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Encyclopedia > Continental Basketball Association
Continental Basketball Association
Continental Basketball Association logo
Sport Basketball
Founded 1946
Claim to fame "Oldest professional basketball league in the world"
No. of teams 8
Country Flag of United States United States
 Canada
Current champions Yakama Sun Kings
Official website www.cbahoopsonline.com

The Continental Basketball Association (CBA) is a professional men's basketball league in the United States. It is affiliated with USA Basketball, the sport's governing body in the U.S. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005. ... See also: 1945 in sports, other events of 1946, 1947 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball January 23: Hall of Fame election: The writers vote again fails to select an inductee, despite a newly revamped voting process. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Canada_(bordered). ... The Yakama Sun Kings are a Continental Basketball Association franchise located in Yakima, Washington, covering the Central Washington sports market of Yakima, Tri-Cities, and Ellensburg. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005. ... USA Basketball is a non-profit organization and the governing body for basketball in the United States. ...

Contents

History

The CBA can date its origins back to April 23, 1946, when it was called the Eastern Pennsylvania Basketball League (1946-47). Between 1948 and 1970 it was called the Eastern Professional Basketball League, and then renamed the Eastern Basketball Association. On June 1, 1978, the league's name became the Continental Basketball Association. Tracing the league's operation back to its Pennsylvania origins, it claims to be the oldest professional basketball league in the world (the NBA's predecessor, the Basketball Association of America, also began operations in 1946, but in June of that year). Its first commissioner was Harry Rudolph, the father of Mendy Rudolph, one of the first great referees of the National Basketball Association. April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Official language(s) English, Pennsylvania Dutch Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Mendy Rudolph Marvin (Mendy) Rudolph (March 8, 1926 - July 1979, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was a National Basketball Association (NBA) referee for 25 years, from 1953 to 1978. ... The National Basketball Association (NBA) is the worlds premier mens basketball league. ...


Notable CBA Accomplishments

Integration

In the 1946-47 Eastern League season, the Hazleton Mountaineers had three African-American players on their roster during the season - Bill Brown, Zack Clayton and John Isaacs. Isaacs previously played with an all-black touring squad, the Washington Bears, while Brown and Clayton were alumni of the Harlem Globetrotters. The Hazleton Mountaineers were one of the original six franchises in the Eastern Professional Basketball League. ... Categories: Football (soccer) stubs | Scottish footballers | 1931 births | 2004 deaths ... John Isaacs (b. ... The Harlem Globetrotters are an exhibition basketball team that combines athleticism and comedy to create one of the best-known sports entertainment franchises in the world. ...


In the 1955-56 season, the Hazleton Hawks Eastern League team were the first professional league franchise with an all-black starting lineup: Tom Hemans, Jess Arnelle, Fletcher Johnson, Sherman White and Floyd Lane.


Three-Point Line

Although the 1961-63 American Basketball League used a three-point scoring line, the Eastern League added a three-point line for the 1964-65 season. In that year, Brendan McCann of the Allentown Jets led the league with 31 completed 3-pointers for the year. Although three-point plays in the 1960s were very few and far-between, the Eastern League did develop several scorers who used the three-point shot to their advantage, including sharpshooters Stan Pawlak and Rich Cornwall.


Collapsible Rims

After Darryl Dawkins shattered two basketball rims in the 1979-80 NBA season, the CBA tested out a collapsible hinged rim. Eventually other leagues converted their rims over to the collapsible hinged model, which is still in use today. Darryl Dawkins (born January 11, 1957 in Orlando, Florida) is a former professional basketball player, most noted for his days with the Philadelphia 76ers and New Jersey Nets, although he also played briefly for the Detroit Pistons and Utah Jazz late in his career. ...


Ten-Day Contract

In the early 1980s, the CBA and the NBA entered into an agreement where CBA players would be signed to 10-day NBA contracts, mostly to replace an injured player or to test out a top prospect. Under the 10-day contract rule, a player is signed at the prorated league minimum salary for 10 calendar days. If the NBA team likes the player, they can sign him to a second 10-day contract. After the second 10-day contract expires, the team must either return the player to the CBA or sign him for the rest of the season. The National Basketball Association (NBA) is the worlds premier mens basketball league. ...


