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Encyclopedia > Conversion of units

Conversion of units refers to conversion factors between different units of measurement for the same quantity. The former Weights and Measures office in Middlesex, England. ... Quantity is a kind of property which exists as magnitude or multitude. ...

Contents

Techniques

Dimensioned values

Carrying units through a mathematical operation is sometimes performed.


e.g. to convert 6 feet into metres. From below one foot is exactly 0.3048 metre. Thus:

6 ft × 0.3048 m/ft = 1.8288 m

This leaves only metres, the desired result.


This works because the numerator and denominator describe the same quantity, the factor is equivalent to the number 1. Therefore, multiplication by this factor does not change the measured quantity, only its units.


Rounding of results

The process of making a conversion cannot produce a more precise result than the original quoted figure. Appropriate rounding of results is normally performed after conversion. (See significant figures). Rounding to n significant figures is a form of rounding. ...


In the above example the 0.3048 metre per foot is precise by definition, but the precision of the answer is determined by the precision of the 6 ft figure and in many cases the result would need rounding perhaps to 1.8 m.


Tables of conversion factors

Legend

Legend
definition
= exactly equal to
approximately equal to
(digits) indicates the digits repeat infinitely

Length

Length
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
metre (SI base unit) m ≡ 1 m = 1 m
ångström Å = 0.1 nm ≡ 1×10−10 m
astronomical unit AU Mean distance from Earth to the Sun = 149 597 870 691 ± 30 m
atomic unit of length a0 ≡ Bohr radius of hydrogen ≈ 5.29 177 208 59×10−11 ± 3.6×10−20 m[1]
barley corn   ≡ ⅓ in = 0.0846 m
Bohr radius a0; b α/4πR ≈ 5.291 772 083×10−11 ± 19×10−20 m
cable length (Imperial)   ≡ 608 ft = 185.3184 m
cable length (International)   ≡ 1/10 nmi = 185.2 m
cable length (U.S.)   ≡ 720 ft = 219.456 m
calibre cal ≡ 1 in = 0.000254 m
chain (Gunter's; Surveyor's) ch ≡ 66.0 ft (4 rods) = 20.1168 m
chain (Ramsden's; Engineer's) ch ≡ 100 ft = 30.48 m
cubit   ≡ 18 in = 0.4572 m
ell ell ≡ 45 in = 1.143 m
fathom fm ≡ 6 ft = 1.8288 m
fathom fm ≈ 1/1000 nmi = 1.852 m
fermi fm ≡ 1×10−15 m = 1×10−15 m
finger   ≡ 7/8 in = 0.00022225 m
finger (cloth)   ≡ 4 ½ in = 0.1143 m
foot (Benoît) ft (Ben) ≈ 0.304 799 735 m
foot (Clarke's; Cape) ft (Cla) ≈ 0.304 797 265 4 m
foot (Indian) ft Ind ≈ 0.304 799 514 m
foot (International) ft ≡ 12 inches = 1/3 yd = 0.3048 m
foot (Sear's) ft (Sear) ≈ 0.304 799 47 m
foot (U.S. Survey) ft (US) ≡ 1200/3937 m [2] ≈ 0.304 800 610 m
french; charriere F ≡ 1/3 mm = 3.3 ×10−4 m
furlong fur ≡ 10 chains = 660 ft =220 yd = 201.168 m
geographical mile ≡ 6082 ft = 1853.7936 m
hand   ≡ 4 in = 0.1016 m
inch in ≡ 1/36 yd = 1/12 ft = 0.0254 m
league lea ≡ 3 mi = 4828.032 m
light-day   ≡ 24 light-hours = 2.590 206 837 12×1013 m
light-hour   ≡ 60 light-minutes = 1.079 252 848 8×1012 m
light-minute   ≡ 60 light-seconds = 1.798 754 748×1010 m
light-second   ≡ 2.997 924 58×108 m
light-year l.y. c0 × 86 400 × 365.25 = 9.460 730 472 580 8×1015 m
line ln ≡ 1/12 in (Klein 1988, 63) ≈ 0,00 002 116 667 m
link (Gunter's; Surveyor's) lnk ≡ 1/100 ch = 0.201 168 m
link (Ramsden's; Engineer's) lnk ≡ 1 ft = 0.3048 m
mickey   ≡ 1/200 in = 1.27×10−4 m
micron µ ≡ 1×10−6 m
mil; thou mil ≡ 1×10−3 in = 2.54×10−5 m
mil (Sweden and Norway) mil ≡ 10 km = 10000 m
mile mi ≡ 1760 yd = 5280 ft = 1609.344 m
mile (U.S. Survey) mi ≡ 5280 ft (US) = 5280 × 1200/3937 m ≈ 1609.347 219 m
nail (cloth)   ≡ 2 ¼ in = 0.000 571 5 m
nautical league NL; nl ≡ 3 nmi = 5556 m
nautical mile(international) NM; nmi ≡ 1852 m [3] 1852 m
nautical mile (Admiralty) NM (Adm); nmi (Adm) ≡ 6080 ft ≡ 1853.184 m
pace   ≡ 2.5 ft = 0.762 m
palm   ≡ 3 in = 0.000 762 m
parsec pc = 3.08567782 ×1016 ± 6×106 m [4]
point (ATA) pt ≡ 0.013837 in = 0.003 514 598 m
point (Didot; European) pt ≡ 0.00 376 065 m
point (metric) pt ≡ 3/8 mm = 0.00 375 m
point (PostScript) pt ≡ 1/72 in ≈ 0.00 352 778 m
quarter   ≡ ¼ yd = 0.2286 m
rod; pole; perch rd ≡ 16 ½ ft = 5.0292 m
rope rope ≡ 20 ft = 6.096 m
span   ≡ 6 in = 0.1524 m
span (cloth)   ≡ 9 in = 0.2286 m
spat[3] ≡ 1012 m = 1×1012 m
stick   ≡ 2 in = 0.05 08 m
stigma; pm   ≡ 1×10−12 m ≡ 1×10−12 m
telegraph mile mi ≡ 6087 ft = 1855.3176 m
twip twp ≡ 1/1440 in ≈ 1.763 889×10−5 m
x unit; siegbahn xu ≈ 1.0021×10−13 m
yard (International) yd ≡3 ft ≡ 36 in = 0.9144 m[2]

For other uses of this word, see Length (disambiguation). ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... The SI system of units defines seven SI base units: physical units defined by an operational definition. ... An Ã¥ngström or aangstroem (the official transliteration), or angstrom (symbol Ã…) is a non-SI unit of length that is internationally recognized, equal to 0. ... The astronomical unit (AU or au or a. ... Atomic units (au) form a system of units convenient for electromagnetism, atomic physics, and quantum electrodynamics, especially when the focus is on the properties of electrons. ... In the Bohr model of the structure of an atom, put forward by Niels Bohr in 1913, electrons orbit a central nucleus. ... The fine-structure constant or Sommerfeld fine-structure constant, usually denoted , is the fundamental physical constant characterizing the strength of the electromagnetic interaction. ... The Rydberg constant, named after physicist Janne Rydberg, is a physical constant discovered when measuring the spectrum of hydrogen, and building upon results from Anders Jonas Ã…ngström and Johann Balmer. ... A cable length is a nautical unit of measure, for which at least four definitions seem to exist: Common definition: 1/10 nautical mile, i. ... The word caliber (American English) or calibre (British English) comes from the Italian calibro, itself from the Arabic quâlib, meaning mould. ... As a unit of measurement within the Imperial system, the chain (surveyors chain, Gunters chain) is defined as 22 yards, 66 feet, or four rods. ... Edmund Gunter (1581 - December 10, 1626), English mathematician, of Welsh extraction, was born in Hertfordshire in 1581. ... As a unit of measurement within the Imperial system, the chain (surveyors chain, Gunters chain) is defined as 22 yards, 66 feet, or four rods. ... Jesse Ramsden (October 6, 1735 - November 5, 1800) was an English astronomical instrument maker. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... The geographical mile is a unit of length determined by 1 minute of arc along the Earths equator, approximately equal to 1855 metres (6087. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... For other uses, see league. ... A light day (also written light-day) is a unit of length. ... A light hour (also written light-hour) is a unit of length. ... A light minute (also written light-minute) is a unit of length. ... A light second is a unit of length. ... A light-year or lightyear (symbol: ly) is a unit of measurement of length, specifically the distance light travels in vacuum in one year. ... A micrometre (American spelling: micrometer, symbol µm) is an SI unit of length equal to one millionth of a metre, or about a tenth of the diameter of a droplet of mist or fog. ... A thou, also known as a mil, is a unit of length equal to one thousandth of an international inch. ... A mil (Norwegian and Swedish for mile) is a unit of length, usually used to measure geographic distance, fairly common in Norway and Sweden. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... A nautical mile or sea mile is a unit of length. ... A nautical mile or sea mile is a unit of length. ... A parsec is the distance from the Earth to an astronomical object which has a parallax angle of one arcsecond. ... For the literary term, see Postscript. ... A rod is a unit of length, equal to 5. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... A twip (loosely from twentieth of a point) is a typographical measurement, defined as 1/20 of a typographical point. ... The X-unit (symbol xu) is a unit of length formerly used to measure the wavelength of X-rays and gamma rays. ... The X-unit (symbol xu) is a unit of length formerly used to measure the wavelength of X-rays and gamma rays. ... A yard (abbreviation: yd) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...

