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Encyclopedia > Cornish people
Cornish

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2304, 2632 KB) Old tin mine workings near Pendeen in Cornwall File links The following pages link to this file: Cornish people Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize...

Total population

uncertain

Regions with significant populations

Cornwall Cornwall (Cornish: Kernow) is a county in South West England on the peninsula that lies to the west of the River Tamar. ...

Language

English (see West Country dialects), Cornish The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Religion

Anglicanism, Methodism
Related
ethnic groups
English, Bretons, Welsh, Irish, Manx, Scottish

The Cornish people are a British ethnic group originating in Cornwall. They are often described as a Celtic people and nation. The term Anglican (from medieval Latin ecclesia Anglicana meaning the English church) is used to describe the people, institutions, and churches as well as the liturgical traditions and theological concepts developed by the established Church of England, the Anglican Communion and the Continuing Anglican Churches (a loosely affiliated group of... Methodism or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... The English are an ethnic group or nation primarily associated with England and the English language. ... The Bretons are a distinct celtic ethnic group located in the region of Brittany in France. ... The Welsh (Cymry) are an ethnic group or nation associated with Wales and the Welsh language, which is a Celtic language. ... This article is about the Scottish as an ethnic group. ... The words Celt and Celtic can have a variety of meanings. ...


The number of people living in Cornwall who consider themselves to be more Cornish than British or English is unknown. A survey found that 35.1% of respondents identified as Cornish, with 48.4% of respondents identifying as English, a further 11% thought of themselves as British.[1]


As with other ethnic groups in the British Isles, the question of identity is not straightforward. Ethnic identity has been based as much – if not more – on cultural identity than on descent. Many descendants of people who came and settled in Cornwall have adopted this identity.[2] Location of the British Isles The British Isles are a group of islands off the northwest coast of continental Europe consisting of Great Britain, Ireland, and a number of smaller surrounding islands and islets. ...


The subject of Cornish identity has been extensively studied in the Cornish studies series of books published by Exeter university press. Cornishness is examined with methodological tools varying from feminist theory to deconstructionism.[3] Feminist theory is the extension of feminism into theoretical, or philosophical, ground. ... The term deconstruction is often used in a loose way as a synonym of critical analysis, especially the kind of uncooperative critical analysis that subjects a work or a text to close scrutiny in order to expose contradictions, poor logic or unwelcome affinities with other works or cultural objects. ...


In the 2001 UK Census, the population of Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly was estimated to be 501,267.[4] Cornish community organisations tend to consider half of these people to be ethnic Cornish.[citation needed] UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ...


A recent survey by the University of Plymouth found that, when given the opportunity, over a third of pupils in Cornish schools identified themselves as Cornish.[citation needed] A survey conducted by Morgan Stanley found that 44% of Cornish inhabitants surveyed felt "Cornish" rather than "British" or "English". [5] This was the largest such figure in England,[6] across the whole of England 21% of people identified most closely to their county, 31% to England and 34% to Britain,[5] but it was not the only such result: 37% of people in Derbyshire and East Sussex also identified themselves with their county first. [6] One of the University of Plymouths newly renovated buildings in the City of Plymouth with the university logo on it The University of Plymouth is the largest university in the southwest of England, with over 30,000 students (the 4th UK university regarding the highest numbers of students), almost... Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) is an investment bank, retail broker, and credit card provider with headquarters in New York City. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... East Sussex is a county in South East England. ...


For the first time in a UK Census, those wishing to describe their ethnicity as Cornish were given their own code number (06) on the 2001 UK Census form, alongside those for people wishing to describe themselves as English, Welsh, Irish or Scottish. About 34,000 people in Cornwall and 3,500 people in the rest of the UK wrote on their census forms in 2001 that they considered their ethnic group to be Cornish.[7] This represented nearly 7% of the population of Cornwall and is therefore a significant phenomenon. Although happy with this development, campaigners expressed reservations about the lack of publicity surrounding the issue, the lack of a clear tick-box for the Cornish option on the census and the need to deny being British in order to write "Cornish" in the field provided. The English are an ethnic group or nation primarily associated with England and the English language. ... The Welsh (Cymry) are an ethnic group or nation associated with Wales and the Welsh language, which is a Celtic language. ... This article is about the Scottish as an ethnic group. ...

