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Encyclopedia > Conservative Party of Canada
Conservative Party of Canada
Parti conservateur du Canada
Active Federal Party
Founded December 7, 2003
Incorporated CA and PC
Leader Stephen Harper
President Don Plett
Headquarters #1204 - 130 Albert Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1P 5G4
Political ideology Conservatism, Neoconservatism, Neoliberalism
International alignment International Democrat Union
Colours Blue
Website www.conservative.ca(english)
www.conservateur.ca(français)

The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the "Tories", is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. The party currently forms the Government of Canada (since February 6, 2006), and its current leader is Prime Minister Stephen Harper. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (652x602, 17 KB) Summary Large, transparent logo of Conservative Party of Canada Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... Don Plett is the president of the National Council of the Conservative Party of Canada, the governing party in Canada. ... In Canada, political conservatism is generally considered to be primarily represented by the Conservative Party of Canada at the federal level, and by the various right-leaning parties at the provincial levels. ... Neoconservatism in Canada is the new strand of Conservatism found within Canada. ... For the school of international relations, see Neoliberalism (international relations). ... The International Democrat Union (IDU) is an international grouping of conservative, neoconservative and Christian democratic political parties. ... YOU SUCK!!!!! ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Bold text The Canada wordmark, used by most agencies of the Canadian federal government. ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ...

Contents

Predecessors

Sir John A. MacDonald, the first Prime Minister of Canada, leader of the Liberal-Conservative Party, one of the party's predecessors.
Sir John A. MacDonald, the first Prime Minister of Canada, leader of the Liberal-Conservative Party, one of the party's predecessors.

The Conservative Party is political heir to a series of conservative parties that have existed in Canada, beginning with Liberal-Conservative Party founded in 1854 by Sir John A. Macdonald and Sir George-Étienne Cartier which became the Conservative Party in the 1880s. Like them (and the Conservative Party of the United Kingdom) it carries the nickname "Tory", and its members are known as "Tories". It is also legal heir to the older parties by virtue of assuming the assets and liabilities of the former Progressive Conservative Party. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Right Honourable Sir John Alexander Macdonald, GCB, QC (January 11, 1815 - June 6, 1891) was the first Prime Minister of Canada from July 1, 1867 - November 5, 1873 - and - October 17, 1878 - June 6, 1891. ... The Liberal-Conservative Party was the formal name of the Conservative Party of Canada until 1873, although some Conservative candidates continued to run under the label as late as the 1911 election and others ran as simple Conservatives prior to 1873. ... Sir John Alexander Macdonald, GCB, KCMG, PC, QC, DCL, LL.D was born on January 11, 1815 in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Hon. ... The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ...


The first incarnation of the Conservative Party was much different than the Conservative Party of today, especially on economic issues. The early Conservatives were known to espouse economic protectionism and British imperialism, by emphasizing Canada's ties to the United Kingdom while vigorously opposing free trade with the United States of America which was supported by the Liberal Party of Canada. The Conservatives also sparred with the Liberal Party's connections with French Canadian nationalists including Henri Bourassa which claimed Canada was two nations, English Canada and French Canada connected together through a common history. The Conservatives would go on with a popular slogan "one nation, one flag, one leader" and supported assimilation of French Canadians and immigrants. The Conservative Party's links to British heritage would remain intact until the 1960s with the change in social values held by Canadians. Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between nations, through methods such as high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, a variety of restrictive government regulations designed to discourage imports, and anti-dumping laws in an attempt to protect domestic industries in a particular nation from foreign take-over... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... Henri Bourassa Joseph-Napoléon-Henri Bourassa (September 1, 1868- August 30, 1952) was a French Canadian political leader and publisher. ... English Canada is a term used to describe either: the English-speaking residents of Canada or the Canadian provinces which are majority anglophone, i. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Prime Minister John Diefenbaker, leader of the PC Party from 1956 to 1967.

The Conservative Party's appeal waned to western Canadians in difficult times from the 1920s to 1940s, as it was seen as an establishment which ignored Western Canada. The Conservatives was challenged in the west by the rise of a number of protest parties including the Progressive Party of Canada and the Social Credit Party of Canada. The Progressives once outplaced the Conservatives in 1920, and became Official Opposition, though soon after, the party collapsed. Former Progressive John Bracken became leader of the the Conservative Party in 1942 and had it renamed the Progressive Conservative Party. Social Credit was a powerful political force provincially, especially under Premier of Alberta Ernest Manning while federally, it was stalled by the selection of western leaders by the PC Party, such as John Diefenbaker and Joe Clark who were seen by westerners as challengers to the Liberal governing establishment. Social Credit's association with western Canada diminished over time and dissipated in the early 1980s. While none of these parties succeeded in gaining power, the dividing of opposition forces to the Liberals was especially damaging to the Conservative Party throughout its history, and allowed the Liberals to win election after election with strong urban support bases in Ontario and Quebec, which has earned the Liberals the unofficial title by political pundits of being Canada's "natural governing party". Conservative governments therefore were seen by pundits as caretaker governments, until the Liberal Party corrects its past mistakes. National Archives of Canada, C-006779 This image is not licensed under the GFDL. It is under a non-commercial-use only licence. ... National Archives of Canada, C-006779 This image is not licensed under the GFDL. It is under a non-commercial-use only licence. ... John George Diefenbaker, CH, PC, QC, BA, MA, LL.B, LL.D, DCL, FRSC, FRSA, D.Litt, DSL, (18 September 1895 – 16 August 1979) was the 13th Prime Minister of Canada (1957 – 1963). ... The Progressive Party of Canada was a political party in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s. ... The Social Credit Party of Canada (French: Parti Crédit social du Canada), was a conservative - populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. ... The Honourable Professor John Bracken, PC (June 22, 1883-March 18, 1969) was an agronomist, Premier of Manitoba (1922-1943) and leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-1948). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Categories: Canada-related stubs | Alberta premiers ... Hon. ... John George Diefenbaker, CH, PC, QC, BA, MA, LL.B, LL.D, DCL, FRSC, FRSA, D.Litt, DSL, (18 September 1895 – 16 August 1979) was the 13th Prime Minister of Canada (1957 – 1963). ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area [1] Ranked... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Pierre Duchesne - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area  Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² (595...

Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, leader of the last elected PC government.

In 1984, PC Leader and Quebecker Brian Mulroney managed to muster a large coalition of westerners aggravated over the National Energy Program of the Liberal government and Quebeckers who were angered over Quebec not having distinct status in the Constitution of Canada signed in 1982. This lead to a huge landslide victory for the PC Party. PCs abandoned protectionism which the party had held strongly to in the past which had aggravated westerners and businesses in the past and fully espoused free trade with the United States and integrating Canada into a globalized economy, which was initiated with the signing of the Canada-United States Free Trade Agreement of 1989. Image File history File links MulroneyPortrait. ... Image File history File links MulroneyPortrait. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... In Canadian English, a Québécois (IPA: ) is a native or resident of the province of Quebec, Canada, especially a French-speaking one. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... The National Energy Program (NEP) was an energy policy of the Government of Canada. ... The Constitution of Canada is the supreme law in Canada. ... The Free Trade Agreement (FTA) was a trade agreement signed by Canada and the United States on January 2, 1988. ...