Area

Area
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
acre ac ≡ 10 sq ch = 4840 sq yd = 4046.856 422 4 m²
are a ≡ 100 m²
barn b ≡ 10−28
barony   ≡ 4000 ac = 1.618 742 568 96×107
board bd ≡ 1 in × 1 ft = 7.741 92×10−3
boiler horsepower equivalent direct radiation bhp EDR ≡ (1 ft²) (1 bhp) / (240 BTUIT/h) ≈ 12.958 174 m²
circular inch circ in ≡ π/4 sq in ≈ 5.067 075×10−4
circular mil; circular thou circ mil ≡ π/4 mil² ≈ 5.067 075×10−10
cord   ≡ 192 bd = 1.486 448 64 m²
dunam   ≡ 1000 m² = 1000 m²
hectare ha ≡ 10 000 m² = 10 000 m²
hide   ≡ 100 ac = 4.046 856 422 4×105
rood ro ≡ ¼ ac = 1011.714 105 6 m²
square chain sq ch ≡ 1 sq ch = 404.685 642 24 m²
square foot sq ft ≡ 1 sq ft = 9.290 304×10−2
square inch sq in ≡ 1 sq in = 6.4516×10−4
square kilometre km² ≡ 1 km² = 106
square link sq lnk ≡ 1 lnk² = 4.046 856 422 4×10−2
square metre (SI unit) ≡ 1 m × 1 m = 1 m²
square mil; square thou sq mil ≡ 1 sq mil = 6.4516×10−10
square mile; section sq mi ≡ 1 sq mi = 2.589 988 110 336×106
square rod/pole/perch sq rd ≡ 1 sq rd = 25.292 852 64 m²
square U.S. Survey foot sq ft ≡ 1 sq ft (US) ≈ 9.290 341 161 327 49×10-2
square U.S. Survey mile sq mi ≡ 1 sq mi (US) ≈ 2.589 998×106
square yard sq yd ≡ 1 sq yd = 0.836 127 36 m²
stremma   ≡ 1000 m² = 1000 m²
township   ≡ 36 sq mi (US) ≈ 9.323 994×107
yardland   ≡ 30 ac = 1.214 056 926 72×105

Area is the measure of how much exposed area any two dimensional object has. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... An are (symbol a) is a unit of area, equal to 100 square meters (10 m × 10 m), used for measuring land area. ... A barn (symbol b) is a unit of area. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A dunam or dönüm, dunum, donum is a unit of area. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... The hide was a variable unit of land area used in medieval England, defined according to its arable yield and taxable potential rather than its exact dimensions. ... A square foot is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 foot long. ... A square inch is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 inch long. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Foot (disambiguation). ... “Miles” redirects here. ... -1... The stremma (Greek:στρέμμα, plural στρέμματα) is a Greek unit of land area, equal to 1000 square metres, also called the royal stremma. ... Survey township, sometimes called Congressional township, as used by the United States Public Land Survey System, refers to a square unit of land, that is nominally six (U.S. Survey) miles (~9. ...

Volume

Volume
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
acre foot ac ft ≡ 1 ac x 1 ft = 43560 ft³ = 1233.5 m³
cubic metre (SI unit) ≡ 1 m × 1 m × 1 m = 1 m³
litre L ≡ 1 dm³ [5] = 0.001 m³
lambda λ ≡ 1 mm³ = 1 ×10−9
drop (metric)   ≡ 1/20 mL = 5 ×10−9
minim (Imperial) min ≡ 1/480 fl oz (Imp) = 1/60 fl dr (Imp) ≈ 5.9 193 880 208 333 ×10−9
minim (U.S.) min ≡ 1/480 US fl oz = 1/60 US fl dr = 6.1 611 519 921 875 ×10−9
drop (U.S.) (alt) gtt ≡ 1/456 US fl oz ≈ 6.4 854 231 ×10−9
drop (Imperial) (alt) gtt ≡ 1/1824 gi (Imp) ≈ 7.7 886 684 ×10−9
drop (U.S.) gtt ≡ 1/360 US fl oz = 8.2 148 693 229 16 ×10−9
drop (medical)   ≡ 1/12 mL = 83 ×10−9
drop (Imperial) gtt ≡ 1/288 fl oz (Imp) = 9.8 656 467 0138 ×10−9
dash (U.S.)   ≡ 1/96 US fl oz = ½ US pinch = 0.0308 057 599 609 375 ×10−6
dash (Imperial)   ≡ 1/384 gi (Imp) = ½ pinch (Imp) = 0.0369 961 751 302 083 ×10−6
pinch (U.S.)   ≡ 1/48 US fl oz = ⅛ US tsp = 0.0616 115 199 218 75 ×10−6
pinch (Imperial)   ≡ 1/192 gi (Imp) = ⅛ tsp (Imp) = 0.0739 923 502 604 16 ×10−6
fluid scruple (Imperial) fl s ≡ 1/24 fl oz (Imp) = 0.1183 877 604 16 ×10−6
fluid drachm (Imperial) fl dr ≡ ⅛ fl oz (Imp) = 0.3551 632 812 5 ×10−6
fluid dram (U.S.); U.S. fluidram fl dr ≡ ⅛ US fl oz = 0.3696 691 195 312 5 ×10−6
teaspoon (Canadian) tsp ≡ 1/6 fl oz (Imp) ≈ 0.4735 510 416 667 ×10−6
teaspoon (U.S.) tsp ≡ 1/6 US fl oz = 0.4928 921 595 ×10−6
teaspoon (metric)   ≡ 0.5 ×10−6
teaspoon (Imperial) tsp ≡ 1/24 gi (Imp) = 0.5919 388 020 83 ×10−6
dessertspoon (Imperial)   ≡ 1/12 gi (Imp) = 1.1838 776 0416 ×10−6
tablespoon (Canadian) tbsp ≡ ½ fl oz (Imp) = 1.4206 531 25 ×10−6
tablespoon (U.S.) tbsp ≡ ½ US fl oz = 1.4786 764 782 5 ×10−6
tablespoon (metric)   ≡ 1.5 ×10−6
cubic inch cu in ≡ 1 cu in = 1.6387 064 ×10−6
tablespoon (Imperial) tbsp ≡ 5/8 fl oz (Imp) = 1.7758 164 0625 ×10−6
pony   ≡ 3/4 US fl oz = 2.218 014 717 187 5 ×10−6
fluid ounce (Imperial) fl oz (Imp) ≡ 1/160 gal (Imp) = 2.8413 062 5 ×10−6
fluid ounce (U.S.) US fl oz ≡ 1/128 gal (US) = 2.9573 529 5625 ×10−6
shot   ≡ 1 US fl oz = 2.9573 529 5625 ×10−6
jigger   ≡ 1½ US fl oz = 4.4360 294 343 75 ×10−6
gill (U.S.) gi (US) ≡ 4 US fl oz = 11.8294 118 25 ×10−6
gill (Imperial); Noggin gi (Imp); nog ≡ 5 fl oz (Imp) = 14.2065 312 5 ×10−6
cup (Canadian) c (CA) ≡ 8 fl oz (Imp) = 22.73045 ×10−6
cup (U.S.) c (US) ≡ 8 US fl oz ≡ 1/16 gal (US) = 23.6588 2365 ×10−6
cup (metric) c ≡ 25.0 ×10−6
breakfast cup   ≡ 10 fl oz (Imp) = 28.4130 625 ×10−6
pint (U.S. fluid) pt (US fl) ≡ ⅛ gal (US) = 47.3176 473 ×10−6
pint (U.S. dry) pt (US dry) ≡ 1/64 bu (US lvl) ≡ ⅛ gal (US dry) = 0.000 550 610 471 3575 m³
pint (Imperial) pt (Imp) ≡ ⅛ gal (Imp) = 0.000 568 261 25 m³
fifth   ≡ 1/5 US gal = 0.000 757 082 356 8 m³
quart (U.S. fluid) qt (US) ≡ ¼ gal (US fl) = 0.000 946 352 946 m³
quart (U.S. dry) qt (US) ≡ 1/32 bu (US lvl) = ¼ gal (US dry) = 0.001 101 220 942 715 m³
quart (Imperial) qt (Imp) ≡ ¼ gal (Imp) = 0.001 136 522 5 m³
pottle; quartern   ≡ ½ gal (Imp) = 80 fl oz (Imp) = 0.002 273 045 m³
board-foot fbm ≡ 144 cu in = 0.002 359 737 216 m³
gallon (U.S. fluid; Wine) gal (US) ≡ 231 cu in = 0.003 785 411 784 m³
gallon (U.S. dry) gal (US) ≡ ⅛ bu (US lvl) = 0.004 404 883 770 86 m³
gallon (Imperial) gal (Imp) = 0.004 546 09 m³
beer gallon beer gal ≡ 282 cu in = 0.004 621 152 048 m³
peck (U.S. dry) pk ≡ ¼ US lvl bu = 0.008 809 767 541 72 m³
peck (Imperial) pk ≡ 2 gal (Imp) = 0.009 092 18 m³
bucket (Imperial) bkt ≡ 4 gal (Imp) = 0.018 184 36 m³
timber foot   ≡ 1 cu ft = 0.028 316 846 592 m³
cubic foot cu ft ≡ 1 ft × 1 ft × 1 ft = 0.028 316 846 592 m³
firkin   ≡ 9 gal (US) = 0.034 068 706 056 m³
bushel (U.S. dry level) bu (US lvl) ≡ 2150.42 cu in = 0.035 239 070 166 88 m³
bushel (Imperial) bu (Imp) ≡ 8 gal (Imp) = 0.036 368 72 m³
bushel (U.S. dry heaped) bu (US) ≡ 1 ¼ bu (US lvl) = 0.044 048 837 708 6 m³
strike (U.S.)   ≡ 2 bu (US lvl) = 0.070 478 140 333 76 m³
strike (Imperial)   ≡ 2 bu (Imp) = 0.072 737 44 m³
kilderkin   ≡ 18 gal (Imp) = 0.081 829 62 m³
sack (U.S.)   ≡ 3 bu (US lvl) = 0.105 717 210 500 64 m³
sack (Imperial); bag   ≡ 3 bu (Imp) = 0.109 106 16 m³
barrel (U.S. dry) bl (US) ≡ 105 qt (US) = 105/32 bu (US lvl) = 0.115 628 198 985 075 m³
barrel (U.S. fluid) fl bl (US) ≡ 31½ gal (US) = 0.119 240 471 196 m³
coomb   ≡ 4 bu (Imp) = 0.145 474 88 m³
barrel (petroleum) bl; bbl ≡ 42 gal (US) = 0.158 987 294 928 m³
barrel (Imperial) bl (Imp) ≡ 36 gal (Imp) = 0.163 659 24 m³
hogshead (U.S.) hhd (US) ≡ 2 fl bl (US) = 0.238 480 942 392 m³
seam   ≡ 8 bu (US lvl) = 0.281 912 561 335 04 m³
quarter; pail   ≡ 8 bu (Imp) = 0.290 949 76 m³
hogshead (Imperial) hhd (Imp) ≡ 2 bl (Imp) = 0.327 318 48 m³
cord-foot   ≡ 16 cu ft = 0.453 069 545 472 m³
butt, pipe   ≡ 126 gal (wine) = 0.476 961 884 784 m³
perch per ≡ 16½ ft × 1½ ft × 1 ft = 0.700 841 953 152 m³
cubic yard cu yd ≡ 27 cu ft = 0.764 554 857 984 m³
tun   ≡ 252 gal (wine) = 0.953 923 769 568 m³
displacement ton   ≡ 35 cu ft = 0.991 089 630 72 m³
water ton   ≡ 28 bu (Imp) = 1.018 324 16 m³
freight ton   ≡ 40 cu ft = 1.132 673 863 68 m³
wey (U.S.)   ≡ 40 bu (US lvl) = 1.409 562 806 675 2 m³
load   ≡ 50 cu ft = 1.415 842 329 6 m³
register ton   ≡ 100 cu ft = 2.831 684 659 2 m³
last   ≡ 80 bu (Imp) = 2.909 497 6 m³
cord (firewood)   ≡ 8 ft × 4 ft × 4 ft = 3.624 556 363 776 m³
cubic fathom cu fm ≡ 1 fm × 1 fm × 1 fm = 6.116 438 863 872 m³
acre-inch   ≡ 1 ac × 1 in = 102.790 153 128 96 m³
acre-foot   ≡ 1 ac × 1 ft = 1233.481 837 547 52 m³
cubic mile cu mi ≡ 1 cu mi = 4.168 181 825 440 579 584 ×109

