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Encyclopedia > Cornish Hurling
Pub Sign at St. Columb Major in Cornwall
Pub Sign at St. Columb Major in Cornwall
For the Irish sport of hurling, see Hurling


Hurling (sometimes pronounced hurlin), is an outdoor team sport of Celtic origin. It is played with a small silver ball. It is not to be confused with the Irish game of the same name which allows the use of sticks. Image File history File links Silver Ball pub sign This is an actual photograph of the pub in St. ... For the Cornish sport of hurling, see Hurling the Silver Ball. ... This article is about the European people. ...


Once played widely in the County of Cornwall, the game has similarites to other traditional football or inter parish 'mob' games, but certain attributes make this version unique to Cornwall. It is considered by many to be Cornwall's national sport along with Cornish wrestling. Motto: Onen hag oll (Cornish: One and all) Geography Status Ceremonial and (smaller) Non-metropolitan county Region South West England Population - Total (2004 est. ... Cornish wrestling (or wrasslin as it is sometimes called in Cornish English) is a form of wrestling similar to judo, which has been established in Cornwall (South West Britain) for several centuries. ...

Contents


Game

New Ball still in its box, 1995
New Ball still in its box, 1995

A silver hurling ball which is the size of an orange, made from applewood and coated with silver, flies through the village streets of St. Ives, Cornwall on Feast Monday in February (the feast is on the Sunday nearest to February 3), and at St. Columb Major on Shrove Tuesday and the Saturday of the following week. At St. Columb, the struggle is a physical battle on the streets, between "Town" and "Country" with the shops in the town barricading their windows and doors for the start of the scrum at 4:30 p.m. The ball is thrown to the crowd at the market square and the objective of the game is to control it through the town or country goals set about two miles apart or, if this isn't possible, the ball may be carried out of the town itself and into the surrounding countryside, the aim then being to carry the ball over one of the Parish boundaries. Image File history File links Ball_95. ... A Silver ball is used in the Cornish game of hurling. ... St Ives harbour St Ives is a seaside town in Cornwall, England, north of Penzance, and west of Camborne. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Location within the British Isles St Columb Major (Cornish: Sen Kolomm Veur) is a town in Cornwall, England, to the west of Wadebridge and south of Newquay. ... A pancake In the Christian calendar, Shrove Tuesday is the English name for the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, which in turn marks the beginning of Lent. ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ...


At 8:00 p.m., a winner returns to declare victory for Town or Country. This is followed by a visit to the public houses of the town where the ball will be dunked into gallon jugs filled with beer. Each gallon will be 'called up' and the 'silver beer' (as it is known), will be shared amongst the hurlers.


Hurling Trivia

Most of the following pertains to the game as it is played at St. Columb Major.
  • There is no referee.
  • There are no written rules.
  • There is no organizing committee.
  • The teams are not even in size. Town will always outnumber the Country. Before the Wars the teams were more evenly matched.
  • To win you must carry the ball to your own goal.
  • Another way to win is to carry the ball out of the parish, which can be up to 3 miles.
  • As soon as the ball is goaled or carried out of the parish, the game finishes.
  • The game takes place mainly in the street where cars still pass up and down. The game can also extend onto private property including gardens and fields and sometimes through houses or pubs.
  • The game can stop at any time so that members of the watching crowd can handle the ball.
  • Touching the ball is said to be lucky and can bring good health and fertility.
  • Serious injuries are very rare.
  • The ball is made from sterling silver which encases a ball of apple wood.
  • There is only one maker of the ball.
  • The winner of the ball has the right to keep it, but must have a new one made in its place for the next game.
  • The price of a new ball is secret but is said to be around £300.
  • The ball weighs just over a pound.
  • The origin of the game is known to be over 500 years.
  • There are only 2 games a year.
  • The first game is always on Shrove Tuesday.
  • The second game is on the Saturday of the following week.
  • The game is always started at 4.30 pm.
  • The game can last anything up to 2 hours.
  • After the game the ball is always returned to the start point.
  • The game attracts vistors from miles away but most watchers are local to the area.
  • In the evening the ball is taken around the pubs of the town and dipped into a gallon jug of beer and is shared out.
  • Drinking "Silver beer" gives you good luck and good health.
  • The parish of St. Columb Major is the world's largest pitch for any ball game.
  • In the last 100 years there have been 2 lost balls.
  • A group of stone circles on Bodmin Moor are known as The Hurlers.

A football (soccer) player is cautioned by a referee A referee is a person who has authority to make decisions about play in many sports. ... A committee is a (relatively) small group that can serve one of several functions: Governance: in organizations too large for all the members to participate in decisions affecting the organization as a whole, a committee (such as a Board of Directors) is given the power to make decisions. ... The pound sterling is the official currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... Officially the pound is the name for at least three different units of mass: The pound (avoirdupois). ... A pancake In the Christian calendar, Shrove Tuesday is the English name for the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, which in turn marks the beginning of Lent. ... The gallon (abbr. ... Location within the British Isles St Columb Major (Cornish: Sen Kolomm Veur) is a town in Cornwall, England, to the west of Wadebridge and south of Newquay. ... The Cheeswring, a granite tor on the southern edge of Bodmin Moor (Photo by Mick Knapton) Bodmin Moor is a granite moorland in northeastern Cornwall, England, 208 km² in size, dating from the Carboniferous period of geological history. ... The Hurlers is the name of a group of three stone circles on Bodmin Moor in Cornwall, UK. The circles were first noted by historian John Norden in 1584 and the first detailed description was made by William Borlase in 1754. ...

