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Encyclopedia > Constantine XI
Constantine XI: The last Byzantine emperor is considered a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church.

Constantine XI Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: Κωνσταντίνος ΙΑ' Δραγάσης Παλαιολόγος, Kōnstantinos XI Dragasēs Palaiologos, Serbian: Константин XI Палеолог Драгаш), (February 8, 1405[1]May 29, 1453) was the last reigning Emperor of the Byzantine Empire, from 1448 to his death. Image File history File links Constantine_XI.jpg Constantine XI Paleologus. ... Image File history File links Constantine_XI.jpg Constantine XI Paleologus. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself as: the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus Christ and the Twelve Apostles, having maintained unbroken the link between its clergy and the Apostles by means of Apostolic Succession. ... Serbian (српски језик; srpski jezik) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 29 - Ralph Neville, Earl of Westmoreland, meets Archbishop Richard Scrope of York and Earl of Norfolk Thomas Mowbray in Shipton Moor, tricks them to send their rebellious army home and then imprisons them June 8 - Archbishop Richard Scrope of York and Thomas Mowbray, Earl of Norfolk, executed in... May 29 is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 2 - Mehmed II begins his siege of Constantinople (Ä°stanbul). ... It has been suggested that Eastern Roman Empire be merged into this article or section. ... Events January 5/ 6 - Christopher of Bavaria, King of Denmark, Norway and Sweden dies with no designated heir leaving all three kingdoms with vacant thrones. ...

Contents

Early life

Constantine was born in Constantinople as the eighth of ten children of Manuel II Palaiologos and Helena Dragaš, the daughter of the Serbian prince Constantine Dragaš of Kumanovo. He spent most of his childhood in Constantinople under the supervision of his parents. During the absence of his older brother in Italy, Constantine was regent in Constantinople from 1437-1439. Map of Constantinople. ... Emperor Manuel II Manuel II Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: Μανουήλ Β΄ Παλαιολόγος, ManouÄ“l II Palaiologos) (June 27, 1350 – July 21, 1425) was Byzantine emperor from 1391 to 1425. ... Helena Dragases was a byzantine queen, born during the XIV century, who married the Byzantine Emperor Manuel II Palaiologos, and died on May 13th, 1450 in Constantinople. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Constantine of Serres, nicknamed Dragases, was a regional lord and prince in the the fragmenting Serbian realm in the end of 14th century and in the beginning of 15th century. ... // Events foundation of All Souls College, University of Oxford. ... Events Battle of Grotnik, which ended the hussite movement in Poland Eric of Pomerania, King of Sweden, Denmark and Norway is declared deposed in Sweden. ...