For other uses, see Volume (disambiguation). ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An acre foot is a unit of volume commonly used in the United States in reference to large-scale water resources, such as reservoirs, aqueducts, canals, and river flows. ... The cubic meter (symbol m³) is the SI derived unit of volume. ... The litre or liter (see spelling differences) is a unit of volume. ... Lambda (upper case Λ, lower case λ) is the 11th letter of the Greek alphabet. ... The drop is a unit of measure of volume. ... A minim is a small amount of fluid. ... ... Also see the article :  Greek drachma. ... Also see the article :  Greek drachma. ... Image:Teaspoon sugar. ... The most commonly used spoon in most houses the dessertspoon is probably what youre used to eating your breakfast with. ... This tablespoon has a capacity of about 1 tbsp. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A fluid ounce is a unit of volume in both the Imperial system of units and the U.S. customary units system. ... For other uses, see Gill (disambiguation). ... The cup is a unit of measurement for volume, used in cooking to measure bulk foods, such as chopped vegetables (dry measurement), and liquids (fluid measurement). ... The pint is an English unit of volume or capacity in the imperial system and United States customary units, equivalent in each system to one half of a quart, and one eighth of a gallon. ... For other uses, see Quart (disambiguation). ... The board-foot is a specialized unit of volume for measuring lumber in the United States and Canada. ... The gallon (abbreviation: gal) is a unit of volume. ... A 1/2 peck apple bag A peck is an Imperial and U.S. customary unit of dry volume, equivalent in each of these systems to 8 dry quarts, or 16 dry pints. ... A 1/2 peck apple bag A peck is an Imperial and U.S. customary unit of dry volume, equivalent in each of these systems to 8 dry quarts, or 16 dry pints. ... A bucket (bkt. ... It has been suggested that Thousand Cubic Feet be merged into this article or section. ... A Firkin is an old English unit of volume. ... A table of weights from the secretaries of the different states, showing the no. ... The kilderkin is an old English unit of brewery casks, holding about 82 litres. ... The word sack can refer to: Look up sack in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... “bbl” redirects here. ... Coomb may refer to: Coomb, a rare Celtic Brythonic survival word; meaning a small deep dry valley, easily defended. ... A hogshead is a large cask of liquid (less often, of a food commodity). ... Seam may mean: A seam, in sewing, is the line where two or more layers of fabric are held together by thread. ... This article is about the physical container. ... The butt (from the medieval French and Italian ) or pipe is an old English unit of wine casks, holding about 477 litres or rather two hogsheads. ... Species P. flavescens (Yellow perch) P. fluviatilis (European perch) P. schrenkii (Balkhash perch) For other meanings of the word perch, including fish not in the Perca genus, see Perch (disambiguation). ... A yard (abbreviation: yd) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A wey is a unit of mass used in England since before 900 CE. The value of a wey has varied over time though was originally used to denote 2 hundredweight or 256 pounds. ... For other uses, see Last (disambiguation). ... Firewood, stacked to dry Bags of firewood logged from the Barmah Forest in Victoria Wood fuel is wood used as fuel. ... A fathom is the name of a unit of length in the Imperial system (and the derived U.S. customary units). ... An acre foot is a unit of volume commonly used in the United States in reference to large-scale water resources, such as reservoirs, aqueducts, canals, and river flows. ... “Miles” redirects here. ...

Angle

Angle
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
radian rad ≡ 180°/π 1 rad
centesimal second of arc " ≡ 1 grad/10000 ≈ 1.57 079 6×10−6 rad
arcsecond " ≡ 1°/3600 ≈ 4.84 813 7×10−6 rad
centesimal minute of arc ' ≡ 1 grad/100 ≈ 15.708 0×10−6 rad
minute of arc ' ≡ 1°/60 ≈ 29.088 8×10−6 rad
angular mil µ ≡ 2π/6400 rad ≈ 98.174 8×10−6 rad
grad; gradian; gon grad ≡ 2π/400 rad = 0.9° ≈ 1.570 796 3×10−3 rad
degree (of arc) ° ≡ π/180 rad ≈ 1.745 329 3×10−3 rad
sign   ≡ 30° ≈ 0.523 599 rad
octant   ≡ 45° ≈ 0.785 398 rad
sextant   ≡ 60° ≈ 1.047 198 rad
quadrant   ≡ 90° ≈ 1.570 796 rad

This article is about angles in geometry. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the musical group, see Radian (band). ... A second of arc or arcsecond is a unit of angular measurement which comprises one-sixtieth of an arcminute, or 1/3600 of a degree of arc or 1/1296000 ≈ 7. ... A second of arc or arcsecond is a unit of angular measurement which comprises one-sixtieth of an arcminute, or 1/3600 of a degree of arc or 1/1296000 ≈ 7. ... A minute of arc, arcminute, or MOA is a unit of angular measurement, equal to one sixtieth (1/60) of one degree. ... A minute of arc, arcminute, or MOA is a unit of angular measurement, equal to one sixtieth (1/60) of one degree. ... The mil (in full, angular mil) is a unit of angular measure. ... The grad is a measurement of plane angles of value 1/400 of a full circle, thus dividing a right angle in 100. ... The gon is a measurement of plane angles, corresponding to 1/400 of a full circle, thus dividing a right angle in 100. ... The gon is a measurement of plane angles, corresponding to 1/400 of a full circle, thus dividing a right angle in 100. ... This article describes the unit of angle. ... Can refer to a region of Euclidean 3-space with a specific sign for x, y and z coordinates. ... Look up Quadrant on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Quadrant can mean: HMS Quadrant (G11), a WW-II British/Australian warship. ...

Solid angle

Solid angle
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
steradian sr (SI derived unit)

A solid angle is the three dimensional analog of the ordinary angle. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The steradian (ste from Greek stereos, solid) is the SI derived unit of solid angle, and the 3-dimensional equivalent of the radian. ... SI derived units are part of the SI system of measurement units and are derived from the seven SI base units. ...

Mass

Note: see Weight for detail of mass/weight distinction and conversion For other uses, see Weight (disambiguation). ...