Early written evidence of hurling in Cornwall

The Cornish-men they are stronge, hardye and nymble, so are their excercises violent, two especially, Wrastling and Hurling, sharpe and seuere actiuties; and in neither of theis doth any Countrye exceede or equall them. The firste is violent, but the seconde is daungerous: The firste is acted in two sortes , by Holdster (as they called it) and by the Coller; the seconde likewise two ways , as Hurling to goales, and Hurling to the Countrye.
  • 1602, In his survey of Cornwall historian Richard Carew wrote about Cornish hurling:
That the hurler must deal no foreball, or throw it to any partner standing nearer the goal than himself. In dealing the ball, if any of the adverse party can catch it flying ... the property of it is thereby transferred to the catching party; and so assailants become defendants, and defendant assailants.
  • 1648 At Penryn, following a Royalist uprising to support the King; the victorious Parliamentarians passed through the town in a triumphant manner; viz:—first, three soldiers, bearing on the points of three swords (carried upright) three silver balls used in hurling. [1]
  • 1654 At Hyde Park, London. - The Protector, (Oliver Cromwell) however, was present on that May-day, and appeared keenly to enjoy the sports, as we learn from another source. In company with many of his Privy Council he watched a great hurling match by fifty Cornish gentlemen against fifty others. 'The ball they played withal was silver, and designed for that party which did win the goal.' Report in the Moderate Intell. 26 Apr.-4 May, 1654 [2]
  • 1705 (13 August) Camborne Parish burials register.
William Trevarthen buried in the church. A margin mote in the churchwardens accounts explains "Being disstroid to a hurling with Redruth men at the high dounes the 10th day of August".

Topography, a term in geography, has come to refer to the lay of the land, or the physiogeographic characteristics of land in terms of elevation, slope, and orientation. ... John Nordens map of London in 1593. ... Joe Cornish, British TV presenter. ... Richard Carew (1555 - 1620) was a Cornish translator and antiquary. ... Market Street in 2005, looking south Map sources for Penryn at grid reference SW782345 Penryn (Cornish: Pennrynn, from Pen-ryn meaning promontory) is a town in Cornwall, England on the Penryn river. ... Cavaliers were gentlemen supporters of the Royalist cause during the English Civil Wars (1642–1651) For other meanings for see cavalier. ... A parliamentarian is a specialist in parliamentary procedure. ... Hyde Park is the name of: Hyde Park, a Royal Park in London (the original location) Hyde Park in Sydney - a park some places in the United States of America: Hyde Park, Massachusetts Hyde Park, New York - a town in Dutchess County, New York Hyde Park, Vermont - a town Hyde... Unfinished portrait miniature of Oliver Cromwell by Samuel Cooper, 1657. ... Location within the British Isles. ... Map sources for Redruth at grid reference SW700420 Redruth (Cornish: Rysrudh) is a town in the south-west of Cornwall, Britain. ...

Dates for future games at St Columb

2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 11 March is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (71st in Leap year). ... 2007 (MMVII) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) will a Leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 5 is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (67th in Leap years). ... For the film, see 2010: The Year We Make Contact. ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2011 (MMXI) will be a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 8 poster from Portugal March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in Leap years). ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ...

References

  • Hurling at St. Columb and in Cornwall by Ivan Rabey, 1972, Lodenek P, ISBN 0902899112
  • Survey of Cornwall' by Sir Richard Carew, 1602, New York, 1969, pp. 147-149.

Motto: Onen hag oll (Cornish: One and all) Geography Status Ceremonial and (smaller) Non-metropolitan county Region South West England Population - Total (2004 est. ... Richard Carew (1555 - 1620) was a Cornish translator and antiquary. ...

External links

  • List of Winners at the St. Columb Hurling, 1950 - 2005

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cornish Hurling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1028 words)
Hurling (sometimes pronounced hurlin), is an outdoor team sport of Celtic origin.
A silver hurling ball which is the size of an orange, made from applewood and coated with silver, flies through the village streets of St.
Hurling at St. Columb and in Cornwall by Ivan Rabey, 1972, Lodenek P, Survey of Cornwall' by Sir Richard Carew, 1602, New York, 1969, pp.
Hurling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (974 words)
The goalkeepers hurl has a bas twice the size of other players hurls (pictured is a goalkeepers hurl with the larger bas) to provide some advantage for the fast moving sliotar.
Hurling was first mentioned in a description of the 14th century BC Battle of Moytura where the Tuatha Dé Danann defeated the Fir Bolg in a match and, later, in a battle.
Significant hurling matches are those between the counties of Ireland in each of the four national provinces.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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