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Encyclopedia > Continental Congress

The Continental Congress resulted from the American Revolution and was the de facto first national government of the United States. It was a provisional government without a legal basis and was completely dependent on the colonies for political direction, funding and other resources. It comprised two successive bodies of representatives of provinces of the Thirteen Colonies in 18th century British North America. The colonies all became states in 1776 when they rejected colonial status: John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... A provisional government is an emergency or interim government set up when a political void has been created by the collapse of a previous administration or regime. ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... British North America consisted of the loyalist colonies and territories (i. ...

Upon the ratification of the Articles, the Continental Congress was succeeded by the first legislative or de jure federal government of the United States: The First Continental Congress was a body of representatives appointed by the legislatures of twelve North American colonies of the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1774. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence depicts the five-man drafting committee presenting the first draft of the Declaration of Independence to the Second Continental Congress. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document, or constitution, of the United States of America. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

  • The Congress of the Confederation or the United States in Congress Assembled ran from March 1, 1781, until a more effective federal government under the Constitution became operative on March 4, 1789. The membership of the Second Continental Congress automatically carried over to the Congress of the Confederation.

Initially formed to coordinate a common American response to the Intolerable Acts, and assert the colonist's rights as Englishmen, the Continental Congress rapidly evolved from a de facto to a de jure governing body of a new nation as the dispute with the British government escalated into the American Revolutionary War. Once the Declaration of Independence was ratified (July 4, 1776) the Congress served as the governing body of the United States of America, organized as a new national legislature, which made war and peace. The Congress of the Confederation or the United States in Congress Assembled was a body of representatives appointed by the legislatures of the United States from March 1, 1781 to March 4, 1789. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Intolerable Acts or the Coercive Acts were names given by colonists in the Thirteen Colonies to a series of laws passed by the British Parliament in March of 1774. ... This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ... This article is about military actions only. ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ...


Notable dates

The Lee Resolution, or sometimes Lees Resolution, was proposed by Richard Henry Lee of Virginia to the Second Continental Congress on June 7, 1776. ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... Fourth of July redirects here. ... The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document, or constitution, of the United States of America. ... Ratification is the act of giving official sanction to a formal document such as a treaty or constitution. ...

Bibliography

  • Bancroft, George. History of the United States of America, from the discovery of the American continent. (1854–78), vol. 4–10 online edition
  • Miller, John C. Triumph of Freedom, 1775–1783 (1948) online edition
  • Miller, John C. Origins of the American Revolution (1943) online edition
  • Journals of the Continental Congress September 5, 1774 to March 2, 1789 online

  Results from FactBites:
 
MSN Encarta - Continental Congress (757 words)
The First Continental Congress convened in Carpenters' Hall, Philadelphia, on September 5, 1774, to consider and act on the situation arising from the so-called Intolerable Acts, passed by the British Parliament in retaliation for the Boston Tea Party.
The First Continental Congress issued a petition to George III, king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, called the Declaration of Rights and Grievances, and invited the people of Canada to join in an appeal to the king to help restore harmony between Britain and the colonies.
When the Second Continental Congress convened on the appointed date, the battles of Lexington and Concord had recently taken place in Massachusetts, and militiamen were besieging the British occupying force within Boston.
Second Continental Congress - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (685 words)
The Second Continental Congress was a body of representatives appointed by the legislatures of several British North American colonies which met from May 10, 1775 to March 1, 1781.
The Continental Congress was forced to flee Philadelphia at the end of September 1777 as British troops occupied the erstwhile capital of the United States.
On November 17, 1777, the Continental Congress passed the Articles of Confederation, uniting the colonies in a formal alliance akin to the Delian League or the United Nations.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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