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Encyclopedia > Conservative Party of Canada (historical)

The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. Initially known as the "Liberal-Conservative Party", it dropped "Liberal" from its name in 1873, although many of its candidates continued to use this name. We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... The Liberal-Conservative Party was the formal name of the Conservative Party of Canada until 1873, although some Tory candidates continued to run under the label as late as the 1911 Canadian election. ...


As a result of World War I and the Conscription Crisis of 1917, the party joined with pro-conscription Liberals to become the "Unionist Party", led by Robert Borden from 1917 to 1920, and then the "National Liberal and Conservative Party" until 1922. It then reverted back to "Liberal-Conservative Party" until 1938, when it became simply the "Conservative Party". It ran in the 1940 election as "National Government" even though it was in opposition. Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total of dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First... The Conscription Crisis of 1917 was a political and military crisis in Canada during World War I. // Background At the outbreak of war in 1914, over 30,000 volunteers joined the army, far more than expected. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... The Unionist Party was formed in 1917 by Members of Parliament (MPs) in Canada who supported the Union government formed by Sir Robert Borden during World War I. In May 1917, Conservative Prime Minister Borden proposed the formation of a national unity government or coalition government to Liberal leader Sir... Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC , KC , GCMG , DCL , LL.D (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... National Government was the name used by the Conservative Party of Canada for the 1940 federal election under leader Robert Manion. ...


The party was almost always referred to as simply the "Conservative Party" or Tories. The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ...

Contents


Origins

John A. Macdonald
John A. Macdonald

The roots of the party are in the pre-confederation coalition government of 1854 the parti bleu of George-√Čtienne Cartier (see also Quebec Conservative Party) and Ontario liberals and conservatives led by John A. MacDonald. It was out of this coalition that the Liberal-Conservative Party (generally known as the Conservative Party) was formed and it was this period that formed the basis for confederation in 1867. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... A coalition government, or coalition cabinet, is a cabinet in parliamentary government in which several parties cooperate. ... The parti bleu was a moderate political group in Quebec, Canada that emerged in 1854. ... George-Étienne Cartier The Honourable Sir George-Étienne Cartier, KCMG, PC (September 6, 1814 – May 20, 1873) was a French-Canadian statesman and Father of Confederation. ... The Parti conservateur du Québec (in English: Conservative Party of Quebec) was a political party in Quebec, Canada. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 106 24 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 4th 1,076,395 km... The Right Honourable Sir John Alexander Macdonald, GCB, QC (January 11, 1815 - June 6, 1891) was the first Prime Minister of Canada from July 1, 1867 - November 5, 1873 - and - October 17, 1878 - June 6, 1891. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ...


Confederation

MacDonald became the leader of the Conservative Party and formed the first national government in 1867. The party brought together ultramontane Quebec Catholics, pro-tariff businessmen, United Empire Loyalist Tories and Orangemen. One major accomplishment of Macdonald's first government was the creation of the Canadian Pacific Railway which also led to the Pacific Scandal that brought down the government in 1873. Ultramontanism literally alludes to a policy supporting those dwelling beyond the mountains (ultra montes), that is beyond the Alps - generally referring to the Pope in Rome. ... United Empire Loyalists is the name given to individuals who are descendants of British North American loyalists who, during the American War of Independence, left the 13 rebellious American colonies for the future Canada: the two British colonies of Quebec (including the Eastern Townships and modern-day Ontario) and Nova... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The Orange Order is a Protestant fraternal organisation largely based in the province of Northern Ireland and in western Scotland but which has a worldwide membership. ... The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR; AAR reporting marks CP, CPAA, CPI), known as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996, is a Canadian Class I railway operated by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited. ... The Pacific scandal involves the allegations of bribes being taken by Canadas Conservative government of Sir John A. Macdonald. ...


The Conservatives under Macdonald returned to power in 1878 by opposing the Liberal Party's policy of free trade or reciprocity with the United States and promoting, instead, the National Policy which sought to promote business and develop industry with protectionist measures as well as settle and develop the west. The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... See also Canadian-American Reciprocity Treaty of 1855. ... The National Policy was a Canadian economic program introduced by John A. Macdonalds Conservative Party in 1879 after it returned to power. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between jurisdictions, through methods such as high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, and anti-dumping measures, in an attempt to protect producers in a particular locale from competition. ...


