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Encyclopedia > Cornell University
Cornell University
The Cornell University Seal

Motto: "I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study." -Ezra Cornell, 1865[1]
Established: 1865
Type: Private with 14 colleges and schools, including 4 statutory colleges
Endowment: $5.5 billion[2]
President: David J. Skorton
Faculty: 1,594 Ithaca
1,005 New York City
34 Qatar†
Students: 19,800[3]
Undergraduates: 13,510 Ithaca[3]
Postgraduates: 6,290 Ithaca
818 New York City
135 Qatar[3][4]
Location: Flag of the United States Ithaca, NY, U.S.
Campus: Small city, 745 acres (3.0 km²)
Colors: Carnelian and white           
Nickname: Big Red
Mascot:
The Cornell University Athletic Logo
None. The unofficial mascot is the bear sometimes named "Touchdown"[5]
Athletics: NCAA Division I Ivy League
Affiliations: AAU
Website: www.cornell.edu
†Regular full-time and part-time professorial faculty members. NYC Weill medical-division units have additional external affiliations with 867 full-time and part-time faculty members elsewhere.

Cornell University is a private university located in Ithaca, New York, U.S. Its two medical campuses are in New York City and Education City, Qatar. Cornell is one of two private land-grant universities and a member of the Ivy League. Cornell may refer to: People Alonzo B. Cornell, a business figure and governor of New York, son of Ezra Cornell Chris Cornell, lead vocalist of Soundgarden and Audioslave Don Cornell, a popular U.S. singer of the 1940s and 1950s Eric Allin Cornell, a Nobel prize-winning physicist Ezekiel Cornell... Download high resolution version (1600x1595, 140 KB)taken from http://www. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... In American higher education, particular to the state of New York, a statutory college or contract college is a college or school that is a component of an independent, private university that has been designated by the state legislature to receive significant public funding from the state. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... David J. Skorton (born November 22, 1949 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin); is an American medical scholar and academic administrator and is currently serving as the 12th President of Cornell University. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Imprint of a carnelian seal with Brahmi inscription Kusumadasasya (Flowers servant). 4-5th century CE, probably Punjab. ... This article is about the color. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... The Cornell Big Red is the name of the sports teams, and other competitive teams, at Cornell University. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... NCAA redirects here. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Education City, a compound of six US universities, is found in Doha, the capital city of Qatar. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ...


Cornell was founded in 1865 by Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White as a coeducational, non-sectarian institution where admission was offered irrespective of religion or race. Inaugurated shortly after the American Civil War, its founders intended that the new university would teach and make contributions in all fields of knowledge — from the classics to the sciences and from the theoretical to the applied. These ideals, unconventional for the time, are captured in Cornell's motto, an 1865 Ezra Cornell quotation: "I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study."[1] Ezra Cornell, co-founder of Cornell University Ezra Cornell (January 11, 1807 – December 9, 1874) was an American businessman and, with Andrew Dickson White, was the founder of Cornell University. ... Andrew Dickson White in 1885 Andrew Dickson White (November 7, 1832 – November 4, 1918) was a U.S. diplomat, author, and educator, best known as the co-founder of Cornell University. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Sectarianism refers (usually pejoratively) to a rigid adherence to a particular sect or party or religious denomination. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Classics (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ...


The university is organized into seven undergraduate colleges and seven graduate divisions, each defining its own academic programs in near autonomy. Since the mid-20th century, the university has been expanding both its campus resources and influence worldwide. From a new residential college housing system to its 2001 founding of a medical college in Qatar, Cornell claims "to serve society by educating the leaders of tomorrow and extending the frontiers of knowledge."[6] The student body consists of over 13,000 undergraduate and 6,000 graduate students from all fifty states and one hundred twenty-two countries.[7] Cornell counts more than 240,000 living alumni, 28 Rhodes Scholars and 40 Nobel laureates affiliated with the university as faculty or students.[4][8][9] Cornell produces more graduates that go on to become doctors than any other university in the country. It also produces the largest number of graduates in the life sciences who continue for Ph.D. degrees, and the third highest number in science and engineering.[10] Research is a central element of the university's mission; in 2006 Cornell spent $649 million on research and development.[11] In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A residential college is an organisational pattern for a division of a university that places academic activity in a community setting of students and faculty, usually at a residence and with shared meals, the college having a degree of autonomy and a federated relationship with the overall university. ... Old girl redirects here. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... Winners of the Nobel Prize are scientists, writers and peacemakers who have been awarded in their field of endeavour, and who are known collectively as either Nobel laureates or Nobel Prize winners. ... USD redirects here. ... Look up million in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

History

The Arts Quad, around which the College of Arts and Sciences centers
The Arts Quad, around which the College of Arts and Sciences centers

Cornell University was created on April 27, 1865 by a New York State Senate bill that named the university as the state's land grant institution. Senator Ezra Cornell offered his farm in Ithaca, New York, as a site and $500,000 of his personal fortune as an initial endowment. Fellow senator and experienced educator Andrew Dickson White agreed to be the first president. During the next three years, White oversaw the construction of the initial two buildings and traveled about the globe, attracting students and faculty.[12] Statue of A.D. White on the Arts Quadrangle The history of Cornell University begins with the convergence of its two founders in the New York State Senate in January 1864. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Cornell_Arts_Quad_1919. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Cornell_Arts_Quad_1919. ... College of Arts & Sciences logo Cornell Universitys College of Arts and Sciences (A&S or CAS) has been part of the university since its founding, although its name has changed over time. ... College of Arts & Sciences logo Cornell Universitys College of Arts and Sciences (A&S or CAS) has been part of the university since its founding, although its name has changed over time. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The New York State Senate is one of two houses in the New York State Legislature and has members each elected to two-year terms. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... Andrew Dickson White in 1885 Andrew Dickson White (November 7, 1832 – November 4, 1918) was a U.S. diplomat, author, and educator, best known as the co-founder of Cornell University. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ...


The university was inaugurated on October 7, 1868, and 412 men were enrolled the next day.[13] Two years later, Cornell admitted its first women students, making it the first coeducational school among what came to be known as the Ivy League. Scientists Louis Agassiz and James Crafts were among the faculty members.[12] is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... Louis Agassiz After the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, Stanford President David Starr Jordan wrote, Somebody—Dr. Angell, perhaps—remarked that Agassiz was great in the abstract but not in the concrete. ... James Mason Crafts (March 8, 1839 – 20 June 1917) was an American chemist, most known for developing the Friedel-Crafts alkylation and acylation reactions with Charles Friedel in 1876. ...

In September 2006, David Skorton formally became Cornell's 12th and current president
In September 2006, David Skorton formally became Cornell's 12th and current president

Cornell expanded significantly in the 20th century, with its student population growing to its current count of about 20,000 students. The faculty expanded as well; by the century's end, the university had more than 3,400 faculty members. Along with its population growth, Cornell increased its breadth of course offerings. Today, the university has wide-ranging programs and offers more than 4,000 courses.[citation needed] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x853, 178 KB) Summary Retrieved from http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x853, 178 KB) Summary Retrieved from http://www. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


In the 2000s, Cornell has been expanding its international programs. In 2001, the university founded the Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, the first American medical school outside of the United States.[14] It continues to forge partnerships with major institutions in India, Singapore, and the People's Republic of China.[15][16][17] The university, with its high international profile, claims to be "the first transnational university".[6] Cornell redirects here. ... Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, Texas, USA. A medical school or faculty of medicine is a tertiary educational institution — or part of such an institution — that teaches medicine. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with transnationalism. ...


Organization

Goldwin Smith Hall and the A.D. White statue
Goldwin Smith Hall and the A.D. White statue

Cornell is a non-profit institution, receiving most of its funding through tuition, research grants, state appropriations, and alumni contributions. Three of its undergraduate schools/colleges and the graduate-level College of Veterinary Medicine are called "statutory colleges" or "contract colleges". These colleges receive significant partial, ongoing funding from the state of New York to support their teaching, research, and service missions. For 2007-08, these colleges will receive $167.7 million in SUNY appropriations.[18] Residents of New York enrolled in the statutory colleges pay reduced tuition. Furthermore, the New York State Governor, the Speaker of the New York State Assembly, and the President Pro Tem of the New York State Senate all serve as ex-officio members of Cornell's Board of Trustees. The statutory colleges are an integral part of the State University of New York.[19] Despite some similarities, Cornell's contract colleges are not public or state schools — they are private institutions that Cornell operates under statutes, appropriations and contracts with New York State. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 575 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 575 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Goldwin Smith (August 13, 1823 – June 7, 1910) was a British-Canadian historian and journalist. ... Andrew Dickson White in 1885 Andrew Dickson White (November 7, 1832 – November 4, 1918) was a U.S. diplomat, author, and educator, most known as the co-founder of Cornell University. ... Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ... Grants are funds given to tax-exempt nonprofit organizations or local governments by foundations, corporations, governments, small business and individuals. ... An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In American higher education, particular to the state of New York, a statutory college or contract college is a college or school that is a component of an independent, private university that has been designated by the state legislature to receive significant public funding from the state. ... The following is a list of the Governors of the State of New York. ... The Speaker of the New York State Assembly is the highest official in the New York State Assembly, customarily elected from the ranks of the majority party. ... Pro tempore or pro tem is a latin phrase which best translates to for the time being in English. ... The New York State Senate is one of two houses in the New York State Legislature and has members each elected to two-year terms. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of a beneficiary. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ...


Cornell is decentralized, with its colleges and schools exercising wide autonomy. Each defines its own academic programs, operates its own admissions and advising programs, and confers its own degrees. The only university-wide requirements for a baccalaureate degree are to pass a swimming test, take two physical education courses, and satisfy a writing requirement. Although students are affiliated with their individual college or school, they may take courses in any of the colleges, provided they have fulfilled the course prerequisites. A handful of inter-school academic departments offer courses in more than one college. Decentralisation (or decentralization) is any of various means of more widely distributing decision-making to bring it closer to the point of service or action. ... College admissions or university admission is the process through which students enter post-secondary education at universities and colleges. ... A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... Physical education (PE) is the interdisciplinary study of all area of science relating to the transmission of physical knowledge and skills to an individual or a group, the application of these skills, and their results. ...


Seven schools provide undergraduate programs and an additional seven provide graduate and professional programs. Students pursuing graduate degrees in departments of these schools are enrolled in the Graduate School. The School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions offers programs for college and high school students, professionals, and other adults.[20] The Graduate School is a graduate school at Cornell University; it confers most professional and research masters degree and doctoral degrees in various fields of study for the university. ...


Several other universities have used Cornell as their model, including the University of Sydney in Australia and the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom; the latter on the recommendation of one of its financiers, Andrew Carnegie.[21] The University of Sydney, established in Sydney in 1850, is the oldest university in Australia. ... Website http://www. ... Andrew Carnegie (last name properly pronounced , but often )[1] (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish industrialist, businessman, a major philanthropist, and the founder of Pittsburghs Carnegie Steel Company which was later merged with Elbert H. Garys Federal Steel Company and several smaller companies to create...

Undergraduate


Endowed

Statutory or Contract The College of Architecture, Art, and Planning (AAP) at Cornell University was established in 1871 as the School of Architecture, offering the first four-year course of study in architecture in the United States. ... College of Arts & Sciences logo Cornell Universitys College of Arts and Sciences (A&S or CAS) has been part of the university since its founding, although its name has changed over time. ... The College of Engineering is a division of Cornell University that was founded in 1870 as the Sibley College of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanic Arts. ... Entrance to the School of Hotel Administration The School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University is a school for hospitality management founded in 1922 as the first four-year school devoted to the field and it is the only such school in the Ivy League. ...

Graduate and professional The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (abbreviated to CALS or Ag School) at Cornell University is a contract college of New York and is considered by many to be the top school of agriculture-related sciences in the world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The School of Industrial and Labor Relations (ILR) at Cornell University was established in 1944 (first students admitted 1945) as the worlds first school for college-level study in industrial and labor relations. ...


Endowed

Statutory or Contract The Graduate School is a graduate school at Cornell University; it confers most professional and research masters degree and doctoral degrees in various fields of study for the university. ... Cornell Law School, located in Ithaca, New York, is a graduate school of Cornell University. ... The S.C. Johnson Graduate School of Management, also referred as the Johnson School, is located at Cornell University. ... The Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University (abbreviated to Weill Cornell) is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Weill Medical Center The Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences (WGSMS) is a graduate college of Cornell University that was founded in 1952 as an academic partnership between two major medical institutions in New York City: the Weill Cornell Medical College and the Sloan-Kettering Institute. ...

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Campuses

Main campus

Main articles: Cornell Central Campus, Cornell North Campus, and Cornell West Campus
McGraw Hall and the clock tower
McGraw Hall and the clock tower
Cornell's Agriculture Quadrangle
Cornell's Agriculture Quadrangle

Cornell's main campus is on East Hill in Ithaca, New York, overlooking the town and Cayuga Lake. When the university was founded in 1865, the campus consisted of 209.5 acres (0.85 km²) of Ezra Cornell's roughly 300 acre (1.2 km²) farm. Since then, it has swelled to about 745 acres (3.0 km²), encompassing both the hill and much of the surrounding areas.[22] Central Campus is the primary academic and administrative section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... North Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... West Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1155x768, 154 KB) Summary (Alex Sergeev, www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1155x768, 154 KB) Summary (Alex Sergeev, www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1299x805, 557 KB) Summary Cornell University Ag Quad, taken from Bradfield Hall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1299x805, 557 KB) Summary Cornell University Ag Quad, taken from Bradfield Hall. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ... Cayuga Lake (pronounced either kA-yü-g& or kI-yü-g&) is the longest of western New Yorks glacial Finger Lakes, and is the second largest in surface area (marginally smaller than Seneca Lake) and volume. ...