The Isiah Thomas Years (1999-2001)

As of 1999, the CBA had survived for 54 years. That year all the league's teams were purchased by an investment group led by former NBA star Isiah Thomas. The combined ownership plan was unsuccessful, and by 2001, the CBA declared bankruptcy and ceased operations. Several of its teams briefly joined the now defunct, International Basketball League. Isiah Lord Thomas III () (born April 30, 1961, in Chicago, Illinois) is a retired American professional basketball player in the NBA, and is currently the head coach and president of basketball operations for the NBAs New York Knicks. ... The International Basketball League (IBL) was a short lived professional basketball league in the United States. ...


The popular scapegoat for the demise of the CBA is Isiah Thomas, who purchased the CBA and ran it as a single-entity league, only to abandon it a year later for an NBA coaching job. The Scapegoat by William Holman Hunt, 1854. ... Isiah Lord Thomas III () (born April 30, 1961, in Chicago, Illinois) is a retired American professional basketball player in the NBA, and is currently the head coach and president of basketball operations for the NBAs New York Knicks. ...


The following is a timeline of the events surrounding Thomas' ownership of the CBA:

  • August 3, 1999 - Former NBA superstar Isiah Thomas purchases the CBA - the entire league, including all the teams, and its marketing company, CBA Properties - for $10 million. Thomas says that the league will now operate as a single-owner entity, and that the CBA will continue to be the official developmental league of the NBA.
  • October 7, 1999 - the sale of the CBA to Thomas is finalized. Thomas paid $5 million up front and agreed to make four additional payments to the CBA's former team owners for the balance of the debt.
  • October 24, 1999 - Thomas announces that there will be salary cuts in the CBA. The average salary of $1,500 per week will be reduced to $1,100 per week, with rookies getting $800 a week. Thomas' reasoning is that by reducing the number of veterans in the league, there will be more young talent available for NBA teams.
  • January 18, 2000 - For the first time in three years, the CBA holds an All-Star Game. The Sioux Falls SkyForce hosts the event. The All-Star Game also features an All-Rookie game, featuring the CBA's top 16 rookies.
  • March 2000 - the NBA offers Thomas $11 million and a percentage of the profits for the CBA. Thomas chose not to sell the league to the NBA. "The NBA made an offer that wasn't what Isiah expected," said Brendan Suhr, a former coach and co-owner of the CBA's Grand Rapids Hoops, "so he decided not to sell the league at that time."
  • May 2000 - a CBA All-Star team travels to China for a three-game series.
  • June 28, 2000 - Isiah Thomas is offered the head coaching job of the NBA's Indiana Pacers. Since the NBA rules forbid a coach from owning his own league, as it would be a conflict of interest (he could sign the minor league's best talent to his NBA team, for example), Thomas has to sell the CBA. On this day, Thomas signs a letter of intent to sell the CBA to the NBA Players' Union.
  • In the summer of 2000, after twenty years of using the CBA as its developmental league, the NBA announces it will form its own minor league feeder system, creating the National Basketball Development League (NBDL or "D-League"). The CBA will no longer be the NBA's official developmental league after the 2001 season.
  • On October 2, 2000, Isiah Thomas, unable to sell his ownership in the CBA, places the league into a blind trust, and accepts the head coaching job of the Pacers. With the league in a blind trust, there are no funds available to pay players, to buy plane tickets for away games, or to handle day-to-day operations.
  • February 8, 2001 - the CBA suspends play and folds. The blind trust that was to find a new owner for the league gives up. The league has over $2 million in debts. The teams are offered back to their original owners for $1.00, simple consideration. A few owners take the offer. Many more refuse and their clubs are shuttered.
  • February 24, 2001 - 18 months after Thomas purchased the CBA, the league declared bankruptcy. Five of the former CBA team owners repurchased their franchises and joined the rival International Basketball League (IBL) to finish out the season. Other team owners chose to let their franchises fold completely, rather than reincur debts that were not theirs originally.
  • Summer 2001 - The IBL folds.
  • November 2001 - The CBA reorganizes for the 2001-02 season, as CBA franchises in Rockford, Gary, Grand Rapids and Sioux Falls merge with the smaller International Basketball Association (IBA), with franchises in Bismarck (Dakota Wizards), Fargo (Fargo-Moorhead Beez) and Saskatoon (Saskatchewan Hawks). The Flint (Mich.) Fuze joining as an expansion team.

