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Encyclopedia > Consubstantiation
Part of the series on
Communion

also known as
"The Eucharist" or
"The Lord's Supper" Communion, more widely known as the Eucharist, is the rite that Christians perform in fulfillment of Jesuss instruction, as recounted in the New Testament (Luke 22:19; 1 Corinthians 11:24-25), to do in memory of him what at his Last Supper he did when he gave his...

Instituted by
Jesus Christ

Theology
Consecration
Consubstantiation
Memorialism
Real Presence
Transubstantiation
Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1211x1096, 178 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article presents a description of Jesus life, as based on the four gospels. ... To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ... Memorialism is the belief held by many Christian denominations that the elements of bread and wine (or juice) in the Eucharist (more often referred to as The Lords Supper by memorialists) are symbolic of the body and blood of Jesus, the feast being primarily a memorial meal. ... Real Presence is the Christian belief and doctrine that Jesus the Christ is physically present in the bread and wine of the Eucharist or Holy Communion. ... Transubstantiation is the belief held by many Christian denominations that the Eucharistic elements of bread and wine are changed into the body and blood of Jesus during Consecration. ...

Theologies contrasted
Ecclesial communities contrasted in relation to Eucharistic theology: // Orthodox Christianity primary theological development from early Church Fathers, esp. ...

Important theologians
Paul ·Aquinas
Augustine · Calvin
Chrysostom · Cranmer
Luther · Zwingli An early portrait of the Apostle Paul. ... St Thomas Aquinas Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225 – March 7, 1274) was an Italian , Catholic philosopher and theologian in the scholastic tradition. ... St. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a prominent Christian theologian during the Protestant Reformation and is the namesake of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism. ... John Chrysostom (347 - 407) was a notable Christian bishop and preacher from the 4th and 5th centuries in Syria and Constantinople. ... Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 - March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. Born in 1489 at Nottingham, Cranmer was educated at Jesus College, Cambridge and became a priest following the death of his first wife. ... The Luther seal Martin Luther (November 10, 1483–February 18, 1546) was a German theologian, an Augustinian monk, and an ecclesiastical reformer whose teachings inspired the Reformation and deeply influenced the doctrines of Lutheran, Protestant and other Christian traditions (a broad movement composed of many congregations and church bodies). ... Huldrych (or Ulrich) Zwingli (January 1, 1484 – October 10, 1531) was the leader of the Swiss Reformation and founder of the Swiss Reformed Churches. ...

Related Articles
Christianity
Catholic Historic Roots
Closed and Open Table
Divine Liturgy
Eucharistic adoration
Eucharistic discipline
First Communion
Infant Communion
Mass · Sacrament
Sanctification Christianity is a monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament writings of his early followers. ... The historical roots of Catholic Eucharistic theology are the basis upon which a number of ecclesial communities, or churches, express their faith in the bread of life as given by Jesus, and are to be found in the Church Fathers, Scripture, the writings of Thomas Aquinas, and other early church... Closed communion is the practice of restricting the serving of the elements of communion (also called Eucharist, The Lords Supper) to those who are members of a particular church, denomination, sect, or congregation. ... Open communion refers to Christian churches that allow individuals other than members of that church to receive communion (also called the Eucharist or the Lords Supper). ... The Divine Liturgy is the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern-Rite Catholic eucharistic service. ... Eucharistic adoration is a practice of the Roman Catholic Church in which the Blessed Sacrament is exposed to and adored by the faithful. ... Eucharistic discipline is the term applied to the regulations and practices associated with an individual preparing for the reception of the Eucharist. ... The First Communion (First Holy Communion) is a Roman Catholic ceremony. ... One of the all-too-often-forgotten customs of the Early Church was that of Infant Communion. ... Then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI) presiding at the 2005 Easter Vigil Mass in place of the dying Pope John Paul II. Mass is the term used of the celebration of the Eucharist in the Latin rites of the Roman Catholic Church. ... A sacrament is a Christian rite that mediates divine grace. ... Sanctification or in its verb form, sanctify, literally means to set apart for special use or purpose, that is to make holy or sacred (compare Latin sanctus holy). Therefore sanctification refers to the state or process of being set apart, i. ...