Some 260 university buildings are divided primarily between Central and North Campuses on the plateau of the Hill, West Campus on its slope, and Collegetown immediately south of Central Campus.[22] Central Campus has laboratories, administrative buildings, and almost all of the university's academic buildings, athletic facilities, auditoriums, and museums. The only residential facility on Central Campus is the Law School's residential college, Hughes Hall. North Campus contains freshman and graduate student housing, themed program houses, and 29 fraternity and sorority houses. West Campus has upperclass residential colleges and an additional 25 fraternity and sorority houses.[23] Collegetown contains the Schwartz Performing Arts Center and two upperclass residence halls, amid a neighborhood of apartments, restaurants, and businesses. Central Campus is the primary academic and administrative section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... North Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... For other meanings, see Plateau (disambiguation). ... West Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... Cornell Law School, located in Ithaca, New York, is a graduate school of Cornell University. ... A residential college is an organisational pattern for a division of a university that places academic activity in a community setting of students and faculty, usually at a residence and with shared meals, the college having a degree of autonomy and a federated relationship with the overall university. ... Freshman redirects here. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at Lafayette College. ... The performing arts are those forms of art which differ from the plastic arts insofar as the former uses the artists own body, face and presence as a medium, and the latter uses materials such as clay, metal or paint which can be molded or transformed to create some... A halls of residence, British English (almost always halls and not hall) or a residence hall (North American English) is a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students. ...

The main campus is marked by an irregular layout and eclectic architectural styles, including ornate Gothic, Victorian, Neoclassical buildings, and less decorative international and modernist structures. The more ornate buildings generally predate World War II. Because the student population doubled from 7,000 in 1950 to 15,000 by 1970, grandiosity was neglected in favor of less expensive and more rapidly constructed styles.[24] While some buildings are neatly arranged into quadrangles, others are packed densely and haphazardly. These eccentricities arose from the university's numerous, ever-changing master plans for the campus. For example, in one of the earliest plans, Frederick Law Olmsted, the designer of Central Park, outlined a "grand terrace" overlooking Cayuga Lake.[25] Because the terrace plan was dropped, McGraw Hall appears to face the wrong direction, facing the Slope rather than the Arts Quad. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1155x768, 198 KB) Summary (Alex Sergeev, www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1155x768, 198 KB) Summary (Alex Sergeev, www. ... F.R. Newman Arboretum (150 acres) is an arboretum within the Cornell Plantations, which are botanical gardens located adjacent to the Cornell University campus in Ithaca, New York. ... Architectural style is a way of classifying architecture largely by morphological characteristics - in terms of form, techniques, materials, etc. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Late Baroque classicizing: G. P. Pannini assembles the canon of Roman ruins and Roman sculpture into one vast imaginary gallery (1756) Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that... The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1927) The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1930) The International style was a major architectural style of the 1920s and 1930s. ... Modern architecture, not to be confused with contemporary architecture, is a term given to a number of building styles with similar characteristics, primarily the simplification of form and the elimination of ornament. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Quadrangle of University of Sydney In architecture, a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space or courtyard, usually square or rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. ... {{Infobox Person | name = | image = FLOlmstead. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... Cayuga Lake (pronounced either kA-yü-g& or kI-yü-g&) is the longest of western New Yorks glacial Finger Lakes, and is the second largest in surface area (marginally smaller than Seneca Lake) and volume. ...


The Ithaca Campus is among the rolling valleys of the Finger Lakes region and, atop the Hill, commands a panoramic view of the surrounding area. Two gorges bound Central Campus, which become popular swimming holes during the warmer months (although the university discourages their use). Adjacent to the main campus, Cornell owns the 2,900 acre (11.7 km²) Cornell Plantations, a botanical garden containing flowers, trees, and ponds along manicured trails.[26] The Finger Lakes, a major tourist destination in the west-central section of Upstate New York, are actually eleven in number, but only seven of the largest are commonly identified as such. ... Grand Canyon, Arizona Noravank Monastery complex and canyon in Armenia. ... The Cornell Plantations (80 ha / 200 acres) are botanical gardens, including the F.R. Newman Arboretum, located adjacent to the Cornell University campus, Ithaca, New York. ... Inside the United States Botanic Garden Washington, D.C. Botanical gardens grow a wide variety of plants primarily categorized and documented for scientific purposes. ...


New York City campus

Weill Medical Center in New York City
Weill Medical Center in New York City

Weill Cornell Medical College, often called Weill Cornell, is on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. It is home to two Cornell divisions, Weill Medical College and Weill Graduate School of Medical Sciences, and has been affiliated with the New York-Presbyterian Hospital since 1927.[27] Although their faculty and academic divisions are separate, the Medical Center shares its administrative functions with the Columbia University Medical Center. Weill Medical College is also affiliated with the neighboring Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Rockefeller University, and the Hospital for Special Surgery. Many faculty members have joint appointments at these institutions, and Weill Cornell, Rockefeller, and Memorial Sloan-Kettering offer the Tri-Institutional MD-PhD Program to selected entering Cornell medical students. Image File history File links Cornell_med_02. ... Image File history File links Cornell_med_02. ... The Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ... The Upper East Side at Sunset The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, USA, between Central Park and the East River. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ... Weill Medical Center The Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences (WGSMS) is a graduate college of Cornell University that was founded in 1952 as an academic partnership between two major medical institutions in New York City: the Weill Cornell Medical College and the Sloan-Kettering Institute. ... New York-Presbyterian Hospital is a prominent university hospital in New York City, composed of two medical centers, Columbia University Medical Center and the Cornell University Weill Medical Center. ... Columbia University Medical Center is name of the medical complex associated with Columbia University located in Washington Heights area of Manhattan. ... The original New York Cancer Hospital[1], first built between 1884 and 1886, now converted to luxury condominiums, at 455 Central Park West and 106th St. ... Founders Hall Rockefeller University is a private university focusing primarily on graduate and postgraduate education research in the biomedical fields, located between 63rd and 68th Streets along York Avenue, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan island in New York City, New York. ... The Hospital for Special Surgery is a hospital in New York City. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In addition to the medical center, New York City hosts local offices for some of Cornell's service programs. The Cornell Urban Scholars Program encourages students to pursue public service careers with organizations working with New York City's poorest children, families, and communities.[28] The College of Human Ecology and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences provide means for students to reach out to local communities by gardening and building with the Cornell Cooperative Extension.[29] Students with the School of Industrial and Labor Relations' Extension & Outreach Program make workplace expertise available to organizations, union members, policy makers, and working adults.[30] The College of Engineering's Operations Research Manhattan, in the city's financial district, brings together business optimization research and decision support services aimed at strengthening industry and public sector collaboration.[31] The College of Architecture, Art, and Planning has a facility on West 17th Street, near Union Square, to provide studio and seminar space for students and faculty.[32] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (abbreviated to CALS or Ag School) at Cornell University is a contract college of New York and is considered by many to be the top school of agriculture-related sciences in the world. ... The School of Industrial and Labor Relations (ILR) at Cornell University was established in 1944 (first students admitted 1945) as the worlds first school for college-level study in industrial and labor relations. ... The College of Engineering is a division of Cornell University that was founded in 1870 as the Sibley College of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanic Arts. ... A view up Broad Street in the Financial District in Manhattan Federal Hall The Financial District of New York City is a neighborhood on the southernmost section of the borough of Manhattan which comprises the offices and headquarters of many of the citys major financial institutions, including the New... The College of Architecture, Art and Planning at Cornell University was established in 1871 as the School of Architecture, offering the first four-year course of study in architecture in the United States. ... Union Square Park (also known as Union Square) is an important and historic intersection in New York City, located where Broadway and the Bowery came together in the early 19th century. ...


Qatar campus

Weill Medical College in Qatar is in Education City, near Doha. Opened in September 2004, it was the first American medical school outside the United States.[14] The college is part of Cornell's program to increase its international influence. The College is a joint initiative with the Qatar government, which seeks to improve the country's academic programs and medical care.[33] Along with its full four-year MD program, which mirrors the curriculum taught at Weill Medical College in New York City, the college offers a two-year undergraduate pre-medical program with a separate admissions process. This undergraduate program opened in September 2002 and was the first coeducational institute of higher education in Qatar.[34] Education City is an area in Doha, Qatar, that with funding from the nonprofit Qatar Foundation, has been set aside for the establishment of branch campuses of several American universities, as well as several local educational and research organizations. ... For other uses, see Doha (disambiguation). ... The Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ... A pre-medical Degree is one preparing for medical school. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ...


The college is partially funded by the Qatar government through the Qatar Foundation, which contributed $750 million for its construction.[35] The medical center is housed in a large two-story structure designed by Arata Isozaki.[36] In 2004, the Qatar Foundation announced the construction of a 350–bed Specialty Teaching Hospital near the medical college in Education City. The hospital will be completed in 2009 and is supported by an $8 billion endowment.[14] The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development is a private, chartered, nonprofit organization in State of Qatar, founded in 1995 by His Highness Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani, Emir of Qatar. ... Kyoto Concert Hall Arata Isozaki (磯崎新, Isozaki Arata; born 23 July 1931) is a Japanese architect from Oita Prefecture. ...


Other facilities

Cornell's West Campus
Cornell's West Campus

Cornell University owns and operates many facilities around the world.[37] The Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, site of the world's largest single-dish radio telescope, is operated by Cornell under a contract with the National Science Foundation.[38] The Shoals Marine Laboratory, operated in conjunction with the University of New Hampshire,[39] is a seasonal marine field station dedicated to undergraduate education and research on 95 acre (0.4 km²) Appledore Island off the MaineNew Hampshire coast. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1155x768, 175 KB) Summary (Alex Sergeev, www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1155x768, 175 KB) Summary (Alex Sergeev, www. ... The Arecibo Observatory is located approximately 9 miles south-southwest from Arecibo, Puerto Rico (near the extreme southwestern corner of Arecibo pueblo). ... The 64 meter radio telescope at Parkes Observatory A radio telescope is a form of directional radio antenna used in radio astronomy and in tracking and collecting data from satellites and space probes. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... Shoals Marine Laboratory (SML) is a seasonal marine field station located on Appledore Island, Maine, the largest of the Isles of Shoals. ... University of New Hampshire (UNH) is a public university in the University System of New Hampshire (USNH). ... Appledore Island, Maine, one of the Isles of Shoals located ten miles off the Maine/New Hampshire coast, is best remembered for the artists salon that thrived there in the late 1800s, before the advent of artists colonies as we know them today. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ...


Many Cornell facilities focus on conservationism and ecology. The New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, operated by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, is in Geneva, New York, 50 miles (80 km) northwest of the main campus. The facility comprises 20 major buildings on 130 acres (0.5 km²) of land, as well as more than 700 acres (2.8 km²) of test plots and other lands devoted to horticultural research.[40] It also operates three substations, Vineyard Research Laboratory in Fredonia, Hudson Valley Laboratory in Highland and the Long Island Horticultural Research Laboratory in Riverhead. Conservation can be confused with conversation and vice versa. ... For the journal, see Ecology (journal). ... The campus of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station at Geneva, New York, is an integral part of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences of Cornell University. ... The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (abbreviated to CALS or Ag School) at Cornell University is a contract college of New York and is considered by many to be the top school of agriculture-related sciences in the world. ... Geneva is a city in Ontario County, New York, USA. The population was 13,617 at the 2000 census. ... Fredonia (New York) Fredonia is a village in Chautauqua County, New York, United States. ... Highland is a census-designated place located in Ulster County, New York. ... The Town of Riverhead is in Suffolk County, New York on the north shore of Long Island. ...


The Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology in Sapsucker Woods in Ithaca, New York, performs research on biological diversity, primarily in birds. In 2005, the lab announced that it had rediscovered the Ivory-billed woodpecker, long thought to be extinct.[41] The Animal Science Teaching and Research Center in Harford, New York, and the Duck Research Laboratory in Eastport, New York, are resources for information on animal disease control and husbandry.[42][43] The Arnot Teaching and Research Forest, a 4,075 acre (16.5 km²) forest 20 miles (32.2 km) south of the Ithaca campus, is the primary field location for faculty and student training and research related to professional forestry.[44] The mission of the Cornell Biological Field Station in Bridgeport, New York, is "to provide a center for long-term ecological research and support the University's educational programs, with special emphasis on freshwater lacustrine systems."[45] In addition, the university operates biodiversity laboratories in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, and in the Amazon rainforest in Peru[46][47] named the Cornell University Esbaran Amazon Field Laboratory. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is a laboratory dedicated to research in the field of ornithology at Cornell University. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ... Rainforests are among the most biodiverse ecosystems on earth Biodiversity is the variation of life forms within a given ecosystem, biome or for the entire Earth. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The Ivory-billed Woodpecker (Campephilus principalis) is, or was, a very large member of the woodpecker family, Picidae; it is officially listed as an endangered species, but by the end of the 20th century had widely been considered extinct. ... In biology and ecology, extinction is the ceasing of existence of a species or group of species. ... Harford is a town located in Cortland County, New York. ... Eastport is a census-designated place located in Suffolk County, New York. ... In general stewardship is responsibility for taking good care of resources entrusted to one. ... A decidous beech forest in Slovenia. ... Bridgeport is a hamlet (and census-designated place) located in the Town of Sullivan in Madison County, New York. ... Fresh water redirects here. ... For other uses, see Lake (disambiguation). ... Punta Cana, named after a local cape, is a region in the easternmost tip of the Dominican Republic. ... Map of the Amazon rainforest ecoregions as delineated by the WWF. Yellow line encloses the Amazon rainforest. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...