August 3 is the 215th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (216th in leap years), with 150 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... October 7 is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... January 18 is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 186 days remaining. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 2 is the 275th day (276th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 90 days remaining. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Rebirth of the CBA

In the fall of 2001, CBA and IBL teams merged with the International Basketball Association and purchased the assets of the defunct CBA, including its name, logo and records from the bankruptcy court and re-started operations, calling itself the CBA. The International Basketball Association is a non-profit (501-c-3) based in Washington, D.C. and has been in existance since 1989. ...


Teams

Location of CBA teams and divisions
Location of CBA teams and divisions

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 592 pixel Image in higher resolution (841 × 622 pixel, file size: 16 KB, MIME type: image/gif) Map showing the CBA divisions and team locations I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 592 pixel Image in higher resolution (841 × 622 pixel, file size: 16 KB, MIME type: image/gif) Map showing the CBA divisions and team locations I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

Current Teams

American Division

Image File history File links Albany_patroons_logo. ... The Albany Patroons are a basketball team in the Continental Basketball Association (CBA). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Indiana Alley Cats Logo The Indiana Alley Cats are a member of the ABA. They are based in Anderson, Indiana and play at Anderson Universitys O.C. Lewis Gymnasium. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Minot SkyRockets are a team in the Continental Basketball Association. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Pittsburgh Xplosion is an ABA Basketball team founded in 2004 but owning the ABA Franchise license from the now defunct Pittsburgh Hardhats from 2000-2004. ...

National Division

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Butte Daredevils are an expansion franchise of the Continental Basketball Association scheduled to begin play in 2006. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Great Falls Explorers are a team of the Continental Basketball Association scheduled to begin play in 2006. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Yakama Sun Kings are a Continental Basketball Association franchise located in Yakima, Washington, covering the Central Washington sports market of Yakima, Tri-Cities, and Ellensburg. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Vancouver Dragons are a team of the Continental Basketball Association. ...

Future Expansion

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Atlanta Krunk Wolverines are a Continental Basketball Association team. ... Bend is a city in Deschutes County, Oregon, United States. ... The Hawaii Volcanoes were an American basketball team based in Honolulu, Hawaii and Hilo, Hawaii that was a member of the Continental Basketball Association. ... The Northern Nevada Blackjacks are a team of the Continental Basketball Association based in Reno, Nevada scheduled to begin play in 2006. ... Image File history File links La_aftershock. ... Los Angeles Aftershock The Los Angeles Stars became the Los Angeles Aftershock before the start of the 2005 season. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Miami Majesty are a team of the Continental Basketball Association based in Miami-Dade County, Florida. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Southern California Legends, known commonly as the SoCal Legends, are a team in the American Basketball Association. ... Nickname: The Lilac City Location of Spokane in Spokane County and Washington Coordinates: Country United States State Washington County Spokane  - Mayor Dennis P. Hession Area    - City  58. ... Nickname: The Emerald City Location of Seattle in King County and Washington Coordinates: Country United States State Washington County King County Incorporated December 2 1869 Government  - Mayor Greg Nickels Area  - City  142. ...

Complete team List

See: Continental Basketball Association franchise history

This is a year-by-year list of franchises in the Continental Basketball Association, along with its incarnations as the Eastern Professional Basketball League and Eastern Basketball Association. ...

CBA Champions

See: List of Continental Basketball Association Champions

// 1946-47 Wilkes-Barre Barons d. ...

All-Star Games

See: List of Continental Basketball Association All-Star Games

List of CBA All-Star Games scores and locations 1949 - EPBL All-Stars 74, Pottsville Packers 69 (Pottsville, Pa. ...

Notable People

See: List of Continental Basketball Association MVP's and Notable Alumni

The following are a list of players and coaches from the CBA or the Eastern League (the CBAs predecessor) who later went on to successful careers, either in the NBA or in the top college divisions. ...

