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Encyclopedia > Cornell Law School

Cornell Law School

Established 1887
Type Private
Dean Stewart J. Schwab
Students 660
Location Ithaca, New York, USA
Website www.lawschool.cornell.edu

Cornell Law School, located in Ithaca, New York, is a graduate school of Cornell University. It is one of the five Ivy League law schools. The law school offers four types of law degrees, an array of programs and institutes, and over 120 courses for its students. Programs at the law school can be supplemented by the rich academic resources available in other units of Cornell University. The law school's faculty is one of the most prolific in the nation, and is also known for its excellence in classroom teaching. Among the profession, Cornell retains an excellent reputation: its graduates have the sixth highest percent placement at the top 50 law firms. Additionally, Cornell's New York bar pass rate for first-time candidates is always among the highest of any law school in New York state. Download high resolution version (1600x1595, 140 KB)taken from http://www. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Localization of Ithaca The big island in the center is Kefalonia. ... “NY” redirects here. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ... Cornell University is a university located in Ithaca, New York, USA. Its two medical campuses are in New York City and Education City, Qatar. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... In the United States, the institution where future lawyers obtain a legal degree is called a law school. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ...


The Cornell Law School was formally opened in 1887, but was moved to its present-day location at Myron Taylor Hall in 1937. The law school building, an ornate, Gothic structure, was the result of a donation by Myron Charles Taylor, a former CEO of US Steel, and a member of the Cornell class of 1894. An addition to Myron Taylor Hall, the Jane M.G. Foster wing, was completed in 1988. Ms. Foster was a member of the class of 1918, and was the first woman to serve as Editor in Chief on an American law review. Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin San Sebastian Church in Manila, Philippines made entirely of steel. ... Myron Charles Taylor (1874 - 1959) was a U.S. businessman and diplomat. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... The United States Steel Corporation (NYSE: X), later named USX Corporation in 1991, then renamed the United States Steel Corporation again in 2001 when the shareholders of USX spun off the steelmaking assets of the company after its acquisition of Marathon Oil, was once the largest steel producer and largest...

Contents

Admissions

Cornell Law School
Cornell Law School

Admission is very competitive. The law school receives roughly 4000 applications each year for an entering class of 185-190. Successful applicants usually have thrived in academic as well as non-academic settings. The academic profile of students is strong. In 2006 the median GPA for incoming Cornell Law students was 3.67, and the median Law School Admissions Test score was 167. The admission rate for 2006 was 22.6%. Entering students graduated from over 100 different undergraduate colleges and universities and studied a wide range of academic disciplines. In addition, they typically were active in extracurricular and community activities. Well over half usually have full-time work experience and less than 40% come straight from college to law school. In the LL.M. program, which is geared to non-U.S.-trained lawyers, the admission rate hovered around 6.67% in 2006, as 900 applications were received for the 50 to 60 openings in the program. LL.M. students come from over 30 different countries.[1] Image File history File links PictureofMyronTaylorHall. ... Image File history File links PictureofMyronTaylorHall. ... The initials GPA can refer, among other things, to Grade Point Average; see Grade (education) Guinness Peat Aviation General Practice Australia, a private, independent medical accreditation society Greyhound Pets of America This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... The Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) is a standardized test used for admission to law schools in the United States of America and Canada that are members of the Law School Admissions Council. ...


Along with consideration of the quality of an applicant's academic record and LSAT scores, the full-file-review admissions process places a heavy emphasis on an applicant's personal statement, letters of recommendation, community/extra-curricular involvement, and work experience. The application also invites a statement on diversity and a short note on why an applicant particularly wants to attend Cornell. The Law School values applicants who have done their research and have particular interests or goals that would be served by attending the school versus one of its peer institutions.[2]


Reputation

Cornell is one of the pre-eminent law schools in the United States; 7th in the 2004 Law School 100 rankings, 13th in the 2007 U.S. News and World Report, and its master of laws, or LL.M., program ranked 1st in the 2006 AUAP rankings.[3][4] In 2005, the National Law Journal reported that Cornell Law graduates had the 6th highest percent placement at the top 50 law firms.[5] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree, commonly abbreviated LL.M. (also LLM or LL.M) from its Latin name, Legum Magister. ... The National Law Journal, a periodical founded in 1980, provides timely legal information of national importance to attorneys, including federal circuit court decisions, verdicts, practitioners columns, coverage of legislative issues, and legal news for the business and private sectors. ...