Consubstantiation is a theory which (like the competing theory of transubstantiation, with which it is often contrasted) attempts to describe the nature of the Christian Eucharist in terms of philosophical metaphysics. It holds that during the sacrament the substance (a technical philosophical term which refers to the fundamental reality of a thing) of the body and blood of Christ are present alongside the substance of the bread and wine, which persists. This view is often attributed to the Lutheran church. However, the Lutheran church formally objects to the description of the Eucharist in terms of any philosophical theory. Lutherans hold that this rejection of metaphysical explanations of Christ's presence is not contradicted by the fact that both the writings of Martin Luther and documents of the church itself often refer to the body and blood of Christ as "in, with, and under" the bread and wine. Transubstantiation is the belief held by many Christian denominations that the Eucharistic elements of bread and wine are changed into the body and blood of Jesus during Consecration. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament writings of his early followers. ... The Eucharist is either the celebration of the Christian sacrament commemorating Christ’s Last Supper, or the consecrated bread and wine of this sacrament. ... A sacrament is a Christian rite that mediates divine grace. ... in philosophy, Substance is that element of an object without which it would not exist. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The Luther seal Martin Luther (November 10, 1483–February 18, 1546) was a German theologian, an Augustinian monk, and an ecclesiastical reformer whose teachings inspired the Reformation and deeply influenced the doctrines of Lutheran, Protestant and other Christian traditions (a broad movement composed of many congregations and church bodies). ...


The practical difference between transubstantiation and consubstantiation is that, while in transubstantiation the bread and wine become the body and blood of Christ through the consecration of the priest, but according to consubstantiation, the change occurs only upon receipt of the communion by the believer.


In England in the late 14th century, there was a political and religious movement known as Lollardy. Among much broader goals, the Lollards affirmed a form of consubstantiation -- that the Eucharist remained physically bread and wine, while becoming spiritually the body and blood of Christ. Lollardy was effectively ended with the execution of John Badby for heresy by burning at the stake. Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... (13th century - 14th century - 15th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was that century which lasted from 1301 to 1400. ... John Wycliffe gives his Bible translation to Lollards Lollardy or Lollardry was the political and religious movement of the Lollards from the late 14th century to early in the time of the English Reformation. ... John Badby (d. ... Burning of two sodomites at the stake (execution of individuals by fire. ...


In literature the conflict between Consubstantiation and Transubstantiation was satirically described in Jonathan Swift's "Gulliver's Travels" as war between Lilliput and Blefuscu. Transubstantiation is the belief held by many Christian denominations that the Eucharistic elements of bread and wine are changed into the body and blood of Jesus during Consecration. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Anglo-Irish writer who is famous for works like Gullivers Travels and A Tale of a Tub. ... Gullivers Travels (1726, amended 1735) is a work of fiction by Jonathan Swift that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the travellers tales literary sub-genre. ... Lilliput and Blefuscu are two island nations that appear in the 1726 novel Gullivers Travels by Jonathan Swift. ...


See also

Ecclesial communities contrasted in relation to Eucharistic theology: // Orthodox Christianity primary theological development from early Church Fathers, esp. ... Real Presence is the Christian belief and doctrine that Jesus the Christ is physically present in the bread and wine of the Eucharist or Holy Communion. ...

External Links

  • LCMS views on Fellowship and the Lord's Supper (PDF document)

  Results from FactBites:
 
What is consubstantiation? (591 words)
Consubstantiation essentially teaches that Jesus is "with, in, and under" the bread and wine - but is not literally the bread and wine.
In Consubstantiation the wine is both wine and the blood of Jesus instead of becoming the actual blood of Jesus.
Consubstantiation is held by some Eastern Orthodox churches, and some other liturgical Christian denominations (Episcopal and Lutheran as examples).
Consubstantiation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (431 words)
Consubstantiation is a theological doctrine that, like the competing theory of transubstantiation, attempts to describe the nature of the Christian Eucharist in concrete metaphysical terms.
Transubstantiation differs from consubstantiation in that it postulates that through consecration, according to some, that one set of substances (bread and wine) is exchanged for another (the Body and Blood of Christ) or, according to others, that the reality of the bread and wine become the reality of the body and blood of Christ.
Consubstantiation is commonly associated with the teachings of Martin Luther and Philipp Melanchthon, the latter actually employing the term with the approval of the former.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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