In the late 1980s and 1990s, federal conservative politics became split by the creation of a new western-based protest party, the populist and social conservative Reform Party of Canada created by Preston Manning, son of Alberta Social Credit Premier Ernest Manning. The party was very controversial in Canadian politics, it advocated deep decentralization of government power, abolishment of official bilingualism and multiculturalism, democratization of the Canadian Senate, opposing abortion, suggested a potential return to capital punishment, and advocating significant privatization of public services. Despite controversial aspects of Reform, Westerners felt betrayed by the federal Conservative Party, seeing it as catering to Quebec and urban Ontario interests over theirs. In 1989, Reform made headlines in the political scene when it elected its first MP, Deborah Grey in a bi-election in Alberta, which was a shock to the PCs which had almost complete electoral dominance over the province for years. The second major event was when Mulroney accepted the results of an unofficial Senate election in Alberta, which elected a Reformer, Stanley Waters and appointed him to the Senate. Waters' appointment made him the first elected Senator in Canada. The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party founded in 1987, originally as a Western Canada-based protest party, but attempted to expand eastward in the 1990s. ... Ernest Preston Manning (born June 10, 1942, in Edmonton, Alberta), is a right-wing populist Canadian politician. ... Motto: Fortis et liber(Latin) Strong and free Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Official languages English (see below) Government - Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong - Premier Ed Stelmach (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 28 - Senate seats 6 Confederation September 1, 1905 (split from Northwest Territories) (8th [Province]) Area Ranked... Bilingualism in Canada refers to laws and policies of the federal government — and some other levels of government — mandating that certain services and communications be available to the public in both English and French. ... Multiculturalism is the idea that modern societies should embrace and include distinct cultural groups with equal social status. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... Deborah Cleland Grey (born July 1, 1952) is a former prominent Canadian Member of Parliament from Alberta for the Reform Party of Canada, Canadian Alliance and Conservative Party of Canada. ... Stanley Charles Waters (commonly referred to as Stan Waters) (born June 14, 1920 -died September 25, 1991) was Canadas first, and so far only elected Senator. ...

Photograph of then-Reform party leader Preston Manning on his 1992 book, The New Canada.
Photograph of then-Reform party leader Preston Manning on his 1992 book, The New Canada.

By the 1990s, Mulroney had failed to bring about Senate reform as he had promised (appointing a number of unelected Senators in 1990), social conservatives were distatisfied with Mulroney's social progressivism and Canadians in general were furious with high unemployment, high debt and deficit, unpopular implementation of the Goods and Services Tax (GST) in 1991, and money wasted on the constitutional reform failures of the Meech Lake and Charlottetown accords. In 1993, the Progressive Conservative Party was decimated from government to having only two seats, due to vote-splitting in Canada's single member plurality electoral system, especially in the west and Ontario with the Reform Party.The 1993 results for the PC Party were the the worst electoral disaster in Canadian history in which the PCs never fully recovered. In 1993, federal politics became divided regionally, the Liberal Party took Ontario, the Maritimes and the territories, the separatist Bloc Quebecois took Quebec, while the Reform Party took Western Canada and became the dominant conservative party in Canada. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ernest Preston Manning (born June 10, 1942, in Edmonton, Alberta), is a right-wing populist Canadian politician. ... The New Canada is a Canadian political literature book written by the now-defunct western-based conservative Reform Party of Canada founder and leader Preston Manning and published by Macmillan Canada. ... Social progressivism is the view that as time progresses, society should disgregard morality in place of political correctness. ... The Canadian Goods and Services Tax (GST) (Taxe sur les produits et services, TPS) is a multi-level value-added tax introduced in Canada on January 1, 1991, by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and finance minister Michael Wilson. ... The Meech Lake Accord was a set of failed amendments to the Constitution of Canada negotiated in 1987 by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and the provincial premiers, including Robert Bourassa, premier of Quebec. ... Headline on October 27, 1992 Globe and Mail. ... The first-past-the-post electoral system is a voting system for single-member districts, variously called first-past-the-post (FPTP or FPP), winner-take-all, plurality voting, or relative majority. ... The Bloc Qu cois is a federal political party in Canada that is primarily devoted to promoting sovereignty for the province of Quebec. ...


With the right-wing vote split, the Liberal Party won three successive majority governments which led the Reform Party and elements of the Progressive Conservative Party to advocate "uniting the right" which was completed in 2003, when the Canadian Alliance (formerly the Reform Party) and Progressive Conservative parties agreed to merge into the present-day Conservative Party, with the Alliance faction conceding its populist ideals and some social conservative elements.


Foreign Affairs Minister Peter MacKay and many other high-profile former PCs, including the former Progressive Conservative Prime Minister Brian Mulroney see the CPC as a natural evolution of the conservative political movement in Canada. MacKay has suggested that the CPC is a reflection of the reunification of conservative ideologies under a "big tent." MacKay has often said that fractures have been a natural part of the Canadian conservative movement's history since the 1890s and that the merger was a reconstitution of a movement that has existed since the Union of Upper and Lower Canada. Peter Gordon MacKay, PC, BA, LL.B, MP (born September 27, 1965) serves as the member of Parliament (MP) for Central Nova, Nova Scotia, Canadas Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ...


Ideology

The new Conservative Party is an amalgam of two contrasting views about conservatism in Canada. Historically, the Progressive Conservatives touted traditional Red Tory ideals like state funded social programs, rejected closer ties with the United States and attempted to model Canada after centuries-old British institutions. Western Canadian conservatism, embodied in the Canadian Alliance party, was more inspired by U.S.-based conservatism; it espoused closer ties with the United States, Blue Tory conservatism, privatization, smaller government as well as reform and overhaul of political institutions (on the American/Australian model) and a decentralized federalism (a limited government in Ottawa with stronger provinces, as also advocated by Brian Mulroney). The new party generally supports a market economy approach to the economic sphere. This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... The Red Tory Tradition: Ancient Roots-New Routes, by Ron Dart Red Tory is a term given to a political philosophy, tradition, and disposition in Canada. ... Blue Tories are, in Canadian politics, members of the former Progressive Conservative Party of Canada and current Conservative Party of Canada who are more ideologically Right wing. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


Since most of the MPs for the new party as well as the grassroots supporters come from the western provinces, its policy has significant influence from Reform Party of Canada philosophy, even though the new party has shed much of Reform's social conservative image, and is more focused on economic, military, "law and order" and democratic reform/ethics-in-government issues. Unlike the old Progressive Conservatives, it more reflects a strong Blue Tory ideology. Prime Minister Stephen Harper is known as an avid fiscal conservative and a strong supporter for a strong military within the context of a joint command for the Canadian Forces co-operating and co-planning with the U.S. under the umbrella of a central command, modelled after NORAD. He has embraced some social conservative positions, such as opposition to same-sex marriage, though not to same-sex civil unions. The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party founded in 1987, originally as a Western Canada-based protest party, but attempted to expand eastward in the 1990s. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... The Canadian Forces (French: Forces canadiennes), abbreviated as CF (French: FC), are the unified armed forces of Canada. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... NORAD is short for: North American Aerospace Defense Command Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ...

The merger symbolizes the latest chapter in the evolution of conservatism in Canada, as the historical Conservative Party, which was founded by United Empire Loyalists, was vehemently opposed to free trade and further integration with the United States, aiming instead to model Canadian political institutions after British ones. Then under the leadership of Brian Mulroney, the party emphasized market forces in the economy and reached a landmark free-trade deal with the United States. Some argue that the current incarnation of conservatism espouses pro-American views, aspires to emulate American capitalism, less government involvement in the economy and more grassroots-oriented Jeffersonian democratic reform. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2132x2132, 221 KB) Summary Stephen Harper gives his victory speech to party faithful in the Telus Convention Centre, Calgary, Alberta. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2132x2132, 221 KB) Summary Stephen Harper gives his victory speech to party faithful in the Telus Convention Centre, Calgary, Alberta. ... The Right Honourable (abbreviated The Rt Hon. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. ... The name United Empire Loyalists is given to those American Loyalists who resettled in British North America and other British Colonies as an act of fealty to King George III after the British defeat in the American Revolutionary War. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ...


History

On October 15, 2003, after secret meetings were held by the Canadian Alliance and Progressive Conservative Party, Stephen Harper (then the leader of the Canadian Alliance) and Peter MacKay (then the leader of the Progressive Conservatives) announced the Conservative Party Agreement-in-Principle, thereby merging their parties to create the new Conservative Party of Canada. After several months of talks between two teams of "emissaries", consisting of Don Mazankowski, Bill Davis and Loyola Hearn on behalf of the PCs and Ray Speaker Senator Gerry St. Germain and Scott Reid on behalf of the Alliance, the deal came to be. is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Gordon MacKay, PC, BA, LL.B, MP (born September 27, 1965) serves as the member of Parliament (MP) for Central Nova, Nova Scotia, Canadas Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency. ... Don Mazankowski The Right Honourable Donald Frank Mazankowski, PC , OC , AOE , LL.D (born July 27, 1935, in Viking, Alberta) was a Canadian politician who served as a cabinet minister under Prime Ministers Joe Clark and Brian Mulroney. ... For the actor, professor, and waterskiier, see William B. Davis The Honourable William (Bill) Grenville Davis, PC , CC , O.Ont. ... Hon. ... The Honourable Raymond Ray Speaker, PC , OC (born December 13, 1935) is a farmer and Canadian politician. ... The Honourable Senator Gerry St. ... Not to be confused with the Scott Reid who serves as press secretary to Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin, see Scott Reid (political advisor). ...