The university also maintains offices for study abroad and scholarship programs. Cornell in Washington is a program that allows students to study for a semester in Washington, D.C., in research and internship positions while earning credit toward a degree.[48] Cornell in Rome, operated by the College of Architecture, Art, and Planning, allows students to use the city as a resource for learning architecture, urban studies, and art.[49] The College of Human Ecology offers the Urban Semester Program, an opportunity to take courses and complete an internship in New York City for a semester. As well, the Capital Semester program allows students to intern in the New York state legislature.[50] Studying abroad is the act of a student pursuing educational opportunities in a foreign country. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... For information about a medical intern, see the article on Medical residency. ... A credit is a unit that gives weighting to the value, level or time requirements of an academic course. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... The College of Architecture, Art, and Planning (AAP) at Cornell University was established in 1871 as the School of Architecture, offering the first four-year course of study in architecture in the United States. ... This article is about building architecture. ... This article needs cleanup. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Academics

Profile

For the undergraduate class of 2011, the admission rate was 20.5%, the most selective in the university's history, though the highest in the Ivy League.[51] Of those admitted, the average SAT Verbal score was 700, while the average SAT Math was a 720. Also, 92% of admitted students for the Class of 2011 were in the top 10% of their graduating high school class.[52] In 2006, the most selective undergraduate college was the College of Arts and Sciences, which admitted only 14.6% of applicants. For the class of 2009, 33.8% enrolled through early decision.[53] Of enrolling students, 67% scored above 650 on the SAT Verbal exam and 82% scored above 650 on the SAT Math exam. Sixty-eight percent of new undergraduate students hailed from public high schools.[53] Cornell enrolls students from all 50 U.S. states and more than 120 countries. The Class of 2010 has representatives from all states except for Arkansas. As of Fall 2005, 28% of undergraduate students identified themselves as members of ethnic minority groups.[4] Ninety-six percent of first-year students return for their second year.[53] Of 13,515 undergraduate students, 4,251 (31.5%) are affiliated with the largest college by enrollment, Arts and Sciences, followed by 3,153 (23.3%) in Agriculture and Life Sciences and 2,680 (19.8%) in Engineering. By student enrollment, the smallest of the seven undergraduate colleges is Architecture, Art, and Planning, with 515 (3.8%) students.[4] College of Arts & Sciences logo Cornell Universitys College of Arts and Sciences (A&S or CAS) has been part of the university since its founding, although its name has changed over time. ... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... “Minority” redirects here. ... College of Arts & Sciences logo Cornell Universitys College of Arts and Sciences (A&S or CAS) has been part of the university since its founding, although its name has changed over time. ... The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (abbreviated to CALS or Ag School) at Cornell University is a contract college of New York and is considered by many to be the top school of agriculture-related sciences in the world. ... The College of Engineering is a division of Cornell University that was founded in 1870 as the Sibley College of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanic Arts. ... The College of Architecture, Art, and Planning (AAP) at Cornell University was established in 1871 as the School of Architecture, offering the first four-year course of study in architecture in the United States. ...


In 2005, the Graduate School accepted 21.6% of applicants, the Johnson School of Management accepted 36.4%, the Law School accepted 20.6%, and the Veterinary School accepted 10.9%.[54][55][56][57] The Weill Cornell Medical School accepted 4.3%.[58] The Graduate School is a graduate school at Cornell University; it confers most professional and research masters degree and doctoral degrees in various fields of study for the university. ... The S.C. Johnson Graduate School of Management, also referred as the Johnson School, is located at Cornell University. ... Cornell Law School, located in Ithaca, New York, is a graduate school of Cornell University. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University (abbreviated to Weill Cornell) is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ...


Faculty

Main articles: List of Cornell University people#Faculty and List of Cornell University people
Carl Sagan with a model of the Viking Mars Lander at Death Valley, California.
Carl Sagan with a model of the Viking Mars Lander at Death Valley, California.

For the August 2005 to May 2006 academic year, Cornell University had 1,594 full-time and part-time academic faculty members affiliated with its main campus.[4] The New York City medical divisions count 1,005 faculty members and Qatar has 34.[4] In total, 40 Nobel laureates have been affiliated with Cornell as faculty or students.[8] Notable former professors include Carl Sagan, Charles Evans Hughes, Norman Malcolm, Vladimir Nabokov, Hans Bethe, Richard Feynman, Kip Thorne, Archie Randolph Ammons, Peter Debye, and Allan Bloom. Cornellians are persons affiliated with Cornell University, commonly including alumni, current and former faculty members, students, and others. ... Cornellians are persons affiliated with Cornell University, commonly including alumni, current and former faculty members, students, and others. ... Image File history File links Sagan_Viking. ... Image File history File links Sagan_Viking. ... Insert non-formatted text here Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer and astrobiologist and a highly successful popularizer of astronomy, astrophysics, and other natural sciences. ... Viking 1 was the first of two spacecraft sent to Mars as part of NASAs Viking program, and holds the record for the longest Mars surface mission. ... For other uses, see Death Valley (disambiguation). ... Nobel Prizes have always been a source of pride for universities, suggesting their excellence in teaching or in providing research opportunities. ... Cornellians are persons affiliated with Cornell University, commonly including alumni, current and former faculty members, students, and others. ... Insert non-formatted text here Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer and astrobiologist and a highly successful popularizer of astronomy, astrophysics, and other natural sciences. ... Charles Evans Hughes, Sr. ... Norman Malcolm (1911 – 1990) is an American philosopher. ... This page is about the novelist. ... Hans Albrecht Bethe (pronounced bay-tuh; July 2, 1906 – March 6, 2005), was a German-American physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1967 for his work on the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis. ... This article is about the physicist. ... Kip S. Thorne Professor Kip Stephen Thorne, Ph. ... A. R. Ammons, or Archie Randolph Ammons, (February 18, 1926 – February 25, 2001) was an American author and poet. ... Petrus Josephus Wilhelmus Debije (March 24, 1884 – November 2, 1966) was a Dutch physical chemist. ... Allan Blooms translation and interpretation, Second edition 1991. ...

Cornell's faculty for the 2005–06 academic year included three Nobel laureates, a Crafoord Prize winner, two Turing Award winners, a Fields Medal winner, two Legion of Honor recipients, a World Food Prize winner, an Andrei Sakharov Prize winner, three National Medal of Science winners, two Wolf Prize winners, five MacArthur award winners, four Pulitzer Prize winners, two Eminent Ecologist Award recipients, a Carter G. Woodson Scholars Medallion recipient, four Presidential Early Career Award winners, 20 National Science Foundation CAREER grant holders, a recipient of the National Academy of Sciences Award for Initiatives in Research, a recipient of the American Mathematical Society's Steele Prize for Lifetime Achievement, a recipient of the Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics, three Packard Foundation grant holders, a Keck Distinguished Young Scholar, two Beckman Foundation Young Investigator grant holders, and two NYSTAR (New York State Office of Science, Technology, and Academic Research) early career award winners.[4] Picture of Hans Bethe circa 1940s-1950s Original source Los Alamos National Laboratory --http://www. ... Picture of Hans Bethe circa 1940s-1950s Original source Los Alamos National Laboratory --http://www. ... Hans Albrecht Bethe (pronounced bay-tuh; July 2, 1906 – March 6, 2005), was a German-American physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1967 for his work on the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The Crafoord Prize was established in 1980 by Holger Crafoord, the inventor of the artificial kidney, and his wife Anna-Greta Crafoord. ... The A.M. Turing Award is given annually by the Association for Computing Machinery to a person selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community. ... The obverse of the Fields Medal The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... Medal for the officer class, decorated with a rosette Napoleon wearing the Grand Cross The President of France is the Grand Master of the Legion. ... The World Food Prize is an international award recognizing the achievements of individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity or availability of food in the world. ... The Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought, named after Soviet scientist and dissident Andrei Sakharov, was established in December 1985 by the European Parliament as a means to honour individuals or organizations who had dedicated their lives to the defence of human rights and freedoms. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and physics. ... The Wolf Prize has been awarded annually since 1978 to living scientists and artists for achievements in the interest of mankind and friendly relations among peoples . ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Carter Woodson biographical cartoon by Charles Alston, 1943 Carter Godwin Woodson (December 19, 1875 — April 3, 1950) was an African American historian, author, journalist and the founder of Black History Month. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ... The American Mathematical Society (AMS) is dedicated to the interests of mathematical research and education, which it does with various publications and conferences as well as annual monetary awards to mathematicians. ... The Leroy P. Steele Prizes are awarded every year by the American Mathematical Society, for distinguished research work and writing in the field of mathematics. ... Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics is an award given each year since 1959 jointly by American Physical Society and American Institute of Physics. ... The David and Lucile Packard Foundation is a private foundation that provides grants to not-for-profit organizations. ...


On June 11, 2005, Jeffrey S. Lehman announced that he would resign from the position of Cornell President effective June 30, 2005, citing "differences with the board regarding the strategy for realizing Cornell's long-term vision."[59] Former Cornell President Hunter R. Rawlings III served as interim president for the 2005–06 academic year. David J. Skorton, former president of the University of Iowa, assumed office on July 8, 2006. is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jeffery Sean Lehman (b. ... Cornellians are persons affiliated with Cornell University, commonly including alumni, current and former faculty members, students, and others. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hunter R. Rawlings III is an American classics scholar and academic administrator. ... David J. Skorton (born November 22, 1949 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin); is an American medical scholar and academic administrator and is currently serving as the 12th President of Cornell University. ... The University of Iowa, also commonly called Iowa or locally UI, is a major coeducational research university located on a 1,900-acre (8 km²) campus in Iowa City, Iowa, US, on the banks of the Iowa River in East Central Iowa. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


International programs

Cornell offers undergraduate curricula with international focuses, including the Africana Studies, French Studies, German Studies, Jewish Studies, Latino Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Romance Studies, and Russian Literature majors. Cornell was the first university to teach modern Far Eastern languages.[4] In addition to traditional academic programs, Cornell students may study abroad on any of six continents.[60] An Africanist is a specialist in African affairs, cultures, or languages. ... Jewish studies also known as Judaic studies is a subject area of study available at many colleges and universities in the Western World. ... Latino/a Studies is an academic discipline which studies the experience of people of Hispanic ancestory in America. ... Romance studies is an umbrella academic discipline that covers the study of the languages, literatures, and cultures of areas that speak a Romance language. ... Russian literature refers to the literature of Russia or its émigrés, and to the Russian-language literature of several independent nations once a part of what was historically Russia or the Soviet Union. ...


The Asian Studies major, South Asia Program, Southeast Asia Program, and the newly launched China and Asia-Pacific Studies (CAPS) major provide opportunities for students and researchers in Asia. Cornell has an agreement with Peking University allowing students in the CAPS major to spend a semester in Beijing.[61] Similarly, the College of Engineering has an agreement to exchange faculty and graduate students with Tsinghua University in Beijing, and the School of Hotel Administration has a joint master's program with Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences has signed an agreement with Japan's National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences,[62] as well as the University of the Philippines, Los Baños,[63] to engage in joint research and exchange graduate students and faculty members. It also cooperates in agricultural research with the Indian Council of Agricultural Research.[64] This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Peking University (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ), colloquially known in Chinese as Beida (北大, BÄ›idà), was established in 1898. ... Peking redirects here. ... The College of Engineering is a division of Cornell University that was founded in 1870 as the Sibley College of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanic Arts. ... Tsinghua University (THU; Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is a university in Beijing, China. ... Peking redirects here. ... Entrance to the School of Hotel Administration The School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University is a school for hospitality management founded in 1922 as the first four-year school devoted to the field and it is the only such school in the Ivy League. ... Malay name Malay: Universiti Teknologi Nanyang Tamil name Tamil: நன்யாங் தொழில்நுட்ப பல்கலைக்கழகம் Nanyang Technological University (Abbreviation: NTU) is a major research university in Singapore. ... The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (abbreviated to CALS or Ag School) at Cornell University is a contract college of New York and is considered by many to be the top school of agriculture-related sciences in the world. ... The University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB) is an autonomous constituent university of the University of the Philippines System situated at the foot of Mount Makiling in Los Baños, Laguna. ... Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), New Delhi, India is the apex body in Agriculture and related allied fields, including research and education. ...


