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Encyclopedia > Corinth

Coordinates: 37°56′N 22°56′E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Greece Corinth (Κόρινθος)

Coordinates 37°56′ N 22°56′ E
Country Greece
Periphery Peloponnese
Prefecture Corinthia
Population 36,555 source (2001)
Area 102.2 km²
Population density 358 /km²
Elevation ±10 m
Postal code 201 00
Area code 27410
Licence plate code ΚΡ

Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. To the west of the isthmus lies the Gulf of Corinth, to the east lies the Saronic Gulf. Corinth is about 48 miles (78 km) southwest of Athens. The isthmus, which was in ancient times traversed by hauling ships over the rocky ridge on sledges, is now cut by a canal. Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Image File history File links Corinth_map. ... See Cartesian coordinate system or Coordinates (elementary mathematics) for a more elementary introduction to this topic. ... This is an alphabetical list of countries of the world, including both internationally recognized and generally unrecognized independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... The peripheries (περιφέρειες) are the subnational divisions of Greece. ... The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... Greece consists of 13 administrative regions known as Peripheries of Greece, which are further subdivided into 51 prefectures (nomoi, singular - nomos, Greek: νομοί, νομός)): See also List of the prefectures of Greece by area List of the prefectures of Greece by population density List of the prefectures of Greece by population External... Corinthia (Greek: Κορινθία, Korinthía) is the area around the city of Corinth. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... The metre, or meter (U.S.), is a measure of length. ... Here are list of postal codes in Greece. ... This is an alphabetical list by town of dialing codes in Greece. ... Greek car number plates are composed of three letters and four digits per plate (e. ... This is a list of traditional Greek place names. ... A city-state is a region controlled exclusively by a city. ... The Isthmus of Corinth is the narrow landbridge which connects the Peloponnesos peninsula with the mainland of Greece, near the city of Corinth. ... Peloponnesos (Greek: Πελοπόννησος, sometime Latinized as Peloponnesus or Anglicized as The Peloponnese) is a large peninsula in Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Isthmus of Corinth. ... The Gulf of Corinth or the Corinthian Gulf is a deep inlet of the Ionian Sea separating the Peloponnese from western mainland Greece. ... The Saronic Gulf or Gulf of Aegina in Greece forms part of the Aegean Sea and defines the eastern side of the isthmus of Corinth. ... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα, Athína IPA: ) is the capital and largest city of Greece. ...


Corinth is also the capital of the prefecture of Corinthia. The city is (clockwise) surrounded by the coastal townlets of Lechaio, Isthmia, Kechries, and the inland townlets of Examilia and Ancient Corinth right next to the archaeological site. Geophysically the city is likewise surrounded by the narrow coastal plain of Vocha, Corinthian Gulf, Corinth Canal, Saronic Gulf, Oneia mountains, and the monolithic rock of Acrocorinth where the medieval acropolis was built. Greece consists of 13 administrative regions known as Peripheries of Greece, which are further subdivided into 51 prefectures (nomoi, singular - nomos, Greek: νομοί, νομός)): See also List of the prefectures of Greece by area List of the prefectures of Greece by population density List of the prefectures of Greece by population External... Corinthia (Greek: Κορινθία, Korinthía) is the area around the city of Corinth. ... Lechaio (Greek Modern: Λέχαιο, Ancient/Katharevousa: -n), also: Lecheo or Leheo older form: Lechaion, Leheon, Lechaeum, Lekhaion is a community in the municipality of Assos-Lechaio in Corinthia. ... There is another Kechries, see Kechries Kechries (Greek Modern: Κεχριές, rarely Κεχρεές, Ancient/Katharevousa: Kenchreai), older form: Cenchreae, Kenchreai, Kechriai, Kekhries, Kekhriai, Kekhriais is a community in the municipality of Corinth in Corinthia. ... Examilia (Greek: Εξαμίλια) is a community in the municipality of Corinth. ... The Corinth Canal The memorial plate of Béla Gerster, the architect of the Corinth Canal, in his birth-place in KoÅ¡ice, Slovakia Bungy jumping at the Corinth canal The Corinth Canal is a canal connecting the Gulf of Corinth with the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Sea. ... Map of the remains of Acrocorinth Acrocorinth (Gr. ... Acropolis of Athens from the south-west with the Propylaea and the Temple of Nike (left centre) and the theatre of Herodes Atticus (below left) Acropolis (Gr. ...

Contents

History

Prehistoric era

The city was founded in the Neolithic Age, circa 6000 BC. According to myth, the city was founded by Corinthos, a descendant of the god Helios (the Sun), while other myths suggest that it was founded by the goddess Ephyra, a daughter of the titan Oceanus, thus the ancient name of the city (also Ephyra). There is evidence that the city was destroyed around 2000 BC. The Neolithic, (Greek neos=new, lithos=stone, or New Stone Age) is traditionally the last part of the stone age. ... (7th millennium BC – 6th millennium BC – 5th millennium BC – other millennia) Events c. ... Helios in his chariot In Greek mythology the sun was personified as Helios or Helius (Greek Ἥλιος / ἥλιος). Homer often calls him Titan and Hyperion. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek Τιτάν, plural Τιτάνες) were a race of powerful deities that ruled during the legendary Golden Age. ... In the Greek and Roman world-view, Oceanus (Greek , Okeanos), was the world-ocean, which they believed to be an enormous river encircling the world. ... (Redirected from 2000 BC) (21st century BC - 20th century BC - 19th century BC - other centuries) (3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC) Events 2064 - 1986 BC -- Twin Dynasty wars in Egypt 2000 BC -- Farmers and herders travel south from Ethiopia and settle in Kenya. ...

