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Encyclopedia > Cooking oil
It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with vegetable oil. (Discuss)


Cooking oil is purified fat of plant or animal origin, which is liquid at room temperature. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with cooking oil. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Divisions Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular plants (bryophytes) Marchantiophyta - liverworts Anthocerotophyta - hornworts Bryophyta - mosses Vascular plants (tracheophytes) Lycopodiophyta - clubmosses Equisetophyta - horsetails Pteridophyta - true ferns Psilotophyta - whisk ferns Ophioglossophyta - adderstongues Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta - seed ferns Pinophyta - conifers Cycadophyta - cycads Ginkgophyta - ginkgo Gnetophyta - gnetae Magnoliophyta - flowering plants Adiantum pedatum (a fern... Phyla Subregnum Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subregnum Agnotozoa Placozoa (trichoplax) Orthonectida (orthonectids) Rhombozoa (rhombozoans) Subregnum Eumetazoa Radiata (unranked) (radial symmetry) Ctenophora (comb jellies) Cnidaria (coral, jellyfish, anemones) Bilateria (unranked) (bilateral symmetry) Acoelomorpha (basal) Orthonectida (parasitic to flatworms, echinoderms, etc. ...


Some of the many different kinds of vegetable oils include; olive oil, soybean oil, canola oil, corn oil, sunflower oil, peanut oil, grape seed oil, safflower oil, cashew oil, sesame oil, argan oil and rice bran oil. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with cooking oil. ... For the cartoon character, see Olive Oyl. ... Binomial name Glycine max Merr. ... For the figure in Celtic mythology see agriculture, canola are certain varieties of plants from which we get rapeseed oil, or the oil produced from those varieties. ... Corn oil is oil extracted from the germ of corn. ... Binomial name Helianthus annuus L. The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an annual plant in the Family Asteraceae with a large flower head (inflorescence). ... Peanut oil is often used in cooking, because it has a mild flavour and burns only at a relatively high temperature. ... Grape oil (also grapeseed oil) is a vegetable oil pressed from the seeds of various varieties of Vitis vinifera grapes, an abundant by-product of wine making. ... Safflower oil is an oil extracted from the safflower seed. ... Binomial name Anacardium occidentale L. The Cashew (Anacardium occidentale) is a tree in the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. ... Binomial name Sesamum indicum Sesame (Sesamum indicum)is a crop grown primarily for its seeds. ... main article Argan Argan oil is an oil produced from the fruits of the Argan (Argania spinosa) a species of tree endemic to the calcareous semi-desert of southwestern Morocco. ... Bran is the hard outer layer of cereal grains, and consists of combined aleurone and pericarp. ...


The generic term "vegetable oil" when used to label a cooking oil product refers to a blend of a variety of oils often based on corn, soybean or sunflower oils.


Oil can be flavoured by immersing aromatic food stuffs such as fresh herbs, peppers and so forth in the oil for an extended period of time. However, care must be taken when using garlic and onions to prevent the growth of botulism in this medium. Botulism (from Latin botulus, sausage) is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin, botulin, that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. ...

Contents


Health and nutrition

Fats in one form or another are necessary to our diets and are an important part of our culinary traditions, but they are also a significant health issue if consumed in excess. Regardless of the type of cooking oil being used, the key health factor is moderation in the use of fats in the diet. While they are a necessary part of a person's diet, fats should not, in most cases, provide more than a third of the daily food energy consumed. Attention must also be paid to the types of fat being used: some fats are regarded as being more healthful, while others can present clear health risks. Food energy is the amount of energy in food that is available through digestion. ...


Many cooking oils are known sources of various vitamins (A and E), minerals, amino acids, essential fatty acids, and antioxidants.


The use of peanut, cashew, or other nut-based oils can represent a significant health risk to persons with a severe nut allergy and these products must be used with an appropriate awareness and any necessary precautions. In medicine, anaphylaxis is a severe and rapid systemic allergic reaction. ...


Storing and keeping oil

Whether refined or not, all oils are sensitive to heat, light and exposure to oxygen. Rancid oil has an unpleasant aroma and acrid taste, and its nutrient value is greatly diminished.


It is best to store all oils in the refrigerator or a cool, dry place. Oils may thicken, but if you let them stand at room temperature they will soon return to liquid. To prevent negative effects of heat and light, take oils out of cold storage just long enough to use them. Refined oils high in monounsaturated fats keep up to a year, while those high in polyunsaturated fats keep about six months. Extra-virgin and virgin olive oils keep about a year after opening. Olive and other monounsaturated oils keep well up to eight months; unrefined polyunsaturated oils only about half as long.


Using Oil as a Cleaning Agent

Oil can also be used as a solvent for removing the adhesive residue tapes leave on glass and plastic. It works well for quickly removing an adhesive residue that has been left on for about 1-2 weeks. To remove the adhesive resiude using oil, you should: (1) Apply the oil to a cloth or paper towel. (2) Dab the cloth or paper towel in a little bit of oil. (3) Scrub at the surface with the damp side of the cloth or paper towel. (4) Dry the surface.**

  • Both oil and vinegar are very useful for cleaning. Oil is the most preffered substance, however, because vinegar could potentially harm the surface. Canola Oil would probably be the best type of oil to use.
    • Because oil tends to be greasy, use soap and water to wash the surface, when applicable.

