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Encyclopedia > Cook Islands
Cook Islands
Kūki 'Āirani
Flag of Cook Islands
Flag Coat of arms
AnthemTe Atua Mou E
God is Truth

Capital
(and largest city)
Avarua
21°12′S, 159°46′W
Official languages English
Cook Islands Māori
Demonym Cook Islander
Government Constitutional monarchy
 -  Head of State Queen Elizabeth II
 -  Queen's Representative
Sir Frederick Goodwin
 -  Prime Minister Jim Marurai
Associated state
 -  Self-government in free association with New Zealand 4 August 1965 
Area
 -  Total 236 km² (209th)
91 sq mi 
Population
 -  Mar 2006 estimate 18,700 (218th (2005))
 -  2001 census 18,027 
 -  Density 76/km² (117th)
197/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2005 estimate
 -  Total $183.2 million (not ranked)
 -  Per capita $9,100 (not ranked)
Currency New Zealand dollar
(Cook Islands dollar also used) (NZD)
Time zone (UTC-10)
Internet TLD .ck
Calling code +682

The Cook Islands (Cook Islands Māori: Kūki 'Āirani) are a self-governing parliamentary democracy in free association with New Zealand. The fifteen small islands in this South Pacific Ocean country have a total land area of 240 square kilometres (92.7 sq mi), but the Cook Islands Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) covers 1.8 million square kilometres (0.7 million sq mi) of ocean.[1] Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Cook_Islands. ... Image File history File links Cook_islands_coa. ... Flag ratio: 1:2 The Flag of the Cook Islands is based on the traditional design of form British colonies of the Pacific region. ... Cook Islands has a shield as its focal point The shield contains the fifteen stars found on the national flag. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Te Atua Mou E (God is Truth; also spelled Te Atua Moue) is the national anthem of the Cook Islands. ... Image File history File links LocationCookIslands. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... This article lists details about the demographics of the Cook Islands. ... Ara Maire Noi in Avarua Avarua is a town in the north of Rarotonga Island and the national capital of Cook Islands. ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Cook Islands Māori also called Maori Kuki Airani became an official language of the Cook Islands in 2003 (1). ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A constitutional monarchy or limited monarchy is a form of government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges an elected or hereditary monarch as head of state, as opposed to an absolute monarchy, where the monarch is not... The Cook Islands are a constitutional monarchy within the Realm of New Zealand with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch, since 4 August 1965. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Prime Minister of the Cook Islands is the most powerful official within the government of the Cook Islands, a self-governing territory in free association with New Zealand. ... Jim Marurai has been the prime minister of the Cook Islands since December 14, 2004 when he was elected by Parliament by a vote of 14-9. ... An associated state is used to describe a free relationship between a territory and a larger nation. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Map of countries by population for the year 2007 This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Look up Per capita in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... ISO 4217 Code NZD User(s) New Zealand, Cook Islands, Niue, Pitcairn Islands, Tokelau Inflation 2. ... ISO 4217 Code none User(s) Cook Islands Inflation 2. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... UTC redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .ck is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for the Cook Islands. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... The Cook Islands Māori also called Maori Kuki Airani became an official language of the Cook Islands in 2003 (1). ... Pacific redirects here. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Sea areas in international rights Under the law of the sea, an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) is a seazone over which a state has special rights over the exploration and use of marine resources. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


The main population centres are on the island of Rarotonga (c.10,000), where there is an international airport. There is also a much larger population of Cook Islanders in New Zealand, particularly the North Island; in the 2006 census, 58,008 self-identified as being of ethnic Cook Island Māori descent.[2] Rarotonga Island from space, September 1994 View of a Rarotongan beach. ... North Island The North Island is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, the other being the South Island. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


With over 90,000 visitors travelling to the islands in 2006, tourism is the country's number one industry, and the leading element of the economy, far ahead of offshore banking, pearls, marine and fruit exports. Tourist redirects here. ...


Defence is the responsibility of New Zealand, in consultation with the Cook Islands and at its request. In recent times, the Cook Islands have adopted an increasingly independent foreign policy.