Temple of Apollo, in Corinth
Temple of Apollo, in Corinth

Before the end of the Mycenaean period the Dorians attempted to settle in Corinth. While at first they failed, their second attempt was successful when their leader Aletes followed a different path around the Corinthian Gulf from Antirio. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1407 KB) [edit] Oggetto [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corinth Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1407 KB) [edit] Oggetto [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corinth Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... The Greeks began to build monumental temples in the first half of the 8th century BC. The temples of Hera at Samos and of Poseidon at Isthmia were among the first erected. ... Lycian Apollo, early Imperial Roman copy of a fourth century Greek original (Louvre Museum) In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (Ancient Greek , Apóllōn; or Ἀπέλλων, Apellōn), the ideal of the kouros, was the archer-god of medicine and healing, light, truth, archery and also a bringer of death... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... This article or section should include material from Dorian invasion The Dorians were one of the ancient Hellenic (Greek) races. ... In Greek mythology, Alete was a son of Aegisthus. ... Antirio (Greek: Modern, Αντίρριο, also pronouced as: a-DEE-ree-oh, Ancient/Katharevousa: _n), older spellings Antirrio, Antirrion, Antirhion, Antirion, ancient spelling: Antirrhion, Latin: Antirrhium is a community lying in a cape which has its closest distance to the Peloponnese in which the...


Some ancient names for the place, such as Korinthos, derive from a pre-Greek, "Pelasgian" language; it seems likely that Corinth was also the site of a Bronze Age Mycenaean palace-city, like Mycenae, Tiryns or Pylos. According to myth, Sisyphus was the founder of a race of ancient kings at Corinth. It was also in Corinth that Jason, the leader of the Argonauts, abandoned Medea. During the Trojan War Corinthians participated under the leadership of Agamemnon. Ancient Greek writers used the name Pelasgian to refer to groups of people who preceded the Greeks and dwelt in several locations in mainland Greece, Crete, and other regions of the Aegean as neighbors of the Hellenes. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Map ot Tiryns Tiryns (in ancient greek Τίρυνς) is a Mycenaean archeological site in the Greek nomos of Argolis in the Peloponnese peninsula, some kilometres north of Nauplion. ... Pylos (Greek Πύλος), formerly Navarino, is the name of a bay and a town on the west coast of the Peloponnese, in the district of Messenia in southern Greece. ... Sisyphus (Greek Σίσυφος; transliteration: Sísuphos; IPA: ), in Greek mythology, was a sinner punished in the underworld by being set to roll a huge rock up a hill throughout eternity. ... Jason (Greek: Ιάσων, Etruscan: Easun) is a hero of Greek mythology who led the Argonauts in the search of the Golden Fleece. ... The Argo, by Lorenzo Costa In Greek mythology, the Argonauts (Ancient Greek: ) were a band of heroes who, in the years before the Trojan War, accompanied Jason to Colchis in his quest for the Golden Fleece. ... Medea by Evelyn De Morgan. ... The fall of Troy by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769) From the collections of the granddukes of Baden, Karlsruhe The Trojan War was a war waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor (present-day Turkey), by the armies of the Achaeans, after Paris of Troy... The so-called Mask of Agamemnon. Discovered by Heinrich Schliemann in 1876 at Mycenae. ...


Classical era

Later, in classical times the ancient city rivalled Athens and Thebes in wealth, based on the Isthmian traffic and trade. Until the mid-6th century Corinth was a major exporter of black-figure pottery to cities around the Greek world. Athenian potters later came to dominate the market. Corinth's great temple on its ancient acropolis was dedicated to Aphrodite. According to most sources, there were more than one thousand temple prostitutes employed at the Temple of Aphrodite. Corinth was also the host of the Isthmian Games. Athens (Greek: Αθήνα, Athína IPA: ) is the capital and largest city of Greece. ... Thebes (in Demotic Greek: Θήβα — Thíva, Katharevousa: — Thēbai or Thívai) is a city in Greece, situated to the north of the Cithaeron range, which divides Boeotia from Attica, and on the southern edge of the Boeotian plain. ... The black-figure pottery technique is a style of ancient Greek pottery painting in which the decoration appears as black silhouettes on a red background. ... Acropolis of Athens from the south-west with the Propylaea and the Temple of Nike (left centre) and the theatre of Herodes Atticus (below left) Acropolis (Gr. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη, pronounced in English as and in Ancient Greek as ) was the Greek goddess of love, lust, beauty, and sexuality. ... The Isthmian Games were one of the Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece, and were held at Corinth every two years. ...

Periander (Περίανδρος) (r.627–585 BC)
Enlarge
Periander (Περίανδρος) (r.627585 BC)