Cornell Law graduates have consistently achieved the highest bar pass-rate among law schools in the state of New York during the past few years.[6] In 2006, Cornell's July 2005 New York bar pass rate for first-time candidates was 95% versus 94% for New York University (NYU) and 90% for Columbia.[7] New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ...


Library and the Legal Information Institute

Cornell's law library is one of the largest in the nation. The law library contains 700,000 books and microforms and includes rare historical texts relevant to the legal history of the United States.[8] Fordham Law School Library, also a Government Document Depository. ... [1]#redirect Book ...

The Cornell Law School Library
The Cornell Law School Library

The library is one of the 12 national depositories for print records of briefs filed with the United States Supreme Court. Also, there is a large collection of print copies of the records and briefs of the New York Court of Appeals. The large microfilm collection has sets of Congressional, Supreme Court, and United Nations documents, as well as a large collection of World Law Reform commission materials. Microfiche records and briefs for the United States Supreme Court, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and D.C. circuit, and the New York State Court of Appeals are also collected.[9] The library also has a large collection of international, foreign, and comparative law, with the main focus being on the Commonwealth of Nations and Europe. Along with this, there are also collections of public international law and international trade law. A new initiative by the library is to collect Chinese, Japanese, and Korean resources to support the Law School’s Clarke Program in East Asian Law and Culture.[9] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1688 KB) Summary Summary Description: The Cornell Law School Library Reading Room Source: My own picture Date: Jun. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1688 KB) Summary Summary Description: The Cornell Law School Library Reading Room Source: My own picture Date: Jun. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... The Court of Appeals is New Yorks highest appellate court, created in 1847, replacing the Court for the Trial of Impeachments and the Correction of Errors. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Microform. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Connecticut Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western Districts of New York District of Vermont The Second Circuit hears argument at the Thurgood Marshall U... The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, known informally as the D.C. Circuit, is the federal appellate court for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1 April 2000) Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... World map showing the location of Europe. ... International law deals with the relationships between states, or between persons or entities in different states. ... International trade law is a misnomer. ...


The law library also boasts a significant collection of rare books. This collection has over 1200 volumes and it is housed in the Rare Book Room, which was built in 1981. Among these rare books is the Samuel Thorne collection, which has 175 of the some of the earliest and most rare books on law. Other significant collections include the Nathaniel C. Moak library and the Edwin J. Marshall Collection of early works on equity and the Earl J. Bennett Collection of Statutory Material, a print collection of original colonial, territorial, and state session laws and statutory codes.[9]


Among the library’s special collections are 19th Century Trials Collection, Donovan Nuremburg Trials Collection, Scottsboro Collection, William P. and Adele Langston Rogers Collection and the Chile Declassification Project.[9] The Nuremberg Trials is the general name for two sets of trials of Nazis involved in World War II and the Holocaust. ... Scottsboro can refer to two things: Scottsboro, Alabama, USA The Scottsboro Boys, involved in a racially-charged legal case that made it to the United States Supreme Court This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... William Pierce Rogers (June 23, 1913 – January 2, 2001) was an American politician, who served as a Cabinet officer in the administrations of two U.S. Presidents in the third quarter of the 20th century. ...


Cornell Law also is home to the Legal Information Institute (LII), known internationally as a leading on-line provider of public legal information. The LII offers all opinions of the United States Supreme Court handed down since 1992, together with over 600 earlier decisions selected for their historic importance, over a decade of opinions of the New York Court of Appeals, and the full United States Code. The LII also publishes important secondary sources: libraries in two important areas (legal ethics and social security) and a series of “topical” pages that serve as concise explanatory guides and Internet resource listings for roughly 100 areas of law. Search engines and ranking systems identify the LII as the most linked to web resource in the field of law. The Free Access to Law Movement is umbrella name for the collective of legal projects across several common law countries to provide free online access to legal information such as case law and legislation. ...


Academic offerings

Law degrees

The Cornell Law School
  • J.D. Programs (including the J.D. Transfer Program)
  • LL.M. Program
  • J.S.D. Program
  • J.D./Master en Droit, Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne (four-year program that prepares graduates for admission to the bar in the United States and in France)
  • J.D./Master of German and European Law and Practice (M.LL.P.), Humboldt University of Berlin (four-year program that provides graduates with a knowledge of German and European law at both an academic and a practical level)
  • J.D./Master in Global Business Law, Institut d’Études Politiques de Paris and Paris I (three-year program that offers a multi-disciplinary, European perspective on international law and business issues)

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 209 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 209 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://www. ... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree that allows someone to specialize in a particular area of law. ... Legum Doctor (English: Doctor of Laws; abbreviated to LL.D.) In the UK and Canada the LL.D. is a doctorate usually awarded on the basis of exceptionally insightful and distinctive publications, containing significant and original contributions to the science or study of law. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... Alternative meaning: Humboldt State University, located in Arcata, California Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin The Humboldt University of Berlin (German Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) is the successor to Berlins oldest university, the Friedrich Wilhelm University (Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität), founded in 1810 by the liberal Prussian educational reformer... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... “Sciences Po” redirects here. ...

