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Encyclopedia > Conradin
Portrait of Conradin from the Codex Manesse (Folio 7r).
Portrait of Conradin from the Codex Manesse (Folio 7r).

Conrad or Conradin (also called Conrad the Younger, Conradin the Boy, Conrad V, German Konradin or Konrad V, or Konrad der Jüngere) (Wolfstein, Bavaria, March 25, 1252Naples, October 29, 1268), duke of Swabia, titular king of Jerusalem and King of Sicily 12541258, 1268, son of the German king Conrad IV, and of Elizabeth, daughter of Otto II of Bavaria, Duke of Bavaria. Download high resolution version (617x851, 88 KB)Portrait of Conradin from the Codex Manesse. ... Download high resolution version (617x851, 88 KB)Portrait of Conradin from the Codex Manesse. ... Folio 371r shows Johannes Hadlaub Folio 149v shows a portrait of Wolfram von Eschenbach The Manesse Codex or Grosse Heidelberger Liederhandschrift (Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg Library, Cod. ... The Free State of Bavaria  (German: Freistaat Bayern), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Naples (Italian Napoli, Neapolitan Napule, from Greek Νέα Πόλις - Néa Pólis - meaning New City; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of Campania Region and the Province of Naples. ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 63 days remaining. ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... The following is a list of Dukes of Swabia, including the several holders of the title who were also Holy Roman Emperors. ... Official language Latin, French, Italian, and other western languages; Greek and Arabic also widely spoken Capital Jerusalem, later Acre Constitution Various laws, so-called Assizes of Jerusalem The Kingdom of Jerusalem was a Christian kingdom established in the Levant in 1099 by the First Crusade. ... The following is a list of monarchs of Naples and Sicily: See also: List of Counts of Apulia and Calabria Hauteville Counts of Sicily, 1071-1130 Roger I 1071-1101 Simon 1101-1105 Roger II 1105-1130 Hauteville Kings of Sicily, 1130-1198 Roger II 1130-1154 William I 1154... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... Conrad IV, Conrad of Hohenstaufen (April 25, 1228 Andria, Italy – May 21, 1254, Lavello), was king of Jerusalem (as Conrad II) 1228–1254, of Germany 1237–1254, and of Sicily (as Conrad I) 1250–1254. ... Duke Otto II of Bavaria was born 7 April 1206 in Kehlheim and died 29 November 1253 in Landshut. ... The Free State of Bavaria  (German: Freistaat Bayern), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ...


Having lost his father in 1254 he grew up at the court of his uncle and guardian, Louis II, Duke of Upper Bavaria. His guardians were able to hold Swabia for him. Jerusalem was held by a relative from the royal house of Cyprus as regent. In Sicily, his father's half-brother Manfred continued as regent, but began to develop plans to usurp the kingship. For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Duke Louis II of Bavaria (born 13 April 1229 in Heidelberg; died 2 February 1294 in Heidelberg) (German: Ludwig II der Strenge , Herzog von Bayern, Pfalzgraf bei Rhein), from 1253 Duke of Bavaria and Count Palatine of the Rhine (see Palatinate). ... Sicilian disambiguates here; see also Sicilian language or Sicilian Defence. ... Manfred (c. ...


We know little of his appearance and character except that he was "beautiful as Absalom, and spoke good Latin". Although his father had entrusted him to the guardianship of the church, Pope Innocent IV pursued Conradin with the same relentless hatred he had had against his grandfather Frederick II, and attempted to bestow the kingdom of Sicily on a foreign prince. Innocent's successor, Pope Alexander IV, continuing this policy, offered the Hohenstaufen lands in Germany to Alfonso X, king of Castile, and forbade Conradin's election as king of the Romans. Absalom or Avshalom (אַבְשָׁלוֹם Father/Leader of/is peace, Standard Hebrew Avšalom, Tiberian Hebrew ʾAḇšālôm), in the Bible, is the third son of David, king of Israel. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Innocent IV, né Sinibaldo de Fieschi (Genoa, ca. ... Frederick II (left) meets al-Kamil (right). ... Alexander IV, né Rinaldo Conti (Anagni, ca. ... The Hohenstaufen were a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ... Alfonso X and his court. ... Flag or Pendón de Castilla A former kingdom of Spain, Castile comprises the two regions of Old Castile in north-western Spain, and New Castile in the centre of the country. ... The title King of the Romans (Latin: Rex Romanorum) — not to be confused with the early, partially mythical Kings of Rome — was carried by Holy Roman Emperors after they had been confirmed as Emperor, but before they had undergone the ceremony of coronation by the Pope. ...