CBA/NBA Relationship

During the early years of the CBA, when it was the EPBL, the league's relationship with the NBA was frosty at best. In 1953, the NBA refused to accept any players from the EPBL after the EPBL signed several college basketball stars who were involved in point-shaving gambling scandals during their college years, including such players as Jack Molinas, Sherman White, Floyd Layne and Ed Roth. The Eastern League also signed 7-foot center Bill Spivey, the former University of Kentucky standout who was accused of pointshaving (although Spivey was acquitted of all charges, the NBA still banned him from their league for life). This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Jacob L. Molinas (1931 – August 3, 1975) was an American pro basketball player and one of the key figures in the point shaving scandal that almost destroyed NCAA basketball. ... Basketball player for CCNY who was implicated in the point shaving scandal that rocked college athletics in the 1950s. ... Ed Big Daddy Roth (March 4, 1932 - April 4, 2001) was an artist and the creator of Rat Fink and other characters, custom car builder, and one of the people responsible for the Kustom Kulture / Hot rod movement of the 1960s in Southern California. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ...


The NBA and EPBL did, however, play several exhibition games in the 1950s, including a 1956 matchup in which the NBA's Syracuse Nationals lost to the EPBL's Wilkes-Barre Barons at Wilkes-Barre's home court. Other EPBL-NBA exhibition matchups include an October 1959 contest in which the New York Knicks defeated the Allentown Jets, 131-102, in a game in Allentown; and a contest in April 1961, in which the Boston Celtics also played an exhibition contest against Allentown, defeating the Eastern Leaguers soundly. The Philadelphia 76ers are a National Basketball Association team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The Wilkes-Barre Barons was the legendary team that played between 1933 - 1972 in different leagues. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The Eastern League also signed various basketball stars, even those who had not completed their college eligibility. Even though Ray Scott had left Portland University two months after his matriculation, the NBA could not sign Scott to a contract until Scott's class graduated. The EPBL, however, could sign him, and Scott played 77 games for the Allentown Jets before later joining the NBA's Detroit Pistons. John Raymond (Ray) Scott (born July 12, 1938 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... The Detroit Pistons are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in the Detroit metropolitan area. ...


By 1968, the Eastern League lost many of its players when the upstart American Basketball Association formed. Players such as Lavern "Jelly" Tart, Willie Somerset, Art Heyman and Walt Simon, all of whom were all-stars in the Eastern League just a year prior, were now in ABA uniforms. The ABA continued to siphon both NBA and Eastern League talent, leaving the Eastern League with only six teams in 1972; and four teams in 1975. Only the merger of the ABA and the NBA kept the Eastern League alive, as an influx of players from defunct ABA teams joined the Eastern League. For information about the ABA that began in 2000 see American Basketball Association (21st century). ... Arthur Bruce Heyman (born June 24, 1941 in New York, New York) is an American former professional basketball player. ... Walter Simon (born December 1, 1939 in Delcambre, Louisiana; died October 10, 1997) was an American basketball player. ...


In 1979, the NBA signed four players from the newly-renamed CBA. The CBA, receiving no compensation from the NBA for these signings, filed a lawsuit against the NBA. The suit was settled and in exchange for the right to sign any player at any time, the NBA paid the CBA $115,000 and also paid the CBA $80,000 to help develop NBA referees at CBA games.


NBA/CBA relationships grew tense again in 1982, when the CBA added the Detroit Spirits to their league roster. Since the Spirits played in the same city as did the NBA's Detroit Pistons, the NBA chose to not sign any CBA players, arguing that the CBA illegally moved into an NBA city. After much negotiation between the two leagues, the NBA agreed to sign qualified CBA players to a 10-day contract. A player could be called up to an NBA team for 10 days at the league minimum, often replacing an injured NBA star. The CBA player could sign a second 10-day contract, but after the completion of the second 10-day contract, the NBA team would have to sign the player for the rest of the season, or return him to the CBA. The CBA teams, in turn, would receive compensation for each 10-day contract.