Law programs

  • International Program
  • Legal Information Institute
  • Death Penalty Project
  • Legal Aid Clinic
  • Public Interest
  • Keck Foundation Ethics Program
  • Olin Program of Law & Economics
  • Clarke Program in East Asian Law and Culture
  • Asylum Clinic
  • International Human Rights Clinic
  • Externships Program

International Summer Law Institutes

Cornell Law School runs two summer institutes overseas, providing Cornell Law students with unique opportunities to engage in rigorous international legal studies. The Cornell-Université Paris I Summer Institute of International and Comparative Law at the Sorbonne in Paris, France offers a diverse curriculum in the historic Sorbonne and Centre Panthéon (Faculté de droit) buildings at the heart of the University of Paris I: Panthéon-Sorbonne. Coursework includes international human rights, comparative legal systems, and international commercial arbitration. French language classes are also offered. Inscription over the entrance to the Sorbonne The front of the Sorbonne Building The name Sorbonne (La Sorbonne) is commonly used to refer to the historic University of Paris in Paris, France or one of its successor institutions (see below), but this is a recent usage, and Sorbonne has actually... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) The Eiffel Tower in Paris, as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ...


In 2006, Cornell Law School announced that it would launch a second summer law institute, the new Workshop in International Business Transactions with Chinese Characteristics in Suzhou, China. In partnership with Bucerius Law School (Germany) and Kenneth Wang School of Law at Soochow University (China), Cornell Law provides students from the United States, Europe, and China with an academic forum in which they can collaborate on an international business problem. Suzhou (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; ancient name: 吳) is a city on the lower reaches of the Yangtze River and on the shores of Lake Taihu in the province of Jiangsu, China. ... Bucerius Law School is a private law school located in Hamburg, Germany. ... Soochow University refers to two distinct institutions for higher learning: one located in Suzhou, Jiangsu, Peoples Republic of China and the other in Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China. ...


Publications

Cornell Law School boasts three highly-regarded law journals that are student-edited: the Cornell Law Review, the Cornell International Law Journal, and the Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy. Additionally, the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies is a peer-reviewed journal that is published by Cornell Law faculty. The Cornell Law Review is the flagship legal journal of Cornell Law School. ... The Cornell International Law Journal is one of the oldest international law journals in the United States; it was founded in 1967 by members of the Cornell Society of International Law at Cornell Law School and is published three times a year and hosts a symposium every spring in Ithaca... The Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy (JLPP) was first published in July 1992. ...


Moot court

Cornell Law students actively participate in myriad moot court competitions annually, both in the law school itself and in external and international competitions. The Langfan First-Year Moot Court Competition, which takes place every spring, traditionally draws a large majority of the first-year class. Other internal competitions include the Cuccia Cup and the Winter Cup. Moot court is an extracurricular activity at many law schools in which participants take part in simulated court proceedings, usually to include drafting briefs and participating in oral argument. ...


Other organizations

Student activities at Cornell Law School include:

  • American Constitution Society
  • Asian Pacific American Law Students Association
  • Black Law Students Association
  • Briggs Society of International Law
  • Business Law Society
  • Christian Legal Society
  • Cornell Advocates for Human Rights
  • Cornell Law Democrats
  • Cornell Law Republicans
  • Cornell Law Students Association
  • Cornell Sports & Entertainment Law Consortium
  • Environmental Law Society
  • Federalist Society
  • J. Reuben Clark Law Society
  • Jewish Law Students Association
  • LAMBDA
  • Latino American Law Students Association
  • LL.M. Association
  • National Lawyers Guild
  • Native American Law Students Association
  • Phi Alpha Delta
  • Phi Delta Phi
  • Public Interest Law Union
  • SOLATA (Society of Law and the Arts)
  • Women’s Law Coalition
  • Students for Marriage Equality
  • The Veterans Society

