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Encyclopedia > Constantine, Algeria

Coordinates: 36°21′N, 6°36′E Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Position of Constantine in Algeria.
Position of Constantine in Algeria.

Constantine or Qusantînah (Arabic: قسنطينة ) is the capital of Constantine Province (ولاية قسنطينة) in north-east Algeria, slightly inland, at about 80 kilometers from the Mediterranean coast. Image File history File links Map of Algeria showing Constantine province. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Constantine Province is one of the 48 provinces of Algeria. ... Composite satellite image of the Mediterranean Sea. ...


Regarded as the capital of eastern Algeria, it has a population of over 500,000 (750,000 with the agglomeration) making it the third largest city in the country after Algiers and Oran. Situated in north eastern Algeria, Constantine is the centre of its region. Constantine is placed on a plateau at 640 metres above sea level. The city is framed by a deep ravine and has a dramatic appearance. The city is very picturesque with a number of bridges and a viaduct crossing the ravine. The economical base is the manufacturing of leather, wool and linen. Constantine is the centre of commercial activities and has Algeria and Tunisia as its markets. Constantine has one university, the University of Constantine, which was founded in 1969. There are museums and important historical sites around the city. Constantine can be found on the top of a gorge protecting the city on almost all sides. As so many other places in North Africa, the fortress and the city has been one and the same. Constantine got help from nature's side. The sights of today are spectacular, especially since this is a fairly big city. The gorge cutting the edges of Constantine, can be crossed by one out of four bridges, like Pont Sidi M'Cid, as on the picture. But I'm sad to report that a serious environmental scheme is needed to turn Constantine into what it should be. The gorge serves to a large extent as a dustbin, and is heavily polluted by oil as well. As for the economical side of constantine, it is the railhead of a prosperous and diverse agricultural area. Constantine is also a center of the grain trade and has flour mills, a tractor factory, and industries producing textiles and leather goods. “Alger” redirects here. ... View of Oran Oran (Arabic: , pronounced Wahran) is a city in northwestern Algeria, situated on the Mediterranean coast. ...

Contents

History

The city was originally settled by Numidian people, and was known as Sarim Batim. Later its name was Cirta, from the Phoenician word for "city". Constantine was capital city of the Numidia, a berber empire that emerged in the 3rd century BC. The city was founded in 203 BC by king Micipsa, with the help of Greek colonists. She distinguished for the splendour of the public buildings and its population overcame that of all other towns of northern Africa. It had an army of 10,000 cavalry and 20,000 infantry. In 113 BC the town was conquered by Jugurtha. Later it served as base of the Roman generals Caecilius Metellus Numidicus and Caius Marius. In 107 BC the latter gained a victory over Jugurtha in the nearby of Cirta. With the suppression of king Juba I and the rest of the supporters of Pompey in Africa (46 BC), Julius Caesar gave special civil rights to a part of Cirta, under the name of Sittlanorum Colonia. It became the head of a confederation of four similar settlements in North Africa. This article is about the Roman province. ... Constantine or Qustantînah is a city and wilaya in north-east Algeria, slightly inland. ... Phoenician was a language originally spoken in the coastal region of what is now Lebanon. ... Numidia was an ancient Berber kingdom in North Africa that later alternated between a Roman province and a Roman client state, and is no longer in existence today. ... The Berbers (also called Amazigh, free men, pl. ... Micipsa (c. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC - 110s BC - 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC Years: 118 BC 117 BC 116 BC 115 BC 114 BC - 113 BC - 112 BC 111 BC... Jugurtha, (c. ... Gaius Marius (Latin: C·MARIVS·C·F·C·N) (157 - January 13, 86 BC) was a Roman general and politician who was mostly known for his reform of Roman armies. ... Juba I of Numidia (Reigned 60 B.C. - 46 B.C.) Juba I Juba I (c. ... Pompey, Pompey the Great or Pompey the Triumvir [1] (Classical Latin abbreviation: CN·POMPEIVS·CN·F·SEX·N·MAGNVS[2], Gnaeus or Cnaeus Pompeius Magnus) (September 29, 106 BC–September 29, 48 BC), was a distinguished military and political leader of the late Roman republic. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 51 BC 50 BC 49 BC 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ...