Contents

Politics

The politics of the Cook Islands takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic associated state, whereby the Queen of New Zealand, represented in the Cook Islands by the Queen's Representative, is Head of State and the Chief Minister is the head of government. There is a pluriform multi-party system and the islands are self-governing in free association with New Zealand and fully responsible for both internal and external affairs. New Zealand no longer has any responsibility for external affairs. As of 2005, it has diplomatic relations in its own name with eighteen other countries. Executive power is exercised by the government. Legislative power is vested in both the government and the Parliament of the Cook Islands. Politics of the Cook Islands takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic dependency, whereby the Chief Minister is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... States currently utilizing parliamentary systems are denoted in red and orange—the former being constitutional monarchies where authority is vested in a parliament, the latter being parliamentary republics whose parliaments are effectively supreme over a separate head of state. ... Representative democracy is a form of government founded on the principles of popular sovereignty by the peoples representatives. ... An associated state is used to describe a free relationship between a territory and a larger nation. ... New Zealand is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm, with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch, since February 6, 1952. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ... The head of government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... A Free Association is an association which meets certain mostly negative criteria. ... Under the doctrine of the separation of powers, the executive is the branch of a government charged with implementing, or executing, the law. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... The Parliament of the Cook Islands or Legislative Council has 24 members, elected for a five year term in single-seat constuencies The parliament building of the Cook Islands that used to be a hotel. ...


The Cook Islands are not United Nations full members but participate in WHO and UNESCO. UN redirects here. ... Look up who in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Org type Specialized Agency Acronyms UNESCO Head Director General of UNESCO Koïchiro Matsuura Japan Status Active Established 1945 Website www. ...


The Judiciary is independent of the executive and the legislature. In the law, the judiciary or judicial system is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ...


Historical dates

1595 — Spaniard Álvaro de Mendaña de Neira is the first European to sight the islands. Álvaro de Mendaña de Neira. ...


1606 — Spaniard Pedro Fernández de Quirós made the first recorded European landing in the islands when he set foot on Rakahanga. Pedro Fernández de Quirós (1565 - 1614) (in Portuguese Pedro Fernandes de Queirós), was a Portuguese seaman and explorer. ...


1773 — Captain James Cook explores the islands and names them the Hervey Islands. Fifty years later they are renamed in his honour by Russian admiral and explorer Krusenstern. A Royal Navy captains rank insignia. ... This article is about the British explorer. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... See also explorations, sea explorers, astronaut, conquistador, travelogue, the History of Science and Technology and Biography. ... Ivan Kruzenstern Adam Johann Ritter von (knight of) Krusenstern (born November 19, 1770 in Hagudi, close to Rapla, in the Russian province of Estonia, died August 24, 1846 in Reval, now Tallinn, Estonia) was the Baltic German admiral and explorer in Russian Service who in 1803-1806 led the first...


1821 — English and Tahitian missionaries arrive, become the first non-native settlers.


1858 — The Cook Islands become united as a state, the Kingdom of Rarotonga.


1888 — Cook Islands are proclaimed a British protectorate and a single federal parliament is established.


1901 — The Cook Islands are annexed to New Zealand.


1924 — The All Blacks Invincibles stop in Rarotonga on their way to the United Kingdom and play a friendly match against a scratch Rarotongan team. First international Australia 3 - 22 New Zealand (15 August 1903) Largest win New Zealand 145 - 17 Japan (4 June 1995) Worst defeat Australia 28 - 7 New Zealand (28 August 1999) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Champions, 1987 All Black redirects here. ...


1946 — Legislative Council is established. For the first time since 1912, the territory has direct representation.


1965 — The Cook Islands become a self-governing territory in free association with New Zealand. Albert Henry, leader of the Cook Islands Party, is elected as the territory's first prime minister.


1974Albert Henry is knighted by Queen Elizabeth II Albert Royle Henry (1907 - 1981) was the former first Premier of the Cook Islands and a colorful and charismatic figure in Cook Islands politics for many years. ...


1979 — Sir Albert Henry is found guilty of electoral fraud and stripped of his premiership and his knighthood. Tom Davis becomes Premier. Albert Royle Henry (1907 - 1981) was the former first Premier of the Cook Islands and a colorful and charismatic figure in Cook Islands politics for many years. ... Sir Thomas (Tom) Davis KBE (June 11, 1917 Rarotonga - July 23, 2007 Rarotonga) was a former Prime Minister of the Cook Islands and a medical researcher. ...