Reign

Constantine became the Despotes of Morea (the Medieval name for the Peloponnesus) in 1443 which he ruled from the palace in Mistra. In 1443, he launched an invasion of the Latin Duchy of Athens from Morea, swiftly conquering Thebes and Athens and forcing its Florentine duke to pay him tribute. However, his triumph was short-lived, as the Ottomans soon intervened and drove him back into Morea. Constantine XI married twice: the first time on July 1, 1428 to Maddalena Tocco, niece of Carlo I Tocco of Epirus, who died in November 1429; the second time to Caterina Gattilusio, daughter of the Genoese lord of Lesbos, who also died (1442). Some sources record that he had no children by either marriage, others that he had one daughter, Magdalena. Painting of Emperor Basil II, exemplifying the Imperial Crown handed down by Angels. ... The Morea and surrounding states carved from the Byzantine Empire, as they were in 1265 (William R. Shepherd, Historical Atlas, 1911) The name Morea (Μωρέας) for Peloponnesos first appears in the 10th century in Byzantine chronicles. ... Peloponnesos (Greek: Πελοπόννησος, sometime Latinized as Peloponnesus or Anglicized as The Peloponnese) is a large peninsula in Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Isthmus of Corinth. ... Events Albanians, under Skanderbeg, defeat the Turks John Hunyadi defeats Turks at the Battle of Nis Vlad II Dracul begins his second term as ruler of Wallachia, succeeding Basarab II. Births January 27 - Albert, Duke of Saxony (died 1500) February 23 - Matthias Corvinus of Hungary (died 1490) May 17 - Edmund... For a village in the prefecture of Ioannina, see Ioannina The Vale of Laconia seen from the battlements of Mystras Mystras (also Mistra, Mystra and Mistras Greek: Μύστρας ) was a fortified town in Morea (the Peloponnesus), on Mt. ... // Duchy of Athens A small crusader state which was established after the Sack of Constantinople (1204) by the Crusaders. ... Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events October 12 - English forces under Thomas Montacute, 4th Earl of Salisbury besiege Orléans. ... Carlo I Tocco, ruler of Epirus from 1411 until his death on July 4, 1429. ... The Despotate of Epirus was one of the medieval Greek successor states of the Byzantine Empire, founded in the aftermath of the Fourth Crusade in 1204. ... January 10 - Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, founds the European Order of the Golden Fleece February 12 - Battle of Rouvray (or of the Herrings). English Forces under Sir John Fastolf defend a supply convoy carrying rations to the army of William de la Pole, 4th Earl of Suffolk at... The Republic of Genoa, in full the Most Serene Republic of Genoa (known as the Ligurian Republic from 1798 to 1805) was an independent state in Liguria on the northwestern Italian coast from ca. ... Lesbos, shown off the coast of the Anatolian peninsula (Asiatic Turkey), northwest of Ä°zmir. ... Events The community of Rauma, Finland was granted its town rights. ...


When his brother, Emperor John VIII Palaiologos, died, a dispute erupted between Constantine and his brother Demetrios Palaiologos over the throne. They appealed to the Ottoman Sultan Murad II to arbitrate the disagreement. He chose Constantine, who was crowned at Mistra on January 6, 1449. Constantine XI attempted to marry a distant cousin, Maria Branković, the widow of Murad II, but the courtship failed. Soon afterwards, Sultan Mehmed II began agitating for ownership of Constantinople. Desperate for any type of military assistance, Constantine XI appealed to the West, but he was refused help unless he united the Orthodox Church with the Roman Catholic Church, which was a policy pursued by his predecessors. He declared the churches united after the Council of Florence in 1452, but the union was overwhelmingly rejected by his subjects and it dangerously estranged him from his chief minister and military commander, the Megas Doux Loukas Notaras. John VIII Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek Ιωάννης Η Παλαιολόγος, IōannÄ“s VIII Palaiologos) (December 18 1392 – October 31, 1448), was Byzantine Emperor from 1425 to 1448. ... Demetrios Palaiologos or Demetrius Palaeologus (Greek: Δημήτριος Παλαιολόγος, DÄ“mÄ“trios Palaiologos) (1407–1470), Despot (despotÄ“s) in Morea de facto 1436–1438 and 1451–1460 and de jure 1438–1451, previously governor of Lemnos 1422–1440, and of Mesembria 1440–1451. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish (official); spoken languages include Abkhazian, Adyghe, Albanian, Arabic, Aramaic, Armenian, Azerbaijani... Murad II Murad II (1404 – February 3, 1451) (Arabic: مراد الثاني) was the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1421 to 1451 (except for a period from 1444 to 1446). ... For a village in the prefecture of Ioannina, see Ioannina The Vale of Laconia seen from the battlements of Mystras Mystras (also Mistra, Mystra and Mistras Greek: Μύστρας ) was a fortified town in Morea (the Peloponnesus), on Mt. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 359 days (360 in leap years) remaining. ... Events January 6 - Constantine XI is crowned Byzantine Emperor. ... Despot ĐuraÄ‘ Branković (Cyrillic: Ђурађ Бранковић, Hungarian: György Brankovics, ruled 1427 - 1456) was a Serbian monarch who built Smederevo. ... ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church... A decree of the Council of Constance (9 October 1417), sanctioned by Pope Martin V obliged the papacy to summon general councils periodically. ... Events October - English troops under John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, land in Guyenne, France, and retake most of the province without a fight. ... The Megas Doux (Gr. ... Loukas Notaras (Gr. ...


