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Encyclopedia > Corfu
Corfu
Κέρκυρα
Part of the old town centre from above
Part of the old town centre from above
Geography
Coordinates: 39°40′N 19°45′E / 39.667, 19.75
Island Chain: Ionian Islands
Area:[28] 592.877 km² (229 sq.mi.)
Highest Mountain: Mt. Pandokratoras (906 m (2,972 ft))
Government
Flag of Greece Greece
Periphery: Ionian Islands
Prefecture: Corfu
Capital: Corfu (city)
Statistics
Population: 107,879 (as of 2001)
Density: 182 /km² (471 /sq.mi.)
Postal Code: 490 xx, 491 xx
Area Code: 266x0-xx
License Code: KY
Website
www.corfu.gr


Corcyra or Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα, Kérkyra, Ancient Greek Κέρκυρα or Κόρκυρα, Latin: Corcyra, Italian Corfù) is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. It lies off the coast of Albania, from which it is separated by straits varying in breadth from 3 to 23 km (2 to 15 mi), including one near Butrint and a longer one west of Thesprotia. The island is part of the Corfu Prefecture, and includes twelve of the sixteen municipalities or communes in the prefecture and over 96 percent of its population (2001 census). (The four excluded municipalities are Ereikoussa, Mathraki, Othonoi, and Paxoi, which are all on separate islands.) Corfu is a village located in Genesee County, New York. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1325 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Greece Corfu Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek: , Ionioi NÄ“soi) are a group of islands in Greece. ... Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a prefecture of Greece. ... Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a city in north-western Greece. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The Ionian Sea. ... For other uses, see Coast (disambiguation). ... Remains of a theatre and part of the agora (Photo by Marc Morell) Remains of the 6th-century baptistery Butrint (Albanian: Butrint or Butrinti) is a city and an archeological site in Albania, close to the Greek border. ... Thesprotia (Greek: Θεσπρωτία) is one of the prefectures of Greece. ... Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a prefecture of Greece. ... Communities and municipalities of Greece are one of several levels of government within the organizational structure of that country. ... Ereikoussa is a Greek island in the Ionian Islands. ... Mathraki is a Greek island in the Ionian Islands. ... Othonoi is a Greek island in the Ionian Islands. ... Paxi - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


The principal town (pop. 28,185) of the island is also named Corfu, or Kérkyra in Greek, as is its municipality (pop. 39,487). Corfu is home to the Ionian University. Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a city in north-western Greece. ... Ionian U. logo The Ionian University is a university located in the city of Corfu, Greece. ...


The island is steeped in history and it is perennially connected to the history of Greece starting from Greek mythology. Its Greek name, Kerkyra, is connected to two powerful water symbols: Poseidon, god of the sea and Asopos, an important Greek mainland river. According to myth, Poseidon fell in love with the beautiful nymph Korkyra, daughter of Asopus and river nymph Metope, and abducted her, as was the custom among gods of that era's myths - Zeus himself was a serial offender. Poseidon brought her to the hitherto unnamed island and, being in marital bliss, offered her name to the place: Korkyra, which gradually evolved to Kerkyra. Together, they had a child they called Phaiax, after whom the inhabitants of the island were named: Phaiakes, that was then transliterated via Latin to Phaeacians. This article covers the Greek civilization. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... For other uses, see Name (disambiguation). ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... Asopus or Asôpos is the name of five different rivers in Greece and also in Greek mythology the name of the gods of those rivers. ... In Greek mythology Korkyra was the daughter of Asopos river and nymph Metope. ... In Greek mythology, Metope was a river nymph, the daughter of the river Ladon. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... Nausicaa takes Odysseus to the palace Σχερία (Scheria, Skhería) or Phaeacia was a phantom island mentioned in the Greek mythology and literature as the homeland of the Phaeacians and the last destination of Odysseus before coming back home to Ithaca. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


The island's history is full of battles and conquests, indicative of Corfu's turbulent position in a historical vortex that lasted until modern times, when after the unification with modern Greece in 1864 the history of the island became one with the mainland's, with no more foreign intervention. The legacy of these struggles remains in the form of castles that exist in strategic locations all over the island. Two of these castles enclose the city. It is the only city in Greece to be surrounded by castles in this way, and as a result has officially been declared as a Kastropolis (Castle city) by the Greek Government.[1] In 2007, the old town of the city was named on the UNESCO World Heritage List after a recommendation by ICOMOS.[2][3][4] For other uses, see Battle (disambiguation). ... An invasion is a military action consisting of armed forces of one geopolitical entity entering territory controlled by another such entity, generally with the objective of conquering territory, or altering the established government. ... Vortex created by the passage of an aircraft wing, revealed by coloured smoke A vortex (pl. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Elabana Falls is in Lamington National Park, part of the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves World Heritage site in Queensland, Australia. ... The International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) was founded in 1965 as a result of the Venice Charter of 1964 and offers advice to UNESCO on World Heritage Sites. ...

Contents

Geography

Map of Corfu. Its satellite islands of Ereikousa, Othoni and Mathraki counterclockwise NW, WNW and W respectively (with respect to the northern part of the island at the top of the map) and Paxoi and Antipaxoi on the SE side, are visible. To the northeast (on the right) the Albanian coast forms a narrow channel with the Corfu landmass near the historic village of Kassiopi. The grey line on the map delineates the boundaries of Greece and Albania. The shades of blue in the map indicate sea depth. In general the sea on the eastern part of the island is shallower (light blue) whereas the sea on the western part is very deep (darker blue)
Map of Corfu. Its satellite islands of Ereikousa, Othoni and Mathraki counterclockwise NW, WNW and W respectively (with respect to the northern part of the island at the top of the map) and Paxoi and Antipaxoi on the SE side, are visible. To the northeast (on the right) the Albanian coast forms a narrow channel with the Corfu landmass near the historic village of Kassiopi. The grey line on the map delineates the boundaries of Greece and Albania. The shades of blue in the map indicate sea depth. In general the sea on the eastern part of the island is shallower (light blue) whereas the sea on the western part is very deep (darker blue)
Pontikonisi island in the background with the Vlaheraina Monastery in the foreground. The shuttle boats that ferry people to and from Pontikonisi can be seen moored in the marina near the Monastery. The trees at the lower left of the picture are from the hills of Kanoni. The hilltops at the upper right corner are on the southern part of the island with Perama, Kaiser's Bridge, Benitses and Mesonghi forming an arc of popular beaches and tourist attractions as one gazes southbound from Kanoni. Farthest south is Lefkimmi and Cape Kavos.

The name Corfu is an Italian corruption of the Byzantine Κορυφώ (Koryphō), meaning city of the peaks, which is derived from the Greek Κορυφαί (Koryphai), meaning Crests or Peaks, denoting the two peaks of the fortresses that enclose the city.[1] In shape it is not unlike the sickle (drepanē, δρεπάνι), to which it was compared by the ancients, the hollow side, with the town and harbour of Corfu in the centre, being towards the Albanian coast. It is about 40 miles (60 km) long, and its greatest breadth is about 20 miles (30 km). The area is estimated at 227 sq miles (580 km²). Two high and well-defined ranges divide the island into three districts, of which the northern is mountainous, the central undulating and the southern low-lying. The most important of the two ranges is that of San Salvador (Αγιος Σωτήρας), probably the ancient Istone, which stretches east and west from Cape St. Angelo to Cape St. Stefano, and attains its greatest elevation in the summit from which it takes its name. The second culminates in the mountain of Santi Jeca, or Santa Decca, as it is called by misinterpretation of the Greek designation Άγιοι Δέκα (Hagioi Deka), or the Ten Saints. The whole island, composed as it is of various limestone formations, presents great diversity of surface, and the views from the more elevated spots are magnificent. Beaches are found in Agii Gordi, the Korissi lagoon, Agios Georgios, Marathia, Kassiopi, Sidari, Roda, Palaiokastritsa and many others. Corfu is located near the Kefalonia geological fault formation and as such earthquakes sometimes are felt. On 29 June, 2007, the island was struck by a medium earthquake measured at 5.9 on the Richter scale with its epicenter located near Lefkimmi. The earthquake also shook Paxoi and some damages were reported. The main quake happened during the evening hours and an aftershock occurred around one in the morning (01:00) near Paxoi. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 371 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 371 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... Using a sickle A sickle is a curved, hand-held agricultural tool typically used for harvesting grain crops before the advent of modern harvesting machinery. ... The island of Kefalonia, also known as Cephallenia, Cephallonia, Kefallinia, or Kefallonia (Ancient Greek: Κεφαλληνία; Modern Greek: Κεφαλλονιά or Κεφαλονιά; Italian: Cefalonia), is the largest of the Ionian Islands in western Greece, with an area of 350 sq. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ...


Coastline and beaches

The coastline is about 217 km including capes. The highest point is Mount Pantokrator (906m); the second is Stravoskiadi (849 m). Capes and promentories include Agia Aikaterini, and Drastis to the north, Lefkimmi and Asprokavos to the southeast and Megachoro to the south. There is an island in the middle of Gouvia Bay which extends across much of the eastern shore of the island; it is called Ptychia. Camping grounds can be found in Palaiokastritsa, Agrillos, four in the northern part, Pyrgi, Roda, Gouvia and Messonghi. Mount Pantokrator (sometimes Pantocrator, Pantōkrator, Παντωκράτορ in Greek) is a mountain located in north-eastern Corfu. ...


Flora

Homer names, as adorning the garden of Alcinous, only seven plants – wild olive, oil olive, pear, pomegranate, apple, fig and vine. Of these the apple and the pear are now very inferior in Corfu; the others thrive, together with all the fruit trees known in southern Europe, with addition of the kumquat, loquat and prickly pear and, in some spots, the banana. When undisturbed by cultivation, the myrtle, arbutus, bay and ilex form a rich brushwood and the minor flora of the island are extensive. For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Alcinous (sometimes with the diacritical mark Alcinoüs; also transliterated as Alkínoös) was a son of Nausithous and father of Nausicaa and Laodamas with Arete. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the color, see Pomegranate (color). ... This article is about the fruit. ... Species About 800, including: Ficus altissima Ficus americana Ficus aurea Ficus benghalensis- Indian Banyan Ficus benjamina- Weeping Fig Ficus broadwayi Ficus carica- Common Fig Ficus citrifolia Ficus coronata Ficus drupacea Ficus elastica Ficus godeffroyi Ficus grenadensis Ficus hartii Ficus lyrata Ficus macbrideii Ficus macrophylla- Moreton Bay Fig Ficus microcarpa- Chinese... Binomial name Vitis vinifera L. For thousands of years, the fruit and plant of Vitis vinifera, the European grapevine, have been harvested for both medicinal and nutritional value; its history is intimately entwined with the history of wine. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Species See text Potted kumquat trees at a kumquat liqueur distillery on Corfu. ... Binomial name Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb. ... Species Some 250, see also Example species. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Species Myrtus communis L. Myrtus nivellei Batt. ... Species See text. ... bay leaves Bay leaf in Greek Daphni (plural bay leaves) is the aromatic leaf of several species of the Laurel family (Lauraceae). ... This article is about the plant type. ...


Agriculture

The island has again become an important port of call and has a considerable trade in olive oil; under a more careful system of tillage the value of its agricultural products could be substantially increased. Typically, a port of call is a city or town in a country being visited by sea; if it is the first a vessel visits in that country, the vessel and all passengers and crew must clear in with local authorities there. ...


In earlier times there was a great export from the citron which was cultivated here. The Greek citron is called Citrus Medica variety etrog due to its major use for the Jewish ritual during the Feast of Tabernacles. ...