In 311, during the civil war between emperor Maxentius and usurper Domitius Alexander (former governor of Africa), the city was destroyed. Rebuilt in 313, it was subsequently named after emperor Constantine the Great, who had defeated Maxentius. Conquered by the Vandals in 432, Constantine returned to the Byzantine exarchate of North Africa from 534 to 697. It was conquered by the Arabs in the 7th century, receiving the name of Qusantina. Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius ( 278-28 October 312) was Western Roman Emperor from 306 to 312. ... Domitius Alexander on a follis. ... Constantine. ... The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe which entered the late Roman Empire during the 5th century. ... // Introduction Exarch is from the Latin; Exarchus, Greek; Exarchon; Meaning Leader, from the word exarchein to lead, to begin, to rule. ...


The city recovered and in 12th century was again a prosperous market, with connection to Pisa, Genoa and Venice. Since 1529 it was intermittently part of Ottoman Empire, ruled by a Turkish bey (governor) subordinate to the dey of Algiers. Salah Bey, who ruled the city in 1770-1792, greatly embellished it and built much of the Muslim architecture still visible today. Leaning Tower of Pisa. ... For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ottoman (disambiguation). ... Bey is originally a Turkish[1][2] word for chieftain, traditionally applied to the leaders of small tribal groups. ... The American Captain William Bainbridge paying tribute to the Dey, circa 1800. ... “Alger” redirects here. ...


In 1826 ,the last Bey, Ahmed Bey ben Mohamed Chérif became the new head of state and led a fierce resistance against French occupation forces. By 13 October 1837 the territory was reconquered by France, and in 1848 it was incorporated into the colony of Algiers (Algeria). Bey is originally a Turkish[1][2] word for chieftain, traditionally applied to the leaders of small tribal groups. ... Ahmed Bey ben Mohamed Chérif(c. ...


In World War II, during campaign in North Africa (1942-43), Constantine and the nearby city of Sétif were used by the Allied forces as operational bases. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Sétif (Arabic: ‎; sātÄ“f`, formerly Sitifis Colonia; population 230,000 (2005 estimate) is the capital of Sétif Province, with 1. ...


People

Constantine is native city of the Islamic reformator Ben Badis. It is also the hometown of Key people in Algeria and France. Abd al Hamid Ben Badis, president and Founder(in 1931)of the Association of Algerian Muslim Ulema(Association des Uléma Musulmans Algériens, AUMA), is an important figure of the muslim reform movement in Algeria, during the first half of 20th century. ...