1981 — Constitution is amended. Parliament grows from 22 to 24 seats and the parliamentary term is extended from four to five years. Tom Davis is knighted.


1985 — Rarotonga Treaty is open for signing in the Cook Islands creating a nuclear free zone in the South Pacific.


1986 — In January 1986, following the rift between New Zealand and the USA in respect of the ANZUS security arrangements Prime Minister Tom Davis declared the Cook Islands a neutral country, because he considered that New Zealand (which has control over the islands' defence and foreign policy) was no longer in a position to defend the islands. The proclamation of neutrality meant that the Cook Islands would not enter into a military relationship with any foreign power, and, in particular, would prohibit visits by US warships. Visits by US naval vessels were allowed to resume by Henry's Government.


1991 — The Cook Islands signed a treaty of friendship and co-operation with France, covering economic development, trade and surveillance of the islands' EEZ. The establishment of closer relations with France was widely regarded as an expression of the Cook Islands' Government's dissatisfaction with existing arrangements with New Zealand which was no longer in a position to defend the Cook Islands.


1995 — The French Government resumed its Programme of nuclear-weapons testing at Mururoa Atoll in September 1995 upsetting the Cook Islands. Henry was fiercely critical of the decision and dispatched a vaka (traditional voyaging canoe) with a crew of Cook Islands' traditional warriors to protest near the test site. The tests were concluded in January 1996 and a moratorium was placed on future testing by the French government.


1997 — Full diplomatic relations established with China.


1997 — In November, Cyclone Martin in Manihiki kills at least six people; 80% of buildings are damaged and the black pearl industry suffered severe losses.


2000 — Full diplomatic relations concluded with France.


2002 — Prime Minister Terepai Maoate is ousted from government following second vote of no-confidence in his leadership.


2004 — Prime Minister Robert Woonton visits China; Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao grants $16 m in development aid.


2006 — Parliamentary elections held. The Democratic Party keeps majority of seats in parliament, but parliament is unable to meet due to petitions filed by the Cook Islands Party over alleged voting irregularities.


Geography

The Cook Islands are in the South Pacific Ocean, north-east of New Zealand, between French Polynesia and Fiji. There are fifteen major islands, spread over 2.2 million square kilometres of ocean, divided into two distinct groups: the Southern Cook Islands, and the Northern Cook Islands of coral atolls.[3] The Cook Islands can be divided into two groups. ... Portion of a Pacific atoll showing two islets on the ribbon or barrier reef separated by a deep pass between the ocean and the lagoon. ...


The islands were formed by volcanic activity; the northern group is older and consists of six atolls (sunken volcanoes topped by coral growth). The climate is moderate to tropical. Portion of a Pacific atoll showing two islets on the ribbon or barrier reef separated by a deep pass between the ocean and the lagoon. ... Extant Subclasses and Orders Alcyonaria    Alcyonacea    Helioporacea Zoantharia    Antipatharia    Corallimorpharia    Scleractinia    Zoanthidea [1][2]  See Anthozoa for details For other uses, see Coral (disambiguation). ...

The fifteen islands are grouped as follows: Image File history File links Cook-Islands-map. ...

Aerial view of Aitutaki Aitutaki, traditionally known as Araura, is one of the Cook Islands, north of Rarotonga. ... Aerial view of Atiu Atiu, also known as Enuamanu (meaning land of the birds), is an island lying at 187 km to the northeast of Rarotonga, in the Southern Islands group of the Cook Islands Archipelago. ... Mangaia (traditionally known as Auau Enua - which means terraced) is the most southerly of the Cook Islands and the second largest, after Rarotonga. ... Rarotonga Island from space, September 1994 View of a Rarotongan beach. ... Palmerston Island is the name of a coral atoll in the Cook Islands in the Pacific Ocean about 500 km northwest of Rarotonga. ... Manuae is an uninhabited atoll in the southern group of the Cook Islands 100 kilometres south-east of Aitutaki. ... Mitiaro Cook Islands THE FOURTH largest island in the Cooks group, Mitiaro is of volcanic origin. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Penrhyn Island (also called Tongareva or Mangarongaro) is the most remote and largest atoll of the 15 Cook Islands in the south Pacific Ocean, 1365 km (848 miles) north-north-east of Rarotonga, 9 degrees below the equator. ... Pukapuka is a coral atoll in the Cook Islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... Rakahanga Atoll, part of the Cook Islands in the central-southern Pacific Ocean, is a paradise not yet spoilt by tourism and it is a long way from civilisation, being 1000 kilometres from Rarotonga]. The most recent claim to fame is that pearls can now be successfully grown in the... Map of Cook Islands with Suwarrow near the middle Suwarrow (also called Suvorov or Suvarov) is a low coral atoll in the Cook Islands in the Pacific Ocean. ...