On December 5, the Agreement-in-Principle was ratified by the membership of the Alliance by a margin of 96% to 4% in a national referendum conducted by postal ballot. On December 6 the PC Party held a series of regional conventions, at which delegates ratified the Agreement-in-Principle by a margin of 90% to 10%. On December 7, 2003, the new party was officially registered with Elections Canada. On March 20, 2004, Stephen Harper was elected leader. December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elections Canada is the non-partisan agency of the Government of Canada responsible for the conduct of federal elections and referendums. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in leap years). ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2004 Conservative Party of Canada leadership election took place on March 20, 2004 in Toronto, Ontario, and resulted in the election of Stephen Harper as the first leader of the new Canadian Conservative Party. ...


The merger was the culmination of the Canadian "Unite the Right" movement, driven by the desire to present an effective right-wing opposition to the Liberal Party of Canada, to create a new party that would draw support from all parts of Canada and would not split the right-wing vote. The splitting of the right-wing vote contributed to Liberal victories in the 1993 federal election, 1997 federal election and the 2000 election. Unite the Right, also referred to as the United Alternative, was a Canadian political movement from 1997 until 2003. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... This article or section should be merged with Spoiler effect A split vote, or vote splitting, occurs in an election when the existence of two or more candidates that represent relatively similar viewpoints among voters reduces the votes received by each of them, reducing the chances of any one of... Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ...


Merger controversy

The merger process was controversial. David Orchard had a written agreement from Peter MacKay at the 2003 Progressive Conservative Leadership convention excluding any such merger and led an unsuccessful legal challenge to it. Orchard (under the PC party leadership election rules) is still owed at least $70,000 by the newly merged Conservative Party. This debt has been recognized as legitimate by the Conservative Party lawyers; however, its reimbursement is on hold pending the outcome of legal matters between the party and Orchard. David Orchard (born June 28, 1950, in Borden, Saskatchewan) is a Canadian political figure and a member of the Liberal Party of Canada. ... Peter Gordon MacKay, PC, BA, LL.B, MP (born September 27, 1965) serves as the member of Parliament (MP) for Central Nova, Nova Scotia, Canadas Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency. ... The 2003 Progressive Conservative leadership convention was held on May 31, 2003 to elect a leader or the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. ...


At the time of the merger four sitting Progressive Conservative Members of Parliament — André Bachand, John Herron, former Tory leadership candidate Scott Brison, and former Prime Minister Joe Clark — decided not to join the new Conservative Party caucus as did retiring PC Party President Bruck Easton. Clark and Brison argued that the party's merger with the Canadian Alliance drove it too far to the right, and away from its historical position in Canadian politics. Brison, at first, voted for and supported the ratification of the Alliance-Tory merger, then crossed the floor to the Liberals [1]. Soon afterward, he was made a parliamentary secretary in Paul Martin's Liberal government, and became a full cabinet minister after the 2004 federal election. Herron also ran as a Liberal candidate in the election but did not join the Liberal caucus prior to the election, and he lost his seat to the new Conservative Party's candidate Rob Moore. Bachand and Clark both left Parliament at the end of the session. André Bachand Not to be confused with André Bachand, Liberal MP from Missisquoi André Bachand (born December 8, 1961 in Quebec City, Quebec) is a Canadian politician, who represented the riding of Richmond—Arthabaska as member of the Progressive Conservatives from 1997 to 2003. ... John Herron. ... Scott A. Brison, PC, MP, BComm (born May 10, 1967, Windsor, Nova Scotia) is a Canadian politician. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... Bruck Easton is a Windsor, Ontario lawyer and a member of the Liberal Party of Canada. ... Paul Edgar Philippe Martin (born August 28, 1938) was the 21st Prime Minister of Canada and a former leader of the Liberal Party of Canada. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Rob Moore. ...


One former Alliance MP, former Alliance leadership candidate Keith Martin, also left the party on January 14. He retained his seat in the 2004 election, running under the Liberal banner. In the 38th Parliament (2004-2005), Martin served as parliamentary secretary to Bill Graham, Canada's minister of defence. He was reelected a second time in the 2006 general election. Keith P. Martin, PC, MP, BSc, MD (born April 13, 1960, in London, UK) is a Canadian physician and politician. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... In the parliamentary systems of several Commonwealth countries, such as Canada and Australia, it is customary for the prime minister to appoint parliamentary secretaries (in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, parliamentary assistants) from their caucus to assist cabinet ministers with their work. ...


Additionally, three senators, the late William Doody, Norman Atkins, and Lowell Murray, declined to join the new party and continue to sit in the upper house as a rump caucus of Progressive Conservatives. The Martin Liberals exacerbated the Tory split in the Senate by appointing in February 2005, provincial Progressive Conservatives Nancy Ruth and Elaine McCoy as senators and additional members of the rump PC Senate caucus. Ms. Ruth, however, later did join the new Conservative party in March 2006. The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... C. William Doody (born February 26, 1931) is a member of the Canadian Senate representing Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Norman (Norm) Kempton Atkins (b. ... The Honourable Senator Lowell Murray, PC, MA, LLD (born 26 September 1936) is a Senator and long time activist with the Progressive Conservative party in Canada. ... The term rump can mean The buttocks or backside of the human body the corresponding part of an animal, as in rump steak, a cut of meat In politics, a remnant of a larger political grouping that continues to exist after the group has formally dissolved or been abolished. ... Nancy Ruth (born January 6, 1942 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian senator from Ontario. ... Elaine McCoy (born March 7, 1946) is a Canadian senator from Alberta. ...


In the early months of the Conservatives' existence two Conservative MPs also became publicly disgruntled with the leadership, policy, and procedures of the new party. Former Progressive Conservative MP Rick Borotsik became openly critical of the new party's leadership during its initial months of existence and officially retired from politics at the end of the parliamentary session of spring 2004. Rick Borotsik (born September 8, 1950 in Brandon, Manitoba) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ...


Former Canadian Alliance MP Chuck Cadman rejected the new party's riding nomination procedures in March after losing his local riding's Conservative nomination to an outside challenger. His membership in the Conservative party was revoked in late May. Cadman ran as an independent candidate in the federal election of June 2004. He was re-elected as the only independent in the new parliament but died of cancer in July 2005. Chuck Cadman Charles Chuck Cadman, (February 21, 1948 – July 9, 2005) was a Canadian politician and Member of Parliament from 1997 to 2005, representing the riding of Surrey North in Surrey, British Columbia. ... An electoral district is a geographically-based constituency upon which Canadas representative democracy is based. ...


Additionally, after the 2004 federal election, Tory Senator Jean-Claude Rivest left the Conservatives to sit as an independent member of the Senate, citing his concerns that the new party was too right-wing and insensitive to Quebec needs and interests. RIVEST, The Hon. ...


Leadership election

With 17,296 votes and 56.2% party support, Stephen Harper was chosen as leader of the new party on March 20, 2004, defeating former Ontario provincial Tory Cabinet minister Tony Clement (2,887 votes, 9.4%) and former Magna International CEO Belinda Stronach (10,613 votes, 34.5%) on the first ballot.[2] The 2004 Conservative Party of Canada leadership election took place on March 20, 2004 in Toronto, Ontario, and resulted in the election of Stephen Harper as the first leader of the new Canadian Conservative Party. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in leap years). ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area [1] Ranked... The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party (PC Party of Ontario) is a right-of-centre political party in Ontario, Canada. ... A cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... Anthony Peter Tony Clement, PC, BA, LL.B., MP (born January 27, 1961 in Manchester, England) is a Canadian politician, federal Minister of Health, Minister for the Federal Economic Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor) and member of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... Magna International Inc. ... Belinda Caroline Stronach, PC, MP (born May 2, 1966 in Newmarket, Ontario) is a Canadian businessperson, philanthropist, politician, and a Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) in the Canadian House of Commons. ...