In the 7th century BC, when Corinth was ruled by the tyrants Cypselus (r. 657-627 BC) and his son Periander (r. 627-585 BC), the city sent forth colonists to found new settlements: Epidamnus (modern day Durres, Albania), Syracuse, Ambracia (modern day town of Lefkas), Corcyra (modern day town of Corfu) and Anactorium. Periander also founded Apollonia (modern day Fier, Albania) and Potidaea (in Chalcidice). Corinth was also one of the nine Greek sponsor-cities to found the colony of Naukratis in Ancient Egypt. Naucratis was founded to accommodate the increasing trade volume between the Greek world and the pharaohnic Egypt, during the reign of Pharaoh Psammetichus I of the 26th dynasty. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1770x2950, 3330 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corinth Periander Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1770x2950, 3330 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corinth Periander Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Periander Periander (Greek: Περίανδρος) was the second tyrant of Corinth, Greece in the 7th century BC. He was the son of the first tyrant, Cypselus. ... Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 670s BC 660s BC 650s BC 640s BC 630s BC - 620s BC - 610s BC 600s BC 590s BC 580s BC 570s BC Events and Trends 627 BC - Death of Assurbanipal, king of Assyria; he is succeeded by Assur_etel_ilani (approximate... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 620s BC - 610s BC - 600s BC - 590s BC - 580s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC Events and Trends 589 BC - Apries succeeds Psammetichus II as king of Egypt 588 BC _ Nebuchadnezzar II of... Cypselus (or Kypselos) was the first tyrant of Corinth, Greece in the 7th century BC. With increased wealth and more complicated trade relations and social structures, Greek city-states tended to overthrow their traditional hereditary priest-kings; Corinth, the richest archaic polis, led the way. ... Periander Periander (Greek: Περίανδρος) was the second tyrant of Corinth, Greece in the 7th century BC. He was the son of the first tyrant, Cypselus. ... The Greek city of Epidamnos (Strabo Geography vi. ... Durrës (Photo by Marc Morell) Durrës (Albanian: Durrës or Durrësi) is the most ancient city of Albania and one of the most economically important as the biggest port city. ... Syracuse (Italian, Siracusa, ancient Syracusa - see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a city on the eastern coast of Sicily and the capital of the province of Syracuse, Italy. ... Ambracia (more correctly Ampracia) was an ancient Corinthian colony, situated about 7 miles from the Ambracian Gulf in Greece, on a bend of the navigable river Aracthus (or Aratthus), in the midst of a fertile wooded plain. ... Lefkada, or Lefkas (Greek: Modern: Λευκάδα, Ancient/Katharevousa: -as) is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea, connected to the mainland by a long causeway and floating bridge, as well as the islands capital city. ... (This article is about the Greek island known in English as Corfu. ... Pontikonisi island in the background with the Vlaheraina Monastery in the foreground. ... Actium (mod. ... Apollonia (of Apollo) was the name of several ancient Greek cities. ... Fier (Albanian: Fier or Fieri) is a city in southwest Albania, in the district and county with the same name. ... Potidaea (Greek: Ποτίδαια Potidaia, modern transliteration: Potidea) was a colony founded by the Corinthians around 600 BC in the narrowest point in Pallene (now Kassandria) in the western point of Chalkidiki (Chalcidice) in what was known as Thrace, Potidaea was maintaining trade with Macedonia. ... Chalkidikí or Chalcidice (in Greek: Χαλκιδική, alternative romanizations Khalkidhikí) is one of the fifty-one prefectures of Greece. ... Naucratis (nŏk´retĬs), was an ancient city of Egypt, on the Canopic branch of the Nile, 45 mi (72 km) SE of Alexandria. ... Khafres Pyramid (4th dynasty) and Great Sphinx of Giza (c. ... Pharaoh is a title used to refer to any ruler, usually male, of the Egyptian kingdom in the pre-Christian, pre-Islamic period. ... praenomen or throne name nomen or birth name Psammetichus, or Psamtik I, was the first of three kings of the Saite, or Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt. ... (Redirected from 26th dynasty) The Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt was the last native dynasty to rule Egypt before the Persian conquest, and had its capital was Sais. ...

Corinthian stater. Obverse: Pegasus with Qoppa () beneath. Reverse: Athena wearing Corinthian helmet. Qoppa symbolised the archaic writing of the city (όρινθος).
Corinthian stater. Obverse: Pegasus with Qoppa ( ) beneath. Reverse: Athena wearing Corinthian helmet. Qoppa symbolised the archaic writing of the city ( όρινθος).

Periander was one of the Seven Wise Men of Greece. During his reign the first Corinthian coins were struck. He was the first to attempt to cut across the Isthmus to create a seaway to allow ship traffic between the Corinthian and the Saronic Gulf. He abandoned the venture due to the extreme technical difficulties he met, but he created the Diolkos (a stone-build overland ramp) instead. The era of the Cypselids, ending with Periander's nephew Psammetichus, named after the hellenophile Egyptian Pharaoh Psammetichus I (see above), was the golden age of the city of Corinth. Image File history File links Ravel_1008. ... Image File history File links Ravel_1008. ... The stater was an ancient coin of Greek or Lydian origin which circulated from about 500 BC to 50 AD. It was also heavily used by Celtic tribes. ... Pegasus and Bellerophon, Attic red-figure In Greek mythology, Pegasus (Greek name: ) was a winged horse that was the son of Poseidon, in his role as horse-god, and the Gorgon Medusa. ... Qoppa Qoppa is an obsolete letter of the Greek alphabet and has a numeric value of 90. ... Image File history File links Greek_alphabet_qoppa2. ... Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ... Image File history File links Greek_alphabet_qoppa2. ... Periander Periander (Greek: Περίανδρος) was the second tyrant of Corinth, Greece in the 7th century BC. He was the son of the first tyrant, Cypselus. ... The Seven Sages of Greece (c. ... Coins were invented in the Kingdom of Lydia, in what is now western Turkey, in about 620 BCE (they were independently invented in China and India in about 600 BCE). ... The Diolkos – from the Greek dia (across) and olkos(train) – was an artificial trackway, resembling a modern portage railway, constructed in ancient times to enable boats to be moved overland across the Isthmus of Corinth, a neck of land 4 miles wide at its narrowest, which separated the Gulf of...