Unexplained disappearance

Mehmed II offered Constantine XI the chance to rule in Mistra before the siege of Constantinople, but he refused, preferring to fight and die defending his empire. His wish to die in defence of the Empire would come true, as he was killed while defending the gates of Constantinople on May 29, 1453. Near the end of the battle, Constantine is remarked to have said; "The City is fallen but I am alive". The Emperor, realising that the end had come, discarded his purple cloak and led his remaining soldiers to charge into the breach. Some sources record that he was only recognized afterwards by his purple boots, and others that the Turks were never able to identify his body, and so the last Roman Emperor was buried in a mass grave along with his soldiers. A legend refers to the Marble King, Constantine XI, holding that, when the Ottomans entered the city, an angel rescued the emperor, turned him into marble and placed him in a cave under the earth near the Golden Gate, where he waits to be brought to life again.[2][3]. Mehmed II (Ottoman Turkish: محمد ثانى , Turkish: ), (also known as el-Fatih (الفاتح), the Conqueror, in Ottoman Turkish, or, in modern Turkish, Fatih Sultan Mehmet) (March 30, 1432 – May 3, 1481) was Sultan of the Ottoman Empire for a short time from 1444 to 1446, and later from 1451 to 1481. ... For a village in the prefecture of Ioannina, see Ioannina The Vale of Laconia seen from the battlements of Mystras Mystras (also Mistra, Mystra and Mistras Greek: Μύστρας ) was a fortified town in Morea (the Peloponnesus), on Mt. ... Combatants Byzantine Empire Ottoman Empire Commanders Constantine XI† Loukas Notaras Giovanni Giustiniani†[1] Mehmed II Strength 7,000[2] 80,000[1]-200,000[1][3] Casualties 4,000 dead[4] 10,000 civilian dead[5][6] - The Fall of Constantinople refers to the capture of the Byzantine capital by... May 29 is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 2 - Mehmed II begins his siege of Constantinople (Ä°stanbul). ...


Unoffical saint

Orthodox Christians consider Constantine XI a saint, but he has not been officially recognized as such. One of the reasons for this was that in the centuries of Ottoman rule, any effort on the part of the Orthodox Church to officially glorify Constantine XI as a saint would have been seen as an act of rebellion, and hence decidedly ill-advised. After the Greek War of Independence (1821-1831), when the Greek Orthodox Church once again had freedom to act, an official act of glorification was thought to be superfluous, on account of longstanding veneration as a saint and martyr, specifically, a national martyr or ethnomartyr, Greek ἐθνομάρτυρας. However, the erection of the statue of "Saint Constantine XI the Ethnomartyr" in the square in front of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens, with the formal blessing of the Church authorities, appears to be a semi-official act of recognition. His feast falls on 29 May. Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish (official); spoken languages include Abkhazian, Adyghe, Albanian, Arabic, Aramaic, Armenian, Azerbaijani... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Eastern Christianity. ... Icon of St. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ... Combatants Greek revolutionaries United Kingdom Kingdom of France Russian Empire Ottoman Empire Egyptian Khedivate Commanders Theodoros Kolokotronis Alexander Ypsilanti Georgios Karaiskakis Omer Vryonis Mahmud Dramali Pasha ReÅŸid Mehmed Pasha Ibrahim Pasha. ... Greek Orthodox Church (Greek: HellÄ“northódoxÄ“ EkklÄ“sía) can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches. ... Icon of St. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Annunciation Cathedral, the Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens, (Greek: Καθεδρικός Ναος Ευαγγελισμού της Θεοτόκου) popularly known as the Mitrópolis, is the cathedral of the Archbishop of Athens and all Greece. ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

Byzantine Greeks or Byzantines, is a conventional term used by modern historians to refer to the medieval Greek or Hellenized citizens of the Byzantine Empire, centered mainly in Constantinople, southern Balkans, the Greek islands, the coasts of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) and the large urban centres of Near East and... Combatants Byzantine Empire Ottoman Empire Commanders Constantine XI† Loukas Notaras Giovanni Giustiniani†[1] Mehmed II Strength 7,000[2] 80,000[1]-200,000[1][3] Casualties 4,000 dead[4] 10,000 civilian dead[5][6] - The Fall of Constantinople refers to the capture of the Byzantine capital by...

