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Encyclopedia > Continental climate

Regions containing a continental climate exist in portions of Northern Hemisphere continents, and also at higher elevations in certain other parts of the world. This climate is characterized by winter temperatures cold enough to support a fixed period of stable snow cover each year, and relatively moderate precipitation occurring mostly in summer, although east coast areas (chiefly in North America) may show an even distribution of precipitation. Only a few areas in Iran, adjacent Turkey and Central Asia show a winter maximum in precipitation, which typically melts in early spring to give short-lived floods. The Northern Hemisphere is the half of a planets surface (or celestial sphere) that is north of the equator (the word hemisphere literally means half ball). On the Earth, the Northern Hemisphere contains most of the land and about 88-90% of the human population. ... Dymaxion map by Buckminster Fuller shows land mass with minimal distortion as only one continuous continent A continent (Latin continere, to hold together) is a large continuous mass of land on the planet Earth. ... Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Animation of snowcover changing with the seasons Trees covered with snow Snow covering a leaf. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ... A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ...


These regions generally have either forest or tall-grass prairie as natural ground cover and include some of the most productive farmlands in the world. All such climates have at least three months of temperatures in excess of 10 °C (50 °F) and winters with at least one month below 0 °C (32 °F) (although some classifications have a lower threshold for winter based on snow cover, in the Köppen climate classification −3 °C (26.6 °F) is used). Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ...


In this climate zone, average summer temperatures are between 21 °C (70 °F) and 32 °C (90 °F) during the day and 10 °C (50 °F) and 18 °C (65 °F) at night. Average winter temperatures are between −12 °C (10 °F) and 7 °C (45 °F) during the day and −23 °C (−10 °F) and −4 °C (25 °F) at night. Spring-like temperatures occur in this zone between early March in the southern parts of this zone to mid April in the far northern fringes of this climate zone. Annual precipitation in this zone is usually between 24 inches (610 mm) to 48 inches (1,219 mm). A lot of it in winter is in the form of snow. Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ...


Most such areas fit Köppen classifications of Dfa, Dwa (cold winters, hot summers; "w" indicating very dry winters characteristic especially of China) or Dfb or Dwb (cold winters, warm summers, same distinction for winter dryness). The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ...


Continental climates exist where cold air masses infiltrate during the winter and warm air masses form in summer under conditions of high sun and long days. Places with continental climates are as a rule either far from any moderating effects of oceans (example: Omaha, Nebraska, USA) or are so situated (example: Boston, Massachusetts, USA) that prevailing winds tend to head offshore. Such regions get quite warm in the summer, achieving temperatures characteristic of tropical climates but are much colder than any other climates of similar latitude in the winter. Nickname: Motto: (Latin) Courageously in every enterprise Location in Nebraska Coordinates: , Country United States State Nebraska County Douglas Founded 1854 Incorporated 1857 Government  - Mayor Michael Fahey (D) Area  - City  118. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated (city) 1822 Government  - Governor Deval Patrick (D) Area  - City  89. ...


These climates grade off toward subtropical climates equator-ward where winters are less severe and semiarid climates where precipitation becomes inadequate for tall-grass prairies. In Europe these climates may grade off into oceanic climates in which the influence of moderating air masses is more marked toward the west. The subarctic climate (Köppen: Dfc), with very cold, long and dry winters, but with at least one month above 10 °C (50 °F), might be considered a sub-type of the continental climate. Subtropical (or semitropical) areas are those adjacent to the tropics, usually roughly defined as the ranges 23. ... Semi-arid generally describes regions that receive low annual rainfall (250 to 500 mm or 10 to 20 in) and generally have scrub or grass vegetation. ... World map showing the oceanic climate zones. ... Regions having a subarctic climate (also called boreal climate) are characterized by long, usually very cold winters, and brief, warm summers. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ...


The Midwestern United States, northeastern parts of the U.S, southern Canada, parts of China, South Korea, and most of Russia are examples of areas of the world with continental climates, which do not exist at all in the Southern Hemisphere due to the lack of broad land masses at middle latitudes, the southernmost parts of Africa and Australia being under marine influences and southern South America being too narrow in breadth to allow air masses as cold as those in corresponding latitudes in North America and Asia to form in the winter. Antarctica, of course, lies completely outside the middle latitudes. The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
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