The principal difference between the Conservatives and the Liberals in this period and well into the twentieth century was that Conservatives were in favour of imperial preference (a protectionist system in which tariffs would be levied against imports from outside the British Empire) and strong political and legal links with Britain while Liberals promoted free trade and continentalism (that is closer ties to the United States) and greater independence from Britain. The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Continentalism refers to the policy and idea that a nation should not acquire territory outside of its continental limits. ...


Macdonald died in 1891 and, without his leadership, the Conservative coalition began to unravel under the pressure of sectarian tensions between Catholic French Canadians and British imperialists who tended to be anti-French and anti-Catholic. The Red River Rebellion (and execution of Louis Riel) and Manitoba Schools Question exacerbated tensions within the Conservative Party and fanned hostility to the Conservatives in Quebec. French Canadian or Canadiens historically refers to inhabitants of Canada who can trace their ancestry to the original French settlers of what is now the Province of Quebec. ... The Métis provisional government The Red River Rebellion of 1869 – 1870 is the term most often used to describe the actions of a provisional government established by Métis leader Louis Riel in 1869 at the Red River Settlement in what is now the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... Louis Riel Louis David Riel (October 22, 1844 – November 16, 1885), was a Canadian politician, a founder of the province of Manitoba, and leader of the Métis people of the Canadian prairies. ... The Manitoba Schools Question was a political crisis in Manitoba and more generally in Canada in the late 19th century involving separate schools and the deeper question of whether French would survive as a language or a culture in the west. ...


Free trade was the major issue of the 1911 election that swept Sir Wilfrid Laurier's Liberals from power. Robert Borden led a new Tory administration that emphasised a revitalised National Policy and links to Britain. Borden had tried to rebuild a base in Quebec by allying with anti-Laurier Quebec nationalists, but, in government, tensions between Quebec nationalists and English Canadian imperialists made any grand coalition untenable. The Canadian parliament after the 1911 election The Canadian federal election of 1911 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Laurier re-directs here. ... Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC , KC , GCMG , DCL , LL.D (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... The National Policy was a Canadian economic program introduced by John A. Macdonalds Conservative Party in 1879 after it returned to power. ...

Sir Robert Borden
Sir Robert Borden

Image from: http://www. ... Image from: http://www. ...

Borden and the Conservative revival

World War I created a further strain as most Quebecers were unenthusiastic about Canadian involvement in what they saw as a foreign, and particularly British, conflict, while Borden's English supporters were adamant that Canada must support the war effort and enact a policy of conscription] (see Conscription Crisis of 1917). Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total of dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First... The Conscription Crisis of 1917 was a political and military crisis in Canada during World War I. // Background At the outbreak of war in 1914, over 30,000 volunteers joined the army, far more than expected. ...


Borden's government was unable to enact conscription on its own and attempted to form a coalition but when Laurier rejected this Borden formed a "Union government" with pro-conscription English Canadian Liberals. Borden thus created the Unionist Party through which he ultimately tried to create a permanent coalition of Conservatives and anti-Laurier Liberals. The Unionist Party was formed in 1917 by Members of Parliament (MPs) in Canada who supported the Union government formed by Sir Robert Borden during World War I. In May 1917, Conservative Prime Minister Borden proposed the formation of a national unity government or coalition government to Liberal leader Sir...


The Unionist Party, 1917-1922

Further information: Unionist Party (Canada)

The Unionist Party was formed in 1917 by Members of Parliament (MPs) in Canada who supported the Union government formed by Sir Robert Borden during World War I. In May 1917, Conservative Prime Minister Borden proposed the formation of a national unity government or coalition government to Liberal leader Sir...

National Liberal and Conservative Party

The attempt to turn the Conservatives into a hegemonic party by merging with Liberal-Unionists failed as most Liberals either joined the new Progressive Party of Canada or rejoined the Liberals under its new leader William Lyon Mackenzie King. One critical issue in this split was free trade - farmers were particularly hostile to Tory tariff policy and free trade was a key issue in the creation of the Progressives while the Conscription Crisis destroyed any remaining Conservative base in Quebec for generations leaving the Tories with even less support than they had before the Union government. The Progressive Party of Canada was a political party in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s. ... William Lyon Mackenzie King, PC, LL.B, Ph. ...