Bibliography

  • Steven Runciman, The Fall of Constantinople, 1453; Cambridge University Press, 1965; ISBN 0-521-09573-5
  • Donald M. Nicol, The Immortal Emperor; Cambridge University Press, 1992; ISBN 0-521-46717-9
  • Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, 1991.
  • Roger Crowley "1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West"; Hyperion, 2005; ISBN 1-4013-0850-3

Sir James Cochran Stevenson Runciman (7 July 1903 - 1 November 2000) was a British historian known for his work on the Middle Ages. ... Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium (often abbreviated to ODB) is a three volume book by the Oxford University Press. ...

References

  1. ^ Nicol, D. M., The Immortal Emperor pp. 2
  2. ^ The Marble King (in greek)
  3. ^ Odysseas Elytis's poem on Constantine XI Palaeologos
Constantine XI
Palaiologos dynasty
Born: 8 February 1405
Died: 29 May 1453
Regnal titles
Preceded by
John VIII Palaiologos
Byzantine Emperor
1448–1453
Conquest by Mehmed II of Ottoman Empire
Preceded by
Theodore II Palaiologos
Despot of Morea
1443–1449
Succeeded by
Thomas Palaiologos

The double-headed eagle, emblem of the Paleologus dynasty and the Byzantine Empire The Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: Παλαιολόγος, pl. ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 29 - Ralph Neville, Earl of Westmoreland, meets Archbishop Richard Scrope of York and Earl of Norfolk Thomas Mowbray in Shipton Moor, tricks them to send their rebellious army home and then imprisons them June 8 - Archbishop Richard Scrope of York and Thomas Mowbray, Earl of Norfolk, executed in... May 29 is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 2 - Mehmed II begins his siege of Constantinople (Ä°stanbul). ... John VIII Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek Ιωάννης Η Παλαιολόγος, IōannÄ“s VIII Palaiologos) (December 18 1392 – October 31, 1448), was Byzantine Emperor from 1425 to 1448. ... This is a list of the Emperors of the late Eastern Roman Empire, called Byzantine by modern historians. ... Mehmed II (Ottoman Turkish: محمد ثانى , Turkish: ), (also known as el-Fatih (الفاتح), the Conqueror, in Ottoman Turkish, or, in modern Turkish, Fatih Sultan Mehmet) (March 30, 1432 – May 3, 1481) was Sultan of the Ottoman Empire for a short time from 1444 to 1446, and later from 1451 to 1481. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish (official); spoken languages include Abkhazian, Adyghe, Albanian, Arabic, Aramaic, Armenian, Azerbaijani... Theodore II Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: Θεόδωρος Β΄ Παλαιολόγος, Theodōros II Palaiologos) (c. ... The Despotate of Morea was a province of the Byzantine Empire which existed between the mid-14th and mid-15th centuries. ... After the fall of Constantinople to Mehmed II, the only free province of the Byzantine Empire was the Despotate of Morea, ruled by two brothers of the dead emperor Constantine XI Palaeologus, Thomas and Demetrius Palaeologus. ... This is a list of the Roman Emperors with the dates they ruled the Roman Empire. ... The Principate is, according to its etymological derivation from the Latin word princeps, meaning chief or first, the political regime dominated by such a political leader, whether or not he is formally head of state and/or head of government. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC - 20s BC - 10s BC 0s 10s 20s 30s Years: 32 BC 31 BC 30 BC 29 BC 28 BC 27 BC 26 BC 25 BC 24 BC 23 BC 22... Events Maximinus Thrax becomes Roman Emperor. ... For other uses, see Augustus (disambiguation). ... 