The American Constitution Society for Law and Policy is an organization to promote a progressive understanding of the United States Constitution. ... The Christian Legal Society is a non-profit, non-denominational organization of Christian lawyers, judges, law professors, and law students whose members profess to follow the commandment of Jesus to do justice with the love of God. ... The Federalist Society logo, depicting James Madisons silhouette The Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies, most frequently called simply the Federalist Society, began at Yale Law School, Harvard Law School, and the University of Chicago Law School in 1982 as a student organization that challenged the perceived... The J. Reuben Clark Law Society is an organization of law school students and alumni consisting of over 65 chapters throughout the world. ... The National Lawyers Guild is a progressive Bar Association in the United States dedicated to the need for basic and progressive change in the structure of our political and economic system. ... ΦAΔ (Phi Alpha Delta), or PAD, is the largest co-ed professional law fraternity in the United States of America. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

Notable faculty

See also: List of Cornell University people
  • Stewart J. Schwab, current Allan R. Tessler Dean and Professor of Law
  • Faust F. Rossi, current Samuel S. Leibowitz Professor of Trial Techniques and well-known for his lectures in evidence to students preparing for the bar examination
  • John H. Blume, current Professor of Law and Director of the Cornell Death Penalty Project, and a prominent U.S. Supreme Court advocate.
  • Robert S. Summers, current William G. McRoberts Research Professor in the Administration of the Law and co-author of the authoritative treatise on the Uniform Commercial Code
  • Annelise Riles, current Professor of Law and Professor of Anthropology who directs the law school's Clarke Program in East Asian Law and Culture, and is an internationally recognized expert on comparative law
  • John J. Barceló III, current William Nelson Cromwell Professor of International and Comparative Law and an expert on International Commercial Arbitration.
  • Cynthia R. Farina, current Professor of Law and co-author of the leading casebook on Administrative Law.
  • Theodore Eisenberg, current Henry Allen Mark Professor of Law and leader of the empirical legal studies movement.
  • Steven H. Shiffrin, current Charles Frank Reavis Sr. Professor of Law and acclaimed First Amendment scholar.
  • James A. Henderson Jr., current Frank B. Ingersoll Professor of Law, leading commentator on the law of torts and products liability and Special Master in the September 11, 2001 attacks respiratory illness cases.
  • Gregory S. Alexander, current A. Robert Noll Professor of Law and leading commentator on the law of property.
  • Valerie P. Hans, current Professor of Law and a leading authority on the jury system.
  • Kevin M. Clermont, current James and Mark Flanagan Professor of Law and nationally acclaimed casebook author and teacher of civil procedure.
  • Robert A. Hillman, current Edwin H. Woodruff Professor of Law and Reporter for the American Law Institute's Principles of the Law of Software Contracts.

Cornellians are persons affiliated with Cornell University, commonly including alumni, current and former faculty members, students, and others. ... The law of evidence governs the use of testimony (e. ... A bar examination is an examination to determine whether a candidate is qualified to practice law in a given jurisdiction. ... Robert Samuel Summers is the current William G. McRoberts Research Professor in the Administration of the Law at the Cornell Law School in Ithaca, NY. Robert S. Summers [edit] Biography Robert Summers was born in Halfway, Oregon in 1933. ... The Uniform Commercial Code (UCC or the Code) is one of a number of uniform acts that have been promulgated in conjunction with efforts to harmonize the law of sales and other commercial transactions in 49 states (all except Louisiana) within the United States of America. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Administrative law in the United States often relates to, or arises from, so-called independent agencies- such as the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Here is FTCs headquarters in Washington D.C. Administrative law (or regulatory law) is the body of law that arises from the activities of administrative agencies... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... In the common law, a tort is a civil wrong for which the law provides a remedy. ... Product liability encompasses a number of legal claims that allow an injured party to recover financial compensation from the manufacturer or seller of a product. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Civil procedure is the body of law that sets out the process that courts will follow when hearing cases of a civil nature (a civil action, as opposed to a criminal action). ...