Image:arthurmeighen.jpeg
Public Domain, Source: National Archives of Canada, PA-026987 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...

Arthur Meighen

Borden's successor, Arthur Meighen and his renamed "National Liberal and Conservative Party" were defeated by the Liberals in the election of 1921 coming in third behind the Progressives. The Liberals were reduced to a minority government in the 1925 election. The Conservatives managed to win a plurality of seats in the House of Commons, but King was able to stay in power with the support of the Progressives and form a minority government. King's government and were defeated in a vote in the House of Commons within months and Prime Minister King asked Governor-General Byng to call a new election but Byng refused and asked Meighen to form a government. Arthur Meighen, PC , QC , BA , LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920, to December 29, 1921, and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... Arthur Meighen, PC , QC , BA , LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920, to December 29, 1921, and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... A minority government or a minority cabinet is a cabinet of a parliamentary system formed by the leading political party when it has won a plurality but not a majority of seats in the parliament. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1925 election The Canadian federal election of 1925 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... A minority government or a minority cabinet is a cabinet of a parliamentary system formed by the leading political party when it has won a plurality but not a majority of seats in the parliament. ... The Governor General and Commander-in-Chief in and over Canada, normally simply known as the Governor General of Canada in French, Gouverneur(e) général(e) is the Canadian representative of the monarch (presently Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II). ... Field Marshal Julian Hedworth George Byng, 1st Viscount Byng of Vimy (11 September 1862–6 June 1935) was a career British Army officer who served as commander of the Canadian army in World War I, and later became Governor General of Canada. ...


Meighen's government was soon defeated by a vote in the Commons, leaving no choice but a new election, which returned a landslide Liberal government. The "King-Byng Affair" inflamed Canadian nationalist sentiment since it was felt the Governor General, a British government appointee, had overstepped his bounds and that this was a sign of excessive British influence in Canadian politics. The Tories not only benefitted from this influence but their pro-imperialist policies were opposed to the concept of Canadian independence. Mackenzie King requested a dissolution of Parliament The King-Byng Affair was a 1926 Canadian constitutional crisis that occurred when the Governor General of Canada, Lord Byng of Vimy, refused a request by the Prime Minister, William Lyon Mackenzie King, to dissolve parliament and call a general election. ...


Bennett and the Great Depression

Meighen was replaced as Tory leader by R.B. Bennett, a millionaire Calgary businessman in 1927. He led the Conservatives to power in the 1930 election, largely as a result of the inability of the Liberal government (or any government in the western world) to deal with the Great Depression. Bennett promised to end the economic crisis in three days by implementing the old Conservative policy of high tariffs and imperial preference. For the British composer named Richard Bennett, see Richard Rodney Bennett. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1930 election The Canadian federal election of 1930 was held on July 28, 1930 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons to the 17th Parliament. ... The Great Depression was a worldwide economic downturn, starting in 1929 and lasting through most of the 1930s. ...

Image:richardbennett.jpeg
Public Domain, Source: National Archives of Canada, C-000687 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...

Richard Bedford Bennett

When this policy failed to generate the desired result Bennett's government had no alternative plan. The party's pro-business, pro-bank inclinations provided no relief to the millions of unemployed who were now becoming increasingly desperate and agitated. The Conservatives seemed indecisive and unable to cope and rapidly lost the confidence of Canadians becoming a focus of hatred, ridicule and contempt. Car owners who could no longer afford gasoline reverted to having their vehicles pulled by horses and dubbed them "Bennett buggies". For the British composer named Richard Bennett, see Richard Rodney Bennett. ...


R. B. Bennett faced pressure for radical reforms from within and without the party:

  • The Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF), formed in 1932, prepared to fight its first election on a socialist program.
  • The Social Credit movement was gaining supporters in the west and shocked the country by winning the Alberta provincial election and forming government in September, 1935.
  • Bennett's own government suffered a defection as his Trade minister, Henry Herbert Stevens, left the Conservatives to form the Reconstruction Party of Canada when Bennett refused to enact Stevens' plans for drastic economic reform and government intervention in the economy to deal with the crisis.