Climate

In late-2002 and early-2003, heavy rains ravaged the island several times including one which caused a mudslide near Messonghi Beach. During the Holiday Season of 2006, the weather was exceptionally hot in May, with greater rainfall during the month of June. August received a heatwave and temperatures reached a high of 45 degrees Celsius in the North of the Island.[citation needed]

Climate Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Avg Daily Sun Hours 4 5 7 7 9 10 12 11 9 6 4 2
High temperature [°C] 14 15 16 19 23 28 31 32 28 23 19 16
Low temperatures [°C] 13 13 14 15 18 22 23 24 23 21 17 14
Precipitation 13 11 9 7 5 2 1 1 5 9 12 15

Urban Landscape

Old town

Further information: Corfu (city)
Corfu City Hall
Corfu City Hall

The town of Corfu stands on the broad part of a peninsula, whose termination in the Venetian citadel (Greek: Παλαιό Φρούριο) is cut off from it by an artificial fosse formed in a natural gully, with a salt-water ditch at the bottom, that serves also as a kind of marina. The old city having grown up within fortifications, where every metre of ground was precious, is a labyrinth of narrow streets paved with cobblestones, sometimes tortuous but colourful and clean. These streets are called "kantounia" (Greek: καντούνια) and the older ones sometimes follow the gentle irregularities of the ground while many of them are too narrow for vehicular traffic. There is promenade by the seashore towards the bay of Garitsa (Γαρίτσα), and also an esplanade between the town and the citadel called "Liston" (Greek: Λιστόν) where restaurants and European style bistros abound. The name Liston came from the American "List on" meaning the list of the vendors' fare, in other words the menu. Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a city in north-western Greece. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1382 KB) I am the author. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1382 KB) I am the author. ... Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a city in north-western Greece. ... This article is about a type of fortification. ...


Palaio Frourio

Palaio Frourio south elevation. The Venetian built moat is on the left and the Doric style St. George church built by the British can be seen in the background on the right
Palaio Frourio south elevation. The Venetian built moat is on the left and the Doric style St. George church built by the British can be seen in the background on the right

The old citadel (Palaio Frourio literally: Old Fortress (Παλαιό Φρούριο)) is an old Venetian fortress built on an islet with fortifications surrounding its entire perimeter, although some sections especially on the east side are slowly being eroded and falling into the sea. Nonetheless the interior has been restored and maintained and it is used for cultural events such as concerts (συναυλίες) and Sound and Light Productions (Ηχος και Φως) whereby historical events are recreated using sound and light special effects. The events take place amidst the ancient fortifications, with the Ionian sea in the background. The central high point of the citadel rises like a giant natural obelisk complete with a military observation post at the top, with a giant cross at its apex. At the foot of the observatory lies St. George's church, in classical Greek architectural style with six Doric colummns,[5] as opposed to the Byzantine architectural style of most Eastern Orthodox churches. Image File history File links Kerkyrapalaiofrourio. ... Image File history File links Kerkyrapalaiofrourio. ... The moated manor house of Baddesley Clinton in Warwickshire, England Moats (also known as a Fosse) were deep and wide water-filled trenches, excavated to provide a barrier against attack upon castle ramparts or other fortifications. ... The Luxor obelisk in the Place de la Concorde in Paris Obelisk outside Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Rome. ... [[Im Category: ... For other uses, see Hagia Sophia (disambiguation). ...


Neo Frourio

Venetian blazons as frequently found on the New Fortress walls
Venetian blazons as frequently found on the New Fortress walls

The new citadel or Neo Frourio (Νέο Φρούριο, "New Fortress") is a huge complex of fortifications that dominates the northeastern part of the city. The huge walls of the fortress dominate the landscape as one makes the trip from Neo Limani (Νέο Λιμάνι, "New Port") to the town, taking the road that passes through the fishmarket (ψαραγορά). The new citadel was until recently a restricted area due to the presence of a naval garrison. However, the old restrictions have been lifted and it is now open to the public, and tours can be taken through the maze of medieval corridors and fortifications. The winged Lion of St Mark, the symbol of Venice, can be seen at regular intervals adorning the fortifications. Image File history File linksMetadata Corfuvenetianblazon. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Corfuvenetianblazon. ... This is an article about Heraldry. ... Mark the Evangelist (1st century) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Mark, drawing much of his material from Peter. ...


Ano and Kato Plateia and the music pavillion

Near the old Venetian Citadel is also a large square divided by a street in two parts: "Ano Plateia" (literally: "Upper square")and "Kato Plateia" (literally: "Lower square"), (Ανω Πλατεία and Κάτω Πλατεία in Greek). It is officially the biggest square in the Balkans and is replete with green spaces and interesting structures such as a Roman style rotunda from the time of the British administration, called the Maitland monument. There is also an ornate music pavilion where the local "Philharmoniki" (Philharmonic Orchestra) (Φιλαρμονική) plays pieces of classical music coming from the tradition of music and arts for which the island is well known. "Kato Plateia" also serves as a place where cricket matches are held from time to time. In Greece, cricket is unique to Corfu, since it used to be a British protectorate. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the sport. ...


Palaia Anaktora and Gardens

The Palace of Sts. Michael and George (Palaia Anaktora). The Gardens are to the right of the statue immediately after the arch to its right. The statue of Adam, a British governor of Corfu, is at the front
The Palace of Sts. Michael and George (Palaia Anaktora). The Gardens are to the right of the statue immediately after the arch to its right. The statue of Adam, a British governor of Corfu, is at the front

Just to the north of "Kato Plateia" exist the "Palaia Anaktora" (Παλαιά Ανάκτορα: literally "Old Palaces") which is a large complex of Roman architecture buildings used in the past to house the King of Greece and before that the British Governors of the Island. Today they are open to the public and they form a complex of halls and buildings housing art exhibits including a Museum of Chinese Art unique in Southern Europe in its scope and richness of Chinese and Asian exhibits. The gardens of the Palaces, complete with old Venetian stone aquariums, exotic trees and flowers, oversee the bay through old Venetian fortifications and turrets. The local sea baths (Μπάνια τ' Αλέκου) are at the foot of the fortifications that surround the gardens. There is a café on the grounds that comes with its own art gallery, where one can see exhibits of local and international artists, and it is called Art Café. From the same place one can gaze at cruise ships passing through the narrow channel of historic Vido island (Νησί Βίδου) to the north, on their way to Corfu harbour (Νέο Λιμάνι). High speed retractable aerofoil ferries from Igoumenitsa can also be seen. There is also a wrought iron aerial staircase, closed to garden visitors, that descends to the sea from the gardens and was used by royalty as a shortcut to the baths. Rewriting history, the locals now refer to the old Royal Gardens as the "Garden of the People" (Ο Κήπος του Λαού). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1304 KB) I am the author. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1304 KB) I am the author. ... The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... Vido (Greek: Βιδο) is an island of the Ionian Islands group of Greece. ... An airfoil (or aerofoil in British English) is a specially shaped cross-section of a wing or blade, used to provide lift or downforce, depending on its application. ...


The old city and Pontikonisi

Pontikonisi island is home of the monastery of Pantokrator (Μοναστήρι του Παντοκράτορος). The white staircase of the monastery resembles from afar a (mouse) tail. The island got its name from this architectural (perceptual) quirk: Mouse island
Pontikonisi island is home of the monastery of Pantokrator (Μοναστήρι του Παντοκράτορος). The white staircase of the monastery resembles from afar a (mouse) tail. The island got its name from this architectural (perceptual) quirk: Mouse island

In several parts of the old city may be found houses from the Venetian times. The old city architecture is strongly influenced by the Venetian style as it was under Venetian occupation for a long time. The small and ancient sidestreets and the style of the old buildings with their trademark Venetian arches are strongly reminiscent of Venice. Of the thirty-seven Greek churches, the most important are the city's cathedral, the church dedicated to Our Lady of the Cave (η Παναγία Σπηλιώτισσα (hē Panagia Spēliōtissa)); Saint Spyridon church, where lies the preserved body of the patron saint of the island; and finally the suburban church of St Jason and St Sosipater (Αγιοι Ιάσων και Σωσίπατρος), reputed the oldest in the island, named after the two saints who were probably the first to preach Christianity to the Corfiots. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x683, 102 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corfu Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x683, 102 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corfu Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Saint Spyridon (Greek c. ...


The nearby island named Pontikonisi (Greek meaning "mouse island") although small is very green with many trees, and the highest natural point, (not counting the trees or man made structures such as the monastery), is about 2 m. Pontikonisi is home of the monastery of Pantokrator (Μοναστήρι του Παντοκράτορος). It is the white stone staircase of the Monastery that when viewed from afar gives the impression of a (mouse) tail that gave the island its name: Mouse island.


Othoni and Erikoussa

Othoni (Οθωνοί) is the westernmost settlement and island in all of Greece. Erikoussa is the northernmost of the Ionian Islands. All areas lie below the 40° N. About a quarter of the villages names end with -ades, while there are some villages outside Corfu whose names also end in -ades, especially in the prefecture of Ioannina on mainland Greece exactly opposite the southern end of Corfu. The villages at the southern part and on the Paxoi islands have names ending with -atika as well as -eika, notably Gramateika. Paxi - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


Lazaretto Island

Lazaretto Island, (formerly known as Aghios Dimitrios) located two nautical miles northeast of Corfu. The island has an area of 17.5 acres and is administered by the Greek National Tourist Organization. During World War II, the Axis Occupation of Greece established a concentration camp there for the prisoners of the Greek National Resistance movement.[6] There remains today the two-storied building that served as the Headquarters of the Italian army, a small church, and the wall against which those condemned to death were shot. [7][6] Lazaretto island, (formerly known as Aghios Dimitrios) is located two nautical miles northeast of Corfu. ... A nautical mile or sea mile is a unit of length. ... Northeastern redirects here. ... Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a city in north-western Greece. ... This article is about the unit of measure known as the acre. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... German soldiers raising the Swastika over the Acropolis. ... It has been suggested that Internment be merged into this article or section. ... An ELAS fighter The Greek Resistance (Greek: , i. ...


During Venetian rule in the early 16th century a monastery was built on the islet and a leprosarium was established there later that century, after which the island was named.


In 1798, during the French occupation, it was occupied by the Russo-Turkish fleet which ran it as as a military hospital. During the British occupation, in 1814, the leprosarium was again opened after renovations. After Enosis in 1864 the leprosarium saw occasional use.[7]


History

Early History

A relief of Dionysus Bacchus at the Corfu Museum
A relief of Dionysus Bacchus at the Corfu Museum

According to the local tradition Corcyra (Κόρκυρα) was the Homeric island of Scheria (Σχερία)[8], and its earliest inhabitants the Phaeacians (Φαίακες). At a date no doubt previous to the foundation of Syracuse it was peopled by settlers from Corinth, but it appears to have previously received a stream of emigrants from Eretria. The splendid commercial position of Corcyra on the highway between Greece and the West favoured its rapid growth and, influenced perhaps by the presence of non-Corinthian settlers, its people, quite contrary to the usual practice of Corinthian colonies, maintained an independent and even hostile attitude towards the mother city. This opposition came to a head in the early part of the 7th century BC, when their fleets fought the first naval battle recorded in Greek history (about 664 BC). These hostilities ended in the conquest of Corcyra by the Corinthian tyrant Periander (Περίανδρος) who induced his new subjects to join in the colonization of Apollonia and Anactorium. The island soon regained its independence and henceforth devoted itself to a purely mercantile policy. During the Persian invasion of 480 BC it manned the second largest Greek fleet (60 ships), but took no active part in the war. In 435 BC it was again involved in a quarrel with Corinth and sought assistance from Athens (see Battle of Sybota). This new alliance was one of the chief immediate causes of the Peloponnesian War, in which Corcyra was of considerable use to the Athenians as a naval station, but did not render much assistance with its fleet. The island was nearly lost to Athens by two attempts of the oligarchic faction to effect a revolution; on each occasion the popular party ultimately won the day and took a most bloody revenge on its opponents (427 BC and 425 BC). During the Sicilian campaigns of Athens Corcyra served as a supply base; after a third abortive rising of the oligarchs in 410 BC it practically withdrew from the war. In 375 BC it again joined the Athenian alliance; two years later it was besieged by a Lacedaemonian force, but in spite of the devastation of its flourishing countryside held out successfully until relieved. In the Hellenistic period Corcyra was exposed to attack from several sides. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixel, file size: 4. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixel, file size: 4. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... Nausicaa takes Odysseus to the palace Σχερία (Scheria, Skhería) or Phaeacia was a phantom island mentioned in the Greek mythology and literature as the homeland of the Phaeacians and the last destination of Odysseus before coming back home to Ithaca. ... Syracuse (Italian, Siracusa, ancient Syracusa - see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a city on the eastern coast of Sicily and the capital of the province of Syracuse, Italy. ... Temple of Apollo at Corinth Corinth, or Korinth (Κόρινθος) is a Greek city, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the original isthmus, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... This is an article about the Greek city of Eretria. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 7th century BC started on January 1, 700 BC and ended on December 31, 601 BC. // Overview Events Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria who created the the first systematically collected library at Nineveh A 16th century depiction of the Hanging Gardens of... Periander Periander (Greek: Περίανδρος) was the second tyrant of Corinth, Greece in the 7th century BC. He was the son of the first tyrant, Cypselus. ... Apollonia in Illyria (modern Albania), known as Apollonia (κατ Εριδαμνον or προς Εριδαμνω), was located on the right bank of the Aous, the ruins of which are situated in the Fier region, near the village of Pojan (Pojani), geographically located at 40°43′N 19°28′E. It was founded in 588 BCE by... Anthem SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān Â² Capital (and largest city) Tehran Official languages Persian Demonym Iranian Government Islamic Republic  -  Supreme Leader  -  President Unification  -  Unified by Cyrus the Great 559 BCE   -  Parthian (Arsacid) dynastic empire (first reunification) 248 BCE-224 CE   -  Sassanid dynastic empire 224–651 CE   -  Safavid dynasty... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... Battle of Sybota Conflict Peloponnesian War Date 433 BC Place Off Corcyra Result Indecisive The Battle of Sybota took place in 433 BC between Corcyra and Corinth. ... “Athenian War” redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... The term Hellenistic (established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen) in the history of the ancient world is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance...