Contents

Mythological Descent of the Cornish nation

An ancient legend, the Brutus Myth, recounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth, gives explicit reference to the Cornish people in describing their descent. The legend tells how Albion was colonised by refugees from Troy under Brutus, how Brutus renamed his new Kingdom, Britain, and how the island was subsequently divided up between his three sons - the eldest inheriting England, the other two Scotland and Wales. Additionally according to the legend there were two groups of Trojans who originally arrived in Britain. The smaller group was led by a warrior named Corineus, to whom Brutus granted extensive estates. And just as Brutus had ‘called the island Britain…and his companions Britons’, so Corineus called ‘the region of the kingdom which had fallen to his share Cornwall, after the manner of his own name, and the people who lived there…Cornishmen’. Brutus of Troy or Brutus I of the Britons (Welsh: Bryttys), according to the accounts of the early Welsh historians Nennius and Geoffrey of Monmouth, was the first king of the Britons. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Geoffrey of Monmouth Geoffrey of Monmouth (c. ... The white cliffs of Dover. ... Walls of the excavated city of Troy Troy (Greek: Τροία [Troia], also Ίλιον [Ilion], Latin: Troia, Ilium) is a legendary city and center of the Trojan War, as described in the Epic Cycle, and especially in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... Motto: (Latin for No one provokes me with impunity)1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots 2 Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... Motto: (Welsh for Wales forever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff Official language(s) Welsh, English Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total 20,779... Walls of the excavated city of Troy This article is about the city of Troy / Ilion as described in the works of Homer, and the location of an ancient city associated with it. ... Corineus, or Corin, eponymous founder of Cornwall, was descended from the heroes of the Trojan War, and was one of the companions of Brutus of Britain, and is spoken of in Geoffrey of Monmouths Historia Regum Britanniae. ...


The first account of Cornwall comes from the Sicilian Greek historian Diodorus Siculus (c.90 BCE–c.30 BCE), supposedly quoting or paraphrasing the fourth-century BCE geographer Pytheas, who had sailed to Britain: Diodorus Siculus (c. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC - 90s BC - 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC Years: 95 BC 94 BC 93 BC 92 BC 91 BC - 90 BC - 89 BC 88 BC 87... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC - 30s BC - 20s BC 10s BC 0s 10s 20s Years: 35 BC 34 BC 33 BC 32 BC 31 BC 30 BC 29 BC 28 BC 27 BC 26 BC...

[The inhabitants of that part of Britain called Belerion or the Land's End] from their intercourse with foreign merchants, are civilised in their manner of life. They prepare the tin, working very carefully the earth in which it is produced…Here then the merchants buy the tin from the natives and carry it over to Gaul, and after travelling overland for about thirty days, they finally bring their loads on horses to the mouth of the Rhône.[8]

Who these merchants were is not known. There is no current evidence for the theory that they were Phoenicians.[9]


No other region is picked out for such special treatment; the historian Dr Mark Stoyle has suggested that this shows that, as far as Geoffrey was concerned, Cornwall possessed a separate identity. Cornishmen and women continued to regard themselves as descendents of Corineus until well into the early modern period.[10]