Having assumed the title of King of Jerusalem and Sicily, Conradin took possession of the duchy of Swabia in 1262, and remained for some time in his dukedom. Conradin's first invitation to Italy came from the Guelphs of Florence: they asked him to take arms against Manfred, who had been crowned king of Sicily in 1258 on a false rumor of Conradin's death. Louis refused this invitation on his nephew's behalf. In 1266 the count Charles I of Anjou, called by the new pope Clement IV, defeated and killed Manfred at Benevento, taking possession of southern Italy: envoys from the Ghibelline cities came then to Bavaria and urged Conradin to come and free Italy. Pledging his lands, he crossed the Alps and issued a manifesto at Verona setting forth his claim on Sicily. Official language Latin, French, Italian, and other western languages; Greek and Arabic also widely spoken Capital Jerusalem, later Acre Constitution Various laws, so-called Assizes of Jerusalem The Kingdom of Jerusalem was a Christian kingdom established in the Levant in 1099 by the First Crusade. ... The following is a list of monarchs of Naples and Sicily: See also: List of Counts of Apulia and Calabria Hauteville Counts of Sicily, 1071-1130 Roger I 1071-1101 Simon 1101-1105 Roger II 1105-1130 Hauteville Kings of Sicily, 1130-1198 Roger II 1130-1154 William I 1154... The following is a list of Dukes of Swabia in southwest Germany. ... Events Strasbourg becomes a Free City of the Holy Roman Empire First Visconti become the lord of Iceland swear fealty to the king of Norway, bringing an end to the Icelandic Commonwealth Births Ladislaus IV of Hungary Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona... Guelph has several meanings: Guelph is a city in Ontario, Canada. ... Founded 59 BC as Florentia Region Tuscany Mayor Leonardo Domenici (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  102 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 356,000 almost 500,000 3,453/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Latitude Longitude 43°47 N 11°15 E www. ... The following is a list of monarchs of Naples and Sicily: See also: List of Counts of Apulia and Calabria Hauteville Counts of Sicily, 1071-1130 Roger I 1071-1101 Simon 1101-1105 Roger II 1105-1130 Hauteville Kings of Sicily, 1130-1198 Roger II 1130-1154 William I 1154... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... Charles I (March 1227 - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous son of King Louis VIII of France, created Count of Anjou by his elder brother King Louis IX in 1246, thus founding the second Angevin dynasty. ... Clement IV, né Gui Faucoi le Gros ( Guy Foulques the Fat or Guido le Gros) (Saint-Gilles-du-Gard, November 23, year uncertain – Viterbo, November 29, 1268), was elected pope February 5, 1265, in a conclave held at Perugia that took four months, while cardinals argued over whether to call... The Battle of Benevento was fought in Southern Italy on February 26, 1266, where the invading Angevin forces led by Charles, the Count of Anjou, overcame a combined German-Sicilian force led by Manfred of Sicily. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th century and 13th century. ... The West face of the Petit Dru above the Chamonix valley near the Mer de Glace. ... This page is about the city in Italy; for other uses, see Verona (disambiguation). ...