In the Middle East, Cornell's efforts focus on biology and medicine. The Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar trains new doctors to improve health services in the region. The university is also developing the Bridging the Rift Center, a "Library of Life" (or database of all living systems) on the border of Israel and Jordan, in collaboration with those two countries and Stanford University.[65] A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Cornell redirects here. ... This article is about computing. ... Stanford redirects here. ...


Cornell has partnered with Queen's University in Canada to offer a joint Executive MBA. The only program of its kind in the world, graduates of the program earn both a Cornell MBA and a Queen's MBA.[66] This program is made possible through videoconferencing, and so students in Canada and the United States share an interactive virtual classroom. Queens University, generally referred to simply as Queens, is a coeducational, non-sectarian public university located in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... It has been suggested that H.331 be merged into this article or section. ...


Rankings

Cornell Law School in the summer
Cornell Law School in the summer

The university ranked 12th in the 2007 and 2008 U.S. News & World Report National Universities ranking and 12th globally in an academic ranking of world universities by Shanghai Jiao Tong University in 2006.[67][68]Britain's THES - QS World University Rankings ranked Cornell 14th in the world in 2005[69] and 15th in 2006.[70] Cornell was ranked seventh nationally and first among Ivy League universities in The Washington Monthly's 2007 ranking of universities' contributions to research, community service, and social mobility.[71] In 2006, The Princeton Review reported that Cornell ranked ninth as a "dream college" for high school students and their parents.[72] Newsweek named Cornell the 'Hottest Ivy' in its 2007 listing of America's 25 Hot Schools. [73] Instead of using the traditional school ranking methods, Newsweek offers a snapshot of todays most interesting colleges according to high school counselors, admissions officers, consultants, students, and parents, who noted Cornell for its emphasis on "problem-solving as well as scholarly debate" and "variety on campus" among other things. [74] Image File history File links PictureofMyronTaylorHall. ... Image File history File links PictureofMyronTaylorHall. ... Cornell Law School, located in Ithaca, New York, is a graduate school of Cornell University. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... The THES - QS World University Rankings is an annual publication of university rankings around the world, published by The Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) and Quacquarelli Symonds (QS). ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ... Social mobility is the degree to which, in a given society, an individuals social status can change throughout the course of their life (known as intragenerational mobility), or the degree to which that individuals offspring and subsequent generations move up and down the class system (intergenerational mobility). ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


The Almanac of Architecture and Design along with Design Intelligence has consistently ranked Cornell's Bachelor of Architecture program as number one in the nation (in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2006 and 2007). In the 2008 survey, the program ranked second and the Master of Architecture program ranked third.[75] In 2008, Design Intelligence also ranked Cornell's undergraduate and graduate landscape architecture programs as 6th and 4th respectively, in the nation.

Among business schools in the United States, the Johnson Graduate School of Management was ranked 7th by BusinessWeek in 2004,[76] 9th by Forbes in 2005,[77] 16th by U.S. News in 2007,[78] and 18th by The Wall Street Journal in 2005.[79] Worldwide, the school was ranked 17th by The Economist in 2005 and 36th by the Financial Times in 2006.[80][81] Image File history File links Sagehallfromchristian. ... Image File history File links Sagehallfromchristian. ... Sage Residential College, Sage College for Women, Sage College, or just Sage was the first womens residential college at Cornell University. ... The S.C. Johnson Graduate School of Management, also referred as the Johnson School, is located at Cornell University. ... The S.C. Johnson Graduate School of Management, also referred as the Johnson School, is located at Cornell University. ... BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ...


The Undergraduate Business Program at Cornell University (or Applied Economics and Management program) ranked 4th Nationally in Business Week's Best Undergraduate Business Programs for 2008.[82] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Cornell University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. ...


U.S. News ranked the Weill Cornell Medical School as the 15th best in the United States in its 2007 edition.[83] The College of Veterinary Medicine was ranked first among national veterinary medicine graduate schools.[84] The Cornell Law School was ranked as the 12th best graduate law program among national universities.[85] In 2005, The National Law Journal reported that Cornell Law had the sixth highest placement rate at the top 50 law firms in the U.S. among law schools with recent graduates.[86] The Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cornell Law School, located in Ithaca, New York, is a graduate school of Cornell University. ... The National Law Journal, a periodical founded in 1978, reports legal information of national importance to attorneys, including federal circuit court decisions, verdicts, practitioners columns, coverage of legislative issues, and legal news for the business and private sectors. ...


In its 2006 ranking[87] and 2007 ranking[88] of undergraduate engineering programs at universities in the United States, U.S. News placed Cornell first in engineering physics. In 1954, Conrad Hilton called the Cornell School of Hotel Administration "the greatest hotel school in the world."[89] Engineering physics (EP) is an academic degree, usually at the level of Bachelor of Science. ... Conrad Nicholson Hilton, Sr. ... Entrance to the School of Hotel Administration The School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University is a school for hospitality management founded in 1922 as the first four-year school devoted to the field and it is the only such school in the Ivy League. ...


According to the latest ranking of National Research Council in 1995, Cornell ranks sixth nationally in the number of graduate programs in the top ten in their fields.[90] Cornell had 19 ranked in the top 10 in terms of overall academic quality. Also National Research Council ranked the quality of faculties as 5th in Arts and Humanities, 6th in Mathematics and Physical Sciences, and 5th in Engineering. The National Research Council (NRC) of the USA is the working arm of the United States National Academy of Sciences and the United States National Academy of Engineering, carrying out most of the studies done in their names. ... The National Research Council (NRC) of the USA is the working arm of the United States National Academy of Sciences and the United States National Academy of Engineering, carrying out most of the studies done in their names. ...


Library

The Cornell Law Library, Myron Taylor Hall
The Cornell Law Library, Myron Taylor Hall

The Cornell University Library is the eleventh largest academic library in the United States, ranked by number of volumes held.[91] Organized into twenty divisions, in 2005 it held 7.5 million printed volumes in open stacks, 8.2 million microfilms and microfiches, and a total of 440,000 maps, motion pictures, DVDs, sound recordings, and computer files in its collections, in addition to extensive digital resources and the University Archives.[92] It was the first among all U.S. colleges and universities to allow undergraduates to borrow books from its libraries.[4] In 2006, The Princeton Review ranked it as the 11th best college library.[93] The Cornell University Library, the library system of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, which is composed of 20 individual libraries, is one of the largest research libraries in the United States. ... Image File history File links Biocrawler. ... Image File history File links Biocrawler. ... Cornell Law School, located in Ithaca, New York, is a graduate school of Cornell University. ... For other uses, see Book (disambiguation). ... Microfilm machines may be available at libraries or record archives. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Microform. ... In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ...


The library plays an active role in furthering online archiving of scientific and historical documents. arXiv, an e-print archive created at Los Alamos National Laboratory by Paul Ginsparg, is operated and primarily funded by Cornell as part of the library's services. The archive has changed the way many physicists and mathematicians communicate, making the e-print a viable and popular means of announcing new research. arXiv (pronounced archive, as if the X were the Greek letter χ) is an archive for electronic preprints of scientific papers in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science and quantitative biology which can be accessed via the Internet. ... A preprint is a draft of a scientific paper that has not yet been published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. ... Los Alamos National Laboratory, aerial view from 1995. ... Paul Ginsparg is a physicist widely known for his development of the ArXiv. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ...


Press

The Cornell University Press, established in 1869 but inactive from 1884 to 1930, was the first university publishing enterprise in the United States.[94] It was established in the College of the Mechanic Arts (as mechanical engineering was called in the 19th century) because engineers knew more than literature professors did about running steam-powered printing presses. From its inception, the press has offered work-study financial aid: students with previous training in the printing trades were paid for typesetting and running the presses that printed textbooks, pamphlets, a weekly student journal, and official university publications. For other uses, see Publishing (disambiguation). ... Mechanical Engineering is an engineering discipline that involves the application of principles of physics for analysis, design, manufacturing, and maintenance of mechanical systems. ... A steam engine is a heat engine that makes use of the potential energy that exists as pressure in steam, converting it to mechanical work. ... The printing press is a mechanical device for printing many copies of a text on rectangular sheets of paper. ... Financial aid refers to funding intended to help students pay tuition or other costs, such as room and board, for education at a college, university, or private school. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Today, the press is one of the country's largest university presses.[4] It produces approximately 150 nonfiction titles each year in various disciplines including anthropology, Asian studies, biological sciences, classics, history, industrial relations, literary criticism and theory, natural history, philosophy, politics and international relations, veterinary science, and women's studies.[94][95] The press's acquisitions, editorial, production, and marketing departments have been located in Sage House since 1993, and the financial department is on Cascadilla Street in downtown Ithaca.[94] A university press is an academic, nonprofit publishing house that is typically affiliated with a large research university. ...


Financial Aid

At the time of its founding, Cornell University was considered revolutionary because its founder, Ezra Cornell, was committed to access for all students, regardless of economic circumstance. Together with Cornell's first president, Andrew Dickson White, he opened the institution's doors "to applicants for admission ... at the lowest rates of expense consistent with its welfare and efficiency, and without distinction as to rank, class, previous occupation or locality."[96] The University Charter provided for free instruction to one student chosen from each Assembly district in the state.[96] Within the first 10 years of operation, the university admitted women and underrepresented minority students and provided financial aid for many students, using a combination of grant, loan and work-study opportunities. The university awarded need-based grants as early as 1879, and its first endowed scholarship fund was created in 1892.


Starting in the 1950s Cornell coordinated with other Ivy League schools to provide a consistent set of financial aid. However, in 1989, a consent decree to end a Justice Department antitrust investigation ended such coordination.[97] Even after the decree, all Ivy League schools continue to award aid on financial need without offering any athletic scholarships.


In 2007-2008, Cornell has budgeted $116.8 million of its own resources on undergraduate financial aid, 94 percent of which will be spent on grant aid. Sixty-four percent of all Cornell students receive some financial aid.[98]


On January 31, 2008, Cornell announced a new financial aid initiative to be phased in over the next two years. In the first year, 2008-09, Cornell will eliminate need-based loans for undergraduate students from families with incomes under $60,000, and cap them annually at $3,000 for students from families with incomes between $60,000 and $120,000. The following year, 2009-10, the program will take full effect by eliminating need-based loans for students from families with incomes up to $75,000, and capping annual loans at $3,000 for students from families with income between $75,000 and $120,000. The initiative will cost an additional $14 million per year when fully implemented. [99]


Student life

Activities

Ives Hall on Cornell's Ithaca campus
Ives Hall on Cornell's Ithaca campus

For the 2006–07 academic year, Cornell had 901 registered student organizations. These clubs and organizations run the gamut from kayaking to full-armor jousting, from varsity and club sports and a cappella groups to improvisational theatre, from political clubs and publications to chess and video game clubs.[100] They are subsidized financially by academic departments and/or the Student Assembly and the Graduate & Professional Student Assembly, two student-run organizations with a collective budget of $3.0 million per year.[101][102] The assemblies also finance other student life programs including a concert commission and an on-campus movie theater. Student organizations also include a myriad of musical groups that play everything from classical, jazz, to ethnic styles in addition to the Big Red Marching Band, which performs regularly at football games and other campus events.[103] Organized in 1868, the oldest student organization is the Cornell University Glee Club. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,600 × 1,200 pixels, file size: 403 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ives Hall on the Cornell Campus I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,600 × 1,200 pixels, file size: 403 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ives Hall on the Cornell Campus I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Cornell University Glee Club (CUGC) is the oldest student organization at Cornell University, having been organized shortly after the first students arrived on campus in 1868. ...


Cornell is home to two secret senior honor societies called Sphinx Head and Quill and Dagger that have maintained a presence on campus for well over 115 years. There are numerous collegiate secret societies at American and Canadian colleges and universities. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Cornell hosts the second largest fraternity and sorority system in North America, with 66 chapters involving 28% of male and 22% of female undergraduates.[104][105] Alpha Phi Alpha, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter organization established for African Americans, was founded at Cornell in 1906. Cornell University currently hosts 39 fraternities, 12 sororities, and 16 multi-cultural Greek-letter associations. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... This page contains special characters. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


During the 2004–05 academic year, the Greek system committed 21,668 community service and advocacy hours and raised $176,547 in philanthropic efforts.[105] However, the administration has expressed concerns over student misconduct in the system. In 2004–05, of 251 social events registered with the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs, 37 (15%) resulted in a complaint. In that same year, there were five reported instances of property destruction, five reports of bias, three hazing incidents, and various other allegations.[105] Student misconduct is reviewed by the Judicial Administrator, Cornell's justice system. Community service refers to service that a person performs for the benefit of his or her local community. ... Advocacy is the act of arguing on behalf of a particular issue, idea or person. ... For other senses of this word, see bias (disambiguation). ... Hazing is an often ritualistic test and a task, which may constitute harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform random, often meaningless tasks, sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of law that punishes criminals for committing offences against the state. ...