Mass
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
kilogram, grave(SI base unit) kg; G = 1kg
electron rest mass me ≈ 9.109 381 88×10−31 ± 72×10−39 kg
atomic unit of mass amu[citation needed] ≡ me ≈ 9.109 381 88×10−31 ± 72×10−39 kg
unified atomic mass unit u ≈ 1.660 538 73×10−27 ± 13×10−35 kg
dalton Da ≈ 1.660 902 10×10−27 ± 13×10−35 kg
gamma γ ≡ 1 ×106 kg
point   ≡ 1/100 kt (metric) = 2 ×106 kg
mite   ≡ 1/20 gr = 3.239 945 5 ×106 kg
mite (metric)   ≡ 1/20 g = 50 ×106 kg
grain gr ≡ 64.798 91 ×106 kg
crith   ≈ 89.9349 ×106 kg
carat (metric) ct ≡ 200 ×106 kg
carat kt ≡ 3 1/6 gr ≈ 205.196 548 333 ×106 kg
sheet   ≡ 1/700 lb av = 647.9891 ×106 kg
scruple (apothecary) s ap ≡ 20 gr = 1.295 978 2 ×103 kg
pennyweight dwt; pwt ≡ 1/20 oz t = 1.555 173 84 ×103 kg
dram (avoirdupois) dr av ≡ 27 11/32 gr = 1.771 845 195 312 5 ×103 kg
dram (apothecary; troy) dr t ≡ 60 gr = 3.887 934 6 ×103 kg
hyl (CGS unit)   ≡ 1 gee × 1 g × 1 s²/m = 9.806 65 ×103 kg
ounce (avoirdupois) oz av ≡ 1/16 lb = 28.349 523 125 ×103 kg
assay ton (short) AT ≡ 1 mg × 1 sh tn ÷ 1 oz t ≈ 29.166 667 ×103 kg
ounce (apothecary; troy) oz t ≡ 1/12 lb t = 31.103 476 8 ×103 kg
assay ton (long) AT ≡ 1 mg × 1 long tn ÷ 1 oz t ≈ 32.666 667 ×103 kg
mark   ≡ 8 oz t = 248.827 814 4 ×103 kg
pound (troy) lb t ≡ 5760 grains = 0.373 241 721 6 kg
pound (avoirdupois) lb av ≡ 7000 grains = 0.453 592 37 kg
pound (metric)   ≡ 500 ×103 kg
clove   ≡ 8 lb av = 3.628 738 96 kg
stone st ≡ 14 lb av = 6.350 293 18 kg
hyl (MKS unit)   ≡ 1 gee × 1 kg × 1 s²/m = 9.806 65 kg
quarter (Imperial)   ≡ 1/4 long cwt = 2 st = 28 lb av = 12.700 586 36 kg
slug; geepound slug ≡ 1 gee × 1 lb av × 1 s²/ft ≈ 14.593 903 kg
bag (Portland cement)   ≡ 94 lb av = 42.637 682 78 kg
short hundredweight; cental sh cwt ≡ 100 lb av = 45.359 237 kg
long hundredweight long cwt or cwt ≡ 112 lb av = 50.802 345 44 kg
bag (coffee) ≡ 60 kg = 60 kg
quintal (metric) q ≡ 100 kg
wey   ≡ 252 lb = 18 st (variants exist) = 114.305 277 24 kg
long quarter (informal)   ≡ ¼ long tn = 254.011 727 2 kg
quarter (informal)   ≡ ¼ short tn = 226.796 185 kg
kip kip ≡ 1000 lb av = 453.592 37 kg
short ton sh tn ≡ 2000 lb = 907.184 74 kg
tonne (mts unit) t ≡ 1000 kg
long ton long tn or ton ≡ 2240 lb = 1016.046 908 8 kg
barge   ≡ 22 ½ sh tn = 20,411.656 65 kg
Zentner Ztr. Definitions vary; see [6] and [7]. See also discussion at Talk:Conversion of units#Zentner

In physics, the pound of mass is sometimes written lbm to distinguish it from the pound-force (lbf). It should not be read as the mongrel unit "pound metre". For other uses, see Mass (disambiguation). ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Kg redirects here. ... now. ... The SI system of units defines seven SI base units: physical units defined by an operational definition. ... For other uses, see Electron (disambiguation). ... Atomic units (au) form a system of units convenient for electromagnetism, atomic physics, and quantum electrodynamics, especially when the focus is on the properties of electrons. ... The atomic mass unit (amu), unified atomic mass unit (u), or dalton (Da), is a small unit of mass used to express atomic masses and molecular masses. ... The unified atomic mass unit (u), or dalton (Da), is a small unit of mass used to express atomic masses and molecular masses. ... A grain is a unit of mass equal to 0. ... The carat is a unit of mass used for measuring gems and pearls, and is exactly 200 milligrams. ... The carat is a unit of mass used for measuring gems and pearls, and is exactly 200 milligrams. ... The apothecaries system of mass is an obsolete system formerly used by apothecaries (now called pharmacists or chemists) in English-speaking countries. ... Interior of an apothecarys shop. ... A pennyweight (dwt) is an unit of mass which is the same as 24 grains, 1/240th of a troy pound, 1/20th of a troy ounce, approximately 0. ... The avoirdupois (IPA: ; French IPA: ) system is a system of weights (or, properly, mass) based on a pound of sixteen ounces. ... Also see the article :  Greek drachma. ... Troy ounce is a traditional unit of gold weight. ... For other meanings, see Slug (disambiguation) The slug is an English and U.S. customary unit of mass. ... This article is about Ounce (unit of mass). ... Troy weight is a system of units of mass customarily used for precious metals and gemstones. ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The stone is a unit of mass in the Imperial system of weights and measures used in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and most Commonwealth countries. ... For other meanings, see Slug (disambiguation) The slug is an English and U.S. customary unit of mass. ... Sampling fast set Portland cement Portland cement is the most common type of cement in general usage, as it is a basic ingredient of concrete, mortar and plaster. ... Hundred weight or hundredweight is a unit of measurement for mass in both the system of measurement used in the United Kingdom (and previously throughout the British Commonwealth), and in the system used in the United States. ... Hundred weight or hundredweight is a unit of measurement for mass in both the system of measurement used in the United Kingdom (and previously throughout the British Commonwealth), and in the system used in the United States. ... For other uses, see Coffee (disambiguation). ... The quintal is a historical unit of mass with many different definitions in different countries. ... A wey is a unit of mass used in England since before 900 CE. The value of a wey has varied over time though was originally used to denote 2 hundredweight or 256 pounds. ... In the United States, a kip is a unit of force that equals 1,000 pounds, i. ... The short ton is a unit of mass equal to 907. ... This article is about the metric tonne. ... The metre-tonne-second or mts system of units is a system of physical units introduced in the Soviet Union in 1933, but abolished in 1955. ... A long ton is the name used in the US for the unit called the ton in the avoirdupois or Imperial system of measurements, as used (alongside the metric system) in the United Kingdom and to some extent in other Commonwealth countries. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The pound-force is a non-SI unit of force or weight (properly abbreviated lbf or lbf). The pound-force is equal to a mass of one pound multiplied by the standard acceleration due to gravity on Earth (which is defined as exactly 9. ...


Time

Time, t
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
second(SI base unit) s = 1 s
Planck time   ≡ (G/c5)½ ≈ 1.351 211 818×10−43 s
atomic unit of time au a0/(α·c) ≈ 2.418 884 254×10−17 s
svedberg S ≡ 10−13 s = 100 fs
shake   ≡ 10−8 s = 10 ns
sigma   ≡ 10−6 s = 1 μs
jiffy   ≡ 1/60 s ≈ .016667 s
jiffy (alternate)   ≡ 1/100 s = 10 ms
helek   ≡ 1/1080 h ≈ 3.333333 s
minute min ≡ 60 s
milliday md ≡ 86 400 s / 1000 ≡ 86.4 s
moment   ≡ 90 s ≡ 90 s
ke(traditional)   ≡ 1/100 d ≡ 864 s
quarter (of an hour) ke ≡ 1/96 d ≡ 900 s
hour h ≡ 60 min = 3600 s
day d ≡ 24 h = 86 400 s
week wk ≡ 7 d = 604 800 s
fortnight   ≡ 2 wk = 1 209 600 s
month (hollow) mo ≡ 29 d = 2 505 600 s
month mo ≡ 30 d = 2 592 000 s
month (full) mo ≡ 31 d = 2 678 400 s
year (Calendar) a, y, or yr ≡ 365 d = 31 536 000 s
year (Gregorian) a, y, or yr ≡ 365.2425 d = 31 556 952 s
year (Julian) a, y, or yr ≡ 365.25 d = 31 557 600 s
sidereal year a, y, or yr ≡ 365.256363 d = 31 558 149.76 s
Olympiad   ≡ 4 a of 365 d = 1.2614×108 s
lustre; lustrum   ≡ 5 a of 365 d = 1.5768×108 s
octaeteris   ≡ 8 a of 365 d = 2.522 88×108 s
decade   ≡ 10 a of 365 d = 3.1536×108 s
enneadecaeteris; Metonic cycle   ≡ 110 mo (hollow) + 125 mo (full) = 19 a of 365 d = 5.996 16×108 s
Callippic cycle   ≡ 441 mo (hollow) + 499 mo (full) = 76 a of 365.25 d = 2.398 377 6×109 s
century (Calendar)   ≡ 100 a of 365 d = 3.1536×109 s
century (Julian)   ≡ 100 a of 365.25 d = 3.155 76×109 s
Hipparchic cycle   ≡ 4 Callippic cycles - 1 d = 9.593 424×109 s
millennium (Calendar)   ≡ 1000 a of 365 d = 3.1536×1010 s
millennium (Gregorian)   ≡ 1000 a of 365.2425 d = 3.155 695 2×1010 s
millennium (Julian)   ≡ 1000 a of 365.25 d = 3.155 76×1010 s
Sothic cycle   ≡ 1461 a of 365 d = 4.607 409 6×1010 s