During this era Corinthians developed the Corinthian order, the third order of the classical architecture after the Ionic and the Doric. The Corinthian order was the most complicated of the three, showing the accumulation of wealth and the luxurious lifestyle in the ancient city-state, while the Doric order was analogous to the strict and simplistic lifestyle of the older Dorians like the Spartans, and the Ionic was a balance between those two following the philosophy of harmony of Ionians like the Athenians. Corinthian column capital File links The following pages link to this file: Post and lintel Solar heating Lintel Passage Tithe barn Stylobate Volute Palisade Folly Neolithic architecture Greek Revival Torana Built environment Structural design Viaduct R-value Shed Frontispiece Plinth Palazzo della Signoria Roman bridge Arch bridge Town square Refinery... Corinthian column capital File links The following pages link to this file: Post and lintel Solar heating Lintel Passage Tithe barn Stylobate Volute Palisade Folly Neolithic architecture Greek Revival Torana Built environment Structural design Viaduct R-value Shed Frontispiece Plinth Palazzo della Signoria Roman bridge Arch bridge Town square Refinery... The Corinthian order as used for the portico of the Pantheon, Rome provided a prominent model for Renaissance and later architects, through the medium of engravings. ... The Corinthian order as used for the portico of the Pantheon, Rome provided a prominent model for Renaissance and later architects, through the medium of engravings. ... Architects first real look at the Greek Ionic order: Julien David LeRoy, Les ruines plus beaux des monuments de la Grèce Paris, 1758 (Plate XX) The Ionic order forms one of the three orders or organizational systems of classical architecture, the other two canonic orders being the Doric and... The uncompleted Doric temple at Segesta, Sicily, has been waiting for finishing of its surfaces since 430–420 BC The Doric order was one of the three orders or organizational systems of Ancient Greek or classical architecture; the other two orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. ...


At this time there was a famous ancient saying: "Ou pantos plein es Korinthon", which translates as "Not everyone is able to go to Corinth", due to the expensive living standards that prevailed in the city. The city was renowned for the temple prostitutes of Aphrodite, the goddess of love, who served the wealthy merchants and the powerful officials living in or travelling in and out of the city. The most famous of them, Lais, was said to have extraordinary abilities and charged tremendous fees for her favours. The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη, pronounced in English as and in Ancient Greek as ) was the Greek goddess of love, lust, beauty, and sexuality. ... Lais of Corinth was a legendary hetaera or courtesan of ancient Greece who was born probably in Corinth. ...

Corinthian helmet
Corinthian helmet

The city had two main ports, one in the Corinthian Gulf and one in the Saronic Gulf, serving the trade routes of the western and eastern Mediterranean, respectively. In the Corinthian Gulf lay Lechaion, which connected the city to its western colonies (Greek: apoikoiai) and Magna Graecia, while in the Saronic Gulf the port of Kenchreai served the ships coming from Athens, Ionia, Cyprus and the rest of the Levant. Both ports had docks for the large war fleet of the city-state. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1564x2192, 312 KB) Summary Helmet in corinthian style . ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1564x2192, 312 KB) Summary Helmet in corinthian style . ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Lechaio (Greek Modern: Λέχαιο, Ancient/Katharevousa: -n), also: Lecheo or Leheo older form: Lechaion, Leheon, Lechaeum, Lekhaion is a community in the municipality of Assos-Lechaio in Corinthia. ... Colonies in antiquity were city-states founded from a mother-city, not from a territory-at-large. ... Magna Graecia around 280 b. ... There is another Kechries, see Kechries Kechries (Greek Modern: Κεχριές, rarely Κεχρεές, Ancient/Katharevousa: Kenchreai), older form: Cenchreae, Kenchreai, Kechriai, Kekhries, Kekhriai, Kekhriais is a community in the municipality of Corinth in Corinthia. ... Ionia (Greek Ιωνία; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was an ancient region of southwestern coastal Anatolia (now in Turkey) on the Aegean Sea. ... The Levant Levant is an imprecise geographical term historically referring to a large area in the Middle East south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea on the west, and by the northern Arabian Desert and Upper Mesopotamia to the east. ...