Press and radio

  • The Cornell Daily Sun is the oldest continuously independent college daily newspaper in the United States, having published since September 1880. In 1912, it became the first collegiate member of the Associated Press. The Sun currently publishes print and online editions five days a week while classes are in session and publishes content online during all school breaks. The Sun is distributed on Cornell's campus, around Ithaca and can be subscribed to outside of Ithaca.[106]
  • The Cornell Chronicle, published by the Division of University Communications with a print edition distributed Fridays during the academic year and an online edition updated daily, is the university's newspaper of record, containing news and features about university programs, research, students, faculty and the administration, and a calendar of events.
  • The Cornell Review is a fortnightly conservative tabloid newspaper published by students. The Review incorporated in 1986 as , researchThe Ithaca Review, Inc. While the ideological makeup of its staff shifts over the years, the paper has maintained strident criticism of Cornell's perceived left-wing politics and political correctness. The Review has received national attention for its articles including one that discussed a proposal to sell vibrators at Gannett Health Center on campus. [2]
  • The Cornell Progressive is an independent student-run publication. This publication was founded in 2000 (as Turn Left) by three engineering students to counter the domination by the conservative Cornell Review. The publication calls itself "Cornell's Liberal Voice."[107]
  • The Cornell Centrist was founded in September 2005, and published its first issue in April 2006. Its purpose is to publish multiple newspaper-style journals that contain centrist, center-right, and center-left political positions. It was originally conceived with the primary goal of "advancing an intellectual, sophisticated political dialogue on campus."
  • The Cornell Moderator is a student publication founded in 2004. Self-described as "unabashedly unbiased", it is meant to serve as a vehicle for intellectually-honest campus discussion. The paper itself takes no editorial position, allowing the mutually-opposed arguments of its freelance writers to succeed or fail on their own merits.
  • WVBR is an independent commercial FM radio station owned and operated by Cornell students, but not affiliated with or controlled by the university. During the week, it plays mostly rock music, and switches to specialty shows and community programming on the weekend. It also provides coverage of both Cornell and national sports.
  • Other campus publications include the campus humor magazine, The Cornell Lunatic.

The Cornell Daily Sun is an independent daily newspaper published in Ithaca, New York by students at Cornell University. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... The Cornell Review is a conservative newspaper published by students of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. ... American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... This article is about the newspaper size. ... Left wing redirects here. ... Political correctness is the alteration of language to redress real or alleged injustices and discrimination or to avoid offense. ... The Cornell Centrist is an on-campus political publication at Cornell University. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in September September 28 : Constance Baker Motley September 25 : M. Scott Peck September 25 : Don Adams September 20 : Simon Wiesenthal September 14 : Robert Wise September 10 : Hermann Bondi September 8 : Donald Horne September 7 : Moussa Arafat... April 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Marcos Pontes, Brazils first astronaut, reaches the International Space Station. ... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... The term center-right has two distinct meanings in politics: Center-right can be used to describe a moderately right-wing political party. ... The term center-left has two distinct meanings in politics: Center-left can be used to describe a moderately left-wing political party. ... WVBR-FM is a radio station that broadcasts to Ithaca, New York, and surrounding areas. ... This article is about the genre. ...

Housing

See also: Cornell North Campus and Cornell West Campus

University housing is broadly divided into three sections: North Campus, West Campus, and Collegetown. Since a 1997 residential initiative, West Campus houses transfer and returning students, whereas North Campus is almost entirely populated by freshmen.[108] The only options for living on North Campus for upperclassmen are the program houses: Risley Residential College, Just About Music, the Ecology House, Holland International Living Center, the Multicultural Living Learning Unit, the Latino Living Center, Akwe:kon, and Ujamaa. Of these, only Ujamaa, Akwe:kon, and the Latino Living Center remain controversial, due to their dedicated racial or ethnic themes. North Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... West Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... North Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... West Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... Prudence Risley Residential College for the Creative and Performing Arts, commonly known as Risley Residential College, Risley Hall, or just Risley, is a program house (themed residence hall) at Cornell University. ... North Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... North Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... North Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... North Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... North Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... North Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ...

Boldt Hall on Cornell's West Campus
Boldt Hall on Cornell's West Campus
Risley has served as the basis for the new residential colleges

In an attempt to create a sense of community and an atmosphere of education outside the classroom and continue Andrew Dickson White's vision, the university has undertaken the $250 million residential college project on West Campus.[109] The Class Halls will be demolished and rebuilt as five residential colleges named after notable deceased Cornell professors. The first, Alice Cook House, was opened to students in 2004, followed by Carl Becker House in 2005. The third house, Hans Bethe House, opened in January 2007. The idea of building a house system can be attributed in part to the success of Risley Residential College, the oldest continually operating residential college at Cornell. Like Risley, the new houses will have their own dining halls, student governments, in-house lectures, house trips, and crests. The completion of the five-house residential college campus will occur in August 2008.[109] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1155x768, 199 KB) Summary (Alex Sergeev, www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1155x768, 199 KB) Summary (Alex Sergeev, www. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 567 KB)Risley Hall, Backyard File links The following pages link to this file: Risley Hall ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 567 KB)Risley Hall, Backyard File links The following pages link to this file: Risley Hall ... Prudence Risley Residential College for the Creative and Performing Arts, commonly known as Risley Residential College, Risley Hall, or just Risley, is a program house (themed residence hall) at Cornell University. ... A residential college is an organisational pattern for a division of a university that places academic activity in a community setting of students and faculty, usually at a residence and with shared meals, the college having a degree of autonomy and a federated relationship with the overall university. ... West Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... West Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... West Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... Prudence Risley Residential College for the Creative and Performing Arts, commonly known as Risley Residential College, Risley Hall, or just Risley, is a program house (themed residence hall) at Cornell University. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ...


Additionally, Cornell has several housing areas for graduate and professional students. Of these, Schuyler House and Hughes Hall are designed similarly to dormitories, while Maplewood Apartments, Hasbrouk Apartments, and Thurston Court Apartments are apartment-style, some even allowing for family living. Unlike many undergraduate dormitories, the graduate housing areas are largely located either on the outer border of campus, or off-campus on university-owned land.

Balch Hall is a women-only residence hall on North Campus
Balch Hall is a women-only residence hall on North Campus

Off campus, many homes in the East Hill neighborhoods adjacent to the university have been converted to apartments. Several high-rise apartment complexes have been constructed in the Collegetown neighborhood. Nine percent of undergraduate students reside in fraternity and sorority houses, although freshmen are not permitted to live in them.[citation needed] Housing cooperatives or other independent living units exist, including Watermargin, Telluride House, Triphammer Cooperative, the Center for Jewish Living, and the Wait Cooperative. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 242 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,023 × 310 pixels, file size: 404 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Uploaded from : http://upload. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 242 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,023 × 310 pixels, file size: 404 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Uploaded from : http://upload. ... Balch as seen from the front Balch Hall, or more accurately Balch Halls, is the only all-female dormitory at Cornell University. ... North Campus is a residential section of Cornell Universitys Ithaca, New York campus. ... A housing co-operative is a legal entity, usually a corporation, that owns real estate, one or more residential buildings. ... The Telluride Association is a non-profit organization in the United States that provides young people with free educational programs emphasizing intellectual curiosity, democratic self-governance, and social responsibility. ...


In its 2007 rankings of college campus food, The Princeton Review ranked Cornell's dining services eighth overall.[93] The university has 31 on-campus dining locations, and a program called the Cross Country Gourmet Guest Restaurant Series periodically brings chefs, menus, and atmosphere from restaurants to Cornell's eight all-you-care-to-eat dining halls.[110] The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ...


Athletics

Main article: Cornell Big Red
Schoellkopf Field, home to Football, Sprint Football, Lacrosse, and Field Hockey
Schoellkopf Field, home to Football, Sprint Football, Lacrosse, and Field Hockey

Cornell has 36 varsity sports teams that are known as the Big Red. An NCAA Division I-AA institution, Cornell is a member of the Ivy League and ECAC Hockey League and competes in the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC), the largest athletic conference in North America.[111] (Note that the ECAC Hockey League is no longer affiliated with the ECAC.) The men's ice hockey team is the most historically successful of the varsity teams and is the university's most intently followed sport. Generally, although Cornell's varsity athletic teams typically earn their "share" of Ivy League titles, they do not perform well in the ECAC conference or the NCAA overall, and fail to compete consistently for national championships in most sports.[112] Because of the Ivy League athletic agreement, the university is not permitted to offer athletic scholarships for athletic recruiting.[113] The Cornell Big Red is the name of the sports teams, and other competitive teams, at Cornell University. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1155x768, 174 KB) Summary (Alex Sergeev, www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1155x768, 174 KB) Summary (Alex Sergeev, www. ... Schoellkopf Field is a 25,597-capacity stadium at Cornell University that opened in 1915 and is used for the Big Red football, sprint football, lacrosse and field hockey teams. ... Cornell Sprint Football team Sprint football, or lightweight football is a version of American football where no player may weigh more than 172 pounds. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... The ECAC Hockey League is one of the six conferences that compete in NCAA Division I ice hockey. ... The Eastern College Athletic Conference is a College Athletic Conference comprising schools that compete in 35 mens and womens sports. ... An athletic scholarship is a form of scholarship to attend a college or university awarded to an individual based predominantly on their ability to play in a sport. ...


Cornell University's football team had at least a share of the national championship four times before 1940[114][115] and has won the Ivy League championship three times, last in 1990.[116] The Sprint Football team has won the CSFL title six times. The men's ice hockey team has been NCAA champion twice, ECAC champion 11 times and Ivy League champion 19 times, and recorded the only undefeated season in NCAA Division I Hockey history in 1970. The men's lacrosse team has been NCAA champion three times and Ivy League champion 21 times. The men's Lightweight rowing team varsity 8+ has won the IRA regatta three times since 1992. The women's polo team has won the National Women's Polo Championship 11 times and the women's hockey team has been Ivy League champion 8 times. In total, Cornell's varsity athletic teams have been champions of the NCAA, ECAC, or Ivy League 114 times. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Cornell Sprint Football team Sprint football, or lightweight football is a version of American football where no player may weigh more than 172 pounds. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... For other uses, see Polo (disambiguation). ...

The Men's Ice Hockey Team at Lynah Rink
The Men's Ice Hockey Team at Lynah Rink

Cornell maintains athletic rivalries with other collegiate institutions. The men's ice hockey team has a historic rivalry with Boston University, but since BU left what became the ECAC Hockey League to join Hockey East, rivalry with Harvard University has become predominant. Following tradition, when Harvard plays the men's ice hockey team at Cornell's Lynah Rink, some Big Red fans throw fish on the ice.[117] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3456x2304, 739 KB) Summary (Mercuryboards friends picture, permission given by creator, I have altered the picture to make it brighter) Taken by Dan Furie http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3456x2304, 739 KB) Summary (Mercuryboards friends picture, permission given by creator, I have altered the picture to make it brighter) Taken by Dan Furie http://www. ... Lynah Rink is a 3,836-seat hockey arena at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, that opened in 1957. ... A sports rivalry is intense competition between athletic teams or athletes. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... The ECAC Hockey League is one of the six conferences that compete in NCAA Division I ice hockey. ... Hockey East is a college athletic conference which operates in New England. ... Cornell-Harvard game in Bright, 2005 The Cornell-Harvard Hockey Game or The Game is a mens hockey sports rivalry between Cornell University and Harvard University dating back to 1910. ... Lynah Rink is a 3,836-seat hockey arena at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, that opened in 1957. ...


Cornell and the University of Pennsylvania are long-time rivals in football. With more than 114 games played since their first meeting in 1893, this is the seventh most-played rivalry in college football.[118] Cornell's football series against both the University of Pennsylvania and Dartmouth College are tied for second longest uninterrupted college football match-ups in history, both dating back to 1919.[119] In polo, the men's and women's teams maintain rivalries with the University of Virginia and the University of Connecticut. This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... For other uses, see Polo (disambiguation). ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... The University of Connecticut is the State of Connecticuts land-grant university. ...


In addition to the school's varsity athletics, club sports teams have been organized as student organizations under the auspices of the Dean of Students. Cornell's intramural program includes 30 sports. Beside such familiar sports such as flag football, squash, or water polo, such unusual offerings as "inner tube water polo" and formerly "broomstick polo" have been offered, as well as a sports trivia competition.[120] Cornell students also often participate in the International Rutabaga Curling Championship, held annually at the Ithaca Farmers' Market. Cornell also has a rich history of martial arts on campus particularly Sport Taekwondo.[121] Since 1987, Cornell Sport Taekwondo has competed in the Ivy-Northeast Collegiate Taekwondo League (INCTL). In 2007 after a 4 year slump, Cornell Sport Taekwondo defeated MIT Sport Taekwondo to take the INCTL Cup. An Intramural game of co-ed flag football at the University of Texas at Austin Flag football is a version of American football that is popular across the United States. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... Water polo is a team water sport. ... Water polo is a team water sport. ... Rutabaga curling originated in the frosty December climes of Ithaca, New York. ...