In 303 BC after a vain siege by Cassander, the island was occupied for a short time by the Lacedaemonian general Cleonymos, then regained its independence and later it was attacked and conquered by Agathocles. He offered Corfu as dowry to his daughter Lanassa on her marriage to Pyrrhus, King of Epirus. The island then became a member of the Epirotic alliance. It was then perhaps that the settlement of Cassiope was founded to serve as a base for the King of Epirus' expeditions. The island remained in the Epirotic alliance until 255 BC when it became independent after the death of Alexander, last King of Epirus. It subsequently fell into the hands of Illyrian corsairs, until in 229 BC it was delivered by the Romans, who retained it as a naval station and gave it the rank of a free state. In 31 BC it served Octavian (Augustus) as a base against Mark Antony.  Kingdom of Cassander Other diadochi  Kingdom of Seleucus  Kingdom of Lysimachus  Kingdom of Ptolemy  Epirus Other  Carthage  Rome  Greek colonies Cassander (in Greek, Κάσσανδρος — Kassandros, ca. ... Laconia (Λακωνία; see also List of traditional Greek place names), also known as Lacedaemonia, was in ancient Greece the portion of the Peloponnese of which the most important city was Sparta. ... For the grindcore band, see Agathocles (band) Agathocles (361 BC - 289 BC), tyrant of Syracuse (317 BC - 289 BC) and king of Sicily (304 BC - 289 BC). ... Pyrrhus of Epirus Pyrrhus (318-272 BC) (Greek: Πύρρος) was one of the most successful ancient Greek generals of the Hellenistic era. ... Epirus, spanning Greece and Albania. ... Alexander II, king of Epirus, succeeded his father Pyrrhus in 272 BC. He attacked Antigonus Gonatas and conquered the greater part of Macedonia, but was in turn driven out of both Epirus and Macedonia by Demetrius, the son of Antigonus. ... This article is about an ancient civilization in southeastern Europe; see also Illyria (software), Illyria (character in the TV series Angel). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Augustus Caesar Caesar Augustus (Latin: IMP·CAESAR·DIVI·F·AVGVSTVS)¹ (23 September 63 BC – 19 August AD 14), known earlier in his life as Gaius Octavius or Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, was the first Roman Emperor and is traditionally considered the greatest. ... Bust of Mark Antony Marcus Antonius (Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) ( January 14 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. ...


Medieval History

The northern side of the old citadel at night. The Great Cross can be clearly seen as described in the Palaio Frourio section of this article

Eclipsed by the foundation of Nicopolis, Kerkyra for a long time passed out of notice. With the rise of the Norman kingdom in Sicily and the Italian naval powers, it again became a frequent object of attack. In 1081-1085 it was held by Robert Guiscard, in 1147-1154 by Roger II of Sicily. During the break-up of the Later Roman Empire it was occupied by Genoese privateers (1197-1207) who in turn were expelled by the Venetians. In 1214-1259 it passed to the Greek despots of Epirus, and in 1267 became a possession of the Neapolitan house of Anjou. Under the latter's weak rule the island suffered considerably from the inroads of various adventurers; hence in 1386 it placed itself under the protection of Venice, which in 1401 acquired formal sovereignty over it. Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 437 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 437 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Nicopolis (meaning in Greek: city of victory; see also List of traditional Greek place names) or Actia Nicopolis was an ancient city of Epirus, founded 31 BC by Octavian in memory of his victory over Antony and Cleopatra at Actium. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Robert Guiscard (i. ... Roger II, from Liber ad honorem Augusti of Petrus de Ebulo, 1196. ... For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... The Despotate of Epirus was one of the medieval Greek successor states of the Byzantine Empire, founded in the aftermath of the Fourth Crusade in 1204. ... Modern département of Maine-et-Loire, which largely corresponds to Anjou Anjou is a former county (c. ...


Venetian rule

Kerkyra remained in Venetian hands from 1401 till 1797, though several times assailed by Turkish naval and land forces and subjected to four notable sieges in 1537, 1571, 1573 and 1716, in which the great natural strength of the city and its defenders asserted itself time after time. The effectiveness of the powerful Venetian fortifications of the island as well as the strength of some old Byzantine fortifications in Angelokastro, Kassiopi, Gardiki and others, was another great factor that enabled Corfu to remain the last bastion of free, uninterrupted Greek and Christian civilization in the southern Balkans after the fall of Constantinople. Will Durant, a French historian, claims that Corfu owed to the Republic of Venice the fact that it was the only part of Greece never conquered by the moslem Turks.[9] Front view of Angelokastro approaching from the nearby village of Krini. ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ...


Turks at the gates

There were many attempts by the Turks to take the island starting as early as 1431 when Turkish troops under Ali Bey landed on the island, tried to take the castle and raided the surrounding area, but were repulsed.[10]


The Siege of 1537

This was the first great siege by the Turks. It started on the 29th August 1537 with 25,000 soldiers from the Turkish fleet landing and pillaging the island and taking 20,000 hostages as slaves. Despite the destruction wrought on the countryside, the city castle held out in spite of repeated attempts over twelve days to take it, and the Turks left the island unsuccessful because of poor logistics and an epidemic that decimated their ranks.[10]


The Siege of 1571
Angelokastro in Kerkyra. These were the Byzantine fortifications that withstood the Turkish onslaught in 1571
Angelokastro in Kerkyra. These were the Byzantine fortifications that withstood the Turkish onslaught in 1571

Thirty four years later in August of 1571 the Turks returned for yet another attempt at conquering the island. Having seized Parga and Mourtos from the Greek mainland side they attacked the Paxi islands, killing, looting and burning. Subsequently they landed on Corfu's southeast shore and established a large beachhead all the way from the southern tip of the island at Lefkimi to Ipsos in Corfu's eastern midsection. These areas were thoroughly pillaged and burnt as in past encounters. Nevertheless the city castle stood firm again, a testament to Corfiot-Venetian steadfastness as well as the Venetian castle-building engineering skills. It is also worth mentioning that another castle, Angelokastro (Greek: Αγγελόκαστρο meaning Angelo's Castle and named for its Byzantine owner Angelos Komnenos), situated on the northwest coast near Palaiokastritsa (Greek: Παλαιοκαστρίτσα meaning Old Castle place) and located on particularly steep and rocky terrain, a tourist attraction today, also held out.[10] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1944x2592, 1804 KB) I am the author. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1944x2592, 1804 KB) I am the author. ... Front view of Angelokastro approaching from the nearby village of Krini. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge of design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Front view of Angelokastro approaching from the nearby village of Krini. ...


These Turkish defeats in the East and the West of the island proved decisive and the Turks abandoned their siege and departed.


The Siege of 1573

Two years later the Turks repeated their attempt. Coming from Africa after a victorious campaign, they landed in Corfu and wreaked havoc on the countryside yet again. Their troops however were not particularly noted for their discipline, so after a counterattack by the Venetian-Corfiot forces they were forced to leave the city by way of the sea.[10]


The Siege of 1716

This is the second great siege of Corfu, which took place in 1716, during the last Turkish Venetian War. After the conquest of the Peloponnese in 1715, the Ottoman fleet appeared in Butrinto opposite Corfu. On 8 July the Turkish fleet, carrying 33,000 men, sailed to Corfu from Butrinto and established a beachhead at Ipsos.[10] The same day the Venetian fleet encountered the Turkish fleet off the channel of Corfu and defeated it in the ensuing naval battle. On 19 July, after taking a few outlying forts, the Ottoman army reached the hills around the city of Corfu and laid siege to it. Despite repeated assaults and heavy fighting, the Turks were unable to breach the defences and wereforced to raise the siege after 22 days. The 5000 Venetians and foreign mercenaries, together with 3000 Corfiotes, under the leadership of Count von der Schulenburg who commanded the defence of the island, loomed tall and victorious once again.[10][1][11] The success is owed in no small part to the extensive fortifications, where Venetian castle engineering had proven itself once again against considerable odds. The repulsion of the Ottomans was widely popularized in Europe, where Corfu was seen as a bastion of Western civilization against the Ottoman tide. Today however, that role is often relatively unknown or ignored. Combatants Republic of Venice Ottoman Empire Commanders Geronimo Delphino Johann Matthias von der Schulenburg Silahdar Damat Ali Pasha The eighth Turkish-Venetian War was fought between the Republic of Venice and the Ottoman Empire between 1714 and 1718. ... Buthrotum (Albanian: Butrint or Butrinti) is an ancient city and an archeological site in Albania, close to the Greek border. ... Count Johann Matthias von der Schulenburg, from a marble statue in Corfu Reichsgraff Marshal Johann Matthias von der Schulenburg was a distinguished aristocrat (imperial count) and general of Austrian descent who served in the Saxon and Venetian armies in the early 1700s. ... For alternative meanings for The West in the United States, see the U.S. West and American West. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... This article is about tides in the Earths oceans. ...


Venetian policies and heritage

Corfu Town looks very different from most Greek towns because of Corfu's unique history. From 1386 to 1797, Corfu was ruled by Venetian nobility; much of the town reflects this era when the island belonged to the Republic of Venice, with multi-storied buildings on narrow lanes. Many Venetian-speaking families settled in Corfu during those centuries and until the second half of the 20th century the Veneto da mar was spoken in Corfu. During this time, the local Greek language assimilated a large number of Italian and Venetian words, many of which are still common today. Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... A sign in Venetian reading Here we also speak Venetian Venetian or Venetan is a Romance language spoken by over five million people,[1] mostly in the Veneto region of Italy. ...


The Venetian feudal families pursued a mild but somewhat enervating policy towards the natives, who began to adopt some segments of Venetian customs and culture. The Corfiotes were encouraged to enrich themselves by the cultivation of the olive, but were debarred from entering into commercial competition with Venice.

The Venetian "Citadel" of Corfu City
The Venetian "Citadel" of Corfu City

The island served as a refuge for Greek scholars, and in 1732 became the home of the first academy of modern Greece. Many Italian Jews took refuge in Corfu during the venetian centuries and spoke their own language (Italkian), a mixture of Hebrew and Venetian with some Greek words. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 528 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 528 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Italkian is a Jewish-Italian dialect that combines Hebrew and Italian, it has been spoken mainly between the 10th and the 17th centuries in Rome and in central and northern Italy (notably in Livorno). ...


The Venetian influence was important in the development of the Opera in Corfu. During Venetian rule, the Corfiotes developed a fervent appreciation of Italian opera, which was the real source of the extraordinary (given the conditions in the mainland of Greece) musical development of the island during that era. The Opera house of Corfu during 18th and 19th century was the Nobile Teatro di San Giacomo, named after the neighbouring catholic cathedral, but later the theatre was converted into the Town Hall. Many local composers, such as Antonio Liberali, Domenico Padovani, Spiros Samaras and others, developed their career with this theatre.


