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Encyclopedia > Cordell Hull
Cordell Hull
Cordell Hull

In office
March 4, 1933 – November 30, 1944
President Franklin D. Roosevelt
Preceded by Henry L. Stimson
Succeeded by Edward Stettinius, Jr.

In office
March 4, 1931 – March 3, 1933
Preceded by William Emerson Brock
Succeeded by Nathan L. Bachman

Born October 2, 1871(1871-10-02)
Olympus, Tennessee, USA
Died July 23, 1955 (aged 83)
Washington, D.C., USA
Political party Democratic
Spouse Rose Frances Witz
Profession Politician, Lawyer
Religion Episcopalian

Cordell Hull (October 2, 1871July 23, 1955) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Tennessee. He is best-known as the longest-serving Secretary of State, having held the position for 11 years (1933–1944) in the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Hull received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1945 for his role in establishing the United Nations, and was referred to by President Roosevelt as the Father of the United Nations. Image File history File links Nobel_prize_medal. ... Download high resolution version (431x640, 20 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Franklin D. Roosevelt Cordell Hull Categories: U.S. history images ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... FDR redirects here. ... Henry L. Stimson Henry Lewis Stimson (September 21, 1867 – October 20, 1950) was an American statesman, who served as Secretary of War, Governor-General of the Philippines, and Secretary of State at various times. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Edward R. Stettinius, Jr. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Emerson Brock (March 14, 1872–August 5, 1950) was a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee from 1929 to 1931. ... Nathan Lynn Bachman (August 8, 1878–April 23, 1937) was a United States Senator from Tennessee from 1933 until his death. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ...


Hull was born in a log cabin in Olympus, which is now part of Pickett County, Tennessee, but had been incorporated from Overton County, Tennessee. Hull became the elected chairman of the Clay County Democratic Party at the age of 19. For other uses, see Log cabin (disambiguation). ... Pickett County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Overton County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


In 1891, he graduated from Cumberland School of Law at Cumberland University and was admitted to the bar as a teenager. He served in the Tennessee House of Representatives from 1893 to 1897. During the Spanish-American War, Hull served in Cuba as a captain in the Fourth Regiment of the Tennessee Volunteer Infantry. It has been suggested that Cumberland Law Schools Center for Biotechnology, Law and Ethics be merged into this article or section. ... This institution is unrelated, other than by similarity of name, to the University of the Cumberlands in Williamsburg, Kentucky. ... In the United States, admission to the bar is permission granted to a lawyer to practice law. ... The Tennessee House of Representatives, in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Tennessee, formally called the Tennessee General Assembly. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties... A Captain in armies, air forces and marine forces, is a rank an army or air force rank with a NATO rank code of OF-2. ...


Hull served 11 terms in the United States House of Representatives (1907–1921 and 1923–1931) and authored the federal income tax laws of 1913 and 1916 and the inheritance tax of 1916. After an electoral defeat in 1920, Hull served as chairman of the Democratic National Committee. He was elected to the Senate in 1930, but resigned upon being named Secretary of State in 1933. Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        The federal government of the United States imposes a progressive tax on the taxable income of individuals, corporations, trusts, decedents estates, and certain bankruptcy estates. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States...


In 1933 Hull was appointed Secretary of State by Franklin D. Roosevelt; he served 11 years until he retired from public office. Hull became the underlying force and architect in the creation of the United Nations, drafting, along with his staff, the United Nations Charter in mid-1943. He resigned as Secretary of State in November 1944 because of failing health. UN and U.N. redirect here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1945 Cordell Hull was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for "co-initiating the United Nations".


Hull died after suffering several strokes and heart attacks in 1955 in Washington, D.C., and is buried in the vault of the Chapel of St. Joseph of Arimathea in the Washington National Cathedral, which is an Episcopal church. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Washington National Cathedral has been the site of three presidential state funerals: for Dwight D. Eisenhower, Ronald W. Reagan, Gerald R. Ford and a presidential burial for Woodrow Wilson and a memorial service for Harry Truman. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ...


There is now a Cordell Hull Museum located near his birthplace in Byrdstown, Tennessee, which houses his papers and other memorabilia. Byrdstown is a town located in Pickett County, Tennessee. ...

Contents

Early life and family

Hull was born in Olympus, Pickett County, Tennessee, third of the five sons of William Paschal Hull (1840–1923) and Elizabeth (Riley) Hull (1841–1903). His brothers were named Orestes (1868), Sanadius (1870), Wyoming (1875), and Roy (1881). He attended college from 1889 until 1890. At the age of 19, Hull became the elected chairman of the Clay County Democratic Party. In 1891, he graduated from Cumberland School of Law at Cumberland University and was admitted to the bar. He served in the Tennessee House of Representatives from 1893 to 1897. Pickett County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... It has been suggested that Cumberland Law Schools Center for Biotechnology, Law and Ethics be merged into this article or section. ... This institution is unrelated, other than by similarity of name, to the University of the Cumberlands in Williamsburg, Kentucky. ... A bar association is a body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ... The Tennessee House of Representatives, in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Tennessee, formally called the Tennessee General Assembly. ...