This article is about the concept of time. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... The SI system of units defines seven SI base units: physical units defined by an operational definition. ... In physics, the Planck time (tP), is the unit of time in the system of natural units known as Planck units. ... The gravitational constant G is a key element in Newtons law of universal gravitation. ... Plancks constant, denoted h, is a physical constant that is used to describe the sizes of quanta. ... The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness.[1] It is the speed of all electromagnetic radiation, including visible light, in a vacuum. ... Atomic units (au) form a system of units convenient for electromagnetism, atomic physics, and quantum electrodynamics, especially when the focus is on the properties of electrons. ... In the Bohr model of the structure of an atom, put forward by Niels Bohr in 1913, electrons orbit a central nucleus. ... The fine-structure constant or Sommerfeld fine-structure constant, usually denoted , is the fundamental physical constant characterizing the strength of the electromagnetic interaction. ... A Svedberg (symbol S, sometimes Sv) is a non-SI physical unit used in ultracentrifugation. ... The helek (Hebrew, meaning portion, plural halakim) is a unit of time used in the calculation of the Hebrew calendar. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... Metric time is the measure of time interval using the metric system, which defines the second as the base unit of time, and multiple and submultiple units formed with metric prefixes, such as kiloseconds and milliseconds. ... Ke (刻) is a traditional decimal time unit equalling 14. ... Ke (刻) is a traditional decimal time unit equalling 14. ... The hour (symbol: h) is a unit of time. ... Look up day in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For more details on each day of the week, see days of the week. ... Look up fortnight in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Month in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Month in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Month in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... The sidereal year is the time for the Sun to return to the same position in respect to the stars of the celestial sphere. ... An Olympiad is a period of four years, associated with the Olympic Games of Classical Greece. ... In astronomy, an octaeteris is the period of eight solar years after which the moon phase occurs on the same day of the year plus one or two days. ... For other senses of this word, see decade (disambiguation). ... The Metonic cycle or Enneadecaeteris in astronomy and calendar studies is a particular approximate common multiple of the tropical year and the synodic month. ... The Metonic cycle or Enneadecaeteris in astronomy and calendar studies is a particular approximate common multiple of the year (specifically, the seasonal tropical year) and the synodic month. ... Eclipses may occur repeatedly, separated by some specific interval of time: this interval is called an eclipse cycle. ... A century (From the Latin cent, one hundred) is one hundred consecutive years. ... A century (From the Latin cent, one hundred) is one hundred consecutive years. ... Eclipses may occur repeatedly, separated by some specific interval of time: this interval is called an eclipse cycle. ... A millennium (pl. ... A millennium (pl. ... A millennium (pl. ... The Sothic cycle or Canicular period is a period of 1461 ancient Egyptian years (of 365 days) or 1460 Julian years (averaging 365. ...

Speed or velocity

Speed
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
metre per second (SI unit) m/s ≡ 1 m/s
foot per hour fph ≡ 1 ft/h ≈ 8.466 667×10−5 m/s
furlong per fortnight   ≡ furlong/fortnight ≈ 1.663 095×10−4 m/s
inch per minute ipm ≡ 1 in/min ≈ 4.23 333×10−4 m/s
foot per minute fpm ≡ 1 ft/min = 5.08×10−3 m/s
inch per second ips ≡ 1 in/s = 2.54×10−2 m/s
kilometre per hour km/h ≡ 1 km/h ≈ 2.777 778×10−1 m/s
foot per second fps ≡ 1 ft/s = 3.048×10−1 m/s
mile per hour mph ≡ 1 mi/h = 0.447 04 m/s
knot kn ≡ 1 NM/h = 1.852 km/h ≈ 0.514 444 m/s
knot (Admiralty) kn ≡ 1 NM (Adm)/h = 1.853 184 km/h ≈ 0.514 773 m/s
mile per minute mpm ≡ 1 mi/min = 26.8224 m/s
mile per second mps ≡ 1 mi/s = 1.609 344 km/s = 1609.344 m/s
speed of light in vacuum c ≡ 2.997 924 58×108 m/s = 2.997 924 58×108 m/s
speed of sound in air s ≡ 770 mph = 1230 km/h ≈ 344 m/s

A velocity consists of a speed combined with a direction; the speed part of the velocity takes units of speed. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Metre per second (U.S. spelling: meter per second) is an SI derived unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector), defined by distance in metres divided by time in seconds. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The hour (symbol: h) is a unit of time. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... Look up fortnight in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... Kilometre per hour (American spelling: kilometer per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ... A knot is a unit of speed abbreviated kt or kn. ... A nautical mile or sea mile is a unit of length. ... A knot is a unit of speed abbreviated kt or kn. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness.[1] It is the speed of all electromagnetic radiation, including visible light, in a vacuum. ... For other uses, see Speed of sound (disambiguation). ... This article is about velocity in physics. ...


Acceleration

Acceleration
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
metre per second squared (SI unit) m/s² ≡ 1 m/s² = 1 m/s²
foot per hour per second fph/s ≡ 1 ft/(h·s) ≈ 8.466 667×10−5 m/s²
inch per minute per second ipm/s ≡ 1 in/(min·s) ≈ 4.233 333×10−4 m/s²
foot per minute per second fpm/s ≡ 1 ft/(min·s) = 5.08×10−3 m/s²
galileo Gal ≡ 1 cm/s² = 10−2 m/s²
inch per second squared ips² ≡ 1 in/s² = 2.54×10−2 m/s²
foot per second squared fps² ≡ 1 ft/s² = 3.048×10−1 m/s²
mile per hour per second mph/s ≡ 1 mi/(h·s) = 4.4704×10−1 m/s²
knot per second kn/s ≡ 1 kn/s ≈ 5.144 444×10−1 m/s²
standard gravity g ≡ 9.806 65 m/s²
mile per minute per second mpm/s ≡ 1 mi/(min·s) = 26.8224 m/s²
mile per second squared mps² ≡ 1 mi/s² = 1.609 344×103 m/s²

Acceleration is the time rate of change of velocity and/or direction, and at any point on a velocity-time graph, it is given by the slope of the tangent to the curve at that point. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The metre (or meter) per second squared is the SI derived unit of acceleration. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The hour (symbol: h) is a unit of time. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... The galileo or gal is the CGS unit of acceleration. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... The hour (symbol: h) is a unit of time. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... A knot is a unit of speed abbreviated kt or kn. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... Gravity is a force of attraction that acts between bodies that have mass. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... This article is about the unit of time. ...

Force

Force
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
newton (SI unit) N ≡ kg·m/s² = 1 N
atomic unit of force au ≡ me·α²·c²/a0 ≈ 8.238 722 241×10−8 N
dyne (cgs unit) dyn ≡ g·cm/s² = 10−5 N
milligrave-force, gravet-force mGf; gf g × 1 g = 9.806 65 mN
poundal pdl ≡ 1 lb·ft/s² = 0.138 254 954 376 N
ounce-force ozf g × 1 oz = 0.278 013 850 953 781 2 N
pound-force lbf g × 1 lb = 4.448 221 615 260 5 N
kilogram-force; kilopond; grave-force kgf; kp; Gf g × 1 kg = 9.806 65 N
sthene (mts unit) sn ≡ 1 t·m/s² = 1 ×10−3 N
kip; kip-force kip; kipf; klbf g × 1000 lb = 4.448 221 615 260 5 ×103 N
ton-force tnf g × 1 sh tn = 8.896 443 230 521 ×103 N

See also: Conversion between weight (force) and mass In physics, a net force acting on a body causes that body to accelerate; that is, to change its velocity. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Newton (disambiguation). ... Atomic units (au) form a system of units convenient for electromagnetism, atomic physics, and quantum electrodynamics, especially when the focus is on the properties of electrons. ... The fine-structure constant or Sommerfeld fine-structure constant, usually denoted , is the fundamental physical constant characterizing the strength of the electromagnetic interaction. ... The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness.[1] It is the speed of all electromagnetic radiation, including visible light, in a vacuum. ... In the Bohr model of the structure of an atom, put forward by Niels Bohr in 1913, electrons orbit a central nucleus. ... In physics, the dyne is a unit of force specified in the centimetre-gram-second (cgs) system of units, symbol dyn. One dyne is equal to exactly 10-5 newtons. ... CGS is an acronym for centimetre-gram-second. ... now. ... g (also gee, g-force or g-load) is a non-SI unit of acceleration defined as exactly 9. ... The poundal is a non-SI unit of force. ... The pound-force is a non-SI unit of force or weight (properly abbreviated lbf or lbf). The pound-force is equal to a mass of one pound multiplied by the standard acceleration due to gravity on Earth (which is defined as exactly 9. ... The pound-force is a non-SI unit of force or weight (properly abbreviated lbf or lbf). The pound-force is equal to a mass of one pound multiplied by the standard acceleration due to gravity on Earth (which is defined as exactly 9. ... The unit kilogram-force (kgf, often just kg) or kilopond (kp) is defined as the force exerted by one kilogram of mass in standard Earth gravity. ... now. ... The metre-tonne-second or mts system of units is a system of physical units introduced in the Soviet Union in 1933, but abolished in 1955. ... In the United States, a kip is a unit of force that equals 1,000 pounds, i. ... Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Weight (disambiguation). ...