History

Beach on Rarotonga.
Beach on Rarotonga.
Main article: History of the Cook Islands

The Cook Islands were first settled in the 6th century A.D. by Polynesian people who migrated from nearby Tahiti, to the southeast.[4] Photo taken from Rarotonga. ... Photo taken from Rarotonga. ... Rarotonga Island from space, September 1994 View of a Rarotongan beach. ... The Cook Islands are named from a [[Russian naval chart of the early 1880s, after Captain James Cook, who visited the islands in 1773 and 1779. ... Look up AD in Wiktionary, the free dictionary AD or ad may stand for: ad or advertisement, see advertising ad- prefix Administrative domain Air Defence Andorra, ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country code Anno Domini (In the Year of [Our] Lord). This year is A.D. 2005. ... Carving from the ridgepole of a Māori house, ca 1840 Polynesia (from Greek: πολύς many, νῆσος island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... Tahiti is the largest island in the Windward group of the French Polynesia, located in the archipelago of Society Islands in the southern Pacific Ocean. ...


Spanish ships visited the islands in the late sixteenth century; the first written record of contact with the Islands came with the sighting of Pukapuka by Spanish sailor Álvaro de Mendaña in 1595 who called it San Bernardo ("Saint Bernard"). Another Spaniard, Pedro Fernández de Quirós, made the first recorded European landing in the islands when he set foot on Rakahanga in 1606, calling it Gente Hermosa ("Beautiful People"). Pukapuka is a coral atoll in the Cook Islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... Álvaro de Mendaña de Neira or Neyra (1541 - November 1595) was a Spanish navigator. ... St. ... Pedro Fernández de Quirós (1565 - 1614) (in Portuguese Pedro Fernandes de Queirós), was a Portuguese seaman and explorer. ... Rakahanga Atoll, part of the Cook Islands in the central-southern Pacific Ocean, is a paradise not yet spoilt by tourism and it is a long way from civilisation, being 1000 kilometres from Rarotonga]. The most recent claim to fame is that pearls can now be successfully grown in the...


British navigator Captain James Cook arrived in 1773 and 1779 and named the islands the Hervey Islands; the name "Cook Islands", in honour of Cook, appeared on a Russian naval chart published in the 1820s.[5] This article is about the British explorer. ...


In 1813, John Williams, a missionary on the Endeavour (not the same ship as that of Cook), made the first official sighting of the island of Rarotonga.[6] Rarotonga Island from space, September 1994 View of a Rarotongan beach. ...


The first recorded landing on Rarotonga by Europeans was in 1814 by the Cumberland; trouble broke out between the sailors and the Islanders and many were killed on both sides.[7]


The islands saw no more Europeans until missionaries arrived from England in 1821. Christianity quickly took hold in the culture and many islanders continue to be Christian believers today.