Greek life

See also: List of fraternities and sororities at Cornell University

Cornell's Greek scene, founded with Zeta Psi in 1868, is the second largest in the nation, with roughly 1/3 of the undergraduate population involved in Greek letter organizations. Cornell currently has 39 fraternities registered with the Interfraternity Council (IFC), 12 sororities with the Panhellenic Council (Panhel), and 16 fraternities and sororities in the Multicultural Greek Letter Council (MGLC). All IFC and Panhel fraternities and sororities have houses, located just off of North or West campus, as there is no specific district for such buildings. However, none of the MGLC organizations have houses. While many of the fraternities at Cornell are known for throwing parties during most weekends and being the axis of campus social life, the fraternities and the sororities alike also partake in various philanthropic and community service projects, dealing with national organizations and local causes. In addition, all Greek letter organizations partake in Greek Week, held sometime during the beginning of fall semester, as a way to foster friendly competition between the chapters and to spark freshmen interest in Greek life and such organizations. Cornell University currently hosts 39 fraternities, 12 sororities, and 16 multi-cultural Greek-letter associations. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...


Underclassmen who choose to join such organizations usually do so during the rush periods. While rush varies for organizations in the MGLC, IFC and Panhel recruit potential members during the fall and spring; the former being the smaller, informal rush periods focused on recruiting upperclassmen, and the latter aimed primarily at freshmen and sophomores (this being the major rush period), held during the week before spring semester classes begin. Freshmen are not permitted to participate in Fall rush; Spring rush is a formal rush period, particularly for the Panhellenic sororities.


Despite its presence and power around campus, the Cornell Greek community has not been without controversy. In recent years, the IFC has seen the departure of Theta Chi and Sigma Phi Epsilon, although the latter has since returned to the campus. A Mexican-stereotype themed frat party in Spring 2007 caused outrage from the local Latino community[citation needed]. In July 2007, a statue from Sibley Hall was found in a fraternity basement after reported missing days earlier. However, the issue of hazing has been a constant controversy for the Greek community. A feature article in the Cornell Daily Sun in 2007 highlighted one student's experience as he was abused and humiliated by the brothers of his fraternity in 2001. Nevertheless, many Greek houses say that they abstain from such practices and choose not to haze their pledges.[citation needed] The Panhellenic sororities have strict anti-hazing requirements, and as all of the Panhellenic sororities have their own, independent off-campus houses, few houses are willing to risk deactivation or lesser penalties for hazing. None of the MGLC fraternities or sororities own their own houses, and most of the IFC fraternities have their own houses. Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Hazing is an often ritualistic test and a task, which may constitute harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform random, often meaningless tasks, sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ...


Cornelliana

Main article: Cornelliana
An early Dragon Day parade, circa 1920
An early Dragon Day parade, circa 1920

Cornelliana is a term for Cornell's traditions, legends, and lore. Cornellian traditions include Slope Day, a celebration held on the last day of classes, and Dragon Day, which includes the burning of a dragon built by architecture students. Dragon Day is one of the school's oldest traditions and has been celebrated annually since 1901, typically on or near St. Patrick's Day. The dragon is built secretly by the architecture students, and taunting messages are left for the engineering students for the week before Dragon Day. On Dragon Day, the dragon is paraded across the Arts Quad and then set afire. [122] According to legend, if a virgin crosses the Arts Quad at midnight, the statues of Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White will walk off their pedestals, meet in the center of the Quad, and shake hands, congratulating themselves on the chastity of the University. There is also another myth that if a couple crosses the suspension bridge on North Campus, and the young woman doesn't accept a kiss from her partner, the bridge will fall. If the kiss is accepted, the couple is assured a long future together. This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Very Old Photo File links The following pages link to this file: User:Xtreambar/Temporary/DragonDay Dragon Day ... Very Old Photo File links The following pages link to this file: User:Xtreambar/Temporary/DragonDay Dragon Day ... Dragon Day 2007 Dragon Day is an annual event at Cornell University. ... A view of Libe Slope during Slope Day Slope Day is an annual day of celebration held at Cornell University during the last day of regular undergraduate classes. ... Dragon Day 2007 Dragon Day is an annual event at Cornell University. ... College of Arts & Sciences logo Cornell Universitys College of Arts and Sciences (A&S or CAS) has been part of the university since its founding, although its name has changed over time. ... Ezra Cornell, co-founder of Cornell University Ezra Cornell (January 11, 1807 – December 9, 1874) was an American businessman and, with Andrew Dickson White, was the founder of Cornell University. ... Andrew Dickson White in 1885 Andrew Dickson White (November 7, 1832 – November 4, 1918) was a U.S. diplomat, author, and educator, best known as the co-founder of Cornell University. ...


The university is also host to various student pranks. For example, on at least three different occasions the university has awoken to find something odd atop the 173-foot (52.7 m) tall McGraw clock tower — once a 60-pound (27 kg) pumpkin, once a banner reading "Who is John Galt?", and another time a disco ball. Because there is no access to the spire atop the tower, how the items were put in place remains a mystery.[123] The colors of the lights on McGraw tower change to orange for Halloween and green for St. Patrick's Day.


The school colors are carnelian (a shade of red) and white, a play on "Cornellian" and Andrew Dickson White. A bear is commonly used as the unofficial mascot, which dates back to the introduction of the mascot "Touchdown" in 1915, a live bear who was brought onto the field during football games.[5] The university's alma mater is "Far Above Cayuga's Waters" and its fight song is "Give My Regards to Davy". People associated with the university are called "Cornellians". "Cornellian" is also used as an adjective and as the name of the university's yearbook. Imprint of a carnelian seal with Brahmi inscription Kusumadasasya (Flowers servant). 4-5th century CE, probably Punjab. ... For other uses, see Alma mater (disambiguation). ... View of Cayuga Lake. ... For the single by Marilyn Manson, see The Fight Song. ... Give My Regards to Davy is frequently sung at Cornell hockey games. ... Cornellians are persons affiliated with Cornell University, commonly including alumni, current and former faculty members, students, and others. ... For other uses, see Yearbook (disambiguation). ...


Historic sites

Andrew Dickson White House.
Andrew Dickson White House.

A number of Cornell University's buildings are individually significant. Morrill Hall is a U.S. National Historic Landmark. Other buildings listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places for their architectural or historic significance are: Image File history File links Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (768 × 1155 pixels, file size: 183 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (Alex Sergeev, www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (768 × 1155 pixels, file size: 183 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (Alex Sergeev, www. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...

  • Andrew Dickson White House
  • Bailey Hall
  • Caldwell Hall
  • Comstock Hall
  • Delta Kappa Epsilon / "Deke" House
  • Fernow Hall
  • Llenroc
  • Rice Hall
  • Wing Hall

In addition, East Robert Hall, Roberts Hall, and Stone Hall are former buildings that were listed on the National Register but are no longer in existence. Bailey Hall is the largest auditorium at Cornell University, seating just over 1300 people. ... Llenroc House Another view Llenroc was the house constructed for Ezra Cornell just below the campus of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, United States. ...


Research

For the 2004–05 fiscal year, the university spent $561.3 million on research.[11] The primary recipients of this funding were the colleges of Medicine ($164.2 million), Agriculture and Life Sciences ($114.5 million), Arts and Sciences ($80.3 million), and Engineering ($64.8 million).[11] The money comes largely from federal sources, with federal investment of $381.0 million. The federal agencies that invest the most money are the Department of Health and Human Services and the National Science Foundation that make up, respectively, 51.4% and 30.7% of all federal investment in the university.[11] Cornell was on the top-ten list of U.S. universities receiving the most patents in 2003, and is one of the nation's top five institutions in forming start-up companies.[124] In 2004–05, Cornell received 200 invention disclosures, filed 203 U.S. patent applications, completed 77 commercial license agreements, and distributed royalties of more than $4.1 million to Cornell units and inventors.[4] The United States Department of Health and Human Services, often abbreviated HHS, is a Cabinet department of the United States government with the goal of protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ... A startup company is a company recently formed, usually until IPO or acquisition. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

An artist's rendering of a Mars Exploration Rover as seen on the "Big Red" planet.
An artist's rendering of a Mars Exploration Rover as seen on the "Big Red" planet.

Since 1962, Cornell has been involved in unmanned missions to Mars.[125] In the 21st century, Cornell had a hand in the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. Cornell's Steve Squyres, Principal Investigator for the Athena Science Payload, led the selection of the landing zones and requested data collection features for the Spirit and Opportunity rovers.[126] Jet Propulsion Laboratory engineers took those requests and designed the rovers to meet them. The rovers, both of which have operated long past their original life expectancies, are responsible for the discoveries that were awarded 2004 Breakthrough of the Year honors by Science.[127] Control of the Mars rovers has shifted between NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory at Caltech and Cornell's Space Sciences Building.[128] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3000x2400, 963 KB)This image may be viewed in 3D stereo with same 3D glasses as other NASA Mars images. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3000x2400, 963 KB)This image may be viewed in 3D stereo with same 3D glasses as other NASA Mars images. ... Artists Concept of Rover on Mars (credit: Maas Digital LLC) Marvin the Martian, Spirit rover Mission patch Duck Dodgers, Opportunity rover Mission patch NASAs Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission is an ongoing robotic mission of exploring Mars, that began in 2003 with the sending of two rovers â€” Spirit... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... Artists Concept of Rover on Mars (credit: Maas Digital LLC) Marvin the Martian, Spirit rover Mission patch Duck Dodgers, Opportunity rover Mission patch NASAs Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission is an ongoing robotic mission of exploring Mars, that began in 2003 with the sending of two rovers â€” Spirit... Steve Squyres Steven W. Squyres (b. ... The launch patch for Spirit, featuring Marvin the Martian. ... The launch patch for Opportunity, featuring Duck Dodgers (Daffy Duck). ... For the singer/songwriter, see Jon Peter Lewis. ... Science is the academic journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is considered one of the worlds most prestigious scientific journals. ... For the singer/songwriter, see Jon Peter Lewis. ... The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech)[1] is a private, coeducational research university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ...


The Automotive Crash Injury Research project was begun in 1952 by John O. Moore at the Cornell Aeronautical Research Laboratories, which spun off in 1972 as Calspan Corporation.[129] It pioneered the use of crash testing, originally using corpses rather than dummies. The project discovered that improved door locks, energy-absorbing steering wheels, padded dashboards, and seat belts could prevent an extraordinary percentage of injuries.[129] The project led Liberty Mutual to fund the building of a demonstration Cornell Safety Car in 1956, which received national publicity and influenced carmakers.[129] Carmakers soon started their own crash-test laboratories and gradually adopted many of the Cornell innovations. Other ideas, such as rear-facing passenger seats, never found favor with carmakers or the public. Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory (now Calspan Corporation) was originally founded in 1943 as part of the Research Laboratory of the Curtiss-Wright Airplane Division at Buffalo, N.Y. It operated as the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory from 1946 until 1972 when Cornell University sold public stock in the lab and set it... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Crash test dummies have saved many thousands of lives. ... Liberty Mutuals current logo Liberty Mutual Group (LMG, Liberty, Liberty Mutual), is a large American insurance company. ... The Automotive Crash Injury Research project was begun in 1952 by John O. Moore at the Cornell Aeronautical Research Laboratories (spun off in 1972 as Calspan Corporation) at Cornell University. ...

The Cornell Theory Center, Rhodes Hall
The Cornell Theory Center, Rhodes Hall

In 1984, the National Science Foundation began work on establishing five new supercomputer centers, including the Cornell Theory Center, to provide high-speed computing resources for research within the United States. In 1985, a team from the National Center for Supercomputing Applications began the development of NSFNet, a TCP/IP-based computer network that could connect to the ARPANET, at the Cornell Theory Center and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. This high-speed network, unrestricted to academic users, became a backbone to which regional networks would be connected. Initially a 56-kbit/s network, traffic on the network grew exponentially; the links were upgraded to 1.5-Mbit/s T1s in 1988 and to 45 Mbit/s in 1991. The NSFNet was a major milestone in the development of the Internet and its rapid growth coincided with the development of the World Wide Web.[130][131] Image File history File linksMetadata Decentrhodeshall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Decentrhodeshall. ... Located at Cornell University, the Cornell Theory Center (CTC) is one of four supercomputing centers funded by the US National Science Foundation. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... For other uses, see Supercomputer (disambiguation). ... Located at Cornell University, the Cornell Theory Center (CTC) is one of four supercomputing centers funded by the US National Science Foundation. ... National Center for Supercomputing Applications NCSA Building, 1205 W. Clark St. ... National Science Foundation Network (NSFNet) was a major part of early 1990s Internet backbone. ... The Internet protocol suite is the set of communications protocols that implement the protocol stack on which the Internet runs. ... ARPANET logical map, March 1977. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... “KBPS” redirects here. ... A megabit per second (Mbps or Mbit/s or Mb/s) is a unit of data transmission equal to 1,024 kilobits per second or 1048576 bits per second. ... For the guitar distortion pedal, see BOSS DS-1. ... The World Wide Web and WWW redirect here. ...


Cornell scientists have researched the fundamental particles of nature for more than 70 years. Cornell physicists, such as Hans Bethe, contributed not only to the foundations of nuclear physics but also participated in the Manhattan Project. In the 1930s, Cornell built the second cyclotron in the United States. In the 1950s, Cornell physicists became the first to study synchrotron radiation. During the 1990s, the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, located beneath Alumni Field, was the world's highest-luminosity electron-positron collider.[132][133] Hans Albrecht Bethe (pronounced bay-tuh; July 2, 1906 – March 6, 2005), was a German-American physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1967 for his work on the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis. ... This article is about the World War II nuclear project. ... A pair of Dee electrodes with loops of coolant pipes on their surface at the Lawrence Hall of Science. ... General Electric synchrotron accelerator built in 1946, the origin of the discovery of synchrotron radiation. ... The Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) is a high-intensity high-energy X-ray lightsource supported by the National Science Foundation and located in Wilson Lab on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca, NY. The lab provides synchrotron radiation facilities for multidiciplinary scientific research, with a particular focus on...