Pressure or mechanical stress

Pressure
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
atmosphere (standard) atm ≡ 101 325 Pa [8]
atmosphere (technical) at ≡ 1 kgf/cm² = 98.0665 ×10−3 Pa [8]
bar bar ≡ 105 Pa
barye (cgs unit)   ≡ 1 dyn/cm² = 0.1 Pa
centimetre of mercury cmHg ≡ 13 595.1 kg/m³ × 1 cm × g ≈ 1.333 22 ×10−3 Pa [8]
centimetre of water (4 °C) cmH2O ≈ 999.972 kg/m³ × 1 cm × g ≈ 98.0638 Pa [8]
foot of mercury (conventional) ftHg ≡ 13 595.1 kg/m³ × 1 ft × g ≈ 40.636 66 ×10−3 Pa [8]
foot of water (39.2 °F) ftH2O ≈ 999.972 kg/m³ × 1 ft × g ≈ 2.988 98 ×10−3 Pa [8]
inch of mercury (conventional) inHg ≡ 13 595.1 kg/m³ × 1 in × g ≈ 3.386 389 ×10−3 Pa [8]
inch of water (39.2 °F) inH2O ≈ 999.972 kg/m³ × 1 in × g ≈ 249.082 Pa [8]
kilogram-force per square millimetre kgf/mm² ≡ 1 kgf/mm² = 9.806 65 ×10−6 Pa [8]
kip per square inch ksi ≡ 1 kipf/sq in ≈ 6.894757 ×10−6 Pa [8]
millimetre of mercury mmHg ≡ 13 595.1 kg/m³ × 1 mm × g ≈ 1 torr ≈ 133.322 4 Pa [8]
millimetre of water (3.98 °C) mmH2O ≈ 999.972 kg/m³ × 1 mm × g = 0.999972 kgf/m² = 9.806 38 Pa
pascal (SI unit) Pa ≡ N/m² = kg/(m·s²) = 1 Pa [9]
pièze (mts unit) pz ≡ 1000 kg/m·s² = 1 ×10−3 Pa
pound per square foot psf ≡ 1 lbf/ft² ≈ 47.880 25 Pa [8]
poundal per square foot pdl/sq ft ≡ 1 pdl/sq ft ≈ 1.488 164 Pa [8]
pound per square inch psi ≡ 1 lbf/in² ≈ 6.894 757 ×10−3 Pa [8]
short ton per square foot   ≡ 1 sh tn × g / 1 sq ft ≈ 95.760 518 ×10−3 Pa
torr torr ≡ 101 325/760 Pa ≈ 133.322 4 Pa [8]

This article is about pressure in the physical sciences. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Atmospheric pressure is the pressure at any given point in the Earths atmosphere. ... Atmospheric pressure is the pressure at any given point in the Earths atmosphere. ... The bar (symbol bar), decibar (symbol dbar) and the millibar (symbol mbar, also mb) are units of pressure. ... CGS is an acronym for centimetre-gram-second. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... In the United States, a kip is a unit of force that equals 1,000 pounds, i. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The torr (symbol: Torr) or millimeter of mercury (mmHg) is a non-SI unit of pressure. ... One way of defining pressure is in terms of the height of a column of fluid that may be supported by that pressure; or the height of a column of fluid that exerts that pressure at its base. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... For other uses, see Pascal. ... The metre-tonne-second or mts system of units is a system of physical units introduced in the Soviet Union in 1933, but abolished in 1955. ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The poundal is a non-SI unit of force. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A pressure gauge reading in PSI (red scale) and kPa (black scale) The pound-force per square inch (symbol: lbf/in²) is a non-SI unit of pressure based on avoirdupois units. ... Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The torr (symbol: Torr) or millimeter of mercury (mmHg) is a non-SI unit of pressure. ...

Torque

Torque
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
Newton metre (SI unit) N·m ≡ N × m = kg·m²/s² = 1 N·m
foot-poundal ft pdl ≡ 1 lb·ft²/s² = 4.214 011 009 380 48×10−2 N·m
inch-pound force in lbf g × 1 lb × 1 in = 0.112 984 829 027 616 7 N·m
foot-pound force ft lbf g × 1 lb × 1 ft = 1.355 817 948 331 400 4 N·m

For other senses of this word, see torque (disambiguation). ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Newton metre is the unit of moment (torque) in the SI system. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The foot-pound force (symbol: ft·lbf) is an English unit of work or energy from the English Engineering System. ...

Energy

Energy
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
joule (SI unit) J ≡ m·N = W·s = V·A·s = kg·m²/s² = 1 J
electronvolt eV e × 1 V ≈ 1.602 176×10−19 J
rydberg Ry R··c ≈ 2.179 872×10−18 J
hartree Eh ≡ me·α²·c² (= 2 Ry) ≈ 4.359 744×10−18 J
atomic unit of energy au ≡ Eh ≈ 4.359 744×10−18 J
erg (cgs unit) erg ≡ 1 g·cm²/s² = 10−7 J
foot-poundal ft pdl ≡ 1 lb·ft²/s² = 4.214 011 009 380 48×10−2 J
cubic centimetre of atmosphere; standard cubic centimetre cc atm; scc ≡ 1 atm × 1 cm³ = 0.101 325 J
inch-pound force in lbf g × 1 lb × 1 in = 0.112 984 829 027 616 7 J
foot-pound force ft lbf g × 1 lb × 1 ft = 1.355 817 948 331 400 4 J
calorie (20 °C) cal20 °C ≈ 4.1819 J
calorie (thermochemical) calth ≡ 4.184 J
calorie (15 °C) cal15 °C ≡ 4.1855 J
calorie (International Table) calIT ≡ 4.1868 J
calorie (mean) calmean ≈ 4.190 02 J
calorie (3.98 °C) cal3.98 °C ≈ 4.2045 J
kilocalorie; large calorie kcal; Cal ≡ 1000 calIT = 4.1868 ×103 J
litre-atmosphere l atm; sl ≡ 1 atm × 1 L = 101.325 J
gallon-atmosphere (US) US gal atm ≡ 1 atm × 1 gal (US) = 383.556 849 013 8 J
gallon-atmosphere (imperial) imp gal atm ≡ 1 atm × 1 gal (imp) = 460.632 569 25 J
British thermal unit (thermochemical) BTUth ≈ 1.054 350 ×103 J
British thermal unit (ISO) BTUISO ≡ 1.0545 ×103 J
British thermal unit (63 °F) BTU63 °F ≈ 1.0546 ×103 J
British thermal unit (60 °F) BTU60 °F ≈ 1.054 68 ×103 J
British thermal unit (59 °F) BTU59 °F ≡ 1.054 804 ×103 J
British thermal unit (International Table) BTUIT = 1.055 055 852 62 ×103 J
British thermal unit (mean) BTUmean ≈ 1.055 87 ×103 J
British thermal unit (39 °F) BTU39 °F ≈ 1.059 67 ×103 J
Celsius heat unit (International Table) CHUIT ≡ 1 BTUIT × 1 K/°R = 1.899 100 534 716 ×103 J
cubic foot of atmosphere; standard cubic foot cu ft atm; scf ≡ 1 atm × 1 ft³ = 2.869 204 480 934 4 ×103 J
cubic yard of atmosphere; standard cubic yard cu yd atm; scy ≡ 1 atm × 1 yd³ = 77.468 520 985 228 8 ×103 J
cubic foot of natural gas   ≡ 1000 BTUIT = 1.055 055 852 62 ×106 J
horsepower-hour hp·h ≡ 1 hp × 1 h = 2.684519537696172792 ×106 J
kilowatt-hour; Board of Trade Unit kW·h; B.O.T.U. ≡ 1 kW × 1 h = 3.6 ×106 J
thermie th ≡ 1 McalIT = 4.1868 ×106 J
therm (U.S.)   ≡ 100 000 BTU59 °F = 105.4804 ×106 J
therm (E.C.)   ≡ 100 000 BTUIT = 105.505 585 262 ×106 J
ton of TNT tTNT ≡ 1 Gcalth = 4.184 ×109 J
barrel of oil equivalent bboe ≈ 5.8 MBTU59 °F ≈ 6.12 ×109 J
ton of coal equivalent TCE ≡ 7 Gcalth = 29.3076 ×109 J
ton of oil equivalent TOE ≡ 10 Gcalth = 41.868 ×109 J
quad   ≡ 1015 BTUIT = 1.055 055 852 62×1018 J

Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The joule (IPA: or ) (symbol: J) is the SI unit of energy. ... An electronvolt (symbol: eV) is the amount of energy gained by a single unbound electron when it falls through an electrostatic potential difference of one volt. ... The elementary charge (symbol e or sometimes q) is the electric charge carried by a single proton, or equivalently, the negative of the electric charge carried by a single electron. ... Johannes Rydberg, commonly known as Janne Rydberg, (November 8, 1854 - December 28, 1919), was a Swedish physicist mainly known for devising the Rydberg formula, which is used to predict the wavelengths of photons (of light and other electromagnetic radiation) emitted by changes in the energy level of an electron in... The Rydberg constant, named after physicist Janne Rydberg, is a physical constant discovered when measuring the spectrum of hydrogen, and building upon results from Anders Jonas Ã…ngström and Johann Balmer. ... A commemoration plaque for Max Planck on his discovery of Plancks constant, in front of Humboldt University, Berlin. ... The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness.[1] It is the speed of all electromagnetic radiation, including visible light, in a vacuum. ... The Hartree energy (symbol Eh) is a physical constant used as atomic unit of energy, named after physicist Douglas Hartree. ... The fine-structure constant or Sommerfeld fine-structure constant, usually denoted , is the fundamental physical constant characterizing the strength of the electromagnetic interaction. ... The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness.[1] It is the speed of all electromagnetic radiation, including visible light, in a vacuum. ... Atomic units (au) form a system of units convenient for electromagnetism, atomic physics, and quantum electrodynamics, especially when the focus is on the properties of electrons. ... An erg is the unit of energy and mechanical work in the centimetre-gram-second (CGS) system of units, symbol erg. Its name is derived from the Greek word meaning work. The erg is a small unit, equal to a force of one dyne exerted for a distance of one... CGS is an acronym for centimetre-gram-second. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Standard atmosphere (symbol: atm) is a unit of pressure. ... The foot-pound force (symbol: ft·lbf) is an English unit of work or energy from the English Engineering System. ... Etymology: French calorie, from Latin calor (heat), from calere (to be warm). ... Etymology: French calorie, from Latin calor (heat), from calere (to be warm). ... Etymology: French calorie, from Latin calor (heat), from calere (to be warm). ... Etymology: French calorie, from Latin calor (heat), from calere (to be warm). ... Etymology: French calorie, from Latin calor (heat), from calere (to be warm). ... Etymology: French calorie, from Latin calor (heat), from calere (to be warm). ... Etymology: French calorie, from Latin calor (heat), from calere (to be warm). ... The litre or liter (see spelling differences) is a unit of volume. ... Standard atmosphere (symbol: atm) is a unit of pressure. ... The gallon (abbreviation: gal) is a unit of volume. ... The gallon (abbreviation: gal) is a unit of volume. ... The British thermal unit (BTU) is a non-metric unit of energy, used in the United States and, to a certain extent, the UK. The SI unit is the joule (J), which is used by most other countries. ... The British thermal unit (BTU) is a non-metric unit of energy, used in the United States and, to a certain extent, the UK. The SI unit is the joule (J), which is used by most other countries. ... The British thermal unit (BTU) is a non-metric unit of energy, used in the United States and, to a certain extent, the UK. The SI unit is the joule (J), which is used by most other countries. ... The British thermal unit (BTU) is a non-metric unit of energy, used in the United States and, to a certain extent, the UK. The SI unit is the joule (J), which is used by most other countries. ... The British thermal unit (BTU) is a non-metric unit of energy, used in the United States and, to a certain extent, the UK. The SI unit is the joule (J), which is used by most other countries. ... The British thermal unit (BTU) is a non-metric unit of energy, used in the United States and, to a certain extent, the UK. The SI unit is the joule (J), which is used by most other countries. ... The British thermal unit (BTU) is a non-metric unit of energy, used in the United States and, to a certain extent, the UK. The SI unit is the joule (J), which is used by most other countries. ... The British thermal unit (BTU) is a non-metric unit of energy, used in the United States and, to a certain extent, the UK. The SI unit is the joule (J), which is used by most other countries. ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A yard (abbreviation: yd) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A yard (abbreviation: yd) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about a unit of measurement. ... The hour (symbol: h) is a unit of time. ... The kilowatt-hour (symbol: kW·h) is a unit for measuring energy. ... Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... R-phrases S-phrases Related Compounds Related compounds picric acid hexanitrobenzene Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a chemical compound with the formula C6H2(NO2)3CH3. ... The barrel of oil equivalent (bboe, sometimes BOE) is a unit of energy based on the approximate energy released by burning one barrel of crude oil. ... The ton of oil equivalent (TOE) is a unit for measuring energy. ... A typical chart using quads. ...