Bennett attempted to prevent social disorder by evacuating the unemployed to relief camps far away from the cities but this only exacerbated social tensions leading to the "On to Ottawa Trek" of unemployed protesters who intended to ride the rails from Vancouver to Ottawa (gathering new members along the way) in order to bring their demands for relief to Bennett personally. The trek ended in Regina on July 1, 1935 when the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, on orders from the Prime Minister, attacked a public meeting of 3,000 strikers leaving one dead and dozens injured. The Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) was a Canadian political party founded in 1932 in Calgary, Alberta, by a number of socialist, farm, co-operative and labour groups, and the League for Social Reconstruction. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... The Social Credit Party of Canada was a conservative - populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. ... Henry Herbert Stevens (December 8, 1878-June 14, 1973) was a Canadian politician and businessman. ... The Reconstruction Party was a Canadian political party founded by Henry Herbert Stevens, a long-time Conservative MP who served as Minister of Trade in the Arthur Meighen governement of 1921, and as Minister of Trade and Commerce from 1930 to 1934 in the Depression-era government of R. B... The On-to-Ottawa Trek was a protest movement in Canada during the Great Depression by the poor and unemployed. ... Royal Canadian Mounted Police heraldic badge. ...


Bennett had in desperation attempted to save his government by reversing its laissez-faire policies and, belatedly, implementing "Bennett's New Deal" based on the New Deal of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Bennett proposed progressive income taxation, a minimum wage, a maximum for work week hours, unemployment insurance, health insurance, an expanded pension program, and grants to farmers. The Conservatives' conversion to the concept of a welfare state came too late, and the Tories were routed in the October 1935 election, winning only 40 seats to 173 for Mackenzie King's Liberals. Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... It has been suggested that Welfare capitalism be merged into this article or section. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1935 election The Canadian federal election of 1935 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ...


The Bennett years left the Conservatives in the worst shape they had ever been - not only did enmity towards the Tories continue in Quebec as a legacy of the Conscription Crisis of 1917, but they were now reviled in the West for their perceived insensitivity to the needs of farmers in the Dust Bowl and Westerners turned to Social Credit or the CCF making the Tories their fourth choice. The Conservatives would have to wait twenty years before their fortunes in Western Canada revived. The Conscription Crisis of 1917 was a political and military crisis in Canada during World War I. // Background At the outbreak of war in 1914, over 30,000 volunteers joined the army, far more than expected. ... Dust storm approaching Stratford, Texas, in 1935. ...


Decline and reinvention as Progressive Conservatives

The Tories fought the 1940 election under Robert J. Manion. The Party again adopted a new name: "National Government". The Tories were advocating a wartime coalition government, an attempt to repeat Borden's "Union government," but they won only 40 seats. The Canadian parliament after the 1940 election The Canadian federal election of 1940 was the 19th general election in Canadian history. ... Robert James Manion (November 19, 1881 Pembroke, Ontario - July 2, 1943 Ottawa, Ontario) was a physician and Canadian politician. ... National Government was the name used by the Conservative Party of Canada for the 1940 federal election under leader Robert Manion. ...


In desperation, the Tories again turned to Arthur Meighen for leadership, but Meighen was trounced by the CCF when he attempted to enter the House of Commons in a February 1942 by-election in York South. His party's agitation for a re-enactment of conscription in World War II only further alienated Quebec from the Conservatives. Arthur Meighen, PC , QC , BA , LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920, to December 29, 1921, and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... Combatants Allies: Poland, British Commonwealth, France/Free France, Soviet Union, United States, China, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, and others Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8 million Civilian dead: 4 million Total dead: 12 million World War II...


Later that year, the Tories attempted to broaden their base by electing Manitoba Progressive Premier John Bracken as their new leader. Bracken agreed to become the party's leader on the condition that it change its name to the "Progressive Conservative Party of Canada." The Progressive Party of Manitoba was a political party that developed from the United Farmers of Manitoba, an agrarian movement that became politically active following World War I. A successor to the provinces Grain Growers Association, the UFM represented the interests of farmers frustrated with traditional political parties. ... In Canada, a Premier is the head of government of a province. ... The Honourable Professor John Bracken, PC (June 22, 1883-March 18, 1969) was an agronomist, Premier of Manitoba (1922-1943) and leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-1948). ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) (In French: Parti progressiste-conservateur du Canada) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ...