The Cornish in history

Main article: History of Cornwall
Year Event
878 The drowned king Donyarth is recorded in the Annales Cambriae as rex Cerniu (King of Cornwall).
1360 Treaty of Brétigny: "John, by the Grace of God, King of England, Lord of Ireland, Duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, Earl of Anjou, confirmed the aforesaid; and Richard, King of Germany and Earl of Cornwall, in like manner, confirmed the aforesaid".
 15th century  The Croyland Chronicle states: "In order zealously to carry out the same, he sent the venerable men of God, brothers Egelmer and Nigel, his fellow-monks, with relics of the saints, into the western parts, namely, Flanders and France. To the northern parts and into Scotland he sent the brothers Fulk and Oger, and into Denmark and Norway the brothers Swetman and Wulsin the younger; while to Wales, Cornwall and Ireland he sent the brothers Augustin and Osbert".
1485 Polydore Vergil, an Italian cleric commissioned by King Henry VII to write a history of England, states that "The whole country of Britain is divided into four parts, whereof the one is inhabited by Englishmen, the other of Scots, the third of Welshmen, the fourth of Cornish people ... and which all differ among themselves either in tongue, either in manners, or else in laws and ordinances."
1497 The Cornish Rebellion.
1509 King Henry VIII's coronation procession includes "nine children of honour" representing "England and France, Gascony, Guienne, Normandy, Anjou, Cornwall, Wales and Ireland."
1531 From the court of King Henry VIII, the Italian diplomat Lodovico Falier writes in a letter that "The language of the English, Welsh and Cornish men is so different that they do not understand each other". He also claims it is possible to distinguish the members of each group by alleged "national characteristics".
1538 Writing to his government, the French ambassador in London, Gaspard de Coligny Chatillon, indicates ethnic differences thus: "The kingdom of England is by no means a united whole, for it also contains Wales and Cornwall, natural enemies of the rest of England, and speaking a [different] language".
1603 Following Queen Elizabeth I's death, the Venetian ambassador writes that the "late queen had ruled over five different 'peoples': 'English, Welsh, Cornish, Scottish ... and Irish'".
1616 Arthur Hopton [later ambassador to Madrid?] writes that "England is ... divided into three great Provinces, or Countries ... speaking a several and different language, as English, Welsh and Cornish".
1652 The English puritan preacher, Roger Williams complained that "we have Indians...in Cornwall, Indians in Wales, Indians in Ireland".
1769 The Antiquarian, William Borlase wrote that "Of this time we are to understand what Edward I. says (Sheringham. p. 129.) that Britain, Wales, and Cornwall, were the portion of Belinus, elder son of Dunwallo, and that that part of the Island, afterwards called England, was divided in three shares, viz. Britain, which reached from the Tweed, Westward, as far as the river Ex; Wales inclosed by the rivers Severn, and Dee; and Cornwall from the river Ex to the Land's-End".

During the eighteenth century, Samuel Johnson created a Cornish declaration of independence that he used in his essay Taxation no Tyranny [11] The history of Cornwall begins with the pre-Roman inhabitants, including speakers of a Celtic language that would develop into Brythonic and Cornish. ... Events The Danes force king Alfred the Great of Wessex to retreat to a fort in Athelney, Somerset. ... Annales Cambriae, or The Annals of Wales, believed to date from 970, is a chronicle of events thought to be significant occurring during the years 447-954. ... Events October 24 - The Treaty of Brétigny is ratified at Calais, marking the end of the first phase of the Hundred Years War. ... The Treaty of Brétigny was a treaty signed on May 8, 1360, between King Edward III of England and King John II (the Good) of France. ... Bold textInsert non-formatted text here This statue of Rollo the Viking (founder of the fiefdom of Normandy) stands in Falaise, Calvados, birthplace of his descendant William I the Conqueror (the Duke of Normandy who became King of England). ... Location Administration Capital Bordeaux Regional President Alain Rousset (PS) (since 1998) Départements Dordogne Gironde Landes Lot-et-Garonne Pyrénées-Atlantiques Arrondissements 18 Cantons 235 Communes 2,296 Statistics Land area1 41,309 km² Population (Ranked 6th)  - January 1, 2005 est. ... Anjou is a former county (c. ... The title of Earl of Cornwall was created several times in the Peerage of England before 1337, when it was superseded by the title Duke of Cornwall, which became attached to heirs-apparent to the throne. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... The Croyland Chronicle (or Crowland Chronicle) is an important, if not always reliable, primary source for English medieval history, in particular the late 15th century. ... // Events August 5-7 - First outbreak of sweating sickness in England begins August 22 - Battle of Bosworth Field is fought between the armies of King Richard III of England and rival claimant to the throne of England Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. ... Polydore Vergil or Virgil (c. ... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), was the founder and first patriarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... 1497 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cornish Rebellion of 1497 was a popular uprising in 1497 by the tin miners of Cornwall in the south west of Britain. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the play, see Henry VIII (play). ... January 26 - Lisbon, Portugal is hit by an earthquake - thousands die. ... Events Treaty of Nagyvarad. ... London (pronounced ) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and the largest city of England (strangely, England has no constitutional existence within the United Kingdom, and therefore cannot be said to have a capital). ... King James I of England/VII of Scotland, the first monarch to rule the Kingdoms of England and Scotland at the same time Events March - Samuel de Champlain, French explorer, sails to Canada March 24 - Elizabeth I of England dies and is succeeded by her cousin King James I of... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England, Queen of France (in name only), and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... Map of the Venetian Republic, circa 1000 CE. The republic is in dark red, borders in light red. ... == {| align=right cellpadding=3 id=toc style=margin-left: 15px; |- | align=center colspan=2 | Years: 1613 1614 1615 - 1616 - 1617 1618 1619 |- | align=center colspan=2 | Decades: 1580s 1590s 1600s - 1610s - 1620s 1630s 1640s |- tall> 16th century - 17th century - 18th century |} randomised 1616 was a leap year starting on Friday... // Events April 6 - Dutch sailor Jan van Riebeeck establishes a resupply camp for the Dutch East India Company at the Cape of Good Hope, and founded Cape Town. ... Roger Williams (December 21, 1603–April 1, 1684) was an English theologian, a notable proponent of the separation of Church and State, an advocate for fair dealings with Native Americans, founder of the City of Providence, Rhode Island and co-founder of the colony of Rhode Island. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Samuel Johnson circa 1772, painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds. ... A declaration of independence is a proclamation of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ...