The Cook Islands became a British protectorate at their own request in 1888, mainly to thwart French expansionism. They were transferred to New Zealand in 1901. They remained a New Zealand protectorate until 1965, at which point they became a self-governing territory in free association with New Zealand. In that year, Albert Henry of the Cook Islands Party was elected as the first Prime Minister. Sir Albert Henry led the country until he was accused of vote-rigging. He was succeeded in 1978 by Tom Davis of the Democratic Party. This article is about states protected and/or dominated by a foreign power. ... Self-governance is an abstract concept that refers to several scales of organization. ... A Free Association is an association which meets certain mostly negative criteria. ... Albert Royle Henry (1907 - 1981) was the former first Premier of the Cook Islands and a colorful and charismatic figure in Cook Islands politics for many years. ... Founded in 1964 by Albert Henry and associates, the Cook Islands Party is a personalist political party in the Cook Islands. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Thomas Davis (born January 11, 1959), American School Teacher and Independent Composer An aspiring jazz composer from the idyllic Finger Lakes region in upstate New York, Tom Davis teaches music at a public high school while tending to a family of four. ... The Democratic Party is a political party in the Cook Islands. ...


Today, the Cook Islands are essentially independent ("self-governing in free association with New Zealand") but New Zealand is tasked with overseeing the country's defence.


On June 11, 1980, the United States signed a treaty with New Zealand specifying the maritime border between the Cook Islands and American Samoa and also relinquishing its claim to the islands of Penrhyn Island, Pukapuka (Danger), Manihiki, and Rakahanga. Penrhyn Island (also called Tongareva or Mangarongaro) is the most remote and largest atoll of the 15 Cook Islands in the south Pacific Ocean, 1365 km (848 miles) north-north-east of Rarotonga, 9 degrees below the equator. ... Pukapuka is a coral atoll in the Cook Islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Rakahanga Atoll, part of the Cook Islands in the central-southern Pacific Ocean, is a paradise not yet spoilt by tourism and it is a long way from civilisation, being 1000 kilometres from Rarotonga]. The most recent claim to fame is that pearls can now be successfully grown in the...


Culture

Float parade during the annual Maeva Nui celebrations.
Float parade during the annual Maeva Nui celebrations.
See also: Music of the Cook Islands
Holidays
Date Name
January 1 New Year's Day
January 2 Day after New Year's Day
The Friday before Easter Sunday Good Friday
The day after Easter Sunday Easter Monday
April 25 ANZAC Day
The first Monday in June Queen's Birthday
during July Rarotonga Gospel Day
August 4 Constitution Day
October 26 Gospel Day
December 25 Christmas
December 26 Boxing Day

Image File history File linksMetadata Rarotonga-8-Maeva-Nui. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Rarotonga-8-Maeva-Nui. ... In the Cook Islands, Christian music is extremely popular. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... Easter (also called Pascha) is generally accounted the most important holiday of the Christian year, observed March or April each year to celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus from the dead (after his death by crucifixion; see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year, almost two... Good Friday, also called Holy Friday or Great Friday, is the Friday preceding Easter Sunday. ... Easter (also called Pascha) is generally accounted the most important holiday of the Christian year, observed March or April each year to celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus from the dead (after his death by crucifixion; see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year, almost two... Easter Monday is the day after Easter Sunday and is celebrated as a holiday in some largely Christian cultures, especially Roman Catholic cultures. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Anzac Day is commemorated by Australia and New Zealand on 25 April every year to remember members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who landed at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I. Anzac Day is also a public holiday in the Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa and... In Jersey the Lieutenant-Governor hosts a reception for the public at Government House to mark the Queens Official Birthday at which he announces recipients of Birthday Honours The Queens Birthday or Queens Official Birthday is celebrated as a public holiday in several Commonwealth countries (usually Commonwealth... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Boxing Day is a public holiday observed in many Commonwealth countries on 26 December. ...

Art

Carving - Woodcarving is a common art form in the Cook Islands. Sculpture in stone is much rarer although there are some excellent carvings in basalt by Mike Taveoni. The proximity of islands in the southern group helped produce a homogeneous style of carving but which had special developments in each island. Rarotonga is known for its fisherman's gods and staff-gods, Atiu for its wooden seats, Mitiaro, Mauke and Atiu for mace and slab gods and Mangaia for its ceremonial adzes. Most of the original wood carvings were either spirited away by early European collectors or were burned in large numbers by missionary zealots. Today, carving is no longer the major art form with the same spiritual and cultural emphasis given to it by the Maori in New Zealand. However, there are continual efforts to interest young people in their heritage and some good work is being turned out under the guidance of older carvers. Atiu, in particular, has a strong tradition of crafts both in carving and local fibre arts such as tapa. Mangaia is the source of many fine adzes carved in a distinctive, idiosyncratic style with the so-called double-k design. Mangaia also produces food pounders carved from the heavy calcite found in its extensive limestone caves. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Weaving - The outer islands produce traditional weaving of mats, basketware and hats. Particularly fine examples of rito hats are worn by women to church on Sundays. They are made from the uncurled fibre of the coconut palm and are of very high quality. The Polynesian equivalent of Panama hats, they are highly valued and are keenly sought by Polynesian visitors from Tahiti. Often, they are decorated with hatbands made of minuscule pupu shells which are painted and stitched on by hand. Although pupu are found on other islands the collection and use of them in decorative work has become a speciality of Mangaia. Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ...