The internationally renowned photographer Felice Beato was born in Corfu from a venetian family in the 19th century. The architecture of Corfu remains much more Italian than anywhere else in Greece. Felice Beato, unknown photographer, c. ...


Venetians promoted the Catholic church during their four centuries rule in Corfu. Even if today the majority of Corfiots are Greek Orthodox (following the official religion of Greece) there is however a percentage of Catholics (5%) who owe their faith to these origins. These contemporary Catholics are mostly families who came from Malta, but also from Italy during the Republic of Venice. Today the Catholic community consists of about 4000 people, (2/3 of Maltese descent) who live almost exclusively in the Venetian "Citadel" of Corfu City, living harmoniously side-by-side with the Orthodox community. Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a city in north-western Greece. ...


The way of life on the island was influenced by the Venetians in a variety of ways: the local cuisine, for example, was influenced by the Venetian cuisine. Today, Corfu's cuisine maintains some Venetian delicacies and recipes: "Pastitsada" (that derives from the Venetian "Spezzatino" and is the most popular dish in the island of Corfu), "Sofrito", "Strapatsada", "Savoro", "Bianco" and "Mandolato".[12] Cuisine (from French cuisine, cooking; culinary art; kitchen; ultimately from Latin coquere, to cook) is a specific set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a specific culture. ...


19th century

The Music Pavillion in Corfu with Palaia Anaktora in the background
The Music Pavillion in Corfu with Palaia Anaktora in the background

By the Treaty of Campo Formio, Corfu was ceded to the French, who occupied it for two years, until they were expelled by a joint Russian-Ottoman squadron under Admiral Ushakov. For a short time it became the capital of a self-governing federation of the Heptanesos ("Seven Islands"), under Ottoman suzerainty; in 1807 after the Treaty of Tilsit its faction-ridden government was again replaced by a French administration, and in 1809 it was besieged in vain by a British fleet, which had taken all the other Ionian islands. When, by the Treaty of Paris of 5 November 1815, the Ionian Islands became a protectorate of the United Kingdom as the United States of the Ionian Islands, Corfu became the seat of the British Lord High Commissioner of the Ionian Islands. The British commissioners, who were practically autocrats in spite of the retention of the native senate and assembly, introduced a strict method of government which brought about a decided improvement in the material prosperity of the island, but by its very strictness displeased the natives. On 29 March 1864, the United Kingdom, Greece, France, and Russia signed the Treaty of London, pledging the transfer of sovereignty to Greece upon ratification. Thus, on 28 May, by proclamation of the Lord High Commissioner, the Ionian Islands were united with Greece.[10] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Treaty of Campo Formio was signed on October 17, 1797 (26 Vendémiaire, Year VI of the French Republic) by Napoleon Bonaparte and Count Ludwig von Cobenzl as representatives of France and Austria. ... Fyodor Fyodorovich Ushakov - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... A republic that existed from 1800 to 1807 under joined Russian-Turkish sovereignity in the Ionian Islands. ... The Treaties of Tilsit were two agreements signed by Napoleon I of France in the town of Tilsit in July, 1807. ... The Treaty of Paris of 1815 was signed on November 20, 1815, following the defeat of Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo, 18 June. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Capital Corfù[1] Largest city  - 1856 (est. ... The Lord High Commissioner of the Ionian Islands was the local representative of the British government in the United States of the Ionian Islands between 1815 and 1863. ...


World War I

During the First World War, the island served as a refuge for the Serbian army that retreated there by the allied forces ships from the homeland occupied by the Austrians and Bulgarians. During their stay, a large portion of Serbian soldiers died from exhaustion, food shortage, and different diseases. Most of their remains were buried at sea near the island of Vido, a small island at the mouth of Corfu port, and a monument of thanks to the Greek Nation has been erected at Vido by the grateful Serbs; consequently, the waters around Vido island are known by the Serbian people as the Blue Graveyard (in Serbian, Plava Grobnica), after a poem written by Milutin Bojić after World War I.[13] “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... Vido (Greek: Βιδο) is an island of the Ionian Islands group of Greece. ...


World War II and Resistance

Italian occupation

The Maitland Monument in Corfu
The Maitland Monument in Corfu

During the Greco-Italian War Corfu was occupied by the Italians in April 1941. They administered Corfu and the Ionian islands as a separate entity from Greece until September 1943, following Mussolini's orders of fulfilling the Italian Irredentism and make Corfu part of the Kingdom of Italy. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Combatants Italy Albania Greece United Kingdom Commanders Sebastiano Visconti Prasca Ubaldo Soddu Ugo Cavallero Giovanni Messe Alexander Papagos Strength 529,000 men Under 300,000 men Casualties 13,755 dead, 50,874 wounded, 25,067 missing, 12,368 incapacitated by frostbites, ca. ... Benito Mussolini created a fascist state through the use of propaganda, total control of the media and disassembly of the working democratic government. ... Italia Irredenta (English: Unredeemed Italy) was an Italian patriotic and political party, which was of importance in the last quarter of the 19th century. ... There have been several entities known as the Kingdom of Italy. ...


During the Second World War the 10th infantry regiment of the Greek Army, composed mainly of Corfiot soldiers,[14] was assigned with the task of defending Corfu. The regiment took part in Operation Latzides, which was a heroic but ultimately unsuccessful attempt to stem the forces of the Italians.[14] After Greece's surrender to the Axis, the island came under Italian control and occupation.[14] On the first Sunday of November 1941, High School students from all over Corfu took part in student protests against the occupying Italian army. The student protests of Corfu were among the first acts of overt popular Resistance in occupied Greece and a rare phenomenon even by wartime European standards.[14] Subsequently many Corfiots escaped to Epirus in mainland Greece and enlisted as partisans in ELAS and EDES in order to join the Resistance Movement of the mainland.[14] Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I Infantry or footmen are very highly disciplined and trained soldiers who fight primarily with small arms(rifles), but are trained to use everything from their bare hands to missle systems in order to neutralize... This article is about the land force of the modern nation of Greece. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Student protest encompasses a wide range of activities that indicate student dissatisfaction with a given political or academic issue and mobilization to communicate this dissatisfaction to the authorities and society in general and hopefully remedy the problem. ... An ELAS fighter The Greek Resistance (Greek: , i. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Epirus, spanning Greece and Albania. ... Look up partisan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Ethnikos Dimokratikos Ellinikos Syndesmos (Greek Εθνικός Δημοκρατικός Ελληνικός Σύνδεσμος, Greek National Democratic Union, abbreviated EDES) was a World War II Greek resistance movement. ...


The German occupation and the Holocaust

Upon the fall of Italian fascism in 1943, the Nazis moved to take control of the island. On 14 September 1943 Corfu was bombarded by the Luftwaffe using napalm-type incendiary bombs. The incendiary bombs destroyed churches, homes, whole city blocks, especially in the Jewish quarter Evraiki, and many important buildings such as the Ionian Parliament, the Municipal Theatre, the Municipal Library and others.[14] The Italians capitulated, and the island came under German occupation. Corfu's mayor at the time, Kollas, was a known collaborator and various anti-semitic laws were passed by the Nazis that now formed the occupation government of the island.[15] In early June 1944, while the Allies bombed Corfu as a diversion from the Normandy landings, the Gestapo rounded up the Jews of the city, temporarily incarcerated them at the old fort (Palaio Frourio), and on 10 June sent them to Auschwitz, where very few survived.[15][16] Approximately two hundred out of a total population of 1900 escaped.[17] Many among the local population at the time provided shelter and refuge to those 200 Jews that managed to escape the Nazis.[18] A prominent section of the old town is to this day called Evraiki (Εβραική, meaning Jewish quarter) in recognition of the Jewish contribution and continued presence in Corfu city. An active Synagogue (Συναγωγή) with about 65 members (who still speak their original Italkian language) is an integral part of Evraiki currently.[17] Italian fascism (in Italian, fascismo) was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... The Deutsche Luftwaffe or   (German: air force, literally Air Weapon, pronounced lufft-va-fa, IPA: ) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ... A simulated Napalm explosion during MCAS Air Show in 2003. ... hey hey you no i rock at soccer cuz no i made the school team!! yay me aka katelyn ♥ Incendiary devices or incendiary bombs are bombs designed to start fires or destroy sensitive equipment using materials such as napalm, thermite, chlorine trifluoride, or white phosphorus. ... For other uses, see Bomb (disambiguation). ... Belligerent military occupation occurs when the control and authority over a territory belonging to a state passes to a hostile army. ... The Battle of Normandy was fought in 1944 between the German forces occupying Western Europe and the invading Allies. ... The   (contraction of Geheime Staatspolizei: “secret state police”) was the official secret police of Nazi Germany. ... Auschwitz, in English, commonly refers to the Auschwitz concentration camp complex built near the town of Oświęcim, by Nazi Germany during World War II. Rarely, it may refer to the Polish town of Oświęcim (called by the Germans Auschwitz) itself. ... A synagogue (from , transliterated synagogÄ“, assembly; beit knesset, house of assembly; or beit tefila, house of prayer, shul; , esnoga) is a Jewish house of worship. ... Italkian is a Jewish-Italian dialect that combines Hebrew and Italian, it has been spoken mainly between the 10th and the 17th centuries in Rome and in central and northern Italy (notably in Livorno). ...


Liberation

Corfu was liberated by British troops, specifically the 40th Royal Marine Commando, which landed in Corfu on 14 October 1944, as the Germans were evacuating Greece. Corfu then became a place for rest and refit for the British forces, during the tail end of the war. The Royal Navy swept the Corfu Channel for mines in 1944 and 1945, and found it to be free of mines. A large minefield was laid there shortly afterwards by the newly-communist Albania.[citations needed]


Post-War and Modern Corfu

After World War II and the Greek Civil War, the island was rebuilt under the general programme of reconstruction of the Greek Government (Ανοικοδόμησις) and many elements of its classical architecture remain. Its economy grew but several of its inhabitants left the island for other parts. Buildings constructed during Italian occupation - such as schools or government buildings - were put back to civic use. The Corfu General Hospital was also constructed.[19] Electricity was introduced to the villages in the 1950s. The radio substation of Hellenic Radio in Corfu was inaugurated March 1957.[20] Television was introduced in the 1960s and Internet in the 1990s. The Ionian University was established in 1984. Combatants Hellenic Army, Royalist forces, Republicans United Kingdom Communist Party of Greece (ELAS, DSE) Commanders Alexander Papagos, Thrasyvoulos Tsakalotos, James Van Fleet Markos Vafiadis Strength 150,000 men 50,000 men and women Casualties 15,000 killed 32,000+ killed or captured The Greek Civil War (Ελληνικός εμφύλιος πόλεμος [ellinikos emfilios polemos]) was... the first thing that was invented was the automatic DILDO. Education grew explosively because of a very strong demand for high school and college education. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Ionian U. logo The Ionian University is a university located in the city of Corfu, Greece. ...