Some Conservative activists had hoped to recruit former Ontario Premier Mike Harris for the leadership but he declined, as did New Brunswick Premier Bernard Lord and Alberta Premier Ralph Klein. Outgoing Progressive Conservative leader Peter MacKay also announced he would not seek the leadership of the new party as did former Democratic Representative Caucus leader and Canadian Alliance Member of Parliament (MP) Chuck Strahl. Jim Prentice, who had been a candidate in the 2003 PC leadership contest, entered the CPC leadership race in mid-December but dropped out in mid-January due to an inability to raise funds so soon after his earlier leadership bid. Michael Deane Harris (born January 23, 1945, in Toronto, Ontario) was the twenty-second Premier of Ontario from June 26, 1995 to April 15, 2002. ... Motto: Spem reduxit (Hope restored) Capital Fredericton Largest city Saint John Official languages English, French (the only constitutionally bilingual province in the country) Government - Lieutenant-Governor Herménégilde Chiasson - Premier Shawn Graham (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 10 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st... Bernard Lord, LL.B., BA, MLA (born September 27, 1965 in Roberval, Quebec) is a Canadian politician. ... Motto: Fortis et liber(Latin) Strong and free Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Official languages English (see below) Government - Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong - Premier Ed Stelmach (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 28 - Senate seats 6 Confederation September 1, 1905 (split from Northwest Territories) (8th [Province]) Area Ranked... Ralph Phillip Klein MLA (born November 1, 1942), leader of the Alberta Progressive Conservatives, is the current premier of the Canadian province of Alberta. ... Peter Gordon MacKay, PC, BA, LL.B, MP (born September 27, 1965) serves as the member of Parliament (MP) for Central Nova, Nova Scotia, Canadas Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency. ... Democratic Reform Association logo The Democratic Representative Caucus was a group of Canadian Members of Parliament who left the Canadian Alliance in 2001 in protest against the leadership of Stockwell Day. ... Charles Strahl, PC, MP (born February 25, 1957 in New Westminster, British Columbia) is a politician in British Columbia, Canada. ... P. E. James Jim Prentice, PC, MP (born July 20, 1956, in South Porcupine, Timmins, Ontario) is a Canadian lawyer and politician. ... The 2003 Progressive Conservative leadership convention was held on May 31, 2003 to elect a leader or the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. ...


Principles and policies

Being conservative both fiscally and socially, the Conservative Party generally favours lower taxes, smaller government, more decentralization of federal government powers to the provinces modelled after the Meech Lake Accord, a tougher stand on "law and order" issues and more spending on the military, and harmonizing standards and regulations with those of the United States. It is also opposed to the legalization of cannabis and has had a free vote on whether the House wanted to reopen the issue of same-sex marriage, which was defeated. As the successor of the western-based Canadian Alliance, the party also supports reform of the Senate to make it "elected, equal, and effective" (the "Triple-E Senate"), as well as several other substantial reforms to reduce the present power of the Prime Minister's Office, such as establishing fixed election dates every four years and giving individual MPs more leeway in representing their constituents. In addition, in the wake of the sponsorship scandal and the resulting high-profile Gomery Inquiry the Conservative Party has advocated government accountability and transparency reforms. This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Fiscal policy is the economic term that defines the set of principles and decisions of a government in setting the level of public expenditure and how that expenditure is funded. ... Social policy is the study of the welfare state, and the range of responses to social need. ... The Meech Lake Accord was a set of failed amendments to the Constitution of Canada negotiated in 1987 by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and the provincial premiers, including Robert Bourassa, premier of Quebec. ... Look up Cannabis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...   CA, CT, MD, NY, NJ, OR, RI, VT, WA See also Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage is a term for a governmentally, socially, or religiously recognized marriage in which two people of the same sex live... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... The Triple-E Senate (standing for elected, equal, and effective) is a topic of constitutional debate in Canada and a proposed plan to reform the current Canadian Senate. ... The sponsorship scandal, AdScam, or Sponsorgate, is an ongoing scandal that came as a result of a Canadian federal government sponsorship program in the province of Quebec and involving the Liberal Party of Canada (mostly its Quebec branch), which was in power since 1993 up to 2005. ... The Gomery Commission, formally the Commission of Inquiry into the Sponsorship Program and Advertising Activities, is a federal Canadian commission headed by the retired Justice John Gomery for the purpose of investigating the sponsorship scandal, which involves allegations of corruption within the Canadian government. ... Accountability is a concept in ethics with several meanings. ... In the physical sciences, specifically in optics, a transparent physical object is one that can be seen through. ...


During the 2006 election, the party also campaigned on [3]: Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ...

  • Cutting the Goods and Services Tax from 7% to 6% immediately after election and to 5% later on.
  • Tax incentives for people to learn skilled trades (such as welding and baking) and for businesses to hire new apprentices.
  • Promote privatization of Crown corporations.
  • Amend the Constitution to add "ownership of private property" to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
  • Support of and some reforms in the "traditional industries" including agriculture, fishing, mining and forestry.
  • Making participation at the Wheat Board voluntary rather than mandatory.
  • In light of a Quebec judge ruling of October 2004, that the CRTC's ban of viewing of U.S.-based channels contravenes the Charter of Rights - limiting the CRTC mandate and giving individual choice to subscribe to foreign and U.S.-based channels, more individual freedom.
  • Mandatory minimum prison sentences for various serious crimes, including drug trafficking, weapons-related and violent offences, as well as ending the practice of house arrest in some cases.
  • Dismantling the gun registry program, using the surplus to hire more police, to facilitate a crackdown on organized crime including white collar crime.
  • Creation of a mandatory DNA databank for sex offenders; raising the age of consent from 14 to 16 years; tougher stance on child pornography.
  • Strengthening of border with armed border guards, port and airport security while at the same time, co-operating more closely on security issues with the U.S.
  • Giving every parent $100 per month for each child under the age of 6, as part of the national child care program.
  • Adding pension income-tax deductions for seniors.
  • Reducing waiting times in hospitals.
  • Investing in transportation infrastructure and introducing tax credits for monthly transit passes.
  • Defending the local industries against foreign trade challenges, including the softwood lumber dispute with the United States.
  • Better relations with the United States.
  • Giving small businesses tax incentives, and ending subsidies for big business.
  • Fixing the "fiscal imbalance" between Ottawa and the provinces; shifting major taxing and decision-making powers to the provinces, with the co-operation of Jean Charest, the Liberal, federalist premier of Quebec.
  • An ethics and accountability bill to limit the ability of the political parties to raise money from the rich, and levelling the playing field for all parties equally, making it more grassroots. That omnibus bill would also create an independent budgetary office.
  • Democratic reform — Triple E Senate, fixed election dates, freer votes in the House. Shifting more powers from the PMO to cabinet and individual MPs.
  • Increasing defence spending beyond previous Liberal commitments, especially in the Arctic Region of Canada. This includes 3 Armed Heavy Icebreakers, additional Canadian Rangers, acquiring new Strategic Airlifters and several other programs.
  • Compensation of $20,000 CAD to survivors and their spouses who paid the Chinese head tax

The Canadian Goods and Services Tax (GST) (Taxe sur les produits et services, TPS) is a multi-level value-added tax introduced in Canada on January 1, 1991, by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and finance minister Michael Wilson. ... In Commonwealth countries a Crown corporation is a state-controlled company or enterprise (a public corporation). ... The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms is the bill of rights which forms part of the Constitution of Canada adopted in 1982. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... In justice and law, house arrest is the situation where a person is confined (by the authorities) to his or her residence. ... The Canadian gun registry is a government-run registry of all legally-owned guns in Canada. ... White-collar crimes (a term coined by Edwin Sutherland in 1939) or Business crimes are those crimes specifically performed by white collar employees. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid that contains the genetic instructions for the development and function of living organisms. ... Age of consent laws Worldwide While the phrase age of consent typically does not appear in legal statutes,[1] when used with reference to criminal law the age of consent is the minimum age at which a person is considered to be capable of legally giving informed consent to any... Child pornography refers to pornographic material depicting children. ... Childcare is the act of caring for and supervising minor children. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border Satellite image of the Arctic surface The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic region around the South Pole. ... US Coast Guard icebreakers near McMurdo Station, February 2002 An icebreaker is a special purpose ship designed to move through ice covered marine environments. ... The Canadian Rangers are a Reserve component of the Canadian Forces which provide a limited military presence in Canadas North. ... There are two types of airlifts in the military, strategic and tactical. ... The Chinese head tax was a fixed fee charged for each Chinese person entering Canada. ...