Power

Power
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
watt (SI unit) W ≡ J/s = N·m/s = = kg·m²/s³ = 1 W
lusec lusec ≡ 1 L·µmHg/s [10] ≈ 1.333×10−4 W
foot-pound-force per hour ft lbf/h ≡ 1 ft lbf/h ≈ 3.766 161×10−4 W
atmosphere cubic centimetre per minute atm ccm ≡ 1 atm × 1 cm³/min = 1.688 75×10−3 W
foot-pound-force per minute ft lbf/min ≡ 1 ft lbf/min = 2.259 696 580 552 334×10−2 W
atmosphere–cubic centimetre per second atm ccs ≡ 1 atm × 1 cm³/s = 0.101 325 W
BTU (International Table) per hour BTUIT/h ≡ 1 BTUIT/h ≈ 0.293 071 W
atmosphere–cubic foot per hour atm cfh ≡ 1 atm × 1 cu ft/h = 0.797 001 244 704 W
foot-pound-force per second ft lbf/s ≡ 1 ft lbf/s = 1.355 817 948 331 400 4 W
litre-atmosphere per minute L·atm/min ≡ 1 atm × 1 L/min = 1.688 75 W
calorie (International Table) per second calIT/s ≡ 1 calIT/s = 4.1868 W
BTU (International Table) per minute BTUIT/min ≡ 1 BTUIT/min ≈ 17.584 264 W
atmosphere-cubic foot per minute atm·cfm ≡ 1 atm × 1 cu ft/min = 47.820 074 682 24 W
square foot equivalent direct radiation sq ft EDR ≡ 240 BTUIT/h ≈ 70.337 057 W
litre-atmosphere per second L·atm/s ≡ 1 atm × 1 L/s = 101.325 W
horsepower (metric) hp ≡ 75 m kgf/s = 735.498 75 W
horsepower (European electrical) hp ≡ 75 kp·m/s = 736 W
horsepower (Imperial mechanical) hp ≡ 550 ft lbf/s = 745.699 871 582 270 22 W
horsepower (Imperial electrical) hp ≡ 746 W
ton of air conditioning   ≡ 1 t × 1005 J/kg × 1 °R/K ÷ 10 min ≈ 844.2 W
poncelet p ≡ 100 m kgf/s = 980.665 W
BTU (International Table) per second BTUIT/s ≡ 1 BTUIT/s = 1.055 055 852 62×103 W
atmosphere-cubic foot per second atm cfs ≡ 1 atm × 1 cu ft/s = 2.869 204 480 934 4×103 W
ton of refrigeration (IT)   ≡ 1 BTUIT × 1 sh tn/lb ÷ 10 min/s ≈ 3.516 853×103 W
ton of refrigeration (Imperial)   ≡ 1 BTUIT × 1 lng tn/lb ÷ 10 min/s ≈ 3.938 875×103 W
boiler horsepower bhp ≈ 34.5 lb/h × 970.3 BTUIT/lb ≈ 9.810 657×103 W

In physics, power (symbol: P) is the rate at which work is performed or energy is transmitted, or the amount of energy required or expended for a given unit of time. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Watt (disambiguation). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The pound-force is a non-SI unit of force or weight (properly abbreviated lbf or lbf). The pound-force is equal to a mass of one pound multiplied by the standard acceleration due to gravity on Earth (which is defined as exactly 9. ... The hour (symbol: h) is a unit of time. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The pound-force is a non-SI unit of force or weight (properly abbreviated lbf or lbf). The pound-force is equal to a mass of one pound multiplied by the standard acceleration due to gravity on Earth (which is defined as exactly 9. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... The British thermal unit (BTU) is a non-metric unit of energy, used in the United States and, to a certain extent, the UK. The SI unit is the joule (J), which is used by most other countries. ... The hour (symbol: h) is a unit of time. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The hour (symbol: h) is a unit of time. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The pound-force is a non-SI unit of force or weight (properly abbreviated lbf or lbf). The pound-force is equal to a mass of one pound multiplied by the standard acceleration due to gravity on Earth (which is defined as exactly 9. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... The litre or liter (see spelling differences) is a unit of volume. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... Etymology: French calorie, from Latin calor (heat), from calere (to be warm). ... This article is about the unit of time. ... The British thermal unit (BTU) is a non-metric unit of energy, used in the United States and, to a certain extent, the UK. The SI unit is the joule (J), which is used by most other countries. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about a unit of measurement. ... This article is about a unit of measurement. ... This article is about a unit of measurement. ... This article is about a unit of measurement. ... Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Poncelet may refer to: Christian Poncelet, the politician; Jean-Victor Poncelet, the mathematician. ... The British thermal unit (BTU) is a non-metric unit of energy, used in the United States and, to a certain extent, the UK. The SI unit is the joule (J), which is used by most other countries. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about a unit of measurement. ...

Angular momentum

Action, Angular momentum
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
SI unit J·s ≡ kg·m²/s = 1 J·s
atomic unit of action au = /2π ≈ 1.054 571 596×10−34 J·s
cgs unit erg·s = 10−7 J·s

Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Atomic units (au) form a system of units convenient for electromagnetism, atomic physics, and quantum electrodynamics, especially when the focus is on the properties of electrons. ... Plancks constant, denoted h, is a physical constant that is used to describe the sizes of quanta. ... A commemoration plaque for Max Planck on his discovery of Plancks constant, in front of Humboldt University, Berlin. ... When a circles diameter is 1, its circumference is π. Pi or π is the ratio of a circles circumference to its diameter in Euclidean geometry, approximately 3. ... CGS is an acronym for centimetre-gram-second. ...

Electric current

Electric current
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
ampere(SI base unit) A 1 A
esu per second; statampere (cgs unit) esu/s ≡ (0.1 A·m/s) /c ≈ 3.335 641×10−10 A
electromagnetic unit; abampere (cgs unit) abamp ≡ 10 A

This box:      Electric current is the flow (movement) of electric charge. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Ampere (disambiguation). ... The SI system of units defines seven SI base units: physical units defined by an operational definition. ... CGS is an acronym for centimetre-gram-second. ... The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness.[1] It is the speed of all electromagnetic radiation, including visible light, in a vacuum. ... CGS is an acronym for centimetre-gram-second. ... CGS is an acronym for centimetre-gram-second. ...

Electric charge

Electric charge
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
coulomb (SI unit) C ≡ A·s = 1 C
atomic unit of charge au e ≈ 1.602 176 462×10−19 C
statcoulomb; franklin; electrostatic unit (cgs unit) statC; Fr; esu ≡ (0.1 A·m) /c ≈ 3.335 641×10−10 C
abcoulomb; electromagnetic unit (cgs unit) abC; emu ≡ 10 C
faraday F ≡ 1 mol × NA·e ≈ 96,485.3383 C

This box:      Electric charge is a fundamental conserved property of some subatomic particles, which determines their electromagnetic interaction. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The coulomb (symbol: C) is the SI unit of electric charge. ... Atomic units (au) form a system of units convenient for electromagnetism, atomic physics, and quantum electrodynamics, especially when the focus is on the properties of electrons. ... The elementary charge (symbol e or sometimes q) is the electric charge carried by a single proton, or equivalently, the negative of the electric charge carried by a single electron. ... The statcoulomb (statC) or franklin (Fr) or electrostatic unit of charge (esu) is the physical unit for electrical charge used in the centimetre-gram-second (cgs) electrostatic system of units. ... The statcoulomb (statC) or franklin (Fr) or electrostatic unit of charge (esu) is the physical unit for electrical charge used in the cgs electrostatic system of units. ... CGS is an acronym for centimetre-gram-second. ... The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness.[1] It is the speed of all electromagnetic radiation, including visible light, in a vacuum. ... The abcoulomb (abC) or electromagnetic unit of charge (emu) is the physical unit for electrical charge used in the cgs electromagnetic system of units. ... CGS is an acronym for centimetre-gram-second. ... In physics, the faraday (not to be confused with the farad) is a unit of electrical charge; one faraday is equal to the charge of 6. ... Avogadros number, also called Avogadros constant (NA), named after Amedeo Avogadro, is formally defined to be the number of carbon-12 atoms in 12 grams (0. ... The elementary charge (symbol e or sometimes q) is the electric charge carried by a single proton, or equivalently, the negative of the electric charge carried by a single electron. ...