Archaeology and architecture

An architectural overview: From classical to modern

The Harbour of Corfu in 1890
The Harbour of Corfu in 1890

Corfu contains a few very important remains of antiquity. The site of the ancient city of Corcyra (Kerkyra) is well ascertained, about 1½ miles (2 km) to the south-east of Corfu, upon the narrow piece of ground between the sea-lake of Halikiopoulo and the Bay of Castrades, in each of which it had a port. The circular tomb of Menekrates, with its well-known inscription, is on the Bay of Castrades. Under the hill of Ascension are the remains of a temple, popularly called of Poseidon, a very simple dome structure, which still in its mutilated state presents some peculiarities of architecture. Of Cassiope, the only other city of ancient importance, the name is still preserved by the village of Cassiopi, and there are some rude remains of building on the site; but the temple of Zeus Cassius for which it was celebrated has totally disappeared. Throughout the island there are numerous monasteries and other buildings of Venetian erection, of which the best known are Paleokastritsa, San Salvador and Peleka. The Achilleion is a palace commissioned by Elisabeth of Austria and purchased in 1907 by Wilhelm II of Germany; it is now a popular tourist attraction. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2206x1260, 1647 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corfu Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2206x1260, 1647 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corfu Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... “Ancient” redirects here. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... For other uses, see Dome (disambiguation). ... This article is about building architecture. ... CASSIOPE is a hybrid satellite project of the Canadian Space Agency. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... Elisabeth in a riding habit, from Vanity Fair, 1884. ... German Emperor Wilhelm (born Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albrecht, Prince of Prussia 27 January 1859–4 June 1941), was the last German Emperor and King of Prussia (de: Deutscher Kaiser und König von Preußen), ruling from 15 June 1888 to 9 November 1918. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Italianate architecture

Corfu Town is famous for its Italianate architecture, most notably the Liston, an arched colonnade lined with cafes on the edge of the Spianada (Esplanade), the vast main plaza and park which incorporates a cricket field and several pavilions. Also notable are the Venetian-Roman style City Hall, the Old and New castles, the recently restored Palace of Sts. Michael and George, formerly the residence of the British governor and the seat of the Ionian Senate, and the summer Palace of Mon Repos, formerly the property of the Greek royal family and birthplace of the Duke of Edinburgh. The Park of Mon Repos is adjacent to the Palaiopolis of Kerkyra, where excavations were conducted by the Greek Archaeological Service in collaboration with the University of Louvain-la-Neuve in Belgium and Brown University in the United States. Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a city in north-western Greece. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Duke of Edinburgh is a dukedom associated with Edinburgh, Scotland. ...

The Municipal Theatre of Corfu, which in early 20th century replaced the legendary Nobile Teatro di San Giacomo (which was converted into Town Hall). This photograph shows the theatre prior to the 1943 Luftwaffe bombardment and its subsequent destruction during World War II
The Municipal Theatre of Corfu, which in early 20th century replaced the legendary Nobile Teatro di San Giacomo (which was converted into Town Hall). This photograph shows the theatre prior to the 1943 Luftwaffe bombardment and its subsequent destruction during World War II

Examples of the finds can be found in the Museum of the Palace of Mon Repos.[21] Image File history File links Kerkyraoldtheatre. ... Image File history File links Kerkyraoldtheatre. ... The Deutsche Luftwaffe or   (German: air force, literally Air Weapon, pronounced lufft-va-fa, IPA: ) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ...


Architectural catastrophies of World War II

During the second world war the island was bombed by the German airforce which resulted to the destruction of most of the buildings in the town including the market (αγορά) and the Hotel Bella Venezia. The worst architectural losses due to the bombardment of Hitler's Luftwaffe were the splendid buildings of the Ionian Academy (Ιόνιος Ακαδημία) and the Municipal Theatre (which in 1901 replaced the Nobile Teatro di San Giacomo) the Roman style Theatre (Θέατρον) of the city that was later replaced by a nondescript modern box-type building. There have been discussions and plans at the local government level (on and off) about demolishing this modern building and replacing it with a replica of the old theatre. In contrast, the Ionian Academy has been rebuilt to its former glory by the Ionian University. Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ... The Deutsche Luftwaffe or   (German: air force, literally Air Weapon, pronounced lufft-va-fa, IPA: ) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ... The Ionian Academy was the first academic institution established in modern Greece and it is located in Corfu. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ...


The Achilleion

Empress (German: Kaiserin) of Austria Elisabeth of Bavaria, also known as Sissi, was a woman obsessed with beauty and very powerful but tragically vulnerable since the loss of her only son, Crown Prince Rudolf of Austria in the Mayerling affair in 1889. A year later in 1890 she built a summer palace in the region of Gastouri (Γαστούρι) to the south of the city, with the powerful mythical hero Achilles as its central theme. Elisabeth in a riding habit, from Vanity Fair, 1884. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Hunting lodge and Carmelites church at Mayerling The term Mayerling Incident refers to the series of events leading to the alleged suicide of Crown Prince Rudolf of Austria and Baroness Mary Vetsera. ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ... In literature, a theme is a broad idea in a story, or a message or lesson conveyed by a work. ...

Achilleas Thniskon in the gardens of the Achilleion. Note Achilles' gaze skywards as if to seek help from Olympus: his mother Thetis was a goddess.
Achilleas Thniskon in the gardens of the Achilleion. Note Achilles' gaze skywards as if to seek help from Olympus: his mother Thetis was a goddess.

The palace, with the neoclassic Greek statues that surround it, is a monument to platonic romanticism as well as escapism and was named after Achilles: Achilleion (Αχίλλειον). This structure abounds with paintings and statues of Achilles, both in the main hall and in the gardens depicting the scenes of the Trojan war. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1243 KB) Summary I am the author. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1243 KB) Summary I am the author. ... Twelve Olympians, also known as the Dodekatheon (Greek: Δωδεκάθεον < δωδεκα, dodeka, twelve + θεον, theon, of the gods), in Greek religion, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ... Late Baroque classicizing: G. P. Pannini assembles the canon of Roman ruins and Roman sculpture into one vast imaginary gallery (1756) Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that... Platonic idealism is the theory that the substantive reality around us is only a reflection of a higher truth. ... Romantics redirects here. ... Escapism is mental diversion by means of entertainment or recreation, as an escape from the perceived unpleasant aspects of daily stress. ... Achilleion Palace Achilleas thniskon in the gardens of the Achilleion. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ...


The Imperial gardens on top of the hill provide a view of the surrounding green hill crests and valleys and the Ionian sea. The Ionian Sea. ...


The centerpiece of the gardens is a marble statue on a high pedestal, of the mortally wounded Achilles (Achilleas Thniskon Αχιλλεύς θνήσκων translated as dying Achilles) without hubris and wearing only a simple cloth and an ancient Greek hoplite helmet. This statue was created by German sculptor Ernst Gustav Herter. Hubris or hybris (Greek ), according to its modern usage, is exaggerated self pride or self-confidence (overbearing pride), often resulting in fatal retribution. ... The hoplite was a heavy infantryman that was the central focus of warfare in Ancient Greece. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... Sterbender Achilles with Herter 1884 Berlin signature detail at the Achilleion Palace Ernst Gustav Herter (14 May 1846 Berlin, Germany – 19 December 1917 Berlin) was a famous German sculptor. ...


The hero is presented devoid of any accoutrements of rank or status and thus seems very human although heroic as he is forever trying to pull Paris's arrow from his heel, with pain and agony etched on his classic face. He is also gazing skyward as if to seek help from Olympus. According to Greek mythology, his mother Thetis was a goddess. See List of King Priams children Statue of Paris in the British Museum This article is about the prince of Troy. ... Twelve Olympians, also known as the Dodekatheon (Greek: Δωδεκάθεον < δωδεκα, dodeka, twelve + θεον, theon, of the gods), in Greek religion, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ...


The parallels to the grieving Empress recuperating from the painful loss of her only son by trying to extract it from her memory, but never quite being able to do so, are compelling.


In contrast, a giant painting of the triumphant Achilles full of pride, dressed in full royal military regalia on his racing chariot, pulling the lifeless body of Hector of Troy and parading it in front of the stunned crowd watching helplessly from inside the walls of the Trojan citadel, is found at the top of the great staircase of the main hall. Hubris or hybris (Greek ), according to its modern usage, is exaggerated self pride or self-confidence (overbearing pride), often resulting in fatal retribution. ... Hector brought back to Troy. ...


In 1898 Empress Sissi was assassinated in Geneva, Switzerland, at the age of 60. After her death the palace was sold to the Kaiser of Germany and eventually it was acquired by the Greek State. The Achilleion was used until recently as a Casino but currently it is used as a museum. Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Kaiser's Bridge

Kaiser's Bridge in Corfu
Kaiser's Bridge in Corfu

German Kaiser Wilhelm II was also fond of vacationing in Corfu. Having purchased Achilleion in 1907 after Sissi's death, he appointed Carl Ludwig Sprenger as the botanical architect of the Palace. He also built a bridge named by the locals after him: "Kaiser's bridge" (Greek: η γέφυρα του Κάιζερ transliterated as: i yefyra tou Kaizer), to access the beach without having to cross the road that is the island's main artery to the south. The bridge, arching over the road, spanned the distance between the lower gardens of Achilleion and the nearby beach. The ruins of that great bridge, a monument to imperial vanity as well as impracticality, are an important landmark of this highway. Ironically, the bridge's central section was demolished by Wehrmacht during the German occupation in World War II to allow for the free movement of its vehicles.[22] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1053 KB) I am the author. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1053 KB) I am the author. ... German Emperor Wilhelm (born Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albrecht, Prince of Prussia 27 January 1859–4 June 1941), was the last German Emperor and King of Prussia (de: Deutscher Kaiser und König von Preußen), ruling from 15 June 1888 to 9 November 1918. ... Carl Ludwig Sprenger was a German botanist, born on 30 November 1846 at Güstrow, Mecklembourg and died 13 December 1917 on the island of Corfu. ... The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, a stylized version of the Iron Cross, the emblem of the Wehrmacht. ...


Tradition in Education

Apart from being a leading centre for the Fine Arts, Corfu is also the home of the first University of Greece, the Ionian Academy, that carried and strengthened the tradition of Greek Education while the rest of Greece was still fighting against the Turkish occupation. Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ... The Ionian Academy was the first academic institution established in modern Greece and it is located in Corfu. ...


It is also home of the Ionian University that was established in 1984 in recognition, by the Greek government of Andreas Papandreou, of Corfu's contribution to Education in Greece as the seat of the first University of Greece, the Ionian Academy, that was fouded in 1824, forty years before the cession of the Ionian islands to Greece and just three years after Greece's Revolution of 1821. Ionian U. logo The Ionian University is a university located in the city of Corfu, Greece. ... Andreas Georgiou Papandreou (Greek: ) (5 February 1919 – 23 June 1996) was a Greek economist, a socialist politician and a towering figure in Greek politics. ... Educational oversight Minister for National Education and Religious Affairs Ministry for National Education and Religious Affairs Marietta Giannakou National education budget 4,7 billion € (public) 2. ... The Ionian Academy was the first academic institution established in modern Greece and it is located in Corfu. ... The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek: , Ionioi Nēsoi) are a group of islands in Greece. ... Combatants Greek guerilla forces Ottoman Empire forces Commanders Kolokotronis Vrionis, Ibrahim Pasha Strength Casualties {{{notes}}} The Greek War of Independence, also known as the Greek Revolution, was a successful war waged by the Greeks between 1821 and 1827 to win independence from the Ottoman Empire. ...


Student activism

The people of Corfu have historically led the way in fighting as a bulwark of Western civilisation against foreign invaders. Not far behind in modern times, starting with the massive student protests of World War II against the fascist Italian army in the foreign front and continuing with the fight against the dictatorship of Georgios Papadopoulos internally, students in Corfu have historically led the way in protesting for freedom and democracy in Greece both against internal and external tyrants. The most recent heroic example is that of Geology student Kostas Georgakis who on 19 September 1970 set himself ablaze in Genoa, Italy as a protest against the Greek military junta of 1967-1974. Closeup of a collection of blinker equipped barricades A barricade is any object or structure that creates a barrier or obstacle to control, block passage or force the flow of traffic in the desired direction. ... Occident redirects here. ... Georgios Papadopoulos (Greek: Γεώργιος Παπαδόπουλος, May 5, 1919 – June 27, 1999) was the head of the military coup détat that took place in Greece on April 21, 1967 and leader of the military government that ruled the country during the period 1967 - 1974. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Hero (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Kostas Georgakis is the only known resistance hero to have sacrificed his life as a protest against the junta Kostas Georgakis (Κώστας Γεωργάκης) born in Corfu in 1948 died 19 September 1970. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... The Greek military junta of 1967-1974, alternatively The Regime of the Colonels (Greek: ), or in Greece The Junta (Greek: ) and The Seven Years (Greek: ) are terms used to refer to a series of right-wing military governments that ruled Greece from 1967 to 1974. ...


Museums and Libraries

The Gorgon just before being beheaded by Perseus, as depicted on a pediment from the Artemis Temple on display at the Archaeological Museum of Corfu.
The Gorgon just before being beheaded by Perseus, as depicted on a pediment from the Artemis Temple on display at the Archaeological Museum of Corfu.