General election of 2004

Two months after Harper's election as national Tory leader, Liberal Party of Canada leader and Prime Minister Paul Martin called a general election for June 28, 2004. However, in the interim between the formation of the new party and the selection of its new leader, factional infighting and investigations into the Sponsorship Scandal reduced the popularity of the governing Liberal Party. This allowed the Conservatives to be more prepared for the race, unlike the 2000 federal election when few predicted the early election call. For the first time since the 1993 federal election, a Liberal government would have to deal with a united conservative front. The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... Paul Edgar Philippe Martin (born August 28, 1938) was the 21st Prime Minister of Canada and a former leader of the Liberal Party of Canada. ... The sponsorship scandal, AdScam, or Sponsorgate, is an ongoing scandal that came as a result of a Canadian federal government sponsorship program in the province of Quebec and involving the Liberal Party of Canada (mostly its Quebec branch), which was in power since 1993 up to 2005. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... A snap election is an election called earlier than scheduled. ... Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ...


The Conservatives did better than expected during the election campaign with polls showing a rise in support for the new Conservative Party, leading some pollsters to predict the election of a minority Conservative government. Off-the-cuff comments from social conservative elements in the new party also hindered Harper's efforts at portraying the new Conservative Party as a reasonable, responsible and moderate alternative to the governing Liberals. This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Several particularly notable controversial comments were made by Conservative MPs during the campaign. Early on in the campaign, Ontario MP Scott Reid indicated his feelings as Tory language critic that the policy of official bilingualism was unrealistic and needed to be reformed. Alberta MP Rob Merrifield suggested as Tory health critic that women ought to have mandatory family counseling before they choose to have an abortion. BC MP Randy White indicated his willingness near the end of the campaign to use the notwithstanding clause of the Canadian Constitution to override the Charter of Rights on the issue of same-sex marriage, and Cheryl Gallant, another Ontario MP, compared abortion to terrorism. Not to be confused with the Scott Reid who serves as press secretary to Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin, see Scott Reid (political advisor). ... Bilingualism in Canada refers to laws and policies of the federal government — and some other levels of government — mandating that certain services and communications be available to the public in both English and French. ... Rob Merrifield (born December 19, 1953 in Mayerthorpe, Alberta) is a Canadian politician. ... Randy White (born September 3, 1948 in Halifax, Nova Scotia) is an accountant and former Canadian politician. ... Section Thirty-three of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms is part of the Constitution of Canada. ... The Constitution of Canada is the supreme law in Canada. ...   CA, CT, MD, NY, NJ, OR, RI, VT, WA See also Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage is a term for a governmentally, socially, or religiously recognized marriage in which two people of the same sex live... Cheryl Gallant, MP Cheryl Gallant, MP (born May 23, 1960 in Sarnia, Ontario) is a Conservative Canadian politician. ...


Harper's new Conservatives emerged from the election with a larger parliamentary caucus of 99 MPs while the Liberals were reduced to a minority government of 135 MPs, requiring the Liberals to obtain support from at least twenty-three opposition MPs in order to guarantee the passage of Liberal government legislation. The Conservatives' popular vote, however, was actually lower than the combined Alliance and PC popular vote in the 2000 federal election. A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ...


38th Parliament (2004-2005)

Montreal policy convention: March 2005

In 2005, some political analysts such as former Progressive Conservative pollster Allan Gregg and Toronto Star columnist Chantal Hébert suggested that the then-subsequent election could result in a Conservative government if the public were to perceive the Tories as emerging from the party's founding convention (then scheduled for March 2005) with clearly defined, moderate policies with which to challenge the Liberals. Allan Gregg (born 1952) is a Canadian pollster, political advisor, and pundit. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... Chantal Hébert is a Canadian columnist and political commentator. ...


The convention provided the public with an opportunity to see the Conservative Party in a new light, appearing to have reduced the focus on its controversial social conservative agenda (although most Conservatives continue to oppose same-sex marriage). It retained its populist appeal by espousing tax cuts, smaller government, a grassroots-oriented democratic reform, and more decentralization by giving the provinces more taxing powers and decision-making authority in joint federal-provincial programs. The party's law and order package was an effort to address the perception of rising homicide rates, which had gone up 12% in 2004. Statistics Canada. Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ...


Stronach defection

On May 17, 2005, MP Belinda Stronach, surprised many when she crossed the floor from the Conservative Party to join the Liberal Party. Some believed Stronach's departure would damage the Conservative Party's chances to attract socially liberal voters, particularly in Ontario. Others have raised suspicions about the timing and opportunism of Stronach's decision, noting that she became a cabinet minister immediately after crossing the floor, and that the departure came mere days before a crucial non-confidence vote in the house. In addition, numerous Conservatives, such as Ontario Progressive Conservative Member of Provincial Parliament Bob Runciman made vitriolic public statements in reaction to this development, such as calling Stronach "a dipstick". These comments were decried by some as sexist and proof that the Party's moderate image was misleading. Others believed the comments were more a reaction to her decision to cross the floor, and had nothing to do with her gender. is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Belinda Caroline Stronach, PC, MP (born May 2, 1966 in Newmarket, Ontario) is a Canadian businessperson, philanthropist, politician, and a Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) in the Canadian House of Commons. ... In politics, crossing the floor is to vote against party lines, especially where this is considered unusual or controversial. ... Alternate meanings in cabinet (disambiguation) A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party (PC Party of Ontario) is a right-of-centre political party in Ontario, Canada. ... A Member of Provincial Parliament (MPP) is an elected member of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... The Honourable Robert W. Runciman (born in Brockville, Ontario) is a veteran Canadian politician. ...


In late August and early September 2005, the Tories released ads through Ontario's major television broadcasters that highlighted their policies towards health care, education and child support. The ads each featured Stephen Harper discussing policy with prominent members of his Shadow Cabinet. Some analysts suggested at the time that the Tories would use similar ads in the expected 2006 federal election, instead of focusing their attacks on allegations of corruption in the Liberal government as they did earlier on. The Shadow Cabinet (also called the Shadow Front Bench) is a senior group of opposition spokespeople in the Westminster system of government who together under the leadership of the Leader of the Opposition (or the leader of other smaller opposition parties) form an alternative cabinet to the governments, whose... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ...


An Ipsos-Reid Poll conducted after the fallout from the first report of the Gomery Commission on the sponsorship scandal showed the Tories practically tied for public support with the governing Liberal Party [4], and a poll from the Strategic Counsel suggested that the Conservatives were actually in the lead. [5] However, polling two days later showed the Liberals had regained an 8-point lead [6]. The Gomery Commission, formally the Commission of Inquiry into the Sponsorship Program and Advertising Activities, is a federal Canadian commission headed by the retired Justice John Gomery for the purpose of investigating the sponsorship scandal, which involves allegations of corruption within the Canadian government. ...

See also: Conservative Party candidates, 2004 Canadian federal election
See also: Conservative Party of Canada Campaign Chairs
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Conservative Canadian government sworn in The Conservative Party of Canada ran a full slate of candidates in the 2004 federal election, and won 99 seats out of 308 to form the Official Opposition. ... First ever Conservative Party of Canada national campaign team - 2004 election - Appointed by Stephen Harper National Campaign Co-Chairs: Michael Fortier John Reynolds Provincial Campaign Co-Chairs: British Columbia - Ed Odishaw, Bob Ransford Alberta - Deb Grey, Rod Love Saskatchewan - Rich Gabruch, Ian Shields Manitoba - Ed Agnew, Eric Stefenson Ontario - John... Image File history File links Wikinews-logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ...