Conservative leaders (1867-1942)

Sir John Alexander Macdonald, KCMG, GCB, QC, PC, DCL, LL.D (January 11, 1815 – June 6, 1891) was the first Prime Minister of Canada from July 1, 1867 – November 5, 1873 and October 17, 1878 – June 6, 1891. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Hon. ... June 16 is the 167th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (168th in leap years), with 198 days remaining. ... 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Right Honourable Sir John Sparrow David Thompson, PC , QC , KCMG (November 10, 1845 – December 12, 1894) was a Canadian lawyer and judge who served as the fourth Prime Minister of Canada from December 5, 1892 to December 12, 1894 as well as Premier of Nova Scotia in 1882. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Honourable Sir Mackenzie Bowell, PC , KCMG (December 27, 1824 – December 10, 1917) was the fifth Prime Minister of Canada from December 21, 1894 to April 27, 1896. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Not to be confused with Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper who was Sir Charles Tuppers son Sir Charles Tupper, GCMG, CB, PC, DCL, LL.D, MD (July 2, 1821 – October 30, 1915) was the sixth Prime Minister of Canada and, as of 2006, the one with the shortest term of... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... February 5 is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Right Honourable Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC , KC , GCMG , DCL , LL.D (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... Arthur Meighen, PC , QC , BA , LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920, to December 29, 1921, and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... July 10 is the 191st day (192nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 174 days remaining. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years). ... 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Hugh Guthrie Hugh Guthrie (13 August 1866 – 3 November 1939) was a Canadian politician and Cabinet minister in the governments of Sir Robert Borden, Arthur Meighen and R. B. Bennett. ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years). ... 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years). ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... An interim leader, in Canadian politics, is a party leader who is appointed by the partys legislative caucus or the partys executive to temporarily act as leader when there is a gap between the resignation or death of a party leader and the election of his or her... For the British composer named Richard Bennett, see Richard Rodney Bennett. ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Robert James Manion (November 19, 1881 Pembroke, Ontario - July 2, 1943 Ottawa, Ontario) was a physician and Canadian politician. ... July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 177 days remaining. ... 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... Richard Burpee Hanson, PC (1879-1948) was a Canadian politician who served as interim leader of the Conservative Party from May 14, 1940 until November 11, 1941. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (135th in leap years). ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... An interim leader, in Canadian politics, is a party leader who is appointed by the partys legislative caucus or the partys executive to temporarily act as leader when there is a gap between the resignation or death of a party leader and the election of his or her... Arthur Meighen, PC , QC , BA , LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920, to December 29, 1921, and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...

Election results 1867-1940

Results in bold indicate elections after which the party formed the government.

Election Party name(s) # of candidates nominated # of seats won # of total votes % of popular vote
1867 Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives
112
100
92,656
34.53%
1872 Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives
140
99
123,100
38.66%
1874 Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives, one Conservative Labour
104
65
99,440
30.58%
1878 Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives
161
129
229,191
42.06%
1882 Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives
168
136
208,544
40.39%
1887 Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives
203
111
343,805
47.41%
1891 Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives
212
117
376,518
48.58%
1896 Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives
207
98
467,415
48.17%
1900 Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives
204
79
438,330
46.1%
1904 Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives
205
75
470,430
45.94%
1908 Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives
211
85
539,374
46.21%
1911 Conservatives, Liberal-Conservatives and Nationalist Conservatives
212
132
636,938
48.90%
1917 Unionist Party
211
152
1,070,694
56.93%
1921 Conservatives
204
49
935,651
29.95%
1925 Conservatives
232
114
1,454,253
46.13%
1926 Conservatives
232
91
1,476,834
45.34%
1930 Conservatives
229
134
1,836,115
47.79%
1935 Conservatives
228
39
1,290,671
29.84%
1940 Conservatives, National Government
207
39
1,402,059
30.41%