During the Spanish-American War, Hull served in Cuba as a captain in the Fourth Regiment of the Tennessee Volunteer Infantry. Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties...


Hull married Rose Frances (Witz) Whitney (?1875–1954) in 1917; the couple had no children.


Early national career

From 1903 to 1907, Hull served as a local judge; later he was elected to the United States House of Representatives where he served 11 terms (1907–1921 and 1923–1931) totaling 22 years. After his defeat in 1920, he served as chairman of the Democratic National Committee. As a member of the powerful Ways and Means committee, he fought for low tariffs and claimed authorship of the federal income tax laws of 1913 and 1916 and the inheritance tax of 1916. Hull was influential in advising Albert Gore, Sr., then a state legislator, to run for the U.S. Congress in 1938. Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... The Committee on Ways and Means is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Sr. ...


U.S. Senate, Secretary of State

He was elected to the Senate in 1930. In 1933, Roosevelt named him Secretary of State. Hull strove to enlarge foreign trade and lower tariffs. In 1943, Hull served as United States delegate to the Moscow Conference. Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Three Moscow conferences took place during the course of World War II. Government leaders or senior representatives of the three leading Allies of World War II, Great Britain, the United States of America, and the Soviet Union took part in each conference. ...


Hull was the Secretary of State responsible for foreign relations before and during the attack on Pearl Harbor. He sent the Hull note to Japan prior to the attack, which was formally titled "Outline of proposed Basis for Agreement Between The United States and Japan" but had been part of the United States' attempt to open Chinese markets to U.S. goods against Japanese interests there. This article is about the actual attack. ... The Hull note was the de facto ultimatum delivered to Japan by the United States on November 26th, 1941. ...


On the day of the attack, not long after it had begun, Hull received the news that it was taking place. The Japanese ambassador and Japan's special envoy were waiting to see Hull at that moment. Admiral Edwin T. Layton, at the time chief intelligence officer to the commander of the Pacific Fleet, tells the rest of the story: // Edwin T. Layton was born in Nauvoo, Illinois, on April 7, 1903, son of George E. and Mary C. Layton. ...


"Roosevelt advised him not to tell them about the raid but 'to receive them formally and coolly bow them out.


"After he had glanced at their copy of the fourteen-part message [Japan's declaration that negotiations were at an end], Hull's anger burst forth. 'In all my fifty years of public service,' he told the astonished diplomats, 'I have never seen such a document that was more crowded with infamous falsehood and distortion.' Nomura and Kurusu, who had not been told of the attack, bowed themselves out in an embarrassed fluster. A department official overheard Hull muttering under his breath as the door closed, 'Scoundrels and piss-ants.' "


Layton, "And I Was There: Pearl Harbor and Midway -- Breaking the Secrets." p. 314.


Hull chaired the Advisory Committee of Postwar Foreign Policy, created in February 1942. The Advisory Committee of Postwar Foreign Policy was a secretive committee created on February 12, 1942, to prepare recommendations for President Franklin D. Roosevelt on post World War II foreign policy. ...

Hull and Chinese Ambassador Wey Daw-ming at the State Department exchanging ratifications of the treaty abolishing extra-territorial "rights" of the United States in China.
Hull and Chinese Ambassador Wey Daw-ming at the State Department exchanging ratifications of the treaty abolishing extra-territorial "rights" of the United States in China.

When the Free French Forces of Charles de Gaulle liberated the islands of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon (located south of Newfoundland) in December 1941, Hull lodged a very strong protest and even went as far as referring to the Gaullist naval forces as "the so called Free French." His request to have the Vichy governor reinstated was met with strong criticism in the American press. The islands remained under the Free French movement until the end of World War II. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Wey Daw-ming (魏道明 Pinyin: Wèi Dàomíng; Wade-Giles: Wei Tao-ming, 1900 - May 18, 1978) was the first Governor of Taiwan Province (1947-1949) to replace Chen Yi, who was the governor general of Taiwan. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... Flag De Jure territory Capital Paris Capital-in-exile London, Algiers Government Republic Leader Charles de Gaulle Historical era World War II  - de Gaulles appeal June 18, 1940  - Liberation of Paris August, 1944 The Free French Forces (French: , FFL) were French fighters in World War II, who decided to... For other uses, see Charles de Gaulle (disambiguation). ... Motto: A Mare Labor(Latin) From the Sea, Work[] Anthem: La Marseillaise Capital (and largest city) Saint-Pierre Official languages French Government  - President of the General Council Stéphane Artano  - Préfet (Prefect) Yves Fauqueur Collectivité doutre-mera of France   - ceded by the UKe 30 May 1814   - Territoire d... Newfoundland —   IPA: [nuw fÉ™n lænd] (French: , Irish: ) is a large island off the east coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