Kerkyra has always been a cultural centre of distinction. The museums and libraries are full of irreplaceable books and artifacts. The most notable of the museums and libraries are located in the city and are:[23] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 505 pixelsFull resolution (2499 × 1576 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 505 pixelsFull resolution (2499 × 1576 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article is about the Greek mythological monster. ... Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, and was the hero who killed Medusa. ... A pediment is a classical architectural element consisting of a triangular section or gable found above the horizontal superstructure (entablature) which lies immediately upon the columns. ...

  • The Archaeological Museum located at Armeni Vraila 1 was inaugurated in 1967. It was constructed to house the exhibit of the huge Gorgon pediment of the Artemis temple that was excavated at Palaiopolis in early 20th century. In 1994 two more halls were added to the museum, where new discoveries from the excavations of the ancient town and the Garitsa cemetery are exhibited.
  • The Public Library of Corfu located at the old English Barracks in Palaio Frourio.
  • Solomos Museum and the Corfiot Studies Society share the same building at 1 Arseniou Str.
  • The Reading Society of Corfu in Capodistriou Str. has an extensive library of old Corfu manuscripts and rare books.
  • The Museum of Asian Art located at the Palaia Anaktora (mainly Chinese and Japanese Arts) and its unique collection is housed in 15 rooms and includes over 12,000 artifacts including a Greek Buddhist collection that shows the influence of Alexander the Great on Buddhist culture as far as Pakistan.
  • The Serbian Museum 19 Moustoxydou St. houses rare exhibits about the Serbian soldiers' tragic fate during the First World War. The remnants of the Serbian Army of about 150,000 soldiers together with their government in exile, found refuge and shelter in Corfu, following the collapse of the Serbian Front as a result of the Austro-Hungarian attack of the 6th October 1915. Exhibits include photographs from the three years stay of the Serbians in Corfu, together with other exhibits such as uniforms, arms and ammunition of the Serbian army, Serbian regimental flags, religious artefacts, surgical tools used in triage by Serbian doctors on Vido island in 1916, war medals and other decorations of the Kingdom of Serbia etc.

The Gorgon just before being beheaded by Perseus, as depicted on a pediment from the Artemis Temple on display at the Archaeological Museum of Corfu. ... This article is about the Greek mythological monster. ... A pediment is a classical architectural element consisting of a triangular section or gable found above the horizontal superstructure (entablature) which lies immediately upon the columns. ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Typical triage tag used for emergency mass casualty decontamination. ... A medal is a small metal object, usually engraved with insignia, that is awarded to a person for athletic, military, scientific, academic or some other kind of achievement. ... Anthem: Bože Pravde [[Image:|250px|center|Location of the Kingdom of Serbia]] Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Serbian Government Monarchy  - King Milan (1882-1889)  - King Aleksandar (1889-1903)  - King Peter I (1903-1918) Proclamation March 6, 1882 Area  - Total  km² ([[List of countries and outlying territories by area|]])  sq...

Saint Spyridon the Keeper of the City

The bell tower of the church of St. Spyridon can be seen in the background among the busy kantounia of the city centre. On top of the stores are apartments with balconies. It is from these type of balconies that Corfiots throw botides, clay pots, to celebrate the Resurrection during Easter festivities
The bell tower of the church of St. Spyridon can be seen in the background among the busy kantounia of the city centre. On top of the stores are apartments with balconies. It is from these type of balconies that Corfiots throw botides, clay pots, to celebrate the Resurrection during Easter festivities

Saint Spyridon the Thaumaturgist (Miracle-worker, Greek: Ο Θαυματουργός), also referred to as Αγιος Σπυρίδων ο πολιούχος (translated as Saint Spyridon the Keeper of the City), is the patron saint of the island. St. Spyridon is revered for the miracle of expelling the plague (πανώλη) from the island, amongst many other miracles attributed to him. It is believed by the faithful that on its way out of the island the plague scratched one of the fortification stones of the old citadel to indicate its fury at being expelled. St. Spyridon is also believed to have saved the island at the second great siege of Corfu which took place in 1716. There were rumours spreading among the Turks that some of their soldiers saw St. Spyridon as a monk approaching them menacingly with a flaming torch in one hand and a cross in the other, and that helped increase their panic.[10][24] This miracle is one of the earliest successful examples of psychological operations in warfare, (psyops). This victory over the Turks, therefore, was attributed not only to the leadership of Count Schulenburg who commanded the stubborn defence of the island against the Turks, but also to the miraculous intervention of St. Spyridon. Venice honoured von der Schulenburg and the Corfiots for successfully defending the island. Recognizing St. Spyridon's role in the defence of the island Venice legislated the establishment of the litany (λιτανεία) of St Spyridon on the 11th of August as a commemoration of the miraculous event, starting a tradition that continues to this day.[10] In 1716 composer Antonio Vivaldi, on commission by the republic of Venice, created the oratorio Juditha triumphans to commemorate this great event. Juditha triumphans was composed and performed in November of 1716 in Venice by the orchestra and choir of the Ospedale della Pietà and is described as Vivaldi's first great oratorio.[25] Image File history File links Corfustspyridonchurch. ... Image File history File links Corfustspyridonchurch. ... Saint Spyridon (Greek c. ... Panic is the primal urge to run and hide in the face of imminent danger. ... A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... Psychological Operations (PSYOP, PSYOPS) are techniques used by military and police forces to influence a target audiences emotions, motives, objective reasoning, and behavior. ... Count Johann Matthias von der Schulenburg, from a marble statue in Corfu Reichsgraff Marshal Johann Matthias von der Schulenburg was a distinguished aristocrat (imperial count) and general of Austrian descent who served in the Saxon and Venetian armies in the early 1700s. ... “Vivaldi” redirects here. ... An oratorio is a large musical composition for orchestra, vocal soloists and chorus. ... First edition of Juditha triumphans Juditha triumphans devicta Holofernis barbarie, Vivaldi catalogue number RV 644, is an oratorio by Antonio Vivaldi, the only survivor of the four that he is known to have composed. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... The Ospedale della Pietà is a convent orphanage and music school in Venice. ...


Transportation

A road in the southern part of Corfu island
A road in the southern part of Corfu island

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1920x1392, 890 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corfu ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1920x1392, 890 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corfu ...

Motorways

The island is linked by two highways, GR-24 in the northwest and GR-25 in the south.

  • Greek National Road 24, Cen., NW, Corfu - Palaiokastritsa
  • Greek National Road 25, Cen., S, SE, Corfu - Lefkimi

Corfu Port

Corfu has ferry services both by traditional ferries to Gaios in the island of Paxoi and as far as Patras and both traditional ferries and advanced Russian, retractable airfoil, hydrodynamic flow, high speed ferries called Flying Dolphins to Igoumenitsa and to Sarandë in neighboring Albania. There is also a small port of Lefkimmi at the southern tip of the island on Cape Kavos, that offers a ferry service to the mainland. Paxi - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Patras (Demotic Greek: Πάτρα, Pátra, Classical Greek: Πάτραι, Pátrai, Latin: , Ottoman Turkish: Ballıbadra) is the third-largest city of Greece and the capital of the prefecture of Achaea, located in northern Peloponnese, 215 kilometers to the west of Athens. ... For the kite, see foil kite. ... Hydrodynamics is fluid dynamics applied to liquids, such as water, alcohol, oil, and blood. ... Igoumenitsa (Greek: Ηγουμενίτσα) (Albanian: Gumenicë) is a coastal city in northwestern Greece. ... Sarandë (Albanian: Sarandë, IPA or ; , Forty Saints; Greek: Άγιοι Σαράντα or Ágii Saránda, Italian: Santi Quaranta), is the capital of the District of Sarandë in Albania, and it is one of the most important tourist attractions of the Albanian Riviera. ... The Pride of Rotterdam, One of the P&O Ferriess Flagships operating the Hull-Rotterdam Route A ferry is a boat or a ship carrying passengers, and sometimes their vehicles, on scheduled services. ...


Ioannis Kapodistrias International Airport

The Ioannis Kapodistrias International Airport, named after John Capodistria distinguished Corfiot European diplomat and first Governor of Greece, is located around 3 kilometres south of Kerkyra just half a kilometre north of Pontikonisi. The approach and landing, in a northeasterly direction, affords the flying passengers a spectacular aerial view of Pontikonisi and Vlaheraina Monastery as well as the hills of Kanoni as the runway used for landing is actually a few hundred meters away from these spectacular landmarks. The airport offers domestic flights with Olympic Airlines (OA 600, 602 and 606) and Aegean Airlines (A3 402, 404 and 406). Air Sea Lines, a Greek seaplane operator offers scheduled flights from Corfu to Paxoi, Ioannina and Patras. Corfu International Airport, Ioannis Kapodistrias (Greek: Κρατικός Αερολιμένας Κέρκυρας, Ιωάννης Καποδίστριας) or Ioannis Kapodistrias (Capodistrias) International Airport (IATA: CFU, ICAO: LGKR) is a small but busy airport on the Greek isle of Corfu at Kerkyra. ... Ioannis Kapodistrias (1776-1831). ... Olympic Airlines (Ολυμπιακές Αερογραμμές - OA) is the state-run flag carrier of Greece, employing about 1850 people. ... Aegean Airlines is the second largest Greek airline based in Athens. ... This article is about the Greek city. ...


Corfu airport is also connected to EU countries through scheduled and chartered flights. This includes scheduled flights from Germany and the United Kingdom. British Airways started at the end of 2006 its first scheduled flights to Corfu. They fly to Corfu 4 times per week: Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat. For the 1930s airline of similar name, see British Airways Ltd. ...


Towns and villages

Village name Region name Municipality Population Geographic location
Agios Athanasios Gyros Aghios Georgios NW Corfu
Agios Mathaios Messi Central Corfu
Ano Korakiana Faiakon NE Corfu
Kanálion Corfu city Corfu city 3,556 Corfy city
Kavos Lefkimmi Lefkimi S Corfu
Lefkimmi Lefkimmi Lefkimi 3,517 S Corfu
Pagi Gyros Aghios Georgios NW Corfu
Potamós Corfu city Corfu city 2,365 Corfy city

Pagi or Paghi is an old village with real Greek countryside in the NW corner of Corfu Island in Greece The name Pagi or Paghi (plural) is derived probably from the ancient Greek wrd Pax (Πάξ)- Pagos (Παγός) (means Rock) or the ancient Latin Pagus (fortified village or fortified hill and the...

Culture

Music and festivities

Philarmonikes

Corfu's musical tradition is significant. In the past, people used to join in the singing of the cantades (Greek: καντάδες), impromptu choral songs in two, three or four voices, usually accompanied by a guitar. The bands (Philharmonic societies, Φιλαρμονικές), which also provide free instruction in music, are still popular and still attract young recruits. Nowadays, given the rigours of modern life that has not spared Corfu society, cantades (deriving from the Italian cantare meaning to sing) are only performed by semi-professional or amateur singers, mainly as tourist attractions. Corfu Town is home to three famous marching wind bands, the dark red-uniformed Philharmonic Society of Corfu or Old Philharmonic or Palia, the blue-uniformed Mantzaros Philharmonic and the bright red and black-uniformed Capodistria Philharmonic. The bands give regular weekend promenade concerts during summer and take part in the yearly Holy Week ceremonies. There is considerable but friendly rivalry between them, and they rigorously adhere to their respective repertoires. The Philarmonic Society of Corfu (Philarmoniki Etaireia Kekyrars, Φιλαρμονική Εταιρεία Κέρκυρας) is the oldest philarmonic band in corfu and Greece. ... Ioannis Kapodistrias (1776-1831). ...

A marching band from Austria, a frequent visitor, through the Corfu landmark of Liston. In the background the western arch of Palaia Anaktora
A marching band from Austria, a frequent visitor, through the Corfu landmark of Liston. In the background the western arch of Palaia Anaktora

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 2911 KB) I am the author. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 2911 KB) I am the author. ...

Easter

On Holy Friday from the early afternoon the bands of the philharmonic societies, separated into squads, accompany the epitaphs of the town's churches. Late in the afternoon the squads come together to form the whole band in order to accompany the epitaph of the metropolitan church. The funeral marches that the bands play differ depending on the band. The Old Philharmonic plays Albinoni's Adagio, the Mantzaros plays Verdi's Marcia Funebre from Don Carlo, and the Capodistria plays Chopin's Funeral March and Mariani's Sventura. Tomaso Albinoni (June 14, 1671, Venice, Italy &#8211; January 17, 1751, Venice) was an Italian baroque composer. ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... Don Carlos is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi. ... Chopin redirects here. ... Mariani is a small town located in Jorhat district in the Indian state of Assam. ...