Tivaevae - A major art form in the Cook Islands is tivaevae. This is, in essence, the art of making handmade patchwork quilts. Introduced by the wives of missionaries in the 19th century, the craft grew into a communal activity and is probably one of the main reasons for its popularity. Tivaivai (also spelt tīvaevae) is a form of art that Cook Islands women excell at. ...


National Flower

The National Flower of the Cook Islands is the Tiare Māori or Tiale Māoli.


Sport

Main article: Sport in the Cook Islands

Rugby union is the most popular sport in the Cook Islands with association football (soccer) and rugby league also popular.[citation needed] For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ...


See also

This article lists communications in the Cook Islands. ... This article lists details about the demographics of the Cook Islands. ... This article describes the economy of the Cook Islands. ... The Cook Islands are named from a [[Russian naval chart of the early 1880s, after Captain James Cook, who visited the islands in 1773 and 1779. ... In the Cook Islands, Christian music is extremely popular. ... Politics of the Cook Islands takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic dependency, whereby the Chief Minister is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... This article lists transport in the Cook Islands. ...

References

  1. ^ A View from the Cook Islands SOPAC
  2. ^ QuickStats About Culture and Identity - Pacific Peoples. 2006 Census. Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved on 2007-06-12.
  3. ^ "Cook Islands Travel Guide" (with description), World Travel Guide, Nexus Media Communications, 2006. Webpage: WTGuide-Cook-Islands.
  4. ^ Cook Islands Samoa2007.com
  5. ^ Cook Islands Government website
  6. ^ TEN DECADES: The Australasian Centenary History of the London Missionary Society, Rev. Joseph King (Word document)
  7. ^ History of the Cook Islands

Statistics New Zealand (Te Tari Tatau) is a New Zealand government department, and the source of the countrys official statistics. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Austronesian redirects here. ... Below is a list of countries that are home to Austronesian languages along with the most notable languages in each country. ... The Formosan languages are a group of Austronesian languages spoken 2% of the population of Taiwan, almost exclusively aboriginals. ... The Malayo-Polynesian languages are a subgroup of the Austronesian languages used by some 351 million speakers. ... Rapa Nui redirects here. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Anthem Patriots of Micronesia Capital Palikir Largest city Weno Official languages English (national), Ulithian, Woleaian, Yapese, Pohnpeian, Kosraean, and Chuukese (at state or local level) Government Constitutional government1  -  President Joseph J. Urusemal Independence from US-administered UN Trusteeship   -  Date 3 November 1986  Area  -  Total 702 km² (188th) 271 sq mi... Old photo of the people of Orchid Island, near Taiwan published in a Japanese colonial government publication, ca. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cook Islands travel guide - Wikitravel (1570 words)
The Cook Islands [1] are a self-governing parliamentary democracy in free association with New Zealand, located in Polynesia, in the middle of the South Pacific Ocean, between French Polynesia (Society Islands) to the east and Tonga to the west.
The northern Cook Islands are seven low-lying, sparsely populated, coral atolls.
Cook Islands Maori is sometimes also called Rarotongan after the capital island and is the most widely spoken version of Maori in the Islands.
Cook Islands - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (977 words)
Politics of the Cook Islands takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic associated state, whereby the Queen of New Zealand, represented in the Cook Islands by the Queen's Representative, is Head of State, and the Chief Minister is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system.
The cook islands are in the South Pacific Ocean, north-east of New Zealand, between French Polynesia and Fiji.
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