During the 1980s and 1990s, the NBA's relationship with the CBA grew, to the point where dozens of former CBA stars found their way onto NBA rosters, including Tim Legler (Omaha Racers), Mario Elie (Albany Patroons), and Ron Davis (Anchorage Northern Knights). The CBA also sent qualified coaches to the NBA, including Phil Jackson (Albany Patroons), Bill Musselman (Tampa Bay Thrillers), Eric Musselman (Rapid City Thrillers), Flip Saunders (LaCrosse Catbirds) and George Karl (Montana Golden Nuggets). Timothy Eugene Tim Legler (born December 26, 1966 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former professional basketball player in the NBA at the shooting guard position from 1990 to 2000, and now currently appears regularly on the ESPN program NBA Shootaround and basketball analyst for SportsCenter. ... Mario Antoine Elie (born November 26, 1963 in New York City, United States) is a former professional basketball player. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Philip Douglas Phil Jackson (born September 17, 1945 in Deer Lodge, Montana) is the current coach of the Los Angeles Lakers, an American professional basketball team. ... William Clifford (Bill) Musselman (August 13, 1940 - May 5, 2000) was an American basketball coach in the NCAA, the ABA, the WBA, the CBA, and the NBA. He was a fiercely intense coach who once was quoted as saying defeat is worse than death, because you have to live with... The Tampa Bay Thrillers were a franchise in the Continental Basketball Association (CBA) from 1984-1987, winning back-to-back championships in 1984 and 1985. ... Eric P. Musselman (born November 19, 1964 in Ashland, Ohio) is the head coach of the Sacramento Kings. ... Flip Saunders Ronald Flip Saunders (born February 23, 1955 in Cleveland, Ohio, United States) is head coach of the NBAs Detroit Pistons and one of the most successful coaches in the history of the Continental Basketball Association. ... George Matthew Karl (born May 12, 1951 in Penn Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an American former National Basketball Association (NBA) and American Basketball Association (ABA) player and current head coach of the Denver Nuggets. ...


In 2002, the NBA formed its own minor league, the National Basketball Development League (the NBDL or "D-League"). At the end of the 2005-2006 season, three current and one expansion CBA franchise jumped to the NBDL. The CBA has obtained eight new franchises for a confirmed total of 10 for the 2006 season. The Atlanta Krunk Wolverines and Vancouver Dragons deferred their participation to the 2007-2008 season, and the Utah Eagles folded as of January 25, 2007. The National Basketball Development League is the NBAs officially sponsored and operated developmental basketball organization. ...


Rules

The CBA follows the same basketball rules as does the NBA and most other professional leagues. However, in the late 1970s CBA commissioner Jim Drucker added several new rules to increase scoring and raise fan interest. The National Basketball Association (NBA) is the worlds premier mens basketball league. ... Template:A year The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ...

  • During each game, a team can win up to seven standings points - three points for winning the game, and one point for each quarter in which they outscore their opponent. The teams with the greatest number of standings points at the end of the year go to the playoffs.
  • A player cannot foul out of the game - after a player's sixth personal foul, the opposing team receives an automatic free throw.
  • During the 1982-83 and 1983-84 seasons, overtime games were decided by the team who scored the first three points in overtime. During the 1984-85 season, that rule was modified so that victory went to the first team to lead by three points in overtime. By the 1987-88 season, that rule was superseded by a standard five-minute overtime period to determine the winner.
  • During the 1981-82 season, the CBA created a six-foot by five-foot "no call box", an area in front of the baskets in which any contact in the box between offensive and defensive players was to be an automatic defensive foul. This rule, which was designed to encourage drives to the hoop, caused more confusion than scoring, and the rule was quickly abandoned. However, a variant of this rule would be adopted by the NBA in 2002.
  • For a few years in the early 1980s, the CBA offered a money-back guarantee, returning a patron's money if before the start of the second quarter, the fan left the game. There was also a "national season ticket," allowing fans to attend any CBA games within a 100-mile radius of his hometown.

Other CBA rules and innovations that were later adopted by the NBA include the three-point line (first used in the CBA in 1964), collapsible rims to keep backboard glass from being destroyed in a dunk (first used by the CBA in 1980), and the offering of three foul shots if a player is fouled in the act of shooting a three-point behind-the-arc play. A money back guarantee is essentially a simple guarantee that, if a buyer is not satisfied with a product or service, a refund of the monies or consideration paid will be made. ... In sports, a season ticket is a ticket that grants the holder access to all regular-season home games for one season without additional charges. ...

