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Encyclopedia > Convention of Peking

The Convention of Peking (October 18, 1860), also known as the First Convention of Peking, was a treaty between the Qing Government of China and the British Empire, and between China and France, and China and Russia. October 18 is the 291st day of the year (292nd in Leap years). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... The Qing Dynasty (Manchu: daicing gurun; Chinese: 清朝; pinyin: qīng cháo; Wade-Giles: ching chao), sometimes known as the Manchu Dynasty, was founded by the Manchu clan Aisin Gioro, in what is today northeast China, expanded into China proper and the surrounding territories of Inner Asia, establishing... The British Empire was the largest empire in history. ...


Article 6 of the Convention between China and the United Kingdom stipulates that China was to cede a part of the Kowloon Peninsula, south of the present day Boundary Street, Kowloon, Hong Kong, and including the Stonecutter's Island, in perpetuity to the UK. The Kowloon Peninsula, commonly referred to as Kowloon, is a peninsula, in the south of the mainland part of the Hong Kong territory. ... Boundary Street is a three-lane one-way street in Kowloon, Hong Kong, Historically it marked the boundary between the southern part of Kowloon, ceded by Qing China to Great Britain in 1860, and the northern part of Kowloon ( New Kowloon), which remained part of China until it was leased... Location within China In modern day Hong Kong, Kowloon (九龍; Cantonese IPA:; Jyutping: gau2 lung4; Mandarin Pinyin: JiÇ”lóng; lit. ... Stonecutters Island (昂船洲) is a former island in Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong. ...


A part of the treaty ceded parts of Outer Manchuria to the Russian Empire. It granted Russia the right to the Ussuri krai, a part of the modern day Primorye), the territory of which corresponds with the one of ancient Manchu province of East Tartary. Outer Manchuria is in light red on this map. ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of Russian history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... Ussuri krai (Russian: Уссури́йский край) is an unofficial name for a part of Primorsky Krai that consisted of Ussuri and South-Ussuri Okrugs. ... Primorsky Krai (Russian: ), also known as Primorye (), is a federal subject of Russia (a krai). ... The Manchu (Manchu: Manju; Simplified Chinese: 满族; Traditional Chinese: 滿族; pinyin: ) are an ethnic group who originated in the dong bei or North East region consisting of Liaoning, Jilin, and Heilongjiang provinces, collectively known in English as Manchuria. ... East Tartary, or Maritime Tartary, are old names for Manchu territory extending from the confluence of the River Amur with the River Ussuri to Sakhalin Island. ...


The Convention was signed as a result of the Second Opium War under the military and diplomatic pressures of British and French troops (which were burning the Old Summer Palace at the time). It was considered to be one of the unequal treaties by the Chinese side. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Imperial Gardens as they once stood The Old Summer Palace, known in China as the Gardens of Perfect Brightness (Chinese: 圆明园 / 圓明園; pinyin: ), and originally called the Imperial Gardens (Chinese: 御園; pinyin: ), was an extremely large complex of palaces and gardens 8 km (5 miles) northwest of the walls of Beijing, built... The Unequal Treaties (lit. ...


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Convention of Peking - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (248 words)
The Convention of Peking (Traditional Chinese: 北京條約; pinyin: Běijīng Tiáoyūe) (October 18, 1860), also known as the First Convention of Peking, was a treaty between the Government of the Qing-Dynasty of China and each of the three European powers, namely the United Kingdom, France, and Russia.
Article 6 of the Convention between China and the United Kingdom stipulated that China was to cede a part of the Kowloon Peninsula, south of the present day Boundary Street, Kowloon, Hong Kong, including the Stonecutter's Island, in perpetuity to Britain.
The Convention was signed as a result of the Second Opium War under military and diplomatic pressure of British and French troops (who were burning the Old Summer Palace at the time).
History of Tibet (3079 words)
Further, Ch'ien Lung sent a golden urn from Peking and declared that future reincarnations of the Dalai Lama and other important lamas should be determined by putting the names of the candidates in it and extracting one at random in the presence of the Manchu Resident.
Two more similar agreements, the Peking Convention of July 24, 1886 and the Calcutta Convention of March 17, 1890, were also repudiated by the Tibetans.
On May 23, 1951 a Tibetan delegation, which had gone to Peking to hold talks on the invasion, was forced to sign the so-called "17-point Agreement on Measures for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet", with threats of more military action in Tibet and by forging the official seals of Tibet.
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