Cornell's accelerator and high-energy physics groups are involved in the design of the proposed International Linear Collider and plan to participate in its construction and operation. The International Linear Collider, to be completed in the late 2010s, will complement the Large Hadron Collider and shed light on questions such as the identity of dark matter and the existence of extra dimensions. The International Linear Collider is a proposed linear particle accelerator. ... , The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a particle accelerator and Hadron collider located at CERN, near Geneva, Switzerland. ... For other uses, see Dark matter (disambiguation). ...


Alumni

Graduates of Cornell are known as "Cornellians". As of August 2005, the university counted 244,276 living Cornellians.[4] Many are active through organizations and events including the annual Reunion Weekend and Homecoming, weekend festivities in Ithaca, and the International Spirit of Zinck's Night. For the 2004–05 fiscal year, Cornell ranked third for gifts and bequests from alumni, and fourth for total support from all sources (alumni, friends, corporations, and foundations) among U.S. colleges and universities reporting voluntary gift support.[4] In October 2006, Cornell made public a 10 year capital campaign "Far Above..." to solicit alumni and raise $4 billion to improve the undergraduate experience, attract and retain faculty, and expand the physical plant.[134] Information about Cornell graduates, most of which is submitted by the graduates themselves, is available in the Cornell Alumni Magazine. The magazine is currently published 6 times a year. Cornellians are noted for their accomplishments in public, professional, and corporate life.[4][135] Taiwan's former President Lee Teng-hui, former President of Cuba Mario García Menocal, and former Iranian Prime Minister Jamshid Amuzegar all graduated from Cornell. In the United States, numerous Congressmen and Cabinet members, including Paul Wolfowitz and Janet Reno, and one Supreme Court justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, have been Cornellians. After his Cornell education, David Starr Jordan went on to become the president of Indiana University and subsequently founding president of Stanford University after former Cornell president Andrew Dickson White turned down the position. M. Carey Thomas founded Bryn Mawr College and was its second president. Lieutenant Colonel Matt Urban is the most decorated serviceman in United States history. Cornellians are persons affiliated with Cornell University, commonly including alumni, current and former faculty members, students, and others. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Ruth_Bader_Ginsburg_official_portrait. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Ruth_Bader_Ginsburg_official_portrait. ... Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ... For other uses, see Homecoming (disambiguation). ... View of Cayuga Lake. ... Lee Teng-hui (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) born January 15, 1923) is a politician of Taiwan. ... Mario García Menocal, c. ... Jamshid Amouzegar in uniform Jamshid Amuzegar (also Amouzegar), (1923 - ) is a former Prime Minister of Iran. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The Cabinet meets in the Cabinet Room on May 16, 2001. ... Paul Dundes Wolfowitz (born December 22, 1943) is a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, working on issues of international economic development, Africa and public-private partnerships. ... Janet Reno (born July 21, 1938) was the first and to date only female Attorney General of the United States (1993–2001). ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ... David Starr Jordan David Starr Jordan, Ph. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Andrew Dickson White in 1885 Andrew Dickson White (November 7, 1832 – November 4, 1918) was a U.S. diplomat, author, and educator, best known as the co-founder of Cornell University. ... M(artha) Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857-December 2, 1935) was the president of Bryn Mawr College and an ardent suffragist. ... Bryn Mawr College (pronounced ) is a highly selective womens liberal arts college located in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania, ten miles northwest of Philadelphia. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... Lt. ...


Cornellian-founded and/or headed businesses include Alamo Rent-A-Car by Michael Egan, Burger King by David Edgerton, Carrier by Willis Carrier, Citigroup by Sanford Weill, Coors Brewing Company by Adolph Coors, Gannett by Frank Gannett, Grumman Aerospace Corporation by Leroy Grumman, Palm by Jeff Hawkins, PeopleSoft by David Duffield, Priceline.com by Jay Walker, Qualcomm by Dr. Irwin M. Jacobs, Staples by Myra Hart, and Tata Group headed by Ratan Tata. Reginald Fils-Aime is President and CEO of Nintendo of America and Dan Hesse is the CEO of Sprint Nextel. Alamo Rent A Car is a car rental agency. ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... David Edgerton is the founder of Burger King fast-food franchise with James McLamore. ... The Carrier Corporation is the world’s largest manufacturer and distributor of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, and a global leader in the commercial refrigeration and food service equipment industry. ... Willis Haviland Carrier (November 26, 1876 – October 7, 1950) was an engineer and inventor, and is known as the man who invented modern air conditioning. ... Citi redirects here. ... Sandy Weill in the 1970s Sandy Weill (March 16 1933 -) is a financier, philanthropist, and chairman of Citigroup. ... The Coors Brewing Company is a regional division of the world’s fifth-largest brewery companies, the Molson Coors Brewing Company. ... Adolph Coors (February 4, 1847 – June 5, 1929) was a brewer that started the Adolph Coors Company in Golden, Colorado in 1873. ... Gannett Company, Inc. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, later Grumman Aerospace Corporation, was a leading producer of military and civilian aircraft of the 20th century. ... Leroy Randle Grumman (January 4, 1895 - October 4, 1982) was an American industrialist and aeronautical engineer. ... Palm, Inc. ... Jeff Hawkins (born June 1, 1957 in Huntington, New York) is the founder of Palm Computing (where he invented the Palm Pilot) [1] and Handspring (where he invented the Treo). ... PeopleSoft, Inc. ... David Duffield (born 1941) is a U.S. businessman in the software industry. ... Priceline. ... Jay S. Walker is a United States entrepreneur who founded Priceline. ... Qualcomm (NASDAQ: QCOM) is a wireless telecommunications research and development company based in San Diego, California. ... Irwin Jacobs speaking during dedication of CSE building and bear sculpture at UCSD, 2005 Irwin M. Jacobs (1933-), Electrical Engineer and Chairman of Qualcomm, Incorporated. ... Staples, Inc. ... Myra M. Hart is a founder of Staples, Inc. ... The Tata Group is Indias largest conglomerate company, with revenues in 2005-06 of Rs. ... Ratan Naval Tata (born December 28, 1937, in Mumbai) is the present Chairman of the Tata Group, Indias largest conglomerate established by earlier generations of his family. ... Reginald Reggie Fils-Aime (IPA pronunciation: ) (born March 1961) is the President and Chief Operating Officer of Nintendo of America, the North American division of Japan-based video game company Nintendo. ... For the video game system, see Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Sprint Nextel Corporation (NYSE: S) is one of the largest telecommunications companies in the US. With 55 million subscribers, Sprint Nextel operates the third largest wireless telecommunications network in the United States (based on total wireless customers), behind AT&T and Verizon Wireless. ...


In medicine, Dr. C. Everett Koop was the Surgeon General under Ronald Reagan, Dr. Robert Atkins developed the Atkins Diet, Dr. Henry Heimlich developed the Heimlich maneuver, and Wilson Greatbatch invented the first successful pacemaker. Dr. James Maas, both an alumnus and current faculty member, coined the term "power nap". Cornellians also include medical personalities Dr. Benjamin Spock and Joyce Brothers, as well as the Nobel laureate maize geneticist Barbara McClintock. C. Everett Koop Charles Everett Koop, M.D. (born October 14, 1916 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American physician. ... Dr. Atkins Robert Coleman Atkins, MD (October 17, 1930 – April 17, 2003) was an American doctor and cardiologist, best known for the Atkins Nutritional Approach (or Atkins Diet), a popular but controversial way of dieting that entails eating low-carbohydrate and high-protein foods, in addition to leaf vegetables and... book The Atkins Nutritional Approach, popularly known as the Atkins Diet or just Atkins, is a popular but controversial high-protein, high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. ... Henry J. Heimlich (b. ... The Heimlich maneuver The Heimlich maneuver, also known as abdominal thrusts, is a first aid procedure for clearing an obstructed airway. ... Wilson Greatbatch is an inventor who advanced the development of early implantable cardiac pacemakers. ... A pacemaker, scale in centimeters A pacemaker (or artificial pacemaker, so as not to be confused with the hearts natural pacemaker) is a medical device which uses electrical impulses, delivered by electrodes contacting the heart muscles, to regulate the beating of the heart. ... Dr. James Maas is a social psychologist best known for his work in the field of sleep research, specifically the relationship between sleep and performance. ... A power nap (sometimes called a catnap) is a short nap, usually 15-20 minutes, intended to revitalize the subject from drowsiness while working, coined by Cornell University social psychologist James Maas. ... Dr. Spock with his grand-daughter Susannah in 1967 Benjamin McLane Spock (May 2, 1903 - March 15, 1998) was an American pediatrician whose book Baby and Child Care, published in 1946, is one of the biggest best-sellers of all time. ... Joyce Brothers Joyce Brothers, PhD (maiden name Joyce Diane Bauer, born October 20, 1928) is a psychologist and advice columnist, publishing a daily syndicated newspaper column since 1960. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... Barbara McClintock (June 16, 1902 – September 2, 1992) was a pioneering American scientist and one of the worlds most distinguished cytogeneticists. ...


A number of Cornellians have been prominent innovators, starting with Thomas Midgley, Jr., the inventor of Freon. Jeff Hawkins invented the Palm Pilot and subsequently founded Palm, Inc. Graduate Jon Rubinstein is credited with the development of the iPod. William Higinbotham developed Tennis for Two in 1958, one of the earliest computer games and the predecessor to Pong, and Robert Tappan Morris developed the first computer worm on the Internet. The most direct evidence of dark matter was provided by Vera Rubin. Jill Cornell Tarter is the current director of the SETI Institute and Steve Squyres is the principal investigator on the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. Eight Cornellians have served as NASA astronauts. Bill Nye is best known as "The Science Guy". Thomas Midgley, Jr. ... Freon is a trade name for a group of chlorofluorocarbons used primarily as a refrigerant. ... Jeff Hawkins (born June 1, 1957 in Huntington, New York) is the founder of Palm Computing (where he invented the Palm Pilot) [1] and Handspring (where he invented the Treo). ... Palm devices are Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) which run Palm OS. This page describes the range of Palm devices, from the first generation of Palm machines known as the Pilot through to the latest models currently produced by Palm, Inc. ... Palm, Inc. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... iPod is a brand of portable media players designed and marketed by Apple Inc. ... William (Willy) A. Higinbotham (October 25, 1910 - November 10, 1994), an American physicist, is credited with creating one of the first computer games, Tennis for Two. ... Tennis for Two was a game developed in 1958 on an oscilloscope which simulated a game of tennis or ping pong. ... A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ... For other uses, see Pong (disambiguation). ... Robert Tappan Morris (born 1965) is an associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... The Morris worm or Internet worm was one of the first computer worms distributed via the Internet; it is considered the first worm and was certainly the first to gain significant mainstream media attention. ... For other uses, see Dark matter (disambiguation). ... Vera (Cooper) Rubin (born 23 July 1928) is an astronomer who has done pioneering work on galaxy rotation rates. ... The SETI Institute is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to scientific research, education and public outreach to explore, understand, and explain the nature and origin of the Universe. ... Steve Squyres Steven W. Squyres (b. ... Artists Concept of Rover on Mars (credit: Maas Digital LLC) Marvin the Martian, Spirit rover Mission patch Duck Dodgers, Opportunity rover Mission patch NASAs Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission is an ongoing robotic mission of exploring Mars, that began in 2003 with the sending of two rovers â€” Spirit... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... For the journalist, see Edgar Wilson Nye. ... Bill Nye the Science Guy is an Emmy Award-winning educational television program, hosted by Bill Nye. ...