On Holy Saturday morning the three town bands take part in the epitaph (Epitaphios Επιτάφιος) of St. Spyridon Cathedral in procession with the Saint's relics. This time the bands play different funeral marches, with Mantzaros playing de Miccheli's Calde Lacrime, the Palia playing Marcia Funebre from Faccio's opera Amleto, while the Kapodistria Philharmonic plays the Funeral March from Beethoven's Eroica. The custom dates from the 19th century, when the British banned the participation of the garrison's band in the traditional Holy Friday funeral cortege. The defiant Corfiotes held the litany the following morning, and paraded the relics of St. Spyridon as well, so that the British would not dare intervene. “Beethoven” redirects here. ... Eroica Symphony Title Page The Symphony No. ...


The litany is followed by the celebration of the "Early Resurrection". Balconies in the old town are decked in bright red cloth, and Corfiotes throw down large clay pots (the botides μπότηδες) full of water to smash on the street pavement, especially in wider areas of Liston and in an organised fashion. This is done in anticipation of the Resurrection of Jesus (Ανάσταση του Κυρίου), which is to be celebrated that same night.


Teatro di San Giacomo

During Venetian rule, the Corfiotes developed a fervent appreciation of Italian opera, which was the real source of the extraordinary (given the conditions in the mainland of Greece) musical development of the island during that era. The opera house of Corfu during 18th and 19th century was the Nobile Teatro di San Giacomo, named after the neighbouring catholic cathedral, but later the theatre was converted into the Town Hall. Many local composers, such as Nikolaos Halikiopoulos Mantzaros, Spiridon Xindas, Antonio Liberali, Domenico Padovani, the Zakynthian Pavlos Karrer, the Lambelets', Spiros Samaras and others, connected their career with this theatre. San Giacomo's place was taken by the so-called New Municipal Theatre in 1901, which held the operatic tradition vivid until its destruction during World War II (namely, in 1943 as a result of a German air raid). The incapability during the post-war years to rebuild it was the main cause that led to the island's continuous crisis in regard to music. In any case, the first opera to be performed in the San Giacomo Theatre was in 1733 ("Gerone, tiranno di Siracusa") and from 1771 until 1943 nearly all the operatic compositions by the most (or less) famous Italians, as well as some of the local and French, composers were performed at the stage of the San Giacomo theatre. This sweet era, a distant reminiscence of the glorious musical past, was until recently reflected in the mythology that supported that the opera theatre of Corfu was a fixture in famous opera singers' itineraries, and those who were successful there were given the title of distinction "applaudito in Corfu", meaning "applauded in Corfu" as a reflection of the discriminating musical taste of its inhabitants. Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... German soldiers raising the Reich War Flag over the Acropolis. ...


Ionian University and musical tradition

Since the early 1990s a new factor in the musical reality of Corfu is the Music Department of the Ionian University, which has placed new standards. Apart from the academic activities, its concerts in Corfu and abroad and its musicological research in the field of the so-called Neo-Hellenic Music, the Department organizes every summer an international music academy, which gathers international students and music professors in brass, strings, singing, jazz and musicology. Ionian U. logo The Ionian University is a university located in the city of Corfu, Greece. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Image of a trumpet, foreground, a piccolo trumpet behind, and a flugelhorn in background. ... The strings of a harp A string is the vibrating element which is the source of vibration in string instruments, such as the guitar, harp, piano, and members of the violin family. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... For album by Prince, see Musicology (album). ...


Ta Karnavalia

Another great Corfu tradition is the Carnival or Ta Karnavalia. Venetian in origin, the festivities include a parade featuring the main attraction of Karnavalos, a rather grotesque figure with a large head and a smiling face that leads a procession of many colourful floats. Corfiots, young and old, dress up in colourful costumes and follow the parade. They even spill into the narrow streets (kantounia), and spread the fun all over the city dancing and frolicking. At night, in more sophisticated social circles, dance and costume parties take place. This article describes the festival season. ... This article is about the word itself. ... A float is a decorated platform, either built on a vehicle or towed behind one, which is a component of many festive parades, such as the Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade and the Tournament of Roses Parade. ...


Corfu in myth

  • It is in Corfu that Hercules, just before embarking on his ten labours, slept with the Naiad Melite and she bore him Hyllus, the leader of the Heraclids.[26]
  • The bay of Palaiokastritsa is considered to be the place where Odysseus disembarked and met Nausicaa for the first time.

For other uses, see Hercules (disambiguation). ... A Naiad by John William Waterhouse, 1893. ... Melite is one of the Naiads and one of the many loves of Zeus and his son Hercules. ... In Greek mythology, Hyllus (also Hyllas or Hylles) was the son of Heracles and Deianira and husband of Iole. ... The Heracleidae or Heraclids were the numerous descendants of Heracles (Hercules), especially applied in a narrower sense to the descendants of Hyllus, the eldest of his four sons by Deianira (Hyllus was also sometimes thought of as a son of Melite with Heracles). ... The Argo, by Lorenzo Costa In Greek mythology, the Argonauts (Ancient Greek: ) were a band of heroes who, in the years before the Trojan War, accompanied Jason to Colchis in his quest for the Golden Fleece. ... In ancient geography, Colchis (sometimes spelled also as Kolchis) (Greek: Κολχίς, kŏl´kĬs; Georgian: კოლხეთი, Kolkheti) was a nearly triangular district in Caucasus. ... Jason returns with the golden Fleece on an Apulian red-figure calyx krater, ca. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Scheria, Skhería, or Phaeacia, is an island, the land of the Phaeacians. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus (disambiguation) Ulysses redirects here. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä — by Charles Gleyre In ancient Greek literature, Nausicaa (often rendered Nausicaä; Greek: Ναυσικάα[1]), burner of ships, a daughter of King Alcinous (Alkínoös) of the Phaeacians and Queen Arete, appears in Homers Odyssey (Odysseía). ... In Greek mythology, Alcinous (sometimes with the diacritical mark Alcinoüs; also transliterated as Alkínoös) was a son of Nausithous and father of Nausicaa and Laodamas with Arete. ... Palaiokastritsa (Παλαιοκαστρίτσα) is a municipality in the Corfu Prefecture, Greece. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä — by Charles Gleyre In ancient Greek literature, Nausicaa (often rendered Nausicaä; Greek: Ναυσικάα[1]), burner of ships, a daughter of King Alcinous (Alkínoös) of the Phaeacians and Queen Arete, appears in Homers Odyssey (Odysseía). ...

Corfu in film

  • Several movies have been filmed in Corfu, including the 1981 James Bond movie, For Your Eyes Only. The most memorable Corfu related scene of the film is of the underwater ancient Greek temple, with a huge turtle swimming in front of the camera; the Casino scene was also filmed at the Achilleion.[27] Other scenes filmed on the island include Melina and James walking through the town streets and Melina being greeted by Bond at Pontikonisi island; the Greek Wedding scene was filmed at the Bouas-Danilia traditional Village (Μπούας Δανίλια παραδοσιακό χωριό).[27]

This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see Turtle (disambiguation). ... Achilleion Palace Achilleas thniskon in the gardens of the Achilleion. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Gerald Durrell – founder of the Jersey Zoo and pioneer of captive breeding The Gerald Durrell Memorial VHS cover, with a self portrait Gerald (Gerry) Malcolm Durrell OBE (January 7, 1925 – January 30, 1995) was a naturalist, zookeeper, conservationist, author, and television presenter. ... My Family and Other Animals is an autobiographical work by naturalist Gerald Durrell, telling of his childhood years spent on the Greek island of Corfu. ...

Tourism

The famous beach at Canal D'Amour, Sidari on a windy day. At the entrance of the bay there is an opening in the rock at the right (centre left of picture) that continues to the other side, a natural tunnel. This sea channel gave the beach its name: Canal D'Amour, French for channel of love.
The famous beach at Canal D'Amour, Sidari on a windy day. At the entrance of the bay there is an opening in the rock at the right (centre left of picture) that continues to the other side, a natural tunnel. This sea channel gave the beach its name: Canal D'Amour, French for channel of love.

Quite apart from their more malevolent invaders, the Corfiotes have a long history of hospitality to foreign residents and visitors, typified in the twentienth century by Gerald Durrell's childhood reminiscence My Family and Other Animals. Some Italian culture and cookery have been absorbed, and are particularly evident during August when Italian holidaymakers visit en masse. The North East coast has largely been developed by a few British holiday companies, with large expensive holiday villas which are used as homes during the two-thirds of the year out of season. The north and east coasts have most of the package holiday resorts, and with some exceptions the interior has relatively little tourist trade. This had had the effect of a massive transfer of resources, because traditionally the best farmland was away from the rocky shore, the salt and the pirates, but from the 1970s the inferior seaside land suddenly became the most desirable and highly valuable holiday property sites. Many Corfiotes now make more from the frantic four month holiday season than from their traditional agriculture. At the other end of the market, and also the other end of the island, the southern resort of Kavos provides the notoriously robust facilities particularly attractive to young holidaymakers, along similar lines to resorts such as Faliraki in Rhodes Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1177 KB) I am the author. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1177 KB) I am the author. ... Gerald Durrell – founder of the Jersey Zoo and pioneer of captive breeding The Gerald Durrell Memorial VHS cover, with a self portrait Gerald (Gerry) Malcolm Durrell OBE (January 7, 1925 – January 30, 1995) was a naturalist, zookeeper, conservationist, author, and television presenter. ... Kavos is a former wide awake fishing village turned clubbers paradise in the 1990s (during the nu rave scene) on the island of Corfu in Greece. ... Faliraki is the primary seaside resort village on the Greek island of Rhodes, in the Dodecanese. ... Rhodes (Greek: Ρόδος Rhódhos; Italian Rodi; [[Ladino language| ) is the largest of the Dodecanese islands in terms of both land area and population, situated in eastern Aegean Sea. ...


Notable People

The old town of Corfu seen from Vido island, south of the harbour. It is enclosed by Palaio Frourio to the left and Neo Frourio to the right. The twin peaks of these two fortresses that enclose the city gave it also its foreign name: Corfu; meaning city of the peaks in medieval Greek
The old town of Corfu seen from Vido island, south of the harbour. It is enclosed by Palaio Frourio to the left and Neo Frourio to the right. The twin peaks of these two fortresses that enclose the city gave it also its foreign name: Corfu; meaning city of the peaks in medieval Greek