General election of 2006

On November 24, 2005, Opposition leader Stephen Harper introduced a motion of no confidence which was passed on November 28, 2005. With the confirmed backing of the other two opposition parties, this resulted in an election on January 23, 2006, following a campaign spanning the Christmas season. is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Leader of the Opposition in Canada is the Member of Parliament in the Canadian House of Commons who leads Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (the body in Parliament recognized as the Official Opposition). ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... A motion of no confidence, also called a motion of non-confidence, a censure motion, a no-confidence motion, or simply a confidence motion, is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ... November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


The Conservatives started off the first month of the campaign by making a series of policy-per-day announcements, which included a GST reduction and a child-care allowance. This strategy was a surprise to many in the news media, as they believed the party would focus on the sponsorship scandal; instead, the Conservative strategy was to let that issue ruminate with voters. The Liberals opted to hold their major announcements after the Christmas holidays; as a result, Harper dominated media coverage for the first few weeks of the campaign and was able "to define himself, rather than to let the Liberals define him". The Conservatives' announcements played to Harper's strengths as a policy wonk[7], as opposed to in the 2004 election and summer 2005 where he tried to overcome the perception that he was cool and aloof. Though his party showed only modest movement in the polls, Harper's personal approval numbers, which had always trailed his party's significantly, began to rise relatively rapidly. The Canadian Goods and Services Tax (GST) (Taxe sur les produits et services, TPS) is a multi-level value-added tax introduced in Canada on January 1, 1991, by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and finance minister Michael Wilson. ... The sponsorship scandal, AdScam, or Sponsorgate, is an ongoing scandal that came as a result of a Canadian federal government sponsorship program in the province of Quebec and involving the Liberal Party of Canada (mostly its Quebec branch), which was in power since 1993 up to 2005. ...


On December 27, 2005, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police announced it was investigating Liberal Finance Minister Ralph Goodale's office for potentially engaging in insider trading before making an important announcement on the taxation of income trusts. The revelation of the criminal investigation and Goodale's refusal to step aside dominated news coverage for the following week, and it gained further attention when the U.S. SEC announced they would also launch a probe. The income trust scandal distracted public attention from the Liberals' key policy announcements and allowed the Conservatives to refocus on their previous attacks on corruption within the Liberal party. The Tories were leading in the polls by early January 2006, and made a major breakthrough in Quebec where they displaced the Liberals as the second place party (after the Bloc Quebecois). December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... RCMP redirects here. ... The Minister of Finance is one of the most important positions in the Cabinet of Canada. ... Ralph Edward Goodale, PC , MP, BA , LL.B (born October 5, 1949, in Regina, Saskatchewan) was Canadas Minister of Finance from 2003 to 2006 and continues to be a Liberal Member of Parliament. ... Insider trading is the trading of a corporations stock or other securities (e. ... An income trust is an investment trust that holds income-producing assets. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... “Securities and Exchange Commission” redirects here. ...


In response to the growing Conservative lead, the Liberals launched negative ads suggesting that Harper had a "hidden agenda", similar to the attacks made in the 2004 election. The Liberal ads did not have the same effect this time as the Conservatives had much more momentum, at one stage holding a ten-point lead. Harper's personal numbers continued to rise and polls found he was considered not only more trustworthy, but also a better potential Prime Minister than Paul Martin. In addition to the Conservatives being more disciplined, media coverage of the Conservatives was also more positive than in 2004. By contrast, the Liberals found themselves increasingly criticized for running a poor campaign and making numerous gaffes.[8] The current tally of the newspaper endorsements for the 2006 Canadian federal election has shown a strong wave of new endorsements for the Conservative Party of Canada, led by Stephen Harper. ...


On January 23, 2006 the Conservatives won 124 seats, compared to 103 for the Liberals. The results made the Conservatives the largest party in the 308-member House of Commons, enabling them to form a minority government. On February 6, Stephen Harper was sworn in as the 22nd Prime Minister of Canada, along with his Cabinet. The Cabinet of Canada (French: Cabinet du Canada or Conseil des ministres) plays an important role in the Government of Canada in accordance with the Westminster System. ...

Further information: Canadian federal election, 2006
Further information: Conservative Party candidates, 2006 Canadian federal election

Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... It has been suggested that Anthony Reale be merged into this article or section. ...

The Harper Government (2006-present)

The Federal Accountability Act in response to the sponsorship scandal, President of the Treasury Board, the Honourable John Baird introduced the bill to the Canadian House of Commons on April 11, 2006. The bill was passed in the House of Commons on June 22, 2006, and was granted royal assent on December 12, 2006. The Federal Accountability Act (full title: An Act providing for conflict of interest rules, restrictions on election financing and measures respecting administrative transparency, oversight and accountability) is a statute introduced as Bill C-2 in the first session of the 39th Canadian Parliament on April 11, 2006, by the President... The sponsorship scandal, AdScam, or Sponsorgate, is an ongoing scandal that came as a result of a Canadian federal government sponsorship program in the province of Quebec and involving the Liberal Party of Canada (mostly its Quebec branch), which was in power since 1993 up to 2005. ... The position of President of the Treasury Board was created as a ministerial position in the Canadian Cabinet in 1966 when the Treasury Board became a fully-fledged department. ... There have been various John Bairds of significance. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which a constitutional monarch completes the legislative process of lawmaking by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ...


The 2006 Canadian federal budget was presented to the House of Commons by Finance Minister Jim Flaherty on May 2, 2006. The government announced that the Goods & Services Tax would be lowered from 7% to 6% (and eventually to 5%); income tax cuts for middle-income earners, and $1,200-per-child childcare payment (the "Universal Child Care Benefit") for Canadian parents. On June 6, 2006, the budget was introduced for third reading in the House of Commons and was declared passed by unanimous consent as the result of procedural confusion. (The Bloc Quebecois had previously indicated that it would support the budget, and its passage was never in doubt.) Jim Flaherty pauses while presenting the budget to parliament, as Rona Ambrose looks on. ... James Michael Jim Flaherty, PC, BA, LL.B, MP (born December 30, 1949) is Canadas Minister of Finance; he had formerly served as Ontarios Minister of Finance. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... The Canadian Goods and Services Tax (GST) (Taxe sur les produits et services, TPS) is a multi-level value-added tax introduced in Canada on January 1, 1991, by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and finance minister Michael Wilson. ... Income taxes in Canada constitute the majority of the annual revenues of the Government of Canada, and of the governments of the Provinces of Canada. ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... Day care is the care of a child during the day by a person other than the childs parents or legal guardians, often someone outside the childs immediate family. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Bloc Qu cois is a federal political party in Canada that is primarily devoted to promoting sovereignty for the province of Quebec. ...


On October 31, 2006, Finance Minister Jim Flaherty announced that the government would begin taxing income trusts in 2011, which backtracked on one of their campaign promises. There had been an increasing number of corporations converting to income trusts which would result in them paying lowered taxes; Flaherty argued that income trusts would cost the government hundreds of millions in lost revenue and shift the burden onto ordinary people. The Conservatives are supported on the matter by the NDP. October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... James Michael Jim Flaherty, PC, BA, LL.B, MP (born December 30, 1949) is Canadas Minister of Finance; he had formerly served as Ontarios Minister of Finance. ... An income trust is an investment trust that holds income-producing assets. ...


On November 22, 2006, Harper introduced his own motion to recognize the Quebecois as forming a "nation within a united Canada." Five days later, the Harper's motion passed, with a margin of 266-16; all federalist parties, as well as the Bloc Quebecois, were formally behind it. November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bloc Qu cois is a federal political party in Canada that is primarily devoted to promoting sovereignty for the province of Quebec. ...