The Canadian parliament after the 1867 election The 1867 federal election, which proved how much canada sucks ended on September 20th, was the first election for the new . ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Politics of Canada Categories: Stub | Canadian federal elections ... The Canadian federal election of 1874 was held on January 22, 1874. ... Conservative Labour was the label used by Canadian Conservative Party politician Henry Buckingham Witton as a candidate in Hamilton, Ontario from 1872 to 1875. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1878 election The Canadian federal election of 1878 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1882 election The Canadian federal election of 1882 was held on June 20, 1882 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1887 election The Canadian federal election of 1887 was held on February 22, 1887 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 1891 Canadian federal election was won by the Conservative Party of Sir John A. Macdonald. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1896 election The Canadian federal election of 1896 was held on July 11, 1896 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1900 election The Canadian federal election of 1900 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... In the Canadian federal election of 1904, SIr Wilfrid Laurier led the Liberal Party of Canada to a second term in government, with an increased majority in the canadian House of Commons, and over half of the popular vote. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1908 election The Canadian federal election of 1908 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1911 election The Canadian federal election of 1911 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The label Nationalist Conservative was used by three Quebec Members of the Canadian Parliament (MPs) and several unsuccessful candidates. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1917 election The 1917 Canadian federal election (sometimes referred to as the khaki election) was held on December 17, 1917, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Unionist Party was formed in 1917 by Members of Parliament (MPs) in Canada who supported the Union government formed by Sir Robert Borden during World War I. In May 1917, Conservative Prime Minister Borden proposed the formation of a national unity government or coalition government to Liberal leader Sir... The Canadian parliament after the 1921 election The Canadian federal election of 1921 was held on December 6, 1921 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1925 election The Canadian federal election of 1925 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1926 election The Canadian federal election of 1926 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1930 election The Canadian federal election of 1930 was held on July 28, 1930 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons to the 17th Parliament. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1935 election The Canadian federal election of 1935 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1940 election The Canadian federal election of 1940 was the 19th general election in Canadian history. ... National Government was the name used by the Conservative Party of Canada for the 1940 federal election under leader Robert Manion. ...

See also

Conservative Maple Leaf Logo

Leaders of Canadian federal conservative parties The first Progressive Conservative Party of Canada leadership convention was held in 1927, when the party was called the Conservative Party. ... The Conscription Crisis of 1944 was a political and military crisis in Canada during World War II. It was similar to the Conscription Crisis of 1917, but was not as politically damaging. ... Canadian federal election results (1867-1879) Canadian federal election results (1880-1899) Canadian federal election results (1900-1919) Canadian federal election results (1920-1939) Canadian federal election results (1940-1959) Canadian federal election results (1960-1979) Canadian federal election results (1980-1999) Canadian federal election results (2000-) See also: Lists... This article lists political parties in Canada. ... Stephen Harper is the current Prime Minister of Canada. ... Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (French: LOpposition Loyale de Sa Majesté) in Canada is usually the largest parliamentary opposition party in the Canadian House of Commons that is not in government either on its own or as part of a governing coalition. ... Image File history File links Conservative_maple_leaf. ... Sir John A. Macdonald, Canadas first prime minister, is considered the father of the Canadian conservative movement. ...

Liberal-Conservative/Conservative (historical)/Progressive Conservative (1867-2003): Macdonald | Abbott | Thompson | Bowell | Tupper | Borden | Meighen | Bennett | Manion | Meighen | Bracken | Drew | Diefenbaker | Stanfield | Clark | Mulroney | Campbell | Charest | Clark | MacKay

