supplement and amplify the Queens Regulations and Orders (QR&O). ... The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps (RCAC) is the armoured branch of service of the Canadian Forces Land Force Command (Canadian Army), including regular force and militia regiments. ... The Royal Canadian Infantry Corps is a personnel branch of the Canadian Forces (CF), formerly known as the Infantry Branch. Order of precedence Categories: | ... The Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery is the artillery personnel branch of the Canadian Forces (CF). ...


The corps system is also used in the U.S. Army to group personnel with a common function, but without a regimental system there is less variation in insignia and tradition. These are often referrd to as "Branches" and include the Quartermaster Corps, Ordnance Corps, Transportation Corps, Medical Corps, Chaplain Corps, Judge Advocate General's Corps, & Finance Corps. Each of these Corps is also considered a "Regiment" for historic purposes but these Regiments have no tactical function. The Quartermaster Corps is a combat service support branch of the United States Army. ... Branch insignia of Ordnance Corps The Ordnance Corps is a combat service support branch of the United States Army. ... The United States Army Transportation Corps was established July 31, 1942 by Executive Order 9082. ... A chaplain is typically a member of the clergy serving a group of people who are not organized as a mission or church; lay chaplains are also found in some settings such as universities. ... Judge Advocate Generals Corps, also known as JAG, can refer to the judicial arm of any of the United States armed forces, consisting of autonomous departments in the Air Force, Army, United States Coast Guard and Navy. ...


In the US, there are non-military, administrative, training and certification corps for commissioned officers of the government's uniformed services such as the Police Corps, the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and the National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration Corps. The United States has seven uniformed services as defined by Title 10 of the United States Code. ...


See also

A military unit is an organisation within an armed force. ... Corps Area is a term used, by the US Army, as a replacement for Department, the name given to pre-World War I military commands. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... The badge of the Eurocorps Eurocorps is a force which consists of up to 60,000 soldiers drawn from the armies of Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg and Spain. ... The article provides links to lists of military corps arranged by ordinal number, name, country or conflict. ... This is a list of corps of the United States. ... Shoulder sleeve insignia (SSI) are cloth emblems worn on the shoulders of US Army uniforms to identify the primary headquarters to which a Soldier is assigned. ... The Cavaliers Drum and Bugle Corps, a DCI Division I corps from Rosemont, Illinois. ... Classic drum and bugle corps are North American musical ensembles that descended from military bugle and drum units returning from World War I and succeeding wars. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ... The Signal Corps is a military branch, usually subordinate to a countrys army. ... United States Army Corps of Engineers logo The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 civilian and 650 military men and women. ...

References and Further Reading

  1. ^ Eve of war Soviet structure
  • Phisterer, Frederick, Statistical Record of the Armies of the United States, Castle Books, 1883, ISBN 0-7858-1585-6.
  • Tsouras, P.G. Changing Orders: The evolution of the World's Armies, 1945 to the Present Facts On File, Inc, 1994. ISBN 0-8160-3122-3
  • Warsaw Pact June 1989 OOB

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