There is some controversy over Hull's role in the 1939 SS St. Louis affair, where Jewish refugees were denied entry into the US. These Jews fled Europe to escape from the Nazis and after being denied entry into Cuba and the U.S. were returned to Europe where most became victims of the Holocaust after the Nazis invaded Western Europe in the following years. SS was a German ocean liner which sailed out of Hamburg into the Atlantic Ocean in the summer of 1939 carrying 963 Jewish refugees, mostly wealthy, seeking asylum from the Holocaust during World War II. The passengers were refused entry to Cuba, despite prior agreement to accept the passengers. ...

To wit, there were two conversations on the subject between (Secretary of the Treasury)Morgenthau and Secretary of State Cordell Hull. In the first, 3:17 PM on 5 June 1939, Hull made it clear to Morgenthau that the passengers could not legally be issued U.S. tourist visas as they had no return addresses. Furthermore, Hull made it clear to Morgenthau that the issue at hand was between the Cuban government and the passengers. The U.S., in effect, had no role. In the second conversation at 3:54 PM on 6 June 1939, Morgenthau said they did not know where the ship was and he inquired whether it was “proper to have the Coast Guard look for it.” Hull responded by saying that he didn’t see any reason why it could not. Hull then informed him that he did not think that Morgenthau would want the search for the ship to get into the newspapers. Morgenthau said. “Oh no. No, no. They would just—oh, they might send a plane to do patrol work. There would be nothing in the papers.” Hull responded, “Oh, that would be all right.” [1] Henry Morgenthau Jr. ... A coast guard is a national organization responsible for various services at sea. ...

In September 1940, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt maneuvered with another State Department official to bypass Hull's refusal to allow Jewish refugees aboard a Portuguese ship, the Quanza, to receive visas to enter the U.S. Through Mrs. Roosevelt's efforts, the Jewish refugees disembarked on September 11, 1940, in Virgina.[1] Anna Eleanor Roosevelt known as Eleanor (IPA: ; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political leader who used her influence as an active First Lady from 1933 to 1945 to promote the New Deal policies of her husband, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, as well as taking a prominent...


Hull was the underlying force and architect in the creation of the United Nations, as recognized by the 1945 Nobel Prize for Peace, an honor for which Franklin D. Roosevelt nominated him. During World War II Hull and Roosevelt spent tireless hours working toward the development of a world organization to prevent a third World War. Hull and his staff drafted the "Charter of the United Nations" in mid-1943. Never one to sit idly by if American interests were (in his view) threatened, Hull would think nothing of dressing down close allies, such as what happened to New Zealand Prime Minister Peter Fraser in early 1944, over U.S. objections to the Canberra Pact (a military treaty of alliance between Australia and New Zealand made in February 1944 without U.S. consultation). The United Nations Conference on International Organization was a convention of delegates from 50 nations that took place from April 25, 1945 to June 26, 1945 in San Francisco. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... A statue of Fraser outside the Government Buildings Historic Reserve in Wellington The Right Honourable Peter Fraser (1884 - 1950) served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from 27 March 1940 until 13 December 1949. ...

Later years

Hull resigned as Secretary of State in November 1944 because of failing health. Roosevelt described Hull, upon his departure as "the one person in all the world who has done his most to make this great plan for peace (the United Nations) an effective fact". The Norwegian Nobel Committee honored Hull with the Nobel Peace Prize in 1945 in recognition of his efforts for peace and understanding in the Western Hemisphere, his trade agreements, and his work to establish the United Nations. Hull was the longest-serving Secretary of State: 11 years, nine months. The Norwegian Nobel Committee (Den norske Nobelkomité) awards the Nobel Peace Prize each year. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... The geographical western hemisphere of Earth, highlighted in yellow. ...


Hull died in Washington, D.C., and is buried in the vault of the Chapel of St. Joseph of Arimathea in the Washington Cathedral. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Washington National Cathedral has been the site of three presidential state funerals: for Dwight D. Eisenhower, Ronald W. Reagan, Gerald R. Ford and a presidential burial for Woodrow Wilson and a memorial service for Harry Truman. ...


Legacy

Cumberland School of Law's Cordell Hull Moot Court Room - Portrait at head of room
Cumberland School of Law's Cordell Hull Moot Court Room - Portrait at head of room

His memory is preserved by Cordell Hull Dam on the Cumberland River near Carthage, Tennessee. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... It has been suggested that Cumberland Law Schools Center for Biotechnology, Law and Ethics be merged into this article or section. ... The Cumberland River is an important waterway in the southern United States. ... Carthage is a town located in Smith County, Tennessee. ...