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Majorian on an bronze coin. ... Libius Severus was a Western Roman Emperor. ... Procopius Anthemius (c. ... Anicius Olybrius, Western Roman Emperor (July 11 - October 23, 472), was a member of a noble family and a native of Rome. ... Glycerius (c. ... Julius Nepos on a coin. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... This is a list of the Roman Emperors with the dates they ruled the Roman Empire. ... Events By Place Roman Empire January 19 - Arcadius is elevated to Emperor. ... April 2 - Mehmed II begins his siege of Constantinople (Ä°stanbul). ... Idealising bust of Arcadius in the Theodosian style combines elements of classicism with the new hieratic style (Istanbul Archaeology Museum) Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Arcadius For the Greek grammarian, see Arcadius of Antioch. ... Theodosius II Flavius Theodosius II (April, 401 - July 28, 450 ). The eldest son of Eudoxia and Arcadius who at the age of 7 became the Roman Emperor of the East. ... Pulcheria (January 19, 399 – 453) was the daughter of the Eastern Roman Emperor Arcadius and Aelia Eudoxia. ... Another but lesser Marcian was a son-in-law of Byzantine Emperor Leo I and his queen Verina. ... Leo I coin. ... Imperator Caesar Flavius Leo Augustus or Leo II (467- November 17, 474) served as Eastern Roman Emperor from January 18 to November 17, 474. ... Flavius Zeno (c. ... For the genus of lizards, see Basiliscus (genus). ... Flavius Anastasius. ... Flavius Iustinus Augustus. ... (Latin: Flavius Petrus Sabbatius Iustinianus, Greek: Ιουστινιανός;) commonly known as Justinian I, or (among Eastern Orthodox Christians) as Saint Justinian the Great; c. ... Flavius Iustinus Iunior Augustus Flavius Iustinus Iunior Augustus or Justin The Divine (c. ... Flavius Tiberius Constantinus Augustus or Tiberius II Constantine (c. ... A solidus of Maurikios reign. ... Phocas on a contemporary coin Flavius Phocas Augustus, Eastern Roman Emperor (reigned 602–610), is perhaps one of the most maligned figures to have held the Imperial title in the long history of Rome and Byzantium. ... Heraclius and his sons Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas. ... Roman coin depicting, on its face, Heraclius and his sons Heraclius Constantine and Heraclonas Heraclius Constantine or Constantine III (May 3, 612 - April 20/24 or May 26, 641) was the eldest son of the Byzantine emperor Heraclius and his first wife Eudocia, and ruled as Emperor for four months... Herakleios with his sons Constantine III and Heraklonas. ... Constans and his son Constantine. ... Mezezius also known as Mecetius, Bizantine usurper in Sicily from 668 to 669. ... Constantine IV on a contemporary coin Constantine IV (649-685); sometimes incorrectly called Pogonatus, meaning the Bearded, like his father; was Byzantine emperor from 668-685. ... Justinian II, known as Rhinotmetus (the Split-nosed) (669-711) was a Byzantine emperor of the Heraclian Dynasty, reigned from 685 to 695 and again from 704 to 711. ... Leontios, showing the symbols of power: the crown, the globus cruciger, and the akakia. ... Tiberius III, the German commander Apsimar. ... Philippikos (FILIPICUS) coin, celebrating the victories of the emperor (VICTORIA AVGU). ... Anastasios II kept his name, Artemios, also on his coinage; this solidus bears the legend APTEMIUS ANASTASIUS. Anastasios II or Anastasius II (Greek: Αναστάσιος Β΄), (died 718), Byzantine emperor, from 713 