The city was a major participant in the Persian Wars, offering 40 war ships in the sea Battle of Salamis under the admiral Adeimantos and 5,000 hoplites (wearing their characteristic Corinthian helmets) in the following Battle of Plataea but afterwards was frequently an enemy of Athens and an ally of Sparta in the Peloponnesian League. In 431 BC, one of the factors leading to the Peloponnesian War was the dispute between Corinth and Athens over the Corinthian colony of Corcyra (Corfu), which probably stemmed from the traditional trade rivalry between the two cities. After the end of the Peloponnesian War, Corinth and Thebes, which were former allies with Sparta in the Peloponnesian League, had grown dissatisfied with the hegemony of Sparta and started the Corinthian War against it, which further weakened the city-states of the Peloponnese. This weakeness allowed for the subsequent invasion of the Macedonians of the north and the forging of the Corinthian League by Philip II of Macedon against the Persian Empire. Philip's son Alexander the Great was the first general of the Hellenes. The Greco-Persian Wars or Persian Wars were a series of conflicts between the Greek world and the Persian Empire that started about 500 BC and lasted until 448 BC. The term can also refer to the continual warfare of the Roman Empire and Byzantine Empire against the Parthians and... Combatants Greek city-states Persia Halicarnassus Commanders Eurybiades of Sparta Themistocles of Athens Adeimantus of Corinth Aristides of Athens Xerxes I of Persia Ariamenes † Artemisia Strength 366-380 ships 1 1000 - 1207 ships [1]2 Casualties 40 ships 200 ships 1 Herodotus gives 378 of the alliance, but the numbers... Adeimantos was a Corinthian Admiral in the sea Battle of Salamis commanding 40 corinthian war ships. ... Warfare in Hellenic Greece centered mainly around heavy infantrymen called hoplites. ... Bronze Corinthian Helmet The Corinthian helmet (Ancient Greek κόρυς κορινθίη, Modern κάσκα κορινθιακή) was a type of bronze helmet which in its later styles covered the entire head and neck, with slits for the eyes and mouth. ... Combatants Greek city-states Persia Commanders Pausanias Mardonius† Strength 100,000 (Pompeius) 110,000 (Herodotus) 120,000 (Ctesias) 300,000 (Herodotus, Plutarch). ... Sparta (Doric: , Attic: ) is a city in southern Greece. ... The Peloponnesian League was an alliance of states in the Peloponnese in the 6th and 5th centuries BC. By the end of the 6th century, Sparta had become the most powerful state in the Peloponnese, and was the political and military hegemon over Argos, the next most powerful state. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC - 430s BC - 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC Years: 436 BC 435 BC 434 BC 433 BC 432 BC - 431 BC - 430 BC 429 BC... Combatants Delian League led by Athens Peloponnesian League led by Sparta Commanders Pericles Cleon Nicias Alcibiades Archidamus II Brasidas Lysander For the earlier war beginning in 460 BC, see First Peloponnesian War The Peloponnesian War (431 BC–404 BC) was an Ancient Greek military conflict fought between Athens and its... Combatants Sparta, Peloponnesian League Athens, Argos, Corinth, Thebes, and other allies Commanders Agesilaus and others Numerous The Corinthian War (395 BC-387 BC) was an ancient Greek military conflict between Sparta and four allied states, Thebes, Athens, Corinth, and Argos, which were initially backed by Persia. ... A polis (πολις) — plural: poleis (πολεις) — is a city, or a city-state. ... The League of Corinth was a federation of Greek states created by Philip II of Macedon during the winter of 338 BC/337 BC to facilitate his use of Greek military forces in his war against Persia. ... Philip II of Macedon: victory medal (niketerion) struck in Tarsus, 2nd c. ... The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau (Irān - Land of the Aryans[1]) and beyond. ... Alexander the Great (Greek: ,[1] Megas Alexandros; July 356 BC–June 11, 323 BC), also known as Alexander III, king of Macedon (336–323 BC), was one of the most successful military commanders in history. ... The Greeks (Greek: Έλληνες—Hellenes) are a nation and ethnic group, who have populated Greece from the 17th century BC up until the present day. ...


In the 4th century BC, Corinth was home to Diogenes of Sinope, one of the world's best known cynics. (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 4th century BC started on January 1, 400 BC and ended on December 31, 301 BC. // Overview Events Bust of Alexander the Great in the British Museum. ... Diogenes by John William Waterhouse, depicting his lamp, tub and diet of onions. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


Roman era

The Romans under Lucius Mummius destroyed Corinth following a siege in 146 BC; when he entered the city Mummius put all the men to the sword and sold the women and children into slavery before he torched the city, for which he was given the cognomen Achaicus as the conqueror of the Achaean League (see Battle of Corinth). While there is archeological evidence of some minimal habitation in the years afterwards, Julius Caesar refounded the city as Colonia laus Iulia Corinthiensis in 44 BC shortly before his assassination. According to Appian, the new settlers were drawn from freedmen of Rome. Under the Romans it became the seat of government for Southern Greece or Achaia (according to Acts 18:12-16). It was noted for its wealth, and for the luxurious, immoral and vicious habits of the people. It had a large mixed population of Romans, Greeks, and Jews. This article is becoming very long. ... Lucius Mummius (2nd century BC), surnamed Achaicus was a Roman statesman and general. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC - 140s BC - 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC Years: 151 BC 150 BC 149 BC 148 BC 147 BC - 146 BC - 145 BC 144 BC... The cognomen (name known by in English) was originally the third name of a Roman in the Roman naming convention. ... The Achaean League was a confederation of Greek city states in Achaea, a territory on the northern coast of the Peloponnese. ... This battle between Rome and Corinth in 146 BC resulted in the complete and total destruction of the Greek state famous for its fabulous wealth. ... Gāius Jūlius Caesar (IPA: ;[1]), July 12 or July 13, 100 BC – March 15, 44 BC) was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 49 BC 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC 41 BC... Appian of Alexandria (Gr. ... A freedman is a former slave who has been manumitted or emancipated. ... This article is about the modern Greek district Achaea. ... The Acts of the Apostles (Greek Praxeis Apostolon) is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ...


When the apostle Paul first visited the city (AD 51 or 52), Gallio, the brother of Seneca, was proconsul. Paul resided here for eighteen months (see Acts 18:1-18). Here he first became acquainted with Aquila and Priscilla, and soon after his departure Apollos came from Ephesus. Although he intended to pass through Corinth the second time before he visited Macedonia, circumstances were such, in the absence of Titus, that he went from Troas to Macedonia, and then likely passed into Corinth for a "second benefit" (see 2 Corinthians 1:15), and remained for three months, according to Acts 20:3. Paul of Tarsus (b. ... // Events Roman Empire Caratacus, British resistance leader, is captured and taken to Rome. ... A Roman law prohibits the execution of old and crippled slaves. ... Depiction of Gallio Junius Annaeus Gallio, (originally Lucius Annaeus Novatus) (c. ... Lucius Annaeus Seneca (often known simply as Seneca, or Seneca the Younger) (c. ... For the Miocene ape, see Proconsul (genus) Under the Roman Empire a proconsul was a promagistrate filling the office of a consul. ... The Acts of the Apostles (Greek Praxeis Apostolon) is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... Aquila (Gk. ... Priscilla could refer to: Priscilla, Queen of the Desert, a movie. ... Apollos (Απολλως; contracted from Apollonius) was an early Christian, who is mentioned several times in the New Testament. ... Historical Map of Ephesus, from Meyers Konversationslexikon 1888 Ephesus (Greek: , Turkish: ), was one of the great cities of the Ionian Greeks in Anatolia, located in Lydia where the Cayster River (Küçük Menderes) flows into the Aegean Sea (in modern day Turkey). ... (Redirected from 2 Corinthians) See also: First Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The Second Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible New Testament. ... The Acts of the Apostles (Greek Praxeis Apostolon) is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ...