Electromotive force

Voltage, Electromotive force
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
volt (SI unit) V ≡ kg·m²/(A·s³) = 1 V
abvolt (cgs unit) abV ≡ 1×10−8 V
statvolt (cgs unit) statV c· (1 μJ/A·m) = 299.792 458 V

International safety symbol Caution, risk of electric shock (ISO 3864), colloquially known as high voltage symbol. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Josephson junction array chip developed by NIST as a standard volt. ... CGS is an acronym for centimetre-gram-second. ... The statvolt is the unit of voltage and electrical potential used in the cgs system of units. ... CGS is an acronym for centimetre-gram-second. ... The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness.[1] It is the speed of all electromagnetic radiation, including visible light, in a vacuum. ...

Electrical resistance

Electrical resistance
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
ohm (SI unit) Ω ≡ V/A = kg·m²/(A²·s³)

Electrical resistance is a measure of the degree to which an electrical component opposes the passage of current. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The ohm (symbol: Ω) is the SI unit of electric resistance. ...

Dynamic viscosity

Dynamic viscosity
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
pascal second (SI unit) Pa·s ≡ N·s/m² , kg/(m·s) = 1 Pa·s
poise (cgs unit) P ≡ 10−1 Pa·s

For other uses, see Viscosity (disambiguation). ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The pascal second (symbol Pa·s) is the SI unit of dynamic viscosity. ... The poise (P; IPA: ) is the unit of dynamic viscosity in the centimetre gram second system of units. ... CGS is an acronym for centimetre-gram-second. ...

Kinematic viscosity

Kinematic viscosity
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
SI unit m²/s ≡ m²/s = 1 m²/s
stokes (cgs unit) St ≡ 10−4 m²/s

For other uses, see Viscosity (disambiguation). ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The stokes is the cgs physical unit for kinematic viscosity. ... CGS is an acronym for centimetre-gram-second. ...

Information entropy

Information entropy,
Name of unit Symbol Definition Relation to SI units
SI unit J/K ≡ J/K = 1 J/K
nat; nip; nepit nat kB = 1.3806505(23) × 10−23 J/K
bit; shannon bit; b; Sh ≡ ln(2) × kB = 9.569940(16) × 10−24 J/K
ban; hartley ban; Hart ≡ ln(10) × kB = 3.1790653(53) × 10−23 J/K
nibble ≡ 4 bits = 3.8279760(64) × 10−23 J/K
byte B ≡ 8 bits = 7.655952(13) × 10−23 J/K
kilobyte (decimal) kB ≡ 1000 B = 7.655952(13) × 10−20 J/K
kilobyte (kibibyte) KB; KiB ≡ 1024 B = 7.839695(13) × 10−20 J/K

Claude Shannon In information theory, the Shannon entropy or information entropy is a measure of the uncertainty associated with a random variable. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A nat (sometimes also nit or even nepit) is a logarithmic unit of information or entropy, based on natural logarithms and powers of e, rather than the powers of 2 and base 2 logarithms which define the bit. ... This article is about the unit of information. ... A ban, sometimes called a hartley, is a logarithmic unit which measures information or entropy, based on base 10 logarithms and powers of 10, rather than the powers of 2 and base 2 logarithms which define the bit. ... For other uses, see Nibble (disambiguation). ... For the computer industry magazine, see Byte (magazine). ... A kilobyte (derived from the SI prefix kilo-, meaning 1,000) is a unit of information or computer storage equal to either 1,000 bytes or 1,024 bytes (210), depending on context. ... A kilobyte (derived from the SI prefix kilo-, meaning 1,000) is a unit of information or computer storage equal to either 1,000 bytes or 1,024 bytes (210), depending on context. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to...

Temperature

Note: see Temperature conversion for more detail // Ranking to Celsius do not match equations from Celsius table. ...

Temperature
Name of unit Symbol Relation to SI units Relation to °C
kelvin K SI base unit T[K] = T[°C] + 273.15
degree Celsius °C T[°C] = T[K] − 273.15
degree Rankine °R; °Ra T[°Ra] = 1.8 × T[K]
degree Fahrenheit °F T[°F] = T[K] × 1.8 − 459.67 T[°F] = 1.8 × T[°C] + 32

For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Kelvin (disambiguation). ... The SI system of units defines seven SI base units: physical units defined by an operational definition. ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For the idealized thermodynamic cycle for a steam engine, see Rankine cycle. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ...

Software tools

Home and office computers come with converters in bundled spreadsheet applications or can access free converters via the Internet. Units and measurements can be easily converted using these tools, but only if the units are explicitly defined and the conversion is compatible (e.g., cmHg to kPa).


Free conversion software

units is a Unix computer program for conversion of units of quantities. ...

General commercial sources of converters

  • Advanced electronic calculators have unit-conversion functionality.
  • Spreadsheet programs usually provide conversion functions or formulas or the user can write their own.
  • Commercial mathematical, scientific and technical applications often include converters.

For other uses, see Calculator (disambiguation). ... Screenshot of a spreadsheet under OpenOffice A spreadsheet is a rectangular table (or grid) of information, often financial information. ... In computer science, a subroutine (function, procedure, or subprogram) is a sequence of code which performs a specific task, as part of a larger program, and is grouped as one, or more, statement blocks; such code is sometimes collected into software libraries. ... In mathematics and in the sciences, a formula (plural: formulae, formulæ or formulas) is a concise way of expressing information symbolically (as in a mathematical or chemical formula), or a general relationship between quantities. ...

References

  1. ^ "NIST Reference on Constants, Units, and Uncertainty."(2006). National Institute of Standards and Technology. Accessed 22 February 2008.
  2. ^ a b National Bureau of Standards. (June 30, 1959). Refinement of values for the yard and the pound. Federal Register, viewed September 20, 2006 at National Geodetic Survey web site.
  3. ^ International System of Units, 8th ed. (2006), Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, Section 4.1 Table 8.
  4. ^ P. Kenneth Seidelmann, Ed. (1992). Explanatory Supplement to the Astronomical Almanac. Sausalito, CA: University Science Books. p. 716 and s.v. parsec in Glossary.
  5. ^ Barry N. Taylor, Ed.,NIST Special Publication 330: The International System of Units (SI) (2001 Edition), Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 43,"The 12th Conference Generale des Poids et Mesures (CGPM)…declares that the word “liter” may be employed as a special name for the cubic decimeter".
  6. ^ The Swiss Federal Office for Metrology gives Zentner on a German language web page[1] and quintal on the English translation of that page[2]; the unit is marked "spécifiquement suisse !"
  7. ^ Rowlett, Russ. A Dictionary of Units of Measurement. Viewed October 14, 2006 at http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictZ.html
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Barry N. Taylor, (April 1995), Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) (NIST Special Publication 811), Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, pp. 64–65.
  9. ^ Barry N. Taylor, (April 1995), Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) (NIST Special Publication 811), Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, p. 5.
  10. ^ Russ Rowlett. (2005). How Many: A Dictionary of Units of Measure. Viewed 5 November 2006 at http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/
  • Klein, Herbert. 1988. The science of measurement: A historical survey. New York: Dover Publications.

NIST logo The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, formerly known as The National Bureau of Standards) is a non-regulatory agency of the United States Department of Commerce’s Technology Administration. ... The Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (International Bureau of Weights and Measures, or BIPM) is a standards organization, one of the three organizations established to maintain the SI system under the terms of the Metre Convention. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Wikibooks
Wikibooks' [[wikibooks:|]] has more about this subject:
FHSST Physics Units:How to Change Units


Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Many, if not most, parameters and measurements in the physical sciences and engineering are expressed as a numerical quantity and a corresponding dimensional unit; for example: 1000 kg/m³, 100 kPa/bar, 50 miles per hour, 1000 Btu/lb. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... “Accuracy” redirects here. ... Rounding to n significant figures is a form of rounding. ... Approximate conversion of units often needs to be done without calculator or computer. ... // Comparison of temperature scales ¹ Normal human body temperature is 36. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... English unit is the American name for a unit in one of a number of systems of units of measurement, some obsolete, and some still in use. ... This article is about post-1824 imperial units, see also English unit, U.S. customary units or Avoirdupois. ... The U.S. customary units (more commonly known in the US as English units or standard units) are the non-metric units of measurement that are presently used in the United States, in some cases alongside the metric system of units. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Conversion of Units of Measurement (7803 words)
Conversion of units must be done explicitly by the programmer; this can be both burdensome and error-prone, since the conversion factors used by the programmer might be entered incorrectly or might have limited accuracy.
Unit conversion may also be required in preparing data for transmission to a remote site over a network, or for use in a remote procedure call.
Conversion of units may generate extra multiplication operations; however, if the compiler performs constant folding [aho], these operations and their conversion factors can often be combined with other constants.
Metric Conversion (1039 words)
Regulations on the use of metric units for WEIGHTS AND MEASURES in retail trade were established and enforced by the government for the protection of consumers and retailers against unfair practices and confusion in comparing products.
Opponents of metric conversion pointed to the costs at a time of inflation and economic weakness, the danger of being out of step with the US and the invasion of a foreign language of measurements upon a Canadian heritage bound to imperial measurements.
SI is simple because of its decimal nature and the absence of a multiplicity of units with conversion factors.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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