to 715. ... Theodosios III or Theodosius III (Greek: Θεοδόσιος Γ΄), was Byzantine Emperor from 715 to March 25, 717. ... Leo the Isaurian and his son Constantine V. Leo III the Isaurian or the Syrian (Greek: Λέων Γ΄, Leōn III ), (c. ... Constantine V Copronymus (The Dung-named) was Byzantine emperor from 741 to 775. ... Artavasdos (erroneously Artabasdos or Artabasdus), (Greek: Αρταύασδος, Artauasdos, from Armenian: Ô±Ö€Õ¿Õ¡Õ¾Õ¡Õ¦Õ¤, Artavazd ), was Byzantine Emperor from June 741 or 742 until November 743. ... Leo IV the Khazar (Greek: Λέων Δ΄, Leōn IV ), (January 25, 750 – September 8, 780), Byzantine Emperor from 775 to 780. ... Constantine VI (Greek: Κωνσταντίνος ΣΤ΄, Kōnstantinos VI; 771–797 or 805) was Byzantine Emperor from 780 to 797. ... This solidus struck under Irene reports the legend bASILISSH, Basilissa. ... Nikephoros I and his son and successor, Stauracius. ... Staurakios on a coin issued by his father Nikephoros I. Staurakios or Stauracius (Greek: Σταυράκιος), (d. ... Michael I on a contemporary coin Michael I Rangabe (Greek: Μιχαήλ Α΄ Ραγγαβέ, MikhaÄ“l I Rangabe), (died January 11, 844) was Byzantine Emperor (811 - 813). ... Contemporary coin of Leo V. Leo V, surnamed The Armenian (775 – December 24, 820), was emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 813 to 820, after first distinguishing himself as a general in the reigns of Nicephorus I and Michael I Rhangabes. ... Michael II, called Psellus, the stammerer, or the Amorian (770-829) reigned as Byzantine emperor 820 - 829. ... Theophilus, in the Chronicle of John Skylitzes Theophilos or Theophilus (Greek: Θεόφιλος), (813 – 20 January 842) was Byzantine emperor from 829 to 842. ... Theodora depicted as ruler on this coin, with her son Michael, nominally emperor, and her daughter Thecla on the reverse. ... This coin struck during the regency of Theodora shows how Michael was less prominent than his mother, who is represented as ruler alone on the obverse, and even than his sister Thecla, who is depicted together with the young Michael on the reverse of this coin. ... Basil, his son Constantine, and his second wife, emperess Eudoxia Ingerina. ... This follis by Leo VI bears the Byzantine Emperors official title, BASILEVS ROMEON, Emperor of the Romans; translation of text: Leo, by the grace of God, King of Romans Leo VI the Wise or the Philosopher (Greek: Λέων ΣΤ΄, Leōn VI, Armenian: [1]), (September 19, 866 – May 11, 912) was Byzantine... A Byzantine Mosaic portrait of Emperor Alexander (870 - 913) which was completed in the Emperors short reign. ... Constantine and his mother Zoë. Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos or Porphyrogenitus, the Purple-born (Greek: Κωνσταντίνος Ζ΄ Πορφυρογέννητος, Kōnstantinos VII PorphyrogennÄ“tos), (Constantinople, September 905 – November 9, 959 in Constantinople) was the son of the Byzantine emperor Leo VI and his fourth wife Zoe Karbonopsina. ... Contemporary coin of Romanus I. Romanos I Lekapenos or Romanus I Lecapenus (Greek: Ρωμανός Α΄ Λακαπήνος, Rōmanos I LakapÄ“nos) (c. ... Romanus II (939 - 963) succeeded his father Constantine VII as Byzantine emperor in 959 at the age of twenty-one, and died, poisoned, it was believed, by his wife, Theophanu in 963. ... Emperor Nikephoros II Phokas Nikephoros II Phokas or Nicephorus II Phocas (Greek: Νικηφόρος Β΄ Φωκάς, NikÄ“phoros II Phōkas), (c. ... Ioannes, protected by God and the Virgin Mary. ... Painting of Basil II, from an 11th century manuscript. ... Constantine VIII (in Greek Konstantinos VIII, written