During this second visit in the spring of 58 it is likely the Epistle to the Romans was written. Paul's First Epistle to the Corinthians reflects the difficulties of maintaining a Christian community in such a cosmopolitan city. Events The Ficus Ruminales begins to die (see Rumina) Start of Yongping era of the Chinese Han Dynasty. ... The Epistle to the Romans is one of the epistles, or letters, included in the New Testament canon of the Christian Bible. ... The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ...


Byzantine era

The city was destroyed by an earthquake in 375 and again in 551. Events The Huns invade Europe. ... Events Jordanes publishes The Origin and Deeds of the Goths. ...


During Alaric's invasion of Greece, in 395396, Corinth was one of the cities he despoiled, selling many of its citizens into slavery. An 1894 photogravure of Alaric I taken from a painting by Ludwig Thiersch. ... Events After the death of emperor Theodosius I, the Roman Empire is divided in an eastern and a western half. ... Events Emperor An succeeds Emperor Xiaowu as ruler of the Chinese Jin Dynasty Augustine appointed bishop of Hippo in North Africa End of the Visigoth invasion in Greece. ...


During the reign of Byzantine emperor Justinian I, a large stone wall was erected from the Saronic to the Corinthian gulf, protecting the city and the Peloponnesean peninsula from the barbarian invasions of the north. The stone wall was about six miles (10 km) long and was named Examilion (exi=six in Greek). During this era Corinth was the seat of the Thema of Hellas (representing modern day Greece). This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ... Justinian I depicted on one of the famous mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale. ... The themata in 950. ...


In the 12th century (during the reign of the Comnenus dynasty), the wealth of the city, generated from the silk trade to the Latin states of western Europe, attracted the attention of the Sicilian Normans under Roger of Sicily, who plundered it in 1147. Byzantine emperor Alexius I Comnenus The Comnenus or Komnenos family was an important dynasty in the history of the Byzantine Empire. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Roger II (1093-1154), son and successor of Roger I, began his rule in 1112. ... Events King Afonso I of Portugal and the Crusaders capture Lisbon from Muslims First written mention of Moscow. ...

View of the Acrocorinth.
View of the Acrocorinth.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1464 KB) [edit] Oggetto [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corinth Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1464 KB) [edit] Oggetto [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corinth Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Map of the remains of Acrocorinth Acrocorinth (Gr. ...

Principality of Achaea

In 1204 Geoffrey I de Villehardouin, nephew of the homonymous famous historian of the Fourth Crusade, was granted Corinth after the sack of Constantinople, with the title of Prince of Achaea. From 1205-1208 the Corinthians resisted the Frankish domination from their stronghold in Acrocorinth, under the command of the Greek general Leo Sgouros. The French knight William of Champlitte led the crusader forces. In 1208 Leo Sgouros killed himself by riding off the top of Acrocorinth, but from 1208 to 1210 the Corinthians continued to resist against the enemy forces. // Events February - Byzantine emperor Alexius IV is overthrown in a revolution, and Alexius V is proclaimed emperor. ... Geoffrey I Villehardouin (Geoffroi) was nephew to Geoffrey of Villehardouin, and a knight and crusader who went to Palestine and later came to help William of Champlitte to conquer Morea and became Prince of Achaea after Williams death. ... Geoffrey of Villehardouin (in French Geoffroi de Villehardouin) (1160–c. ... The Fourth Crusade (1201–1204), originally designed to conquer Jerusalem through an invasion of Egypt, instead, in 1204, invaded and conquered the Eastern Orthodox city of Constantinople, capital of the Byzantine Empire. ... Map of Constantinople. ... Events January 6 - Philip of Swabia becomes King of the Romans April 14 - Battle of Adrianople (1205) between Bulgars and Latins August 20 - Following certain news of Baldwin Is death, Henry of Flanders is crowned Emperor of the Latin Empire Births Walter IV of Brienne Wenceslaus I, King of... Events Philip of Swabia King of Germany and rival Holy Roman Emperor to Otto IV, assassinated June 21 in Bamberg by German Count Otto of Wittelsbach because Philip had refused to give him his daughter in marriage. ... Map of the remains of Acrocorinth Acrocorinth (Gr. ... William of Champlitte (died 1209) was a participant on the Fourth Crusade, and the first Prince of Achaea. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Tsuchimikado, emperor of Japan Emperor Juntoku ascends to the throne of Japan Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor excommunicated by Pope Innocent III for invading southern Italy in 1210 Gottfried von Strassburg writes his epic poem Tristan about 1210 Beginning of Delhi Sultanate Births...