"We are the acknowledged descendants of the earliest inhabitants of Britain, of men, who, before the time of history, took possession of the island desolate and waste, and, therefore, open to the first occupants. Of this descent, our language is a sufficient proof, which, not quite a century ago, was different from yours."

Additionally, many maps of the isles prior to the seventeenth century showed Cornwall ("Cornubia"/"Cornwallia") as a nation on a par with Wales.[12][13][14] [15] (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Motto: (Welsh for Wales forever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff Official language(s) Welsh, English Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total 20,779...


Contemporary references

In 1937 Bartholomew published a Map of European Ethnicity prepared by the Edinburgh Institute of Geography which featured "Celtic Cornish".[16] 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


More recently, on 12 July 2005, Jim Fitzpatrick MP, an ODPM Parliamentary Under Secretary in the current Labour government, said in the Commons, in response to Andrew George MP, a Liberal Democrat representing the St Ives constituency in Cornwall, I realise that the people of Cornwall consider that they have a separate identity, but that alone does not justify creating an assembly for Cornwall.[17] Phil Woolas MP, Minister for Local Government, indicated the same in his answer to a letter from Mebyon Kernow: "On your point about Cornwall’s desire to control its own future, the Government is very much aware of the strength of feeling about Cornwall’s separate identity and distinctiveness ... The Government recognises that many people in Cornwall consider they have a separate identity."[citation needed]NGOs such as Eurominority and the Federal Union of European Nationalities also give varying degrees of recognition to a Cornish people.[18][19][20] James Fitzpatrick (born 4 April 1952) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The Office of the Deputy Prime Minister is a department of the British government. ... A Parliamentary Under Secretary of State, in the United Kingdom government structure, is a minister who is junior to a Minister of State who is then junior to a Secretary of State. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Andrew George Andrew Henry George (born 2 December 1958, Mullion, Cornwall) is a British politician. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... St Ives harbour and the local rescue lifeboat. ... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... Philip James Woolas (born 11 December 1959) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... There is no single system of local government in the United Kingdom. ... Mebyon Kernow (Cornish for Sons of Cornwall, often abbrieviated MK) is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... NGO is an abbreviation or code for: Non-governmental organization Nagoya Airport (IATA code) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Cornish language

The Cornish language is seen by many as the cultural back bone of the Cornish identity, although only 3,500 of the estimated 250,000 Cornish people (1.4%) speak it to a basic conversational level, and just 300-400 fluently. Recently the Cornish language, which was revived in the 20th Century after dying out as a native tongue in the 19th, has been recognised by the UK and EU for protection as a UK minority language and now receives funding from both these bodies. The Cornish language is a Brythonic language related to Welsh and Breton. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Brythonic is one of two major divisions of Insular Celtic languages (the other being Goidelic). ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Breton (Breton: Brezhoneg) is a Celtic language spoken by some of the inhabitants of Brittany (Breizh) and Loire-Atlantique (historically part of Brittany) in France. ...


A distinct dialect of English can also be found in Cornwall, and appears in many popular Cornish folksongs such as Camborne Hill. To an extent, the accent and dialect is a badge of "Cornishness" for some people, but interest in Anglo-Cornish has been overshadowed by the Cornish language recently.