  • Drucker also created a series of high-profile, big-money promotions that attracted increased attendance and league sponsorhips and substantial media interest. From 1984-86, "The 1 Million Dollar CBA Supershot" offered a $1,000,000 cash prize for a fan selected at random at halftime who made a 3/4 court shot. Although no fan won that one, in 1986 one fan did win a $1,000,000 zero coupon bond. The winner, Don Mattingly (no relation to the New York Yankee player with the same name), won the bond in the "CBA Easy Street Shootout" at the 1986 CBA All-Star Game in Tampa, Florida. Other promotions included the "Ton of Money Free Throw" which consisted of 2,000 pounds of pennies ($5,000) for making one foul shot, and "The Fly-In, Drive-Away" Contest where each fan received a paper airplane with a distinct serial number. At halftime, a new car, with the sun roof opened, was driven to mid-court and the fan who threw his airplane into the sun roof won the car. A new Ford Thunderbird was won by a fan at the CBA All-Star Game in Casper, Wyoming in 1984.

The New York Yankees are a Major League baseball team based in The Bronx, New York City. ... Nickname: Cigar City, The Big Guava Location in Hillsborough County and the state of Florida. ... Above: A variety of coins considered to be lower-value, including an Irish 2p piece and many US pennies. ... A sliding glass moonroof on an Acura Integra A sunroof is an opening in an automobile roof. ... Fixed-wing aircraft is a term used to refer to what are more commonly known as aeroplanes in Commonwealth English (excluding Canada) or airplanes in North American English. ... The Ford Thunderbird is a car manufactured in the United States by the Ford Motor Company. ... Downtown Casper Casper is a city located in Natrona County, Wyoming. ...

See also

This article contains a list of developmental and minor sports leagues: two concepts which are largely restricted to North American sports. ...

External links

Men's professional basketball leagues
v  d  e

FIBA | National Basketball Association | Euroleague | Other leagues Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005. ... The International Basketball Federation (French: Fédération Internationale de Basketball), more commonly known by the French acronym FIBA (pronounced ), is an association of national organizations which governs international competition in basketball. ... The National Basketball Association (NBA) is the worlds premier mens basketball league. ... The Euroleague is a high-calibre professional basketball league with teams from thirteen different European countries. ...

Americas: Argentina | Brazil | Chile | Mexico | Paraguay | Uruguay | Venezuela
United States developmental leagues: American Basketball Association | Continental Basketball Association | Eastern Basketball Alliance | International Basketball League | NBA Development League | National Superior Basketball | Premier Basketball League | United Basketball League | United States Basketball League | Universal Basketball League | World Basketball Association
Europe: Adriatic League | Austria | Bosnia and Herzegovina | Croatia | Cyprus | France | Germany | Greece | Israel | Italy | Lithuania | Montenegro | Norway | Poland | Portugal | Romania | Russia | Serbia | Slovenia | Spain | Sweden | Turkey | Ukraine | United Kingdom
Asia: China | Japan | Korea | Philippines | Taiwan
Oceania: Australia | New Zealand

  Results from FactBites:
 
Continental Basketball Association - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3286 words)
The Continental Basketball Association or CBA is a professional men's basketball league in the United States.
In the fall of 2001, CBA and IBL teams merged with the International Basketball Association and purchased the assets of the defunct CBA, including its name, logo and records from the bankruptcy court and re-started operations, calling itself the CBA.
During the 1981-82 season, the CBA created a six-foot by five-foot "no call box", an area in front of the baskets in which any contact in the box betwen offensive and defensive players was to be an automatic defensive foul.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Continental Basketball Association (849 words)
The U.S. basketball court is a rectangular area ranging in size from 94 ft by 50 ft (29 m by 15 m) for college and professional games to 74 ft by 42 ft (22 m by 13 m) for junior high school games.
The regulation basketball is an inflated, leather- or nylon-covered sphere that weighs from 20 to 22 oz (567 to 624 g) and has a circumference of 30 in.
Basketball rules have changed over the years with the intent of speeding its action, increasing the scoring, and offsetting the advantages given to teams with extremely tall players.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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