After the collapse of the resistance and for the years to come Corinth became a full part of the Principality, governed by the Villehardouins from their capital in Andravida of Elis. Corinth was the last significant town of Achaea on its northern borders with another crusader state, the Duchy of Athens. 1. ... Andrav da, (Ανδραβίδα) is a city in the Prefecture of Ilia in Greece that has a military base in the east side. ... Elis, or Eleia (Greek, Modern: Ήλιδα Ilida, Ancient/Katharevousa: Ήλις, also Ilis, Doric: Άλις) is an ancient district within the modern prefecture of Ilia. ... // Duchy of Athens A small crusader state which was established after the Sack of Constantinople (1204) by the Crusaders. ...


Ottoman Rule

In 1458 five years after the final Fall of Constantinople, the Turks of the Ottoman Empire conquered the city and its mighty castle. Events January 24 - Matthias I Corvinus becomes king of Hungary Foundation of Magdalen College, University of Oxford George of Podebrady becomes king of Bohemia Pope Pius II becomes pope Turks sack the Acropolis Births February 15 - Ivan the Young, Ruler of Tver (d. ... Combatants Byzantine Empire Ottoman Empire Commanders Constantine XI† Loukas Notaras Mehmed II Strength <10,000 >80,000[1] Casualties Unknown Unknown The Fall of Constantinople was the conquest of the Byzantine capital by the Ottoman Empire under the command of Sultan Mehmed II, on Tuesday, May 29, 1453. ... Motto: دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem: Ottoman imperial anthem At the height of its power (1680) Capital Söğüt (1299-1326) Bursa (1326-1365) Edirne (1365-1453) Constantinople (Istanbul) (1453-1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–1922 Mehmed VI...


During the Greek War of Independence, 1821-1830 the city was totally destroyed by the Turkish forces. The city was officially liberated in 1832 after the Treaty of London. In 1833, the site was considered among the candidates for the new capital city of the recently founded Kingdom of Greece, due to its historical significance and strategic position. Athens, then an insignificant village, was chosen instead. Combatants Greek revolutionaries, United Kingdom, Russia, France Ottoman Empire, Egyptian troops Commanders Theodoros Kolokotronis, Alexander Ypsilanti Omer Vryonis, Ibrahim Pasha of Egypt. ... The coronation banquet for George IV 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Greece, having won its independence from the Ottoman Empire after eight years of war (1821-1829) with the help of the Great Powers (Great Britain, France and Russia) at the Battle of Navarino had formed a republican government with John Capodistrias (Καποδíστριας)as its leader. ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Official Tourist Site HR-Net (Hellenic Resources Network)/ comprehensive Greek news site Official Greek Statistics Site Ask for Greece/ A volunteer community for Q&As about Greece Greece Museums/ Museum directory of Greece Take a short virtual tour of Athens Take a long virtual tour of Athens Greece Webcam Radio...

North: Gulf of Corinth,
Loutraki-Perachoras (NE)
West: Vocha,
Lechaio
Corinth East: Saronic Gulf,
Isthmia,
Kechries (SE)
South: Oneia mountains,
Examilia,
Ancient Corinth (SW)

The Gulf of Corinth or the Corinthian Gulf is a deep inlet of the Ionian Sea separating the Peloponnese from western mainland Greece. ... Loutraki-Perachoras Common is a municipality of Corinthia Prefecture. ... Lechaio (Greek Modern: Λέχαιο, Ancient/Katharevousa: -n), also: Lecheo or Leheo older form: Lechaion, Leheon, Lechaeum, Lekhaion is a community in the municipality of Assos-Lechaio in Corinthia. ... The Saronic Gulf or Gulf of Aegina in Greece forms part of the Aegean Sea and defines the eastern side of the isthmus of Corinth. ... There is another Kechries, see Kechries Kechries (Greek Modern: Κεχριές, rarely Κεχρεές, Ancient/Katharevousa: Kenchreai), older form: Cenchreae, Kenchreai, Kechriai, Kekhries, Kekhriai, Kekhriais is a community in the municipality of Corinth in Corinthia. ... Examilia (Greek: &#917;&#958;&#945;&#956;&#943;&#955;&#953;&#945;) is a community in the municipality of Corinth. ...

Corinth today

The Corinth Canal
The Corinth Canal

In 1858 the old city (ancient Corinth, today a town 3km SW of the modern city) was totally destroyed by an earthquake. The new city of Corinth was founded on the coast of the Gulf of Corinth. Corinth Canal in Greece My aunt and/or uncle made this photograph when they went on vacation to Greece. ... Corinth Canal in Greece My aunt and/or uncle made this photograph when they went on vacation to Greece. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Corinth is the second largest city in the periphery of Peloponnese after Kalamata (53,659 inh. in 2001). In the census of 1991 the city had a population of 28,071 while latest data 2001 showed an increase of 2,363 inhabitants (+8,4%) to 30,434. It should be noted the fact that between the census of 1981 and that of 1991 the city had one of the fastest increasing populations in the country. Generally, a periphery is a boundary or outer part of any space or body. ... There is also a Kalamata in the Democratic Republic of Congo, see Kalamata, Democratic Republic of Congo Kalamata (Greek, Modern: Καλαμάτα, Ancient/Katharevousa: -ai), older forms: Kalamai is a city in southern Greece, on the Peloponnesos, by the Mediterranean. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 2001. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Municipality of Corinth or Dimos Korinthion had a population of 36,991 in 2001. The municipality includes the town of Ancient Corinth (1,770 inh.), where the ancient and the medieval city used to be built at the foothills of the rock of Acrocorinth 3km from the new city centre, the town of Examilia (1,547 inh.), and the smaller settlements of Xylokeriza (777 inh.) and Solomos (686 inh.).