Descent

Many who perceive themselves to be of the Cornish nation also consider themselves to be descended from the Brythons of the post-Roman period. For this reason they consider there to be a kinship connection with the Welsh and Breton peoples and more distantly with the Scots, Manx and Irish. After the Anglo-Saxon conquest of southern, eastern and central Great Britain, Brythonic speakers were gradually pushed further into the fringes, eventually cutting them off into three groups - the Southwestern Britons (from whence the Cornish), the West Britons (the Welsh) and the Northern Britons (see Cumbric). This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Welsh (Cymry) are an ethnic group or nation associated with Wales and the Welsh language, which is a Celtic language. ... Traditional coat of arms Modern flag (Gwenn-ha-du) Historical province of Brittany région of Bretagne, see Bretagne. ... This article is about the Scottish as an ethnic group. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... Brythonic is one of two major divisions of Insular Celtic languages (the other being Goidelic). ... Southwestern Brythonic is one of two dialects into which the Brythonic language split following the Battle of Deorham in 577 CE; the other being Western Brythonic, which later evolved into Welsh and Cumbric. ... Cumbric was the Brythonic Celtic language spoken in Cumbria, and the southern Lowland Scotland . ...


This sense of a shared past is given voice in such organisations as the Celtic League and Celtic Congress, both of whom recognise Cornwall and the Cornish as a Celtic nation. The Celtic League is a political and cultural organisation in the modern Celtic nations of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany, Cornwall and the Isle of Man, as well as their Celtic languages // Aims The fundamental aim of the Celtic League is to contribute, as an international organisation, to the struggles of... The International Celtic Congress is a cultural organisation that seeks to promote the Celtic languagues of the nations of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany, Cornwall and the Isle of Man. ...


Today, many family and given names from Cornwall are clearly rooted in the Cornish language.


Y chromosome analysis of samples from the British Isles, Germany, Denmark, Norway, Friesland, and the Basque Country have shown that Cornish men's Y chromosomes are generally more similar to those of the assumed indigenous population (Welsh/Irish/Basque) than are those of men from other parts of England or Scotland. The Y chromosomes from Cornwall, however, were more Germanic (Danish/German/Frisian) than those from Wales, Ireland or the Basque Country. It should be noted that samples from all parts of the British Isles show an indigenous component.[21] Location of the British Isles The British Isles are a group of islands off the northwest coast of continental Europe consisting of Great Britain, Ireland, and a number of smaller surrounding islands and islets. ... Capital Leeuwarden Queens Commissioner drs. ... Location of Historical Territory of the Basque Country The Ikurriña, Basque Country flag The Lauburu, Basque Country symbol This article is about the overall Basque domain. ... Motto: (Welsh for Wales forever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff Official language(s) Welsh, English Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total 20,779...


Politics

The Cornish national identity is given voice also in the existence of various political and pressure groups. These organisations usually call for greater home rule for Cornwall, recognition of Cornwall as a Duchy and various other human rights issues. See Cornish nationalism and Constitutional status of Cornwall. For the heavy metal band, see Devolved (band) Devolution or home rule is the granting of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... A duchy is a territory, fief, or domain ruled by a duke or duchess. ... Cornish nationalism is a movement which seeks greater autonomy for the area of Cornwall which advocates assert is not a county of England as is generally regarded, but a separate nation which has never been formally incorporated into England. ... The constitutional status of Cornwall, in the southwest of Great Britain, is the subject of ongoing debate. ...


In parliamentary politics, Cornwall is a Liberal Democrat stronghold. As of the 2005 General Election, all five members of parliament returned to Westminster are Liberal Democrats.[22] The largest Cornish nationalist party, Mebyon Kernow (Cornish for Sons of Cornwall), fielded candidates in four of the five constituencies and received around 3,500 votes, less than two percent of constituencies' electorate. The Liberal Democrats in Cornwall, however, have campaigned for Cornish language issues,[23][24] Cornish national minority issues and for the establishment of a devolved Cornish Assembly[25] and Cornish development agency.[26] The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The Houses of Parliament, seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative body in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories. ... Mebyon Kernow (Cornish for Sons of Cornwall, often abbrieviated MK) is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Regional Development Agencies are Non-Departmental Public Bodies, sponsored by Central Government Departments, for the development of each of the UKs Government Office regions. ...


The Cornish branch of the Green Party of England and Wales also campaigns on a manifesto of devolution to Cornwall and Cornish minority issues. In the 2005 general election the Green Party struck a partnership deal with Mebyon Kernow. [27] The Green Party of England and Wales (GPEW) is the principal Green political party in England and Wales. ...


Religion

Traditionally, the Cornish have been nonconformist in their religion. Celtic Christianity was predominant during the first millennium AD and many Cornish saints are commemorated in legends, churches and place names. Non conformism is the term of KKK ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of saints connected with Cornwall Saint Austell Saint Blaze Saint Breaca Saint Constantine Saint Erc Saint Gerren Geraint of Dumnonia Saint Just Saint Keyne Saint Levan Saint Marwenna Saint Menfre Saint Meriasek Saint Morwenna Saint Ouine Saint Petroc Saint Piran St. ...