Party leaders

See also: Cabinet of Canada and Prime Minister of Canada

The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... The Honourable John Lynch-Staunton (born June 19, 1930 in Montreal) is a former Canadian senator and was the first leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in leap years). ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An interim leader, in Canadian politics, is a party leader who is appointed by the partys legislative caucus or the partys executive to temporarily act as leader when there is a gap between the resignation or death of a party leader and the election of his or her... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... The Cabinet of Canada (French: Cabinet du Canada or Conseil des ministres) plays an important role in the Government of Canada in accordance with the Westminster System. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ...

Electoral results (2004-2006)

Election # of candidates nominated # of seats won # of total votes  % of popular vote result
2004
308
99
3,994,682
29.6%
Liberal minority government
2006
308
124
5,374,071
36.3%
Conservative minority government

The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ...

Provincial parties

The Conservative Party, while officially having no current provincial wings, works with its former provincial affiliates. There have been calls to change the names of the provincial parties from "Progressive Conservative" to "Conservative". There are a number of conservative parties in Canada, a country which has traditionally been dominated by two political parties, one liberal and one conservative. ...


The federal Conservatives have the support of many provincial Tory members. Several Tory premiers, such as Ed Stelmach of Alberta, Pat Binns of Prince Edward Island, Danny Williams of Newfoundland and Labrador and Rodney MacDonald of Nova Scotia, have expressed general support for the party at different times. Williams's support has been the most ambivalent of any provincial PC leader, and in 2007 he took out full-page newspaper advertisements against the Harper government's policies. In Ontario, provincial PC Party leader John Tory and former interim provincial opposition leader Bob Runciman have also expressed open support for Stephen Harper and the Conservative Party of Canada, with former provincial MPPs Jim Flaherty, Tony Clement, and John Baird now ministers in Harper's government. The CPC also has the support of Stuart Murray, opposition and former Tory leader in Manitoba and Bernard Lord, former premier and Tory leader in New Brunswick. Edward Stelmach (born ca. ... Motto: Fortis et liber(Latin) Strong and free Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Official languages English (see below) Government - Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong - Premier Ed Stelmach (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 28 - Senate seats 6 Confederation September 1, 1905 (split from Northwest Territories) (8th [Province]) Area Ranked... Patrick George Binns (born October 8, 1948 in Weyburn, Saskatchewan), is a Canadian politician and the Premier of Prince Edward Island. ... Motto: i lost P.E.I. again mom:well, look under the couch Capital Charlottetown Largest city Charlottetown Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Barbara Oliver Hagerman - Premier Pat Binns (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 4 - Senate seats 4 Confederation July 1, 1873 (7th) Area Ranked 13th... Daniel Danny Williams, QC, LL.B, BA, MHA (born August 4, 1949 in St. ... Motto: Quaerite Prime Regnum Dei (Latin: Seek ye first the kingdom of God) Capital St. ... Rodney Joseph MacDonald, MLA (born January 2, 1972) is an educator and politician and the current Premier of Nova Scotia, Canada. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... John Tory John H. Tory, LL.B, BA, MPP (born May 28, 1954) is a Canadian businessman and leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party. ... The Honourable Robert W. Runciman (born in Brockville, Ontario) is a veteran Canadian politician. ... James Michael Jim Flaherty, PC, BA, LL.B, MP (born December 30, 1949) is Canadas Minister of Finance; he had formerly served as Ontarios Minister of Finance. ... Anthony Peter Tony Clement, PC, BA, LL.B., MP (born January 27, 1961 in Manchester, England) is a Canadian politician, federal Minister of Health, Minister for the Federal Economic Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor) and member of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... There have been various John Bairds of significance. ... Stuart Murray (born November 24, 1954) is a Manitoba politician. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL YT NT NU Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard - Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 14 - Senate seats 6 Confederation... Bernard Lord, LL.B., BA, MLA (born September 27, 1965 in Roberval, Quebec) is a Canadian politician. ... Motto: Spem reduxit (Hope restored) Capital Fredericton Largest city Saint John Official languages English, French (the only constitutionally bilingual province in the country) Government - Lieutenant-Governor Herménégilde Chiasson - Premier Shawn Graham (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 10 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st...


In Alberta, relations have been strained between the federal Conservative Party and the Progressive Conservative. Part of the federal Tories' loss in the 2004 election was often blamed on then Premier Klein's public musings on health care late in the campaign. Klein had also called for a referendum on same-sex marriage. With the impending 2006 election, Klein predicted another Liberal minority, though this time the federal Conservatives won a minority government[9]. The Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta is a provincial right-of-centre party in the Canadian province of Alberta. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ...   CA, CT, MD, NY, NJ, OR, RI, VT, WA See also Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage is a term for a governmentally, socially, or religiously recognized marriage in which two people of the same sex live...


While officially separate, federal Conservative Party documents, such as membership applications, can be picked up from most provincial Progressive Conservative Party offices. Several of the provincial parties also contain open links to the federal Conservative website on their respective websites.


Conservative leader Stephen Harper has attended multiple provincial Progressive Conservative party conventions as a keynote speaker and he has encouraged all federal party members to purchase memberships in their provincial conservative counterparts.


See also

See also: List of political parties in Canada

This article lists political parties in Canada. ...

External links

  • Conservative Party of Canada official site
  • Conservative Party of Canada — 2006 Election Platform
Federal political parties of Canada
Represented in the House of Commons:
Conservative Liberal Bloc Québécois NDP
Other parties recognized by Elections Canada:
Green CHP PC Party Marxist-Leninist Marijuana Action
Communist Libertarian FPNP WBP AAEVP PPP

Federal elections
(Results summaries - Electoral districts)

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1965 · 1968 · 1972 · 1974 · 1979 · 1980 · 1984 · 1988 · 1993 · 1997 · 2000 · 2004 · 2006 This article lists political parties in Canada. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... The Bloc Québécois is a centre-left federal political party in Canada that is devoted to the promotion of sovereignty for Quebec. ... The New Democratic Party (NPD; Nouveau Parti démocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a progressive social democratic philosophy that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... Elections Canada is the non-partisan agency of the Government of Canada responsible for the conduct of federal elections and referendums. ... The Green Party of Canada is a Canadian federal political party founded in 1983. ... The Christian Heritage Party of Canada is a federal political party that advocates the governance of Canada according to the inspired, inerrant written Word of God. [1] This socially and fiscally conservative party held its founding convention in Hamilton, Ontario in November 1987, where Ed Vanwoudenberg was elected its first... The Progressive Canadian Party (PC Party) is a minor federal political party in Canada. ... The Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist) (CPC-ML) is a Canadian federal Marxist-Leninist political party. ... The Marijuana Party is a Canadian federal political party that aims to end prohibition of cannabis. ... The Canadian Action Party (CAP) is a Canadian federal political party founded in 1997. ... The Communist Party of Canada is a communist political party in Canada. ... The Libertarian Party of Canada is a minor political party in Canada that adheres to the philosophy of libertarianism. ... The First Peoples National Party of Canada (FPNPC) is a political party that is eligible for registration as a federal political party in Canada. ... The Western Block Party is a political party in Canada founded in 2005 by Doug Christie. ... The Animal Alliance Environment Voters Party of Canada is a minor registered political party in Canada. ... People’s Political Power of Canada (PPP) is a Canadian Roman Catholic federal political party officially recognized by Elections Canada. ... The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) has two chambers. ... This page provides an overview of Canadian federal election results since 1867, the year the Constitution Act established the federal government structure for the Dominion of Canada . ... This is a list of Canadas 308 electoral districts (also known as ridings in Canadian English) as defined by the 2003 Representation Order, which came into effect on May 23, 2004. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1867 election The 1867 federal election, which proved how much canada sucks ended on September 20th, was the first election for the new . ... Politics of Canada Categories: Stub | Canadian federal elections ... The Canadian federal election of 1874 was held on January 22, 1874. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1878 election The Canadian federal election of 1878 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1882 election The Canadian federal election of 1882 was held on June 20, 1882 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1887 election The Canadian federal election of 1887 was held on February 22, 1887 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 1891 Canadian federal election was won by the Conservative Party of Sir John A. Macdonald. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1896 election The Canadian federal election of 1896 was held on June 23, 1896 to elect members of the 8th Parliament of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1900 election The Canadian federal election of 1900 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... In the Canadian federal election of 1904, SIr Wilfrid Laurier led the Liberal Party of Canada to a second term in government, with an increased majority in the canadian House of Commons, and over half of the popular vote. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1908 election The Canadian federal election of 1908 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1911 election The Canadian federal election of 1911 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1917 election The 1917 Canadian federal election (sometimes referred to as the khaki election) was held on December 17, 1917, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1921 election The Canadian federal election of 1921 was held on December 6, 1921 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1925 election The Canadian federal election of 1925 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1926 election The Canadian federal election of 1926 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1930 election The Canadian federal election of 1930 was held on July 28, 1930 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons to the 17th Parliament. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1935 election The Canadian federal election of 1935 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1940 election The Canadian federal election of 1940 was the 19th general election in Canadian history. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1945 election The Canadian federal election of 1945 was the 20th general election in Canadian history. ... The Canadian federal election of 1949 was the first election in Canada in almost thirty years in which the Liberals were not led by William Lyon Mackenzie King. ... National results Notes: (1) The Liberal-Labour MP sat with the Liberal caucus. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1957 election The Canadian federal election of 1957 was held June 10, 1957, to elect members of the 23rd Parliament of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 24th general election was held just nine months after the 23rd and transformed Prime Minister John Diefenbakers minority into the largest ever majority government in Canadian history. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1962 election The Canadian federal election of 1962 was held on June 18, 1962 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Map of Canadas provinces and territories and which party won the most votes in each province and territory and their popular vote. ... In the Canadian federal election of 1965, the Liberal Party of Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson was re-elected with a larger number of seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... In the Canadian federal election of June 25, 1968, the Liberal Party won a majority government under its new leader, Pierre Trudeau. ... The House of Commons after the 1972 election The Canadian federal election of 1972 was held on October 30, 1972 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1974 election The Canadian federal election of 1974 was held on July 8, 1974 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1979 election The Canadian federal election of 1979 was held on May 22, 1979 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1980 election The 1980 Canadian federal election was called when the minority Progressive Conservative government led by Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. ... The Canadian federal election of 1984 was called on July 4, 1984, and held on September 4 of that year. ... Map of the Popular Vote with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories The Canadian Parliament after the 1988 election The Canadian federal election of 1988 was held November 21, 1988, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ...