Abd al Hamid Ben Badis, president and Founder(in 1931)of the Association of Algerian Muslim Ulema(Association des Uléma Musulmans Algériens, AUMA), is an important figure of the muslim reform movement in Algeria, during the first half of 20th century. ... Malek Bennabi is a prominent Algerian thinker, born in 1905 and dead in 1973. ... Masinissa, King of Numidia Masinissa or Massinissa (c. ... An ancient kingdom located in the region of North Africa now occupied by Algeria The Kingdom existed from the 3rd to 1st Centuries BC. The Kingdom of Numidia was established as a client kingdom by Rome following the Second Punic War. ... Princess Charlotte, Duchess of Valentinois (Charlotte Louise Juliette Grimaldi, née Louvet) (30 September 1898 – 15 November 1977), styled HSH The Princess Charlotte, was the illegitimate daughter of Louis II, Prince of Monaco, and the mother of Prince Rainier III. From 1922 until 1944, she was the Hereditary Princess of... Louis II of Monaco (July 12, 1870 – May 9, 1949) was the Sovereign Prince of Monaco from June 26, 1922 until May 9, 1949. ... Rainier III, Prince of Monaco (Rainier Louis Henri Maxence Bertrand Grimaldi; 31 May 1923 – 6 April 2005), styled His Serene Highness The Sovereign Prince of Monaco, ruled the Principality of Monaco for almost fifty-six years, making him one of the longest ruling monarchs of the 20th century. ... Claude Cohen-Tannoudji (born April 1, 1933) is a French physicist working at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France, where he has also studied physics. ... Hassiba Boulmerka (Arabic: ) (born July 10, 1968) in Constantine in the north east of Algeria is a former Algerian middle distance athlete. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Ahlam (or Ahlem) Mosteghanemi (born 13 April 1953), the daughter of Algerian revolutionary leader Mohammed Chérif, is a notable Algerian writer. ... Ahmed Bey or Hadj Ahmed Bey (1784 - 1850) was the last Bey of Constantine. ... Bey is originally a Turkish[1][2] word for chieftain, traditionally applied to the leaders of small tribal groups. ... Rabah Bitat (December 19, 1925 - April 9/10, 2000) was the acting President of Algeria from 27 December 1978 to 9 February 1979. ... Malouf may refer to: Music of Tunisia David Malouf, an Australian writer Category: ... Enrico Macias (born Gaston Ghrenassia December 11, 1938) is an Algerian-born Jewish singer, who sings primarily in French. ... Jean-Michel Atlan (January 23, 1913 - February 12, 1960) was born in Constantine, Algeria, and moved to Paris in 1930. ... Malouf may refer to: Music of Tunisia David Malouf, an Australian writer Category: ... Category: ... Jacques Derrida (IPA: [1]) (July 15, 1930 – October 8, 2004) was an Algerian-born French philosopher, known as the founder of deconstruction. ... Kateb Yacine (1929 - 1989) was an Algerian writer. ... Maurice Boitel in 1980 Maurice Boitel (born July 31, 1919) is a French painter. ... Samir Nasri (Arabic: ; born 26 June 1987 in Marseille) is a French attacking midfielder. ... This article needs translation. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... For other uses, see Running (disambiguation). ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games held in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Alfred Nakache (also known as Artem, b. ... Sandra Laoura of France is a freestyle skiier who competed at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... La Reine Margot Isabelle Yasmine Adjani (born June 27, 1955) is one of Frances best known actresses. ...

Main sights

The city is framed by a deep ravine and has a dramatic appearance. The city is very picturesque with a number of bridges and a viaduct crossing the ravine.

  • Gustave Mercier Museum (displays of ancient and modern art).
  • Ben-Badis Mosque.
  • the Casbah.
  • Emir Abdel Kader University & Mosque.
  • Soumma Mausoleum, at Khroub.
  • the Palace of Ahmed Bey.
  • ruins of the Antonian Roman aqueduct.

In the nearby are the Roman city of Tiddis and the megalithic monuments and burial grounds at Djebel Mazala Salluste.


Miscellaneous

Constantine is also known for its universities: Mentouri, designed by the Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer., Zerzara, and The Islamic University of El amir Abdelkader, Constantine will have another huge University town under construction in the (nouvelle ville) Constantine's current zip code is 25000. Oscar Niemeyer Oscar Niemeyer Soares Filho (born December 15, 1907) is a Brazilian architect who is considered one of the most important names in international modern architecture. ... Mr. ...


Constantine was also one of the focal points of the novel Memory in the Flesh by Ahlam Mosteghanemi. Ahlam (or Ahlem) Mosteghanemi (born 13 April 1953), the daughter of Algerian revolutionary leader Mohammed Chérif, is a notable Algerian writer. ...


Town twinning

Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Grenoble (Arpitan: Grasanòbol) is a city and commune in south-east France situated at the foot of the Alps where the Drac joins the Isère River. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tunisia. ... View from the Abou Nawas Hotel over to the main beach in Sousse (Bou Jaafar) The Grand Mosque of Sousse, Tunisia, as seen from the tower of the Ribat The Ribat of Sousse Sousse (Arabic سوسة Susa), is a city of Tunisia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ...

References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Constantine, Algeria

  Results from FactBites:
 
Constantine, Algeria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (577 words)
Constantine was capital city of the Numidia, a berber empire that emerged in the 3rd century BC.
Constantine is home to the tomb of the Algerian national hero Abd al-Qadir al-Jazairi and the native city of the Islamic reformator Ibn Badis.
Constantine is also known for its universities: Mentouri, Zerzara, and The Islamic University of El amir Abdelkader, designed by the Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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