Approximately four thousand people from Devon and Cornwall died in the Prayer Book Rebellion in the 1540s, trying to resist the compulsory use of a new English language version of the Book of Common Prayer. Attempts to revert to the Latin version, or to translate the text into Cornish, were suppressed. This failure to produce or sustain a translation of the Bible in Cornish is generally seen as a crucial factor in the demise of the language. An approved version of the Bible in Cornish was finally published in 2004.[citation needed] The Prayer Book Rebellion or Western Rebellion occurred in the southwest of England in 1549. ... 1979 ECUSABCP The Book of Common Prayer[1] is foundational prayer book of the Church of England and also the name for similar books used in other churches in the Anglican Communion. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The word Bible refers to the canonical collections of sacred writings of Judaism and Christianity. ...


Methodism

During the Industrial Revolution, Methodism proved to be very popular amongst the working classes in Cornwall. Methodist chapels became important social centres, with church church-affiliated groups such as male voice choirs playing a central role in social life. Methodism still plays a large part in the religious life of Cornwall today, although Cornwall has shared in the general post-World War II decline in British religious worship. A Watt steam engine in Madrid. ... Methodism or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Nazi Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Harry Truman Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead...


Fry an Spyrys

In 2003, a campaign group was formed called Fry an Spyrys (English: "Free the Spirit") [28] dedicated to disestablishing the Church of England in Cornwall in favour of an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion; a Church of Cornwall. They appeal to the precedents set when the Anglican Church was disestablished in Wales to form the Church in Wales in 1920 and in Ireland to form the Church of Ireland in 1869. The group's chairman is Dr Garry Tregidga of the Institute of Cornish Studies. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... An autonomous (subnational) entity is a subnational entity that has a certain amount of autonomy. ... The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... Flag of the Church in Wales The Church in Wales (Welsh: Yr Eglwys Yng Nghymru) is a member Church of the Anglican Communion, consisting of six dioceses in Wales. ... Church of Ireland The Church of Ireland (Irish: Eaglais na hÉireann) is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion, operating seamlessly across the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ...


Cornish emigration

In the 18th and 19th centuries many Cornish people migrated to various parts of the world in search of a better life — this is called Cornish migration. A driving force for some emigrants was the opportunity for skilled miners to find work abroad, later in combination with the decline in the tin and copper mining industries in Cornwall. Migration became some common that a slang term to describe a Cornish migrant abroad appeared: "Cousin Jack" [29]. The Cornish diaspora consists of Cornish emigrants and their descendants in countries such as the United States, England, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Mexico. ...


Today, in the USA, Canada, Mexico, Australia, South Africa and other countries, some of the descendants of these original migrants celebrate their Cornish ancestry and remain proud of the Cornish family names they carry. This is evidenced by the existence of both Cornish societies and Cornish festivals in these countries, as well as a growing overseas interest in the Cornish language.


See also

Cornwall Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of topics related to Cornwall, UK. The Cornwall category contains a more comprehensive selection of Cornish articles. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Cornovii (perhaps meaning people of the horn Cornwall), were a people of Iron Age and Roman Britain, who lived in the modern counties of North Staffordshire, Shropshire and Cheshire in the English West Midlands. ... Cornwall, in the United Kingdom, though administratively part of England, has many cultural differences from the culture of England. ... Note: This list includes people not only of Cornish ethnicity but those born or of long-term residence there. ... Flag of Cornwall The Cornish diaspora consists of Cornish emigrants and their descendants in other parts of England and in countries such as the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Mexico. ... This article concerns those peoples who consider themselves, or have been considered by others, to be Celts in modern times. ... The Six Nations considered the heartland of the modern Celts Celtic nations are areas of Europe inhabited by members of Celtic cultures, specifically speakers of Celtic languages. ...