Conservative Maple Leaf Logo

Leaders of the Conservative Party of Canada and its antecedents Image File history File links Conservative_maple_leaf,_blue. ... Sir John A. Macdonald, Canadas first prime minister, is considered the father of the Canadian conservative movement. ...

Liberal-Conservative/Conservative/Unionist/N.L.C./National Government/Progressive Conservative (1867-2003): Macdonald | Abbott | Thompson | Bowell | Tupper | Borden | Meighen | Bennett | Manion | Meighen | Bracken | Drew | Diefenbaker | Stanfield | Clark | Mulroney | Campbell | Charest | Clark | MacKay

Reform (1987-2000)/Canadian Alliance (2000-2003): Manning | Day | Harper
The Liberal-Conservative Party was the formal name of the Conservative Party of Canada until 1873, although some Conservative candidates continued to run under the label as late as the 1911 election and others ran as simple Conservatives prior to 1873. ... The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. ... The Unionist Party was formed in 1917 by Members of Parliament (MPs) in Canada who supported the Union government formed by Sir Robert Borden during World War I. In May 1917, Conservative Prime Minister Borden proposed the formation of a national unity government or coalition government to Liberal leader Sir... The National Liberal and Conservative Party was the name adopted by the Canadian Conservatives in 1920 after the end of the Unionist government of Robert Borden. ... National Government was the name used by the Conservative Party of Canada for the 1940 federal election under leader Robert Manion. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Sir John Alexander Macdonald, GCB, KCMG, PC, QC, DCL, LL.D was born on January 11, 1815 in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Hon. ... Sir John Sparrow David Thompson, KCMG, PC, QC, (November 10, 1845 – December 12, 1894) was a Canadian lawyer and judge who served as the fourth Prime Minister of Canada from December 5, 1892 to December 12, 1894 as well as Premier of Nova Scotia in 1882. ... Sir Mackenzie Bowell, PC , KCMG (December 27, 1823 – December 10, 1917) was the fifth Prime Minister of Canada from December 21, 1894 to April 27, 1896. ... Not to be confused with Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper who was Sir Charles Tuppers son. ... Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC, GCMG, KC, DCL, LL.D (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... the best school name in the world Arthur Meighen, PC, QC, BA, LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920 to December 29, 1921 and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... Richard Bedford Bennett, 1st Viscount Bennett, PC, KC (July 3, 1870 – June 26, 1947) was the eleventh Prime Minister of Canada from August 7, 1930 to October 23, 1935. ... Robert James Manion (November 19, 1881 Pembroke, Ontario - July 2, 1943 Ottawa, Ontario) was a physician and Canadian politician. ... the best school name in the world Arthur Meighen, PC, QC, BA, LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920 to December 29, 1921 and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... The Honourable Professor John Bracken, PC (June 22, 1883-March 18, 1969) was an agronomist, Premier of Manitoba (1922-1943) and leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-1948). ... Colonel The Honourable George Alexander Drew, PC , CC , QC (May 7, 1894 - January 4, 1973) was a Canadian conservative politician who founded a Progressive Conservative dynasty in Ontario that lasted 42 years. ... John George Diefenbaker, CH, PC, QC, BA, MA, LL.B, LL.D, DCL, FRSC, FRSA, D.Litt, DSL, (18 September 1895 – 16 August 1979) was the 13th Prime Minister of Canada (1957 – 1963). ... Robert Lorne Stanfield, PC, QC (April 11, 1914–December 16, 2003) was Premier of Nova Scotia and leader of the federal Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... Avril Phaedra Douglas Campbell, PC, QC, LL.B, LL.D (h. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... Peter Gordon MacKay, PC, BA, LL.B, MP (born September 27, 1965) serves as the member of Parliament (MP) for Central Nova, Nova Scotia, Canadas Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency. ... The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party founded in 1987, originally as a Western Canada-based protest party, but attempted to expand eastward in the 1990s. ... The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... Ernest Preston Manning (born June 10, 1942, in Edmonton, Alberta), is a right-wing populist Canadian politician. ... Stockwell Burt Day Jr. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ...


Conservative (new) (2003-present): Harper Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ...

Major national, provincial, and territorial conservative parties in Canada (edit):
Forming the government:
Canada - Alberta - Newfoundland and Labrador - Nova Scotia - Yukon
Forming the official opposition:
Manitoba - Prince Edward Island - New Brunswick - Ontario - Saskatchewan - Québec
Third parties represented in legislatures:
Alberta Alliance
Historical conservative parties:
Progressive Conservative Party of Canada - Canadian Alliance - Social Credit Party of Canada - British Columbia Conservative Party - British Columbia Social Credit Party - Social Credit Party of Alberta - Progressive Conservative Party of Saskatchewan - Conservative Party of Quebec - Union Nationale - Northwest Territories Liberal-Conservative Party

  Results from FactBites:
 
Party History (493 words)
Conservative achievements include Confederation, women’s suffrage, the Canadian Bill of Rights, the Free Trade Agreement and, since the election of a new Conservative Government in 2006, historic political reforms including fixed election dates, enhanced family support through the Universal Child Care Benefit and the re-building of the Canadian military.
Today, the Conservative Party of Canada is a vibrant national organization with strong grassroots’ support  from coast-to-coast-to-coast.  The party is formally allied with provincial Progressive Conservative parties and is a member of the International Democrat Union, an international grouping of centre-right parties. 
This website is the property of the Conservative Party of Canada and may not be reproduced in whole or in part without express written permission.
CBC News Indepth: Conservative Party (1019 words)
Barely two years after members of the old Canadian Alliance and Progressive Conservative parties voted overwhelmingly to merge and form the Conservative Party of Canada, the new party defied the sceptics and won a federal election.
But, the PC party under former leader Joe Clark concluded that Manning's dream of a united right appeared to be far closer to Reform's values than it was to the party of Sir John A. Macdonald.
Members of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservatives overwhelmingly approved the merger in early December 2003 –; and the Conservative Party of Canada was born.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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