Both female American Nobel Laureates in Literature studied at Cornell. Nobel Prize in Literature winner Toni Morrison wrote Song of Solomon and won a Pulitzer Prize for her novel, Beloved. The Nobel Prize in Literature was also awarded to Pearl S. Buck, author of The Good Earth. E. B. White, author of Charlotte's Web and Stuart Little, co-wrote the influential writing guide The Elements of Style with fellow Cornellian William Strunk Jr. Other Cornellian writers include Laura Z. Hobson, Thomas Pynchon, Kurt Vonnegut and Lauren Weisberger, author of The Devil Wears Prada. Cornellian journalists include Margaret Bourke-White, Ann Coulter, Allison Danzig, Dick Schaap, Keith Olbermann, Kate Snow, and radio personality/former congressional candidate, Dave Ross. René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart... For the Louisiana politician, see deLesseps Morrison, Jr. ... Song of Solomon (ISBN 0-452-26011-6) is a novel by Pulitzer-prize and Nobel-prize winner Toni Morrison, published in 1977. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Beloved is a 1987 Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Nobel laureate Toni Morrison. ... Pearl Sydenstricker Buck, most familiarly known as Pearl S. Buck (birth name Pearl Comfort Sydenstricker; Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (June 26, 1892 – March 6, 1973), was a prolific American writer and Nobel Prize winner. ... The Good Earth is a novel by Pearl S. Buck, first published in 1931, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for the Novel in 1932. ... Elwyn Brooks White (July 11, 1899, Mount Vernon, New York – October 1, 1985, North Brooklin, Maine) was a leading American essayist, author, humorist, poet and literary stylist. ... This article is about the book. ... This article is about the book. ... The Elements of Style, 2000 edition. ... William Strunk Jr. ... Laura Kean Zametkin (June 19, 1900 – February 28, 1986), whose books appeared under the name Laura Z. Hobson, was an American novelist. ... Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Jr. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... Lauren Weisberger (born March 28, 1977 in Scranton, Pennsylvania) is an American novelist and author of the 2003 bestseller The Devil Wears Prada, a speculated roman à clef of her time as a put-upon assistant to Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour. ... The Devil Wears Prada (2003) is a best selling novel by Lauren Weisberger about a young woman who, freshly graduated from college, is hired as a personal assistant to a powerful fashion magazine editor, a job that becomes hellish as she struggles to keep up with her bosss capricious... Margaret Bourke-White (1904-1971) USPS stamp depicting LIFE magazine cover bearing Fort Peck Dam photograph Margaret Bourke-White (IPA: [1][2], June 14, 1904 – August 27, 1971) was an American photographer and photojournalist. ... Ann Hart Coulter (born December 8, 1961)[1] is an American best-selling author, columnist and political commentator. ... Allison Danzig (1899-1987) was an American sportswriter who specialized in writing about tennis but also covered U.S. college football, many Olympic Games, and rowing. ... Richard J. Schaap (September 27, 1934 – December 21, 2001) was a 20th century American sportswriter, broadcaster, and the author or co-author of 33 books. ... Keith Olbermann (born January 27, 1959) is an American news anchor, commentator and radio sportscaster. ... Kate Snow (b. ... Dave Ross (1952 - ) is a popular talk show host on Seattle, Washingtons KIRO-AM 710 radio station, with whom he has been since 1978, his show starting nine years later in 1987. ...

Cornell Club of New York City
Cornell Club of New York City

Christopher Reeve is best known for his role as Superman, while comedian Frank Morgan is best known to younger generations as The Wizard of Oz. Howard Hawks is widely regarded as one of the most prominent directors of the classic Hollywood era, directing His Girl Friday and The Big Sleep among many other films. Stand-up comedian Bill Maher, host of the HBO series Real Time with Bill Maher is said to have been Politically Incorrect even as an undergraduate at Cornell. Jimmy Smits, best known for his roles on L.A. Law, The West Wing, and in the Star Wars films Episode II: Attack of the Clones and Episode III: Revenge of the Sith earned his MFA from Cornell. Charlie Bucket was played by future Cornellian Peter Ostrum, and alumnus Robert Smigel is the puppeteer behind Triumph, the Insult Comic Dog. Cornellians have won Academy Awards and been enshrined on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Mack David wrote Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo from the 1950 film Cinderella. Robert Alexander Anderson (composer) wrote the Christmas song Mele Kalikimaka. Greg Graffin of the band Bad Religion, Peter Yarrow of Peter, Paul and Mary, singer-songwriter Harry Chapin, pop star Huey Lewis, and modern composers Steve Reich, Christopher Rouse, and Steven Stucky, all attended Cornell. Ronald D. Moore created the Battlestar Galactica remake that debuted in 2004. Carla Gallo played Lizzie in Undeclared. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Christopher DOlier Reeve[1] (September 25, 1952 – October 10, 2004) was an American actor, director, producer, and writer. ... For the franchise, see Superman film series. ... For the documentary about Jerry Seinfeld, see Comedian (film). ... Frank Morgan as The Wizard of Oz. ... The Wizard, on the cover of Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz The Wizard of Oz (or simply The Wizard) is a fictional character in the Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum and further popularized by the classic 1939 movie. ... Howard Winchester Hawks (May 30, 1896 – December 26, 1977) was an American film director, producer and writer of the classic Hollywood era. ... His Girl Friday is a 1940 screwball comedy, a remake of the 1931 film The Front Page, itself an adaptation by Charles Lederer, Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur of their play of the same name. ... The Big Sleep (1946) is the first film version of Raymond Chandlers 1939 novel of the same name. ... William Maher, Jr. ... Real Time with Bill Maher is a talk show that airs weekly on HBO, hosted by comedian and political satirist Bill Maher. ... Politically Incorrect was a late-night, half-hour political talk show hosted by Bill Maher that ran from 1993 to 2002. ... Jimmy Smits as President Matt Santos on The West Wing. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about a TV show. ... Charlie Bucket is the title character in the Roald Dahl childrens book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and its sequel, Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator. ... Peter Ostrum, during an interview for the documentary Pure Imagination Peter Ostrum as Charlie Bucket in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory Peter Gardner Ostrum [1] (born November 1, 1957) is a former American child actor who starred as Charlie Bucket in the 1971 motion picture Willy Wonka & the Chocolate... Robert Smigel (born February 7, 1960) is an American humorist and performer best known for his Saturday Night Live TV Funhouse cartoon shorts and as the puppeteer behind Triumph, the Insult Comic Dog. ... Best of Triumph DVD Triumph, the Insult Comic Dog is a puppet created and performed by Robert Smigel premiering in 1997 on NBCs Late Night with Conan OBrien. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... Mack David (born July 5, 1912) was an American lyricist and songwriter, best known for his work with movies and television in the 1960s, particularly his work on the Disney films Cinderella and Alice in Wonderland. ... Cinderella (first released on February 15, 1950) is an animated film by The Walt Disney Company in which a young girl abused by her stepmother and step-sisters is still able to go the ball and win her prince, with the help of a fairy godmother, a half dozen mice... Cinderella is a 1950 animated feature produced by Walt Disney, and released to theaters on February 15, 1950 by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Robert Alexander Anderson (1894 Honolulu - 1995), was an American composer who wrote the Christmas song Mele Kalikimaka. ... In the Hawaiian language, mele Kalikimaka is the translation of Merry Christmas, and is used as such around Christmastime in Hawaii. ... Gregory Walter Graffin, Ph. ... Bad Religion is a seminal American punk rock band, formed in Southern California in 1980 by Jay Bentley (bass), Greg Graffin (vocals), Brett Gurewitz (guitars) and Jay Ziskrout (drums). ... Peter Yarrow (born May 31, 1938) is an American singer who found fame with the 1960s folk music trio Peter, Paul and Mary. ... The trio Peter, Paul and Mary (often PP&M) is a musical group from the United States; they were one of the most successful folk-singing groups of the 1960s. ... Harry Forster Chapin (December 7, 1942 – July 16, 1981) was an American singer, songwriter, and humanitarian. ... Huey Lewis (born Hugh Anthony Cregg, III on July 5, 1950) is an American musician and occasional actor. ... Stephen Michael Reich (born October 3, 1936) is an American composer. ... Christopher Rouse (born 15 February 1949 in Baltimore, Maryland) is an American composer. ... Steven Stucky pronounced [stʌki] (rhymes with lucky) is a U.S. composer. ... For other persons named Ronald Moore, see Ronald Moore (disambiguation). ... This article is about all the media that use the name Battlestar Galactica. ... Carla Gallo (born on 24 June 1975 in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is an American actress best known for roles in the television series Undeclared and Carnivàle. ... Undeclared is a U.S. television series that aired on FOX during the 2001–2002 TV season. ...


The Empire State Building and Grauman's Chinese Theatre were designed by Cornell architects Richmond Shreve and Raymond M. Kennedy, respectively. Edmund Bacon is best known for reshaping Philadelphia in the mid 20th century. Contemporary architects Richard Meier and Peter Eisenman are also Cornellians. The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, New York at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Raymond McCormick Kennedy was the guiding light and architect of the Graumans Chinese Theater that opened in May 1927. ... TIME Magazine November 6, 1964 Edmund Norwood Bacon (May 2, 1910 – October 14, 2005) was a noted American architect, urban planner, educator, and author. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Richard Meier (born October 12, 1934 in Newark, New Jersey) is a late twentieth century American architect known for his use of the purist white. ... Installation art by Peter Eisenman in the courtyard of Castelvecchio Museum in Verona, Italy, Entitled: Il giardino dei passi perduti, (The garden of the lost steps) Peter Eisenman (born August 11, 1932 in Newark, New Jersey) is one of the foremost practitioners of deconstructivism in American architecture. ...


In athletics, Cornellians have won Olympic gold medals, been inducted into sports halls of fame, include the current commissioner of the National Hockey League, led numerous teams as general managers and coaches including Glenn "Pop" Warner, and Bruce Arena, former head coach of the United States men's national soccer team. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Walhalla temple, Germany A hall of fame (sometimes HOF) is a type of museum established for any a field of endeavour to honour individuals of noteworthy achievement in that field. ... Gary Bruce Bettman (born on June 2, 1952 in Queens, New York) is the commissioner of the National Hockey League (NHL), a post he has held since February 1, 1993. ... NHL redirects here. ... The term general manager is a descriptive term for certain executives in a business operation. ... Glenn Scobey Pop Warner in a 1997 USA Postage stamp. ... Bruce Arena (born September 21, 1951 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American soccer coach, former Head Coach and Sporting Director for Red Bull New York of Major League Soccer and the former coach of the United States mens national soccer team. ... First international Unofficial: USA 0 - 1 Canada  (Newark, NJ, USA; November 28, 1885) Official:  Sweden 2 - 3 USA (Stockholm, Sweden; August 20, 1916) Biggest win USA 8 - 1 Cayman Islands  (Mission Viejo, CA, USA; November 14, 1993) USA 7 - 0 El Salvador  (Los Angeles, CA, USA; December 5, 1993) USA...


Notes

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  2. ^ Cornell Chronicle: Interview with James Walsh, Cornell's CIO
  3. ^ a b c Common Data Set 2007-2008 (PDF). University Registrar. Cornell University (2007-10-15). Retrieved on 2007-12-26.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n 2006–07 Factbook (PDF). Cornell University. Retrieved on 2006-07-07.
  5. ^ a b History of Athletics at Cornell University. Cornell University Athletics. Retrieved on 2006-05-23.
  6. ^ a b The Cornell University Mission. Cornell University. Retrieved on 2006-01-01.
  7. ^ Undergraduate Admissions (URL). Cornell University. Retrieved on 2008-04-06.
  8. ^ a b Cornell Nobel laureates. Cornell News Service. Retrieved on 2006-06-06.
  9. ^ Uncle Ezra. Cornell University. Retrieved on 2007-01-10.
  10. ^ Research Expenditures (URL). Chestorton House. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
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  12. ^ a b Becker, Carl L. (1943). Cornell University: Founders and the Founding. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press. ISBN 0-8014-9058-8. Retrieved on 2006-06-17. 
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  19. ^ NYS Education Law §§ 350(3), 352(3) and 357
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  127. ^ Editorial: Breakthrough of the Year. Science. Retrieved on 2006-01-10.
  128. ^ Control of Mars Rovers Shifts to Cornell. Space.com. Retrieved on 2006-01-10.
  129. ^ a b c Calspan Company History and Timeline. Calspan. Retrieved on 2006-06-02.
  130. ^ The Internet - The Launch of NSFNET. National Science Foundation. Retrieved on 2006-01-05.
  131. ^ A Brief History of NSF and the Internet. National Science Foundation. Retrieved on 2006-01-05.
  132. ^ Cornell's laboratory is at the crossroads. CERN Courier. Retrieved on 2006-05-23.
  133. ^ Accelerator Physics: Cornell Electron Storage Ring. Cornell University. Retrieved on 2006-07-04.
  134. ^ Far Above: The Campaign for Cornell. Cornell University. Retrieved on 2006-10-26.
  135. ^ Altschuler, Glenn C.; Isaac Kramnick, R. Laurence Moore (2003). The 100 Most Notable Cornellians. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press. ISBN 0-8014-3958-2. 

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Carl Lotus Becker (1873–1945) was an American historian. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ... The Cornell Daily Sun, of Cornell University, is an independent daily newspaper published in Ithaca, New York. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A front page of the Yale Daily News. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cornell Daily Sun, of Cornell University, is an independent daily newspaper published in Ithaca, New York. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with The Times Higher Education Supplement. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ... Cornell redirects here. ...

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Cornell University - jobs - index (366 words)
Cornell University was founded in Ithaca, NY, in 1865 with a revolutionary aim--to educate students, without regard to race, gender, religion, or wealth, in a community where all forms of knowledge would be explored.
Today Cornell remains committed to this legacy by seeking not only a wide diversity of students, but visionary faculty and equally talented staff who give new meaning to the concepts of stewardship, teamwork, inclusiveness, innovation, and adaptability.
Cornell University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action educator and employer.
Cornell University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6139 words)
Cornell University was created on April 27, 1865 by a New York State Senate bill that named the university as the state's land grant institution.
Cornell in Rome, which is operated by the College of Architecture, Art, and Planning, allows students to use the city as a resource for learning architecture, urban studies, and art.
Cornell and the University of Pennsylvania are long-time rivals in football.
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