Types of oils and their characteristics

Saturated fats are unhealthful in excess, but the consumption of small amounts of these oils is essential. Unsaturated fats (monounsaturated, polyunsaturated) are more generally more healthful for those consuming Western-style diets. Nutrition experts recommend that no more than 30% of a Western-style diet be composed of fats. In extremely cold environments, a diet that is up to two-thirds fat is acceptable and can, in fact, be critical to survival in that type of environment. Saturated fat is fat that consists of triglycerides containing only saturated fatty acids. ... In nutrition, monounsaturated fats are dietary fats with one double-bonded carbon in the molecule, with all of the others single-bonded carbons. ... A polyunsaturated organic compound is one in which more than one double bond exists within the representative molecule. ...

Type of Oil or Fat Saturated Mono
unsaturated
Poly
unsaturated
Smoke Point[1] Uses
Butter 66% 30% 4% 150 °C cooking, baking, condiment, sauces, flavoring
Ghee, clarified butter 65% 32% 3% 190 °C deep frying, cooking, sauteing, condiment, flavoring
Canola oil 6% 62% 32% 238 °C frying, baking, salad dressings
Coconut oil 92% 6% 2% 177 °C commercial baked goods, candy and sweets, whipped toppings, nondairy coffee creamers, shortening
Corn oil 13% 25% 62% 236 °C frying, baking, salad dressings, margarine, shortening
Cottonseed oil 24% 26% 50% 216 °C margarine, shortening, salad dressings, commercially fried products
Grape seed oil 12% 17% 71% 204 °C cooking, salad dressings, margarine
Lard 41% 47% 12% 138-201 °C[2] baking, frying
Margarine, hard 80% 14% 16% 150-160 °C[3] cooking, baking, condiment
Margarine, soft 20% 47% 33% 150-160 °C cooking, baking, condiment
Olive oil 14% 77% 9% 190 °C frying, cooking, salad dressings, condiment
Palm oil 52% 38% 10% 230 °C cooking, flavoring, vegetable oil
Peanut oil 18% 49% 33% 231 °C frying, cooking, salad oils, margarine
Safflower oil 10% 13% 77% 265 °C cooking, salad dressings, margarine
Soybean oil 15% 24% 61% 241 °C cooking, salad dressings, vegetable oil, margarine, shortening
Sunflower oil 11% 20% 69% 246 °C cooking, salad dressings, margarine, shortening
  1.   The smoke point of oils depends primarily on their free fatty acid content (FFA) and molecular weight. Through repeated use, as in a deep fryer, food residues or by-products of the cooking process will accumulate within the oil and lower its smoke point. The values shown in the above table must therefore be taken as approximate, and are not suitable for accurate or scientific use.
  1.   The smoke point of margarine varies depending on the types of oils used in its formulation, but can be generally assumed to be similar to that of butter.
Wikibooks
Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject:
Oil and fat

The smoke point refers to the point in which a cooking fat or oil is heated until it breaks down. ... Butter is commonly sold in sticks (pictured) or small blocks, and often served using a butterknife. ... Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject: Ghee Ghee (Hindi घी, from Sanskrit ghṛta घृत sprinkled) is a type of clarified butter important in Pakistani and Indian cuisine and tradition. ... Clarified butter is butter that has been rendered to separate the milk solids and water from the butter fat. ... For the figure in Celtic mythology see agriculture, canola are certain varieties of plants from which we get rapeseed oil, or the oil produced from those varieties. ... Coconut oil, also known as coconut butter, is a fat consisting of over 90 percent saturated fat extracted from coconuts and used in cosmetics and in baking as a cooking oil. ... Corn oil is oil extracted from the germ of corn. ... Cottonseed oil is a vegetable oil extracted from the seeds of the cotton plant after the cotton lint has been removed. ... Grape oil (also grapeseed oil) is a vegetable oil pressed from the seeds of various varieties of Vitis vinifera grapes, an abundant by-product of wine making. ... A slice of bread spread with lard is a typical hors dœuvre in traditional rural cuisine of many countries. ... Margarine, as a generic term, can indicate any of a wide range of butter-substitutes. ... Margarine, as a generic term, can indicate any of a wide range of butter-substitutes. ... For the cartoon character, see Olive Oyl. ... Palm oil is a form of edible vegetable oil obtained from the fruit of the Oil palm tree. ... Peanut oil is often used in cooking, because it has a mild flavour and burns only at a relatively high temperature. ... Safflower oil is an oil extracted from the safflower seed. ... Binomial name Glycine max Merr. ... Binomial name Helianthus annuus L. The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an annual plant in the Family Asteraceae with a large flower head (inflorescence). ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ...

External Links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Which cooking oil is the best? (362 words)
Therefore, based on the above classification, the "ideal" cooking oil should contain higher amount of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats and with minimal or no saturated fats and trans fats.
As long as you're using fats and oils sparingly in your cooking and preparation, it would be fine to use any one of the following "good" oils.
Choose corn oil, safflower oil, sunflower oil, soy oil or canola oil if you wish to fry foods as these oils have higher smoke point.
Cooking oil - definition of Cooking oil in Encyclopedia (113 words)
Cooking oil is purified fat of plant or animal origin, which is liquid at room temperature.
Common plant-derived cooking oils (vegetable oils) are derived from nuts, seeds, grains and beans.
Cooking oil is most often used to fry or deep-fry food, or to preserve it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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