Κωνσταντίνος Η) (960 – November 15, 1028), Byzantine emperor (December 15, 1025 – November 15, 1028) was the son of the Emperor Romanus II and the younger brother of the eminent Basil... Empress Zoe as depicted in a mosaic from the Hagia Sophia Zoe (in Greek Ζωή, meaning life), (c. ... Romanus III. Romanos III Argyros or Romanus III Argyrus (Greek: Ρωμανός Γ΄ Αργυρός, Rōmanos III Argyros), (968 – April 11, 1034) was Byzantine emperor (November 15, 1028 - April 11, 1034). ... Michael IV (1010 – December 10, 1041), called the Paphlagonian (in Greek, Μιχαήλ Παφλαγών, meaning from the province of Paphlagonia), was Byzantine emperor from April 11, 1034 to December 10, 1041. ... Michael V Calaphates (1015 - August 24, 1042) (in Greek Μιχαήλ Καλαφάτης, meaning the caulker), was the nephew and successor as Byzantine emperor of Michael IV and adoptive son of his wife Zoë. His surname reflected the early... Mosaic of Constantine IX and Empress Zoe Constantine IX Monomachus (c. ... Theodora (in Greek Θεοδώρα, literally meaning Gift of God, lived 981 - August 31, 1056) ruled as Byzantine Empress from January 11, 1055 to August 31, 1056. ... Michael VI Stratioticus, the warlike, was Byzantine emperor (1056 - 1057). ... Isaac coin. ... Constantine X Ducas (1006 - May, 1067) was the emperor of the Byzantine Empire (1059 - 1067). ... Michael VII Ducas or Parapinakes, was the eldest son of Constantine X Ducas and Eudocia Macrembolitissa. ... Diptych of Romanus and Eudocia Macrembolitissa. ... Nicephorus Botaniates. ... Emperor Alexios I Komnenos Emperor Alexios I Komnenos depicted in a mosaic in the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople Alexios I Komnenos or Alexius I Comnenus (Greek: ; Latin: ) (1048 – August 15, 1118), Byzantine emperor (1081–1118), was the son of John Komnenos and Anna Dalassena and the nephew of Isaac I... John II Komnenos or Comnenus (Greek: Ιωάννης Β΄ Κομνηνός, IōannÄ“s II KomnÄ“nos) (September 13, 1087 – April 8, 1143) was Byzantine emperor from 1118 to 1143. ... Manuel I Komnenos, or Comnenus, (Greek: Μανουήλ Α Κομνηνός, ManouÄ“l I KomnÄ“nos), November 28, 1118 – September 24, 1180), was a Byzantine Emperor of the 12th century who reigned over a crucial turning point in the history of Byzantium and the Mediterranean. ... Alexios II Komnenos or Alexius II Comnenus (Greek: Αλέχιος Β’ Κομνηνός, Alexios II KomnÄ“nos) (September 10, 1169 – October 1183), Byzantine emperor (1180-1183), was the son of Emperor Manuel I Komnenos and Maria, daughter of Raymond, prince of Antioch. ... Billon trachy (a cup-shaped coin) of Andronikos I Komnenos (1183-1185) Andronikos I Komnenos or Andronicus I Comnenus (Greek: Ανδρόνικος Α’ Κομνηνός, Andronikos I KomnÄ“nos) (c. ... Isaac II Angelos or Angelus (Greek: Ισαάκιος Β’ Άγγελος, Isaakios II Angelos) (September 1156 - January, 1204) was Byzantine emperor from 1185 to 1195, and again from 1203 to 1204. ... Alexios III Angelos or Alexius III Angelus (Greek: Αλέξιος Γ Άγγελος) (c. ... Emperor Alexios IV Alexios IV Angelos or Alexius IV Angelus (Greek: Αλέξιος Δ Άγγελος) (c. ... Nikolaos Kanabos was elected Emperor of Byzantium on the 25. ... Alexios V Doukas Mourtzouphlos or Alexius V Ducas Murtzuphlus (Greek: Αλέξιος Ε΄ Δούκας Μούρτζουφλος) (d. ... Constantine Laskaris (Greek Κωνσταντίνος Λάσκαρης) was Byzantine emperor for a few months in 1204. ... The Latin Empire, Empire of Nicaea, Empire of Trebizond and the Despotate of Epirus. ... John III Doukas Vatatzes or Ducas Vatatzes (Greek: Ιωάννης Γ΄ Δούκας Βατάτζης, IōannÄ“s