Reform(1987-2000): Manning
The Liberal-Conservative Party was the formal name of the Conservative Party of Canada until 1873, although some Tory candidates continued to run under the label as late as the 1911 Canadian election. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) (In French: Parti progressiste-conservateur du Canada) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... Sir John Alexander Macdonald, KCMG, GCB, QC, PC, DCL, LL.D (January 11, 1815 – June 6, 1891) was the first Prime Minister of Canada from July 1, 1867 – November 5, 1873 and October 17, 1878 – June 6, 1891. ... The Hon. ... The Right Honourable Sir John Sparrow David Thompson, PC , QC , KCMG (November 10, 1845 – December 12, 1894) was a Canadian lawyer and judge who served as the fourth Prime Minister of Canada from December 5, 1892 to December 12, 1894 as well as Premier of Nova Scotia in 1882. ... The Honourable Sir Mackenzie Bowell, PC , KCMG (December 27, 1824 – December 10, 1917) was the fifth Prime Minister of Canada from December 21, 1894 to April 27, 1896. ... Not to be confused with Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper who was Sir Charles Tuppers son Sir Charles Tupper, GCMG, CB, PC, DCL, LL.D, MD (July 2, 1821 – October 30, 1915) was the sixth Prime Minister of Canada and, as of 2006, the one with the shortest term of... Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC , KC , GCMG , DCL , LL.D (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... Arthur Meighen, PC , QC , BA , LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920, to December 29, 1921, and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... Richard Bedford Bennett, 1st Viscount Bennett, PC , KC, LL.B (July 3, 1870 – June 26, 1947) was the eleventh Prime Minister of Canada from August 7, 1930 to October 23, 1935. ... Robert James Manion (November 19, 1881 Pembroke, Ontario - July 2, 1943 Ottawa, Ontario) was a physician and Canadian politician. ... Arthur Meighen, PC , QC , BA , LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920, to December 29, 1921, and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... The Honourable Professor John Bracken, PC (June 22, 1883-March 18, 1969) was an agronomist, Premier of Manitoba (1922-1943) and leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-1948). ... Colonel The Honourable George Alexander Drew, PC , CC , QC (May 7, 1894 - January 4, 1973) was a Canadian conservative politician who founded a Progressive Conservative dynasty in Ontario that lasted 42 years. ... John George Diefenbaker, CH, PC, QC, BA, MA, LL.B, LL.D, DCL, FRSC, FRSA, D.Litt, DSL, (September 18, 1895 – August 16, 1979) was the 13th Prime Minister of Canada (1957 – 1963). ... Robert Stanfield, PC , QC , BA , LL.B (April 11, 1914–December 16, 2003) was Premier of Nova Scotia and leader of the federal Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark (born June 5, 1939 in High River, Alberta) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... Martin Brian Mulroney (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... Avril Phaedra Douglas Campbell, usually known as Kim Campbell (born 10 March 1947), was the nineteenth Prime Minister of Canada from 25 June to 4 November 1993. ... The Honourable John James Jean Charest (sha-ræ), PC, MNA (born June 24, 1958) is a Quebecois lawyer and politician. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark (born June 5, 1939 in High River, Alberta) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... Hon. ... The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party founded in 1987. ... Preston Manning Ernest Preston Manning (born June 10, 1942, in Edmonton, Alberta), is a Canadian politician. ...


Canadian Alliance(2000-2003): Day | Harper
The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian right-of-centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... Hon. ... Stephen Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ...


Conservative (2003-present): Harper The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a right-of-centre political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... Stephen Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ...

Preceded by:
Upper Canada Tories and Parti bleu
Canadian Tory
1867 - 1942
Succeeded by:
Progressive Conservative Party of Canada

  Results from FactBites:
 
Canada | Koordinaten / Informationen / Encyclopedia of terms - Canada (5358 words)
Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm that formally recognizes Elizabeth II as Queen of Canada.
Canada's two official languages are English and French, spoken by 56.3% and 28.7% of the population respectively.
Canada is known for its vast forests and mountain ranges, and the animals that reside within them, such as moose, caribou, beavers, polar bears, grizzly bears, Canada goose and the common loon.
Canada's Official Opposition to found new right-wing party (1445 words)
Canada's ruling party from 1984 to 1993, the Tories were almost obliterated in the 1993 election, winning just 2 of the then 295 House of Commons seats.
Although historically the party of the British Empire, Orangeism (i.e., anti-Catholic bigotry), and Anglo-chauvinism, the Tories have over the past quarter-century embraced bilingualism and championed an accommodation with Quebec's elite, based on granting Quebec some form of special constitutional status within the Canadian federal state.
Canada's oldest political party the Tories are, by contrast, the quintessential establishment party, the party most closely identified with the interests of the Bay Street banking and financial houses.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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