FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Core based statistical area

A Core Based Statistical Area is the United States Census Bureau term for a functional region based around an urban center of at least 10,000 people, based on standards published by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in 2000. Areas defined on the basis of these standards applied with Census 2000 data were announced by OMB in June 2003. These standards are used to replace the definitions of metropolitan areas that were defined in 1990. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is a body within the Executive Office of the President of the United States which is tasked with coordinating United States Federal agencies. ... A metropolitan area is a large population center consisting of a large city and its adjacent zone of influence, or of several neighboring cities or towns and adjoining areas, with one or more large cities serving as its hub or hubs. ...


The term "CBSA" refers to both metropolitan statistical areas and newly-created micropolitan areas collectively. Micro areas are based around Census Bureau-defined urban cluster of at least 10,000 and less than 50,000 people. United States micropolitan areas, as defined by the Census Bureau and the Office of Management and Budget, are areas in the United States based around a core city or town with a population of 10,000 to 49,999. ...


The basic definition of metropolitan areas has had slight changes made to it as well. A metro area, as it did in 1990, requires a Census Bureau-defined urbanized area of at least 50,000 people. A metropolitan statistical area containing an urbanized area of at least 2.5 million people can be subdivided into two or more "metropolitan divisions," provided specified criteria are met. Metropolitan divisions are conceptually similar the primary metropolitan statistical areas (PMSAs) defined under previous standards.


By a similar token, there are now definitions for "Combined Statistical Areas" (CSA). These areas can be formed when adjoining CBSAs meet particular standards to become new areas. It does not matter which kind of areas they are; any combination of metro and micro areas may be used to form a CSA.


Unlike past years, the traditional listings of metro areas list New England regions as county-based areas. In the past, these were referred to by the Census as "NECMA"'s (New England County Metropolitan Areas) and were separate from the normal census counts for the areas, which used cities and towns as their basis. They have essentially swapped places now, with the city and town areas (or NECTAs for New England City and Town Areas) being the separate listings. First Flag of New England, 1686-c. ...


Despite there not being much change in the basic definition, 49 new metropolitan areas were formed as a result of the new rules for them. Over 550 other areas were classified as micropolitan. All told, the present rules have defined 935 CBSAs in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. 11 of the CBSAs have metropolitan divisions, 29 in total. In comparison, the definition of metropolitan areas in 1999, the last year areas were formed based on the 1990 rules for them, there were 284 metropolitan areas, with 19 of the areas providing 76 primary metropolitan areas (the equivalent of divisions); almost three times the number of areas overall are now recognized by the OMB.


External links

  • More detailed information on the redefinition of metropolitan areas
  • The current definitions of all 935 CBSA's
  • A link to population statistics for all CBSA's will be available sometime near the end of the year.

  Results from FactBites:
 
U.S. Core Based Statistical Areas (1385 words)
U.S. Core Based Statistical Areas represents geographic entities, defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget for use by Federal statistical agencies, based on the concept of a core area with a large population nucleus, plus adjacent communities having a high degree of economic and social integration with that core.
A Core-Based Statistical Area consists of a county containing an Incorporated Place or Census Designated Place with a population of at least 10,000 along with any adjacent counties that have at least 25 percent of employed residents of the county who work in the CBSA's core or central county.
CBSA polygons are built from GDT County boundaries.
Core based statistical area - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (552 words)
Map of the Core-Based Statistical Areas of the US Core Based Statistical Area is the official term for a functional region based around an urban center of at least 10,000 people, based on standards published by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in 2000.
Areas defined on the basis of these standards applied with Census 2000 data were announced by OMB in June 2003.
In comparison, the definition of metropolitan areas in 1999, the last year areas were formed based on the 1990 rules for them, there were 284 metropolitan areas, with 19 of the areas providing 76 primary metropolitan areas (the equivalent of divisions); almost three times the number of areas overall are now recognized by the OMB.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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