The Corinth Canal, carrying ship traffic between the western Mediterranean and the Aegean Sea, is about 4 km east of the city, cutting through the Isthmus of Corinth. The Corinth Canal The memorial plate of Béla Gerster, the architect of the Corinth Canal, in his birth-place in Košice, Slovakia Bungy jumping at the Corinth canal The Corinth Canal is a canal connecting the Gulf of Corinth with the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Sea. ... The Aegean Sea. ... The Isthmus of Corinth is the narrow landbridge which connects the Peloponnesos peninsula with the mainland of Greece, near the city of Corinth. ...


A city square is located next to its port. The port operates north of the square, and serves the local needs of industry and agriculture. It is mainly a cargo exporting facility. Ports designation: Corinth, Greece Geo Position: 37 56. ...


Corinth is a major industrial hub at a national level. Copper cables, petroleum products, medical equipment, marble, gypsum, ceramic tiles, salt, mineral water & beverages, meat products, and gums are produced nearby. Currently (2005) a period of de-industrialization has commenced as a large pipework complex, a textile factory and a meat packing facility disrupted their operations.


A large oil-refinery complex is situated about 12 km northeast of the city, which some think is the line marking the Athens metro area. The complex is amongst the largest in the eastern Mediterranean. It is surrounded by Greece Interstate 8A and a 3+1 lanes per direction freeway. A modern rest area with restaurants and gas stations is located nearby on the freeway. A non-freeway part of the road Greece Interstate 8A, sometimes Greece Interstate 8 is a toll road running from Kifissou avenue, in Athens up to the northeast of Patras. ...


The city is the terminal point of a newly-built ultra-modern electric railway line (Proastiakos) to the Athens metropolitan area. Expectations for further economic and residential expansion are significant due to this new development. Proastiakos train in Athens Central Railway Station The Proastiakos (Greek: Προαστιακός meaning literally the Suburban) is the suburban railway system of Athens, Greece. ...


The city is also a major road hub being the entry point to the Peloponnesian peninsula, the southernmost area of continental Greece.


External links


Partial text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897

Municipalities of the Corinthia Prefecture
Agioi Theodoroi • Assos-Lechaio • CorinthEvrostiniFeneos • Loutraki-Perachora • NemeaSaronikosSikyonaSolygeiaStymfaliaTeneaVeloVochaXylokastro



Corinthia (Greek: Κορινθία, Korinthía) is the area around the city of Corinth. ... There are communities that have the name Agioi Theodoroi, other forms, Agii Theodori (Greek: &#902;&#947;&#953;&#959;&#953; &#920;&#949;&#959;&#948;&#974;&#961;&#959;&#953; for Saint Theodore) in Greece): Agioi Theodoroi (&#902;&#947;&#953;&#959;&#953; &#920;&#949;&#959;&#948;&#974;&#961;&#959;&#953;) sometimes Aghioi Theodoroi... Assos-Lechaio (Άσσος-Λέχαιο) is a municipality in Corinthia, Greece. ... Evrostini (Greek: Ευρωστίνη) is a town and a municipality in the northwestern part of Corinthia, Greece. ... Feneos (Φενεός) is a municipality in Corinthia, Greece. ... Loutraki-Perachora (Greek: Λουτράκι-Περαχώρα) is a municipality of Corinthia Prefecture, Greece. ... Nemea is an ancient site near the head of the valley of the Nemea River in the Peloponnessus of Greece. ... Saronikos (Σαρωνικός) is a municipality in Corinthia, Greece. ... Sikyona (Σικυώνα) is a municipality in Corinthia, Greece. ... Solygeia (Σολυγεία) is a municipality in Corinthia, Greece. ... Stymfalia (Στυμφαλία) is a municipality in Corinthia, Greece. ... Tenea (&#932;&#949;&#957;&#941;&#945;) was established approximately 15 kilometers west of Corinth and 25 kilometers NW of Mycenae shortly after the Trojan war by Trojans living in the island of Tenedos, offshore Troy, hence the name. ... Velo (Greek Modern: Βέλο, Ancient/Katharevousa: -n), older form: Velon is a community and a municipality in the northern part of Corinthia. ... Vocha (Βόχα) is a municipality in Corinthia, Greece. ... Xylokastro (Greek:, Modern: &#926;&#965;&#955;&#972;&#954;&#945;&#963;&#964;&#961;&#959; Ancient: Xylokastron, &#926;&#965;&#955;&#972;&#954;&#945;&#963;&#964;&#961;&#959;&#957; Greek word meaning wooden castle) is a city that is 40 km W of Corinth via GR-8, which is also E65. ...

Topics about Ancient Greece edit
Places: Aegean Sea | Hellespont | Macedon | Sparta | Athens | Corinth | Thermopylae | Antioch | Alexandria | Pergamon | Miletus | Delphi | Olympia | Troy
Life: Agriculture | Art | Cuisine | Economy | Law | Medicine | Pederasty | Pottery | Prostitution | Slavery
Philosophy: Pythagoras | Heraclitus | Parmenides | Protagoras | Empedocles | Democritus | Socrates | Plato | Aristotle | Zeno | Epicurus
Literature: Homer | Hesiod | Pindar | Aeschylus | Sophocles | Euripides | Aristophanes | Herodotus | Thucydides | Xenophon | Polybius
Buildings: Parthenon | Temple of Artemis | Acropolis | Ancient Agora | Arch of Hadrian | Statue of Zeus | Temple of Hephaestus | Samothrace temple complex
Chronology: Aegean civilization | Mycenaean civilization | Greek dark ages | Ancient Greece | Hellenistic Greece | Roman Greece

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