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1178 KB) I am the author. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1178 KB) I am the author. ... Ptolichus (Greek ) is the name of several people from Classical antiquity: Ptolichus of Aegina was the son and pupil of Synnoön. ... The 5th century BC started the first day of 500 BC and ended the last day of 401 BC. // The Parthenon of Athens seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west. ... Saint Arsenius (Arsenios) of Corfu, also known as Arsenius of Kerkyra, (d. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Nicholas Alamanos (born 4th May 1982 in Gouvia, Corfu) is Greek Rugby Union Player for Walsall RFC, England. ... Princess Alexia of Greece and Denmark, born 10 July 1965, is the elder daughter and eldest child of King Constantine II of the Hellenes and his wife Queen Anna-Marie (née Princess Anne-Marie Dagmar Ingrid of Denmark who is the youngest daughter of King Frederick IX of Denmark... Felice Beato, unknown photographer, c. ... “Casanova” redirects here. ... Albert Cohen (August 16, 1895 - October 7, 1981) was a Greek-born Jewish Swiss novelist who wrote in French. ... Panagiotis Doxaras (Παναγιώτης Δοξαράς) (Mani, 1662 -Corfu, 1729) was a Greek painter that founded the Heptanese School of Greek art [1]. // In 1664 his family moved to Zante where he was taught iconography by Leo Moscos. ... The Heptanese School of painting (Greek: ) or Ionian Island School is the first artistic movement in Greece that was shaped by Western European artistic influences which appeared in the Ionian islands in the middle of the 17th century until the middle of the 19th century[1]. // The Ionian islands or... Gerald Durrell – founder of the Jersey Zoo and pioneer of captive breeding The Gerald Durrell Memorial VHS cover, with a self portrait Gerald (Gerry) Malcolm Durrell OBE (January 7, 1925 – January 30, 1995) was a naturalist, zookeeper, conservationist, author, and television presenter. ... Lawrence George Durrell (February 27, 1912 – November 7, 1990) was a British novelist, poet, dramatist, and travel writer, though he resisted affiliation with Britain and preferred to be considered cosmopolitan. ... Elisabeth in a riding habit, from Vanity Fair, 1884. ... Kostas Georgakis is the only known resistance hero to have sacrificed his life as a protest against the junta Kostas Georgakis (Κώστας Γεωργάκης) born in Corfu in 1948 died 19 September 1970. ... The Greek military junta of 1967-1974, alternatively The Regime of the Colonels (Greek: ), or in Greece The Junta (Greek: ) and The Seven Years (Greek: ) are terms used to refer to a series of right-wing military governments that ruled Greece from 1967 to 1974. ... Tolis Voskopoulos Tolis Voskopoulos is one of the legends of modern Greek music. ... Spyros Gogolos is an expirienced defender playing for Aris Thessaloniki. ... Ioannis Kapodistrias (1776-1831). ... Kore. ... Vicky Leandros (born August 23, 1952 or 1948) is a Greek singer with a long international career. ... Nikolaos Halikiopoulos Mantzaros (Greek: or Niccolo Calichiopulo Manzaro, (26 October 1795 - 12 April 1872) was a Greek composer born in Corfu and the major representative of the so called Ionian Islands school of music. ... Prince Philip redirects here. ... Saint Philomena is an alleged 4th century saint and martyr of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Alexander Mark Rossi was a successful British artist specializing in genre works who flourished in the late 19th century. ... Anastasios Sakis Rouvas (Greek: ) (born January 5, 1972 in the island of Corfu) is a popular Greek singer and athlete, as well as an actor, and a model, who has sold nearly 1. ... Count Johann Matthias von der Schulenburg, from a marble statue in Corfu Reichsgraff Marshal Johann Matthias von der Schulenburg was a distinguished aristocrat (imperial count) and general of Austrian descent who served in the Saxon and Venetian armies in the early 1700s. ... Carl Ludwig Sprenger was a German botanist, born on 30 November 1846 at Güstrow, Mecklembourg and died 13 December 1917 on the island of Corfu. ... Theodore Stephanides was a Greek poet, author, doctor and naturalist. ... Georgios Theotokis was a Greek politician and four times prime minister of Greece. ... “Vivaldi” redirects here. ... An oratorio is a large musical composition for orchestra, vocal soloists and chorus. ... First edition of Juditha triumphans Juditha triumphans devicta Holofernis barbarie, Vivaldi catalogue number RV 644, is an oratorio by Antonio Vivaldi, the only survivor of the four that he is known to have composed. ... Rena Vlahopoulou (&#929;&#941;&#957;&#945; &#914;&#955;&#945;&#967;&#959;&#960;&#959;&#973;&#955;&#959;&#965;) (1923 - July 29, 2004) was a famous Greek actress and singer. ... Tolis Voskopoulos Tolis Voskopoulos is one of the legends of modern Greek music. ... Spyridon Xyndas Spyridon Xyndas (Σπυρίδων Ξύνδας) (1812-1896) was a Greek composer and guitarist; his last name has also been transliterated as Xinta, Xinda, Xindas, and Xyntas. His opera O ypopsifios vouleftis (The Parliamentary Candidate) is said to have been the first opera written on a Greek libretto. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... German Emperor Wilhelm (born Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albrecht, Prince of Prussia 27 January 1859–4 June 1941), was the last German Emperor and King of Prussia (de: Deutscher Kaiser und König von Preußen), ruling from 15 June 1888 to 9 November 1918. ...

See also

  • Heptanese School

The Heptanese School of painting (Greek: ) or Ionian Island School is the first artistic movement in Greece that was shaped by Western European artistic influences which appeared in the Ionian islands in the middle of the 17th century until the middle of the 19th century[1]. // The Ionian islands or...

References

A wrestler, (one of a pair), in the Garden of Achilleion. The majestic view of the surrounding hills can be seen in the background
A wrestler, (one of a pair), in the Garden of Achilleion. The majestic view of the surrounding hills can be seen in the background
  1. ^ a b c Corfu City Hall website
  2. ^ BBC news on UNESCO World Heritage List
  3. ^ UNESCO Advisory Body (ICOMOS) report on Corfu History retrieved 3 July 2007
  4. ^ Old Town of Corfu on UNESCO website retrieved 3 July 2007
  5. ^ St. George Article
  6. ^ a b Travel to Corfu
  7. ^ a b Corfu honored with a new museum
  8. ^ Strab. vi. p. 407
  9. ^ Will Durant. The Renaissance. pag 684. MJF Books. New York, 1981 ISBN 1-56731-016-8
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j History of Corfu
  11. ^ History of Corfu from xenos website
  12. ^ destination-guides Food info
  13. ^ Serbs in Corfu website
  14. ^ a b c d e f History of Corfu from Corfu City Hall website
  15. ^ a b United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on the Holocaust in Corfu. Also contains information about the Nazi collaborator mayor Kollas.
  16. ^ From the interview of a survivor in the film "Shoah"
  17. ^ a b Central Jewish Council of Greece website
  18. ^ United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: "[...]two hundred of the 2,000 Corfu Jews found sanctuary with Christian families[...]"
  19. ^ Corfu General Hospital
  20. ^ Corfu Radio Station History
  21. ^ R. Winkes (editor) , Kerkyra. Artifacts from the Palaiopolis, Providence 2004.
  22. ^ Corfu map: Ironically, the bridge was destroyed during a German attack in WWII. The remains can still be seen today.
  23. ^ Libraries and Museums from the City Hall website
  24. ^ Catholic encyclopedia website
  25. ^ Baroque Music As far as his theatrical activities were concerned, the end of 1716 was a high point for Vivaldi. In November, he managed to have the Ospedale della Pietà perform his first great oratorio, Juditha Triumphans devicta Holofernis barbaric [sic]. This work was an allegorical description of the victory of the Venetians (the Christians) over the Turks (the barbarians) in August 1716.
  26. ^ Hercules slept with a minor goddess named Melite and she bore him a son named Hyllus (not to be confused with Hyllus, Hercules’ son by Deianeira)
  27. ^ a b 007 Fact website
  28. ^ Basic Characteristics. Ministry of the Interior. www.ypes.gr. Retrieved on 2007-08-07.

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3264x2448, 1332 KB) The Garden of the Achilleon House, near Corfu-City Source: Own Picture File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corfu Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3264x2448, 1332 KB) The Garden of the Achilleon House, near Corfu-City Source: Own Picture File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Corfu Metadata This file contains additional... Ancient Greek wrestlers (Pankratiasts) Wrestling is the act of physical engagement between two unarmed persons, in which each wrestler strives to get an advantage over or control of their opponent. ... Achilleion Palace Achilleas thniskon in the gardens of the Achilleion. ... The International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) was founded in 1965 as a result of the Venice Charter of 1964 and offers advice to UNESCO on World Heritage Sites. ... Shoah is a nine-hour documentary film completed by Claude Lanzmann in 1985 about the Holocaust (or Shoah). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge&#8212;writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others&#8212;in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


External links

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  • Municipality of Corfu (official site)
  • Detailed history of the island
  • Information about Port of Corfu
  • Serbs in Corfu and Vido: Historical Website
  • Corfu travel guide from Wikitravel

Coordinates: 39°40′N, 19°45′E Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ... Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a prefecture of Greece. ... Achilleio (Αχίλλειο) is a municipality in the Corfu Prefecture, Greece. ... Agios Georgios (Άγιος Γεώργιος) is a municipality in the Corfu Prefecture, Greece. ... Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a city in north-western Greece. ... Esperion (Εσπερίων) is a municipality in the Corfu Prefecture, Greece. ... Faiakes (Φαίακες) is a municipality in the Corfu Prefecture, Greece. ... Kassopaia (Κασσωπαία) is a municipality in the Corfu Prefecture, Greece. ... Korissia (Κορισσία) is a municipality in the Corfu Prefecture, Greece. ... Lefkimmi (Λευκίμμη) is a municipality in the Corfu Prefecture, Greece. ... Meliteieis (Μελιτειείς) is a municipality in the Corfu Prefecture, Greece. ... Palaiokastritsa (Παλαιοκαστρίτσα) is a municipality in the Corfu Prefecture, Greece. ... Parelioi (Παρέλιοι) is a municipality in the Corfu Prefecture, Greece. ... The natural port of Gaios, created by the islet Pontikonisi (center) resembles a fjord. ... Thinali (Θινάλι) is a municipality in the Corfu Prefecture, Greece. ... Ereikoussa is a Greek island in the Ionian Islands. ... Mathraki is a Greek island in the Ionian Islands. ... Othonoi is a Greek island in the Ionian Islands. ... The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek: , Ionioi NÄ“soi) are a group of islands in Greece. ... Antikythera (Αντικύθηρα) is a Greek island community with a land area of 20. ... A beach on Antipaxos Antipaxos is a small (5 square kilometres), unspoilt Greek island about 3 kilometers to the south of Paxos. ... Arkoudi is a Greek island in the Ionian Islands. ... Atokos (Greek: Άτοκος), is a Greek island in the Ionian Islands. ... Drakonera or Dhragonára (Greek: Δρακονέρα) is an island of the Echinades, among the Ionian Islands group of Greece. ... Elafonissos (Greek: Ελαφόνησος) or Elafonisos is a small Greek island between the Peloponnese and Kythira. ... Ereikoussa is a Greek island in the Ionian Islands. ... Ithaca, see Ithaca (disambiguation). ... For other places or objects named Ithaca, see Ithaca (disambiguation). ... Kalamos (Greek: Κάλαμος), known in antiquity as Karnos (Καρνος), is a mountainous Greek island in the Ionian Sea. ... Kastos is a Greek island in the Ionian Islands. ... The island of Kefalonia, also known as Cephallenia, Cephallonia, Kefallinia, or Kefallonia (Ancient Greek: Κεφαλληνία; Modern Greek: Κεφαλλονιά or Κεφαλονιά; Italian: Cefalonia), is the largest of the Ionian Islands in western Greece, with an area of 350 sq. ... Kythira (Îœodern Hellenic: Κύθηρα), also known as Cerigo (Τσιρίγο), also spelt: Kithira, Kythera, Cythera, Cerigo or Tsirigo, is an hellenic island, historically part of the Ionian Islands. ... Lazaretto island, (formerly known as Aghios Dimitrios) is located two nautical miles northeast of Corfu. ... Lefkada, or Lefkas (Greek: Modern: Λευκάδα, Ancient/Katharevousa: -as) is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea, connected to the mainland by a long causeway and floating bridge, as well as the islands capital city. ... Makri is a Greek island, one of the Echinades, in the Ionian Islands group. ... Mathraki is a Greek island in the Ionian Islands. ... Meganisi or Meganissi (Greek, Modern: Μεγανήσι, literally big island), older forms: Meganision and Meganission is a Greek island and municipality immediately to the east-southeast of Lefkada. ... Othonoi is a Greek island in the Ionian Islands. ... Oxeia (also Oxiés, Oxiá, or Oxia) is a Greek island. ... The natural port of Gaios, created by the islet Pontikonisi (center) resembles a fjord. ... Petalas or Petalá is the largest island (area 5. ... Psitros (Greek: Πίστρος) is an islet east of Ithaca, one of the Ionian Islands in Greece. ... Pontikos or Pondikónisi is an island of the Echinades, among the Ionian Islands group of Greece. ... Prováti (Greek: Προβάτι) is an island of the Echinades, among the Ionian Islands group of Greece. ... Skorpios is an island in the Ionian Sea off the western coast of Greece. ... Strofades is a small group of Greek islands in the Ionian Islands. ... Vido (Greek: Βιδο) is an island of the Ionian Islands group of Greece. ... Vromonas is a Greek island in the Ionian Islands. ... “Zante” redirects here. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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