His law school, Cumberland School of Law, continues to honor Cordell Hull with a Cordell Hull Speaker's Forum and the pictured Moot Court Room. It has been suggested that Cumberland Law Schools Center for Biotechnology, Law and Ethics be merged into this article or section. ... Moot court is an extracurricular activity at many law schools in which participants take part in simulated court proceedings, usually to include drafting briefs and participating in oral argument. ...


A segment of Kentucky highway routes 90, 63, and 163, from Interstate 65 at Mammoth Cave National Park south to the Tennessee State Line, is named "Cordell Hull Highway". Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Interstate 65 (abbreviated I-65) is an Interstate Highway in the United States. ... Mammoth Cave National Park is a U.S. National Park in central Kentucky, encompassing portions of Mammoth Cave, the most elongated cave system known in the world. ...


The Shoreline School District in Shoreline, Washington, had a Cordell Hull Middle School, which was renamed in the mid-1990s to Meridian Park Elementary, after a renovation. Shoreline is a city located in King County, Washington, 15 miles (24 km) north of Downtown Seattle. ...


There is a Cordell Hull Lake, covering approximately 12,000 acres (49 km²), in the vicinity of Nashville. Cordell Hull Lake is a lake in north-central Tennessee, about thirty miles east of Nashville, in the vicinity of Carthage. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ...


Fictional appearance

In the Worldwar series of alternate history novels by Harry Turtledove, Hull becomes president at some point in 1944, following the deaths of first Vice-President Wallace and then President Roosevelt. Worldwar is a series of four alternate history science fiction novels by Harry Turtledove. ... Alternative history or alternate history can be: A History told from an alternative viewpoint, rather than from the view of imperialist, conqueror, or explorer. ... Harry Norman Turtledove (born June 14, 1949) is an American historian and prolific novelist who has written historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction works. ...


Hull was portrayed by veteran actor George Macready in the 1970 film Tora! Tora! Tora! Actor George Macready in A Kiss Before Dying George Macready (August 29, 1908 - July 2, 1973) was a movie actor with a distintive scar (from an auto accident) that helped him land roles as aristocratic villians. ... For the Melvinss album, see Tora Tora Tora (album) Tora! Tora! Tora! is a 1970 American-Japanese film that dramatizes the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the series of American blunders that unintentionally improved its effectiveness. ...


Actor Charles Trowbridge played Hull in the 1941 film Sergeant York. Charles Trowbridge (10 January 1882 – 30 October 1967), was an American film actor. ... For the unsuccessful U.S. weapon system, see M247 Sergeant York. ...


Sources

Primary

Secondary

  • Julius W. Pratt, Cordell Hull, 1933–44, 2 vol. (1964)
  • Biography from U.S. Congress biography page
  • Hull, Cordell by EB

References

  1. ^ http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-cp/history/faqs/St_Louis.html The Voyage of the Damned: What was the Coast Guard’s Role in the S.S. St. Louis Affair?

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Preceded by
Mounce Gore Butler
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's 4th congressional district

March 4, 1907March 3, 1921
Succeeded by
Wynne F. Clouse
Preceded by
George White
Chairman of the Democratic National Committee
1921–1924
Succeeded by
Clem L. Shaver
Preceded by
Wynne F. Clouse
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's 4th congressional district

March 4, 1923March 3, 1931
Succeeded by
John R. Mitchell
Preceded by
William Emerson Brock
United States Senator (Class 2) from Tennessee
March 4, 1931March 3, 1933
Served alongside: Kenneth D. McKellar
Succeeded by
Nathan L. Bachman
Preceded by
Henry L. Stimson
United States Secretary of State
March 4, 1933November 30, 1944
Succeeded by
Edward Stettinius, Jr.

  Results from FactBites:
 
History of Cordell Hull (823 words)
Cordell Hull (October 2, 1871-July 23, 1955) was born in a log cabin in present day Pickett County, Tennessee (Overton County until 1879), the third of the five sons of William and Elizabeth (Riley) Hull.
Hull was elected U.S. Senator for the 1931-1937 term but resigned upon his appointment as secretary of state by the age of sixty-two.
Cordell Hull was a quiet,and dedicated man. His whole life was so immersed in politics that he did not get married until 1917 at age 46, when he married Rose Frances Witz..
NAPF Programs: Youth Outreach: Peace Heroes: Cordell Hull (952 words)
Hull using Wilson’s ideologies concluded that the proper way to peace and mutual cooperation in the world was to have the correct ideals among everyone.
Cordell Hull is considered the father of the United Nations.
Cordell Hull was a man who will forever be a champion of peace, because he allowed for leaders to unite in the pride of humanity and the world, rather than in only themselves and their countries.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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