III Doukas BatatzÄ“s) (c. ... Theodore II Doukas Laskaris or Ducas Lascaris (Greek: Θεόδωρος Β΄ Δούκας Λάσκαρις, Theodōros II Doukas Laskaris) (1221/1222–August 18, 1258) was emperor of Nicaea, 1254–1258. ... John IV Doukas Laskaris or Ducas Lascaris (Greek: Ιωάννης Δ΄ Δούκας Λάσκαρις, IōannÄ“s IV Doukas Laskaris), December 25, 1250 - c. ... The Byzantine Empire in 1265 (William R. Shepherd, Historical Atlas, 1911) Michael VIII Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: Μιχαήλ Η΄ Παλαιολόγος, MikhaÄ“l VIII Palaiologos) (1224/1225 – December 11, 1282) reigned as Byzantine emperor 1259–1282. ... Andronikos II Palaiologos or Andronicus II Palaeologus (Greek: ) (1259/1260 – February 13, 1332), reigned as Byzantine emperor 1282–1328. ... Andronikos III Palaiologos or Andronicus III Palaeologus (Greek: Ανδρόνικος Γ Παλαιολόγος) (March 25, 1297 - June 15, 1341) reigned as Byzantine emperor 1328–1341, after being rival emperor since 1321. ... John V Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: , IōannÄ“s V Palaiologos), (1332 – February 16, 1391) was the son of Emperor Andronikos III Palaiologos and Anna of Savoy. ... John VI Kantakouzenos or Cantacuzene (Greek: Ιωάννης ΣΤ΄ Καντακουζηνός, IōannÄ“s VI KantakouzÄ“nos) (c. ... Matthew Kantakouzenos or Cantacuzenus (Greek: Ματθαίος Ασάνης Καντακουζηνός, Matthaios AsanÄ“s KantakouzÄ“nos) (c. ... Andronikos IV Palaiologos or Andronicus IV Palaeologus (Greek: Ανδρόνικος Δ Παλαιολόγος) (April 2, 1348–June 28, 1385), was Byzantine emperor from 1376 to 1379. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Andronikos V Palaiologos or Andronicus V Palaeologus (Greek: Ανδρόνικος Ε Παλαιολόγος) (c. ... Emperor Manuel II Manuel II Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek: Μανουήλ Β΄ Παλαιολόγος, ManouÄ“l II Palaiologos) (June 27, 1350 – July 21, 1425) was Byzantine emperor from 1391 to 1425. ... John VIII Palaiologos or Palaeologus (Greek Ιωάννης Η Παλαιολόγος, IōannÄ“s VIII Palaiologos) (December 18 1392 – October 31, 1448), was Byzantine Emperor from 1425 to 1448. ...

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Constantine XI

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal (817 words)
Constantine was born in Constantinople as the eighth of ten children of Manuel II Palaiologos and Helena Dragaš, the daughter of the Serbian prince Constantine Dragaš of Kumanovo.
Constantine XI married twice: the first time on July 1, 1428 to Maddalena Tocco, niece of Carlo I Tocco of Epirus, who died in November 1429; the second time to Caterina Gattilusio, daughter of the Genoese lord of Lesbos, who also died (1442).
However, the erection of the statue of "Saint Constantine XI the Ethnomartyr" in the square in front of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens, with the formal blessing of the Church authorities, appears to be a semi-official act of recognition.
Constantine XI - Definition, explanation (569 words)
Constantine was born in Constantinople, the eighth of ten children of Manuel II and Helena Dragas, the daughter of the Serbian prince Constantine of Serres.
Constantine became the despotes of Morea (the Medieval name for the Peloponnesus) in 1443 which he ruled from the palace in Mystra.
Constantine married twice: the first time on July 1, 1428 to Maddelena Tocco, the niece of the Italian ruler of Epirus, who died in November 1429; the second time to Caterina Gattilusio, daughter of the Genovese lord of Lesbos, who also died (1442).
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