References

  1. ^ Appendix I: Sample Profile (downloadable '.doc' file) from QUALITY OF LIFE IN CORNWALL: Summary Report (2004), by Cornwall County Council Research and Information Unit. Retrieved 16 July 2006.
  2. ^ Payton, Philip: Cornwall – A History. ISBN 1-904880-05-3
  3. ^ Various authors: Cornish Studies series, ed. Philip Payton ISBN 0-85989-771-0.
  4. ^ Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly from Census 2001: National Statistics Online, UK state website. Retrieved 14 July 2006.
  5. ^ a b Welsh are 'more patriotic' from BBC News website. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  6. ^ a b Cornish people the most attached to their county: Morgan Stanley, March 18, 2004, p1
  7. ^ [1] from The London School of Economics and Political Science website.
  8. ^ Halliday, p51.
  9. ^ Halliday, p52.
  10. ^ Stoyle, Mark: West Britons -Cornish Identities and the Early Modern British State ISBN 0-85989-687-0.
  11. ^ TAXATION NO TYRANNY by Samuel Johnson, From The Works of Samuel Johnson published by Pafraets & Company, Troy, New York (1913). Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  12. ^ Detail by Gerardus Mercator (1569) from The Mercator Atlas of Europe Retrieved 16 July 2006.
  13. ^ Anglia & Hibernia by Sebastian Munster (1550), from Old Maps from RootsWeb.com a genealogy website. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  14. ^ Epitome Theatri Orteliani by Abraham Ortelius (1595), from Old Maps from RootsWeb.com a genealogy website. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  15. ^ Anglia et Hibernia Nova by Girolamo Ruscelli (1561), from Old Maps from RootsWeb.com a genealogy website. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  16. ^ This map is unsourced.[citation needed]
  17. ^ Regional Government Debate: The United Kingdom Parliament, 12 Jul 2005. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  18. ^ The Cornish in the south-west of Great Britain article in FUEN - Now Actuel No 77, p. 4, October 2001. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  19. ^ Minorities, native people and ethnic groups from Eurominority website. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  20. ^ Stateless nations and regions Eurominority website. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  21. ^ A Y Chromosome Census of the British Isles, Cristian Capelli et al in Current Biology, Volume 13, Issue 11, Pages 979-984 (2003). Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  22. ^ General Election 2005, Results in Full Map of constituencies from Guardian Unlimited. Retrieved 15 July 2005.
  23. ^ Cornish gains official recognition: BBC News, 6 November 2002. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  24. ^ Local MP swears oath in Cornish BBC News, 12 May, 2005. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  25. ^ Blair gets Cornish assembly call: BBC News, 11 December 2001. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  26. ^ Aid cash bureaucracy criticised: BBC News, 28 October, 2004. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  27. ^ Historic election deal between Cornish party and Greens, Green Party of England and Wales website, 25th Mar 2004. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  28. ^ Fry an Spyrys: The campaign for self-government for the churches of Cornwall. Website. Retrieved 15 July 2006.
  29. ^ Cousin Jack: BBC - Legacies - Immigration and Emigration - England - Cornwall. Website. Retrieved 6 September 2006.

Motto: Onan hag oll (Cornish: One and all) Cornwall, England Geography Status Ceremonial and (smaller) Non-metropolitan county Region South West England Area - Total - Admin. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, invariably known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world, employing 26,000 staff in the UK alone and with a budget of £4 billion. ... March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that LSE Computer Security Research Centre be merged into this article or section. ... Gerardus Mercator (March 5, 1512 – December 2, 1594) was a Flemish cartographer of German descent, his parents being from Gangelt in the Duchy of Jülich. ... Genealogy is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ... Abraham Ortelius. ... Genealogy is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ... Girolamo Ruscelli (ca. ... Genealogy is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ... The Houses of Parliament, seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative body in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories. ... Front page of Guardian Unlimited from August 16, 2005 Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... The Green Party of England and Wales (GPEW) is the principal Green political party in England and Wales. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cornish language, alphabet and pronunciation (1007 words)
Cornish is a Celtic language closely related to Breton and Welsh spoken mainly in Cornwall (Kernow) and also by a few people in Australia and the USA.
Cornish started to diverge from Welsh towards the end of the 7th century AD and the earliest known examples of written Cornish date from the end of the 9th century AD.
People are writing and performing songs and poetry in Cornish, and the language is taught in some schools and at the University of Exeter.
Cornish people - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2317 words)
The Cornish are an ethnic group associated with Cornwall, located at the extreme South West of the United Kingdom where most of the Cornish currently live.
The Cornish language is seen by many as the cultural back bone of the Cornish identity, although only 3,500 of the estimated 250,000 Cornish people (1.4%) speak it to a basic conversational level, and just 300-400 fluently.
This failure to produce or sustain a translation of the Bible in Cornish is generally seen as a crucial factor in the demise of the language.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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