Notable alumni

See also: List of Cornell University people

Cornellians are persons affiliated with Cornell University, commonly including alumni, current and former faculty members, students, and others. ... From [1]. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... From [1]. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... Public domain portrait of U.S. Sec. ... Public domain portrait of U.S. Sec. ... William Pierce Rogers (June 23, 1913 – January 2, 2001) was an American politician, who served as a Cabinet officer in the administrations of two U.S. Presidents in the third quarter of the 20th century. ... Barry T. Albin was a justice nominated to serve on the New Jersey Supreme Court on July 10, 2002. ... Robert Ernest Andrews (born August 4, 1957) is an American politician. ... J. Carter Bacot was president of The Bank of New York for 8 years and he was chairman and CEO for 16 years. ... The Bank of New York NYSE: BK, founded by Alexander Hamilton in 1784, is the oldest bank in the United States and has a distinguished history of serving clients around the world through its five primary businesses: Securities Servicing and Global Payment Services Private Client Services and Asset Management Corporate... Her Royal Highness Princess Bajrakitiyabha, the first grandchild of King Bhumibol and Queen Sirikit of Thailand, is the eldest daughter of HRH Crown Prince Maha Vajralongkorn and HRH Princess Soamsavali. ... Edward J. Bloustein (1925-1989) Edward J. Bloustein (born 1925, in New York City New York—9 December 1989 in the Bahamas) was the seventeenth President of Rutgers University) serving from 1971 to 1989. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... Courtroom sketch by Bill Hennessy Leonie M. Brinkema (born 1944, in Teaneck, New Jersey) is a United States District Court judge, in the Eastern District of Virginia. ... Hotels. ... Robert A. Bob DuPuy (born c. ... Peter W. Hall (center) with Senators Jeffords (left) and Leahy (right) after his confirmation hearing. ... Harvard Business School, officially named the Harvard Business School: George F. Baker Foundation, and also known as HBS, is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Philip Henderson Hoff (born June 29, 1924) was an American politician from Vermont, serving as Governor of Vermont from 1963 to 1969. ... This is a list of Governors of Vermont: As an Independent Republic Thomas Chittenden (None) 1778-1789 Moses Robinson (None) 1789-1790 Thomas Chittenden (None) 1790-1791 As a State Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Vermont ... Frank Jefferson Horton (December 12, 1919 – August 30, 2004) was a former U.S. Congressman. ... Hughie Jennings on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card (White Borders (T206)). Hugh Ambrose Jennings (April 2, 1869 - February 1, 1928) was an American baseball player and manager in Major League Baseball. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline for Biographies. ... Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP, which also goes by the shorter market name WilmerHale, is a leading American law firm with major offices in Washington, Boston and New York and smaller offices in Palo Alto, Baltimore, London, Brussels, Beijing, Berlin, and Waltham, Massachusetts. ... Leonard Leo (1965 - ) is director of the Lawyers Division and executive vice president of the Federalist Society, and head of Catholic Outreach at the Republican National Committee. ... The Federalist Society logo, depicting James Madisons silhouette The Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies, most frequently called simply the Federalist Society, began at Yale Law School, Harvard Law School, and the University of Chicago Law School in 1982 as a student organization that challenged the perceived... The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Sol Myron Linowitz (December 17, 1913 – March 18, 2005) was an American diplomat, lawyer, and businessman who helped negotiate the return of the Panama Canal to Panama under the direction of President Jimmy Carter. ... Hotels. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... Philip J. Perry (born 1964, San Diego County, California) is an American attorney and political appointee. ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS), commonly known in the US as Homeland Security, is a Cabinet department of the Federal Government of the United States with the responsibility of protecting the territory of the United States from terrorist attacks and responding to natural disasters. ... Samuel Riley Silent Sam Pierce, Jr. ... William Pierce Rogers (June 23, 1913 – January 2, 2001) was an American politician, who served as a Cabinet officer in the administrations of two U.S. Presidents in the third quarter of the 20th century. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Alexander Pirnie was a American congressman. ... Shira A. Scheindlin (b. ... Jan R. Schlichtmann (born 1951) is a Boston attorney specializing in personal injury law and toxic torts. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Civil Action is a 1998 film, starring John Travolta (as plaintiffs attorney Jan Schlichtmann) and Robert Duvall, based on the book of the same name by Jonathan Harr. ... William vanden Heuvel, a prominent New York attorney and diplomat, has served as United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations and as Ambassador to the European office of the United Nations in Geneva. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... Richard C. Wesley (born August 1, 1949 in Canandaigua, New York) is a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. ...

References

  1. ^ Cornell Law School. JDAadmission.com. Retrieved on 2006-06-23.
  2. ^ Cornell Law School. JDAadmission.com. Retrieved on 2006-06-23.
  3. ^ US News Law School Rankings. Retrieved on 2006-05-24.
  4. ^ Law School 100 Rankings. Retrieved on 2006-05-24.
  5. ^ Top 50 firms hire most from big names. The National Law Journal. Retrieved on 2006-05-23.
  6. ^ Highest bar pass-rates at law schools in New York State. Retrieved on 2006-05-24.
  7. ^ Bar Pass Rates. Retrieved on 2006-05-24.
  8. ^ Tax Proof Blog: Rankings of Law Libraries. Tax Proof Blog. Retrieved on 2006-06-23.
  9. ^ a b c d Cornell Law School Library. Cornell University. Retrieved on 2006-06-23.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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