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Encyclopedia > Consecration

To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. For example, a church building or an altar may be consecrated to the purpose of religious worship, or a chalice may be consecrated to the purpose of containing the eucharistic elements (bread or wine). A ritual is a formalised, predetermined set of symbolic actions generally performed in a particular environment at a regular, recurring interval. ... A church building is a building used in Christian worship. ... Picture of an altar from the Meyer Encyclopaedia An altar, (Hebrew mizbeah, from a word meaning to slay) is any structure on which sacrifices known as the korbanot as well as incense offerings are offered for religious purposes. ... Worship usually refers to specific acts of religious praise, honour, or devotion, typically directed to a supernatural being such as a god or goddess. ... Russian chalice A chalice (from Latin calix, cup) is a goblet, intended to hold just drink. ... The Eucharist is either the celebration of the Christian sacrament commemorating Christ’s Last Supper, or the consecrated bread and wine of this sacrament. ...


A person may be consecrated to a specific role within a religious hierarchy, or a person may consecrate his or her life to a religion.


In Christianity

In regard to the Eucharist, the term consecration refers to those words by which bread and wine are blessed. There seem to be two main positions taken in regard to the words used. In the east, the consecration is generally understood to be the Epiclesis by which the priest invokes the Holy Spirit. In the west, the consecration is understood to be the Words of Institution by which a priest is said to act "in the person of Christ" (in persona Christi) as "another Christ" (alter Christus). The Eucharist is either the celebration of the Christian sacrament commemorating Christ’s Last Supper, or the consecrated bread and wine of this sacrament. ... The term Eastern Church is variously used to refer to: The Eastern Orthodox Church, or Any of the Oriental Orthodox churches, or Any of the Eastern Rite Catholic churches, or The three groups collectively, when speaking of things they share in common with each other but not with Western churches. ... In Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, and Roman Catholic churches, the epiclesis (also sometimes spelled epiklesis, since it is a transliterated Greek word) is that part of the prayer of consecration of the Eucharistic elements (bread and wine) by which the priest invokes the Holy Spirit. ... The term Great Schism refers to either of two splits in the history of Christianity: Most commonly, it refers to the great East-West Schism, the event that separated Eastern Orthodoxy and Western Roman Catholicism in the eleventh century (1054). ... The words of Christ, This is my body. ...


Those who take the vows of religion are said to be living a consecrated life. A vow (Lat. ...


The ordination of a bishop is called consecration, for a bishop is said to be living the life of perfection. Holy Orders in the modern Roman Catholic Church and in the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, Assyrian, Old Catholic, and Independent Catholic Churches, includes three degrees: bishop, priest, and deacon. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ...


In the Latter Day Saint tradition, consecration involved the giving of member's worldly possessions to the church in a type of voluntary religious communism, which was practiced off and on during the 18th Century, but is now extremely rare among Latter Day Saint denominations. See Law of Consecration. A Latter Day Saint is a person who identifies with the Latter Day Saint movement, and is a follower of Mormonism. ... Religious communism is a term used by some Communists that claim that before communism became associated with atheism, the word communism was mainly used by religious groups. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... A Latter Day Saint is a person who identifies with the Latter Day Saint movement, and is a follower of Mormonism. ... The Law of Consecration is one of the names Latter Day Saints or Mormons give to a communitarian doctrine that calls upon the churchs membership to hold all things in common. ...


Other religions

Hinduism, Buddhism and Wicca all use the term Hinduism (सनातन धर्म; also known as Sanātana Dharma, and Vaidika-Dharma) is a worldwide religious tradition that is based on the bedrock of the Veda scriptures. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, who lived between approximately 566 and 486 BCE. Originating in India, Buddhism gradually spread throughout Asia to Central Asia... A Neo-Pagan pentagram: a symbol used by many Wiccans. ...


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  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Consecration (1074 words)
For example, a church building or an altar may be consecrated to the purpose of religious worship, or a chalice may be consecrated to the purpose of containing the eucharistic elements (bread or wine).
In the west, the consecration is understood to be the Words of Institution by which a priest is said to act "in the person of Christ" (in persona Christi) as "another Christ" (alter Christus).
Consecration, in general, is an act by which a thing is separated from a common and profane to a sacred use, or by which a person or thing is dedicated to the service and worship of God by prayers, rites, and ceremonies.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Consecration (6766 words)
Hence the Roman Pontifical treats of the consecration of a bishop and of the blessing of an abbot, of the blessing of a corner-stone and the consecration of a church or altar.
The consecrator is vested in full pontificals of the colour of the Mass of the day; the assistant bishops, in amice, stole, and cope of the same colour, and a white linen or damask mitre; the bishop-elect in amice, alb, cincture, white stole crossed on the breast, and cope and biretta.
The consecrator then blesses the mitre and places it on the head of the bishop, referring to its mystical signification and a helmet of protection and salvation, that the wearer of it may seem terrible to the opponents of truth and be their sturdy adversary.
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