Notwithstanding the defection of his uncle Louis and of other companions who returned to Germany, the threats of Clement IV, and a lack of funds, his cause seemed to prosper. Proclaiming him King of Sicily, his partisans both in the north and south of Italy took up arms; Rome received his envoy with enthusiasm; and the young king himself received welcomes at Pavia, Pisa and Siena. In September 1267 a Spanish fleet disembarked in the Sicilian city of Sciacca, and most of the island rebelled against the Angevine rule. Only Palermo and Messina remained loyal to Charles. The revolt spread to Calabria and Puglia. In November of the same year the Church excommunicated him; but his fleet won a victory over that of Charles; and in July 1268, Conradin himself entered with immense enthusiasm in Rome. Clement IV, né Gui Faucoi le Gros ( Guy Foulques the Fat or Guido le Gros) (Saint-Gilles-du-Gard, November 23, year uncertain – Viterbo, November 29, 1268), was elected pope February 5, 1265, in a conclave held at Perugia that took four months, while cardinals argued over whether to call... Church San Michele in Pavia The Old Bridge (Ponte Vecchio) on the Ticino river is a symbol of Pavia Pavìa (the ancient Ticinum) (population 71,000) is a town and comune of south-western Lombardy, northern Italy, 35 km south of Milan on the lower Ticino river near its... Pisa is a city in Tuscany, central Italy, on the right bank of the mouth of the river Arno on the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... This page is about Siena, Italy. ... September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with 30 days. ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... Sciacca is a town located on the southern coast of Sicily. ... Anjou is a former county (c. ... Nickname: Palermu Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: http://www. ... Messina, Italy Strait of Messina, Italy. ... Calabria, formerly Brutium, is a region in southern Italy which occupies the toe of the Italian peninsula south of Naples. ... Apulia is a region of Italy (called Puglia in Italian), bordering on Molise to the north-west, Campania to the south-west, Basilicata to the south, the Adriatic Sea to the east and the Ionian Sea to the south-east. ... For other uses, see November (disambiguation). ... Excommunication is a religious censure which is used to deprive or suspend membership in a religious community. ... Charles I (March 1227 - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous son of King Louis VIII of France, created Count of Anjou by his elder brother King Louis IX in 1246, thus founding the second Angevin dynasty. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,823,807 almost 4,000,000 1...


Having strengthened his forces, he marched towards Lucera to join the Saracens troops settled there since the time of his grandfather. On August 23, 1268 his multi-national army of Italian, Spanish, Roman, Arab and German troops encountered the one of Charles at Tagliacozzo, in a hilly area of central Italy. The eagerness of Conradin's soldiers to obtain plunder in the enemy's camp after a momentary victorious assault gave the final victory to the French. Escaping from the field of battle, Conradin reached Rome, but acting on advice to leave the city he proceeded to Astura in an attempt to sail for Sicily: but here he was arrested and handed over to Charles of Anjou, who imprisoned him the Castel dell'Ovo in Naples, together with the inseparable Frederick of Baden. He was tried as a traitor, and on October 29, 1268 he and Frederick were beheaded. Lucera is a town in the Puglia region of Italy. ... The term Saracen comes from Greek sarakenoi. ... August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (236th in leap years), with 130 days remaining. ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,823,807 almost 4,000,000 1... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are a large and heterogenous ethnic group found throughout the Middle East and North Africa, originating in the Arabian Peninsula of southwest Asia. ... The Battle of Tagliacozzo was fought on August 23, 1268 between the French forces of Charles of Anjou and the Sicilians, led by Conradin. ... Torre Astura, formerly an island, is now a peninsula, on the coast of Latium, Italy, 7 M. S.E. of Antium, at the S.E. extremity of the Bay of Antium. ... Sicilian disambiguates here; see also Sicilian language or Sicilian Defence. ... Naples (Italian Napoli, Neapolitan Napule, from Greek Νέα Πόλις - Néa Pólis - meaning New City; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of Campania Region and the Province of Naples. ... Frederick I, Margrave of Baden (1249 - October 29, 1268, margrave from October 4, 1250), the only son of Margrave Herman VI of Baden and of Gertrude of Austria (the niece of Duke Frederick II the Quarrelsome of Austria), grew up at the Bavarian court with his friend Conradin. ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 63 days remaining. ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ...


With Conradin's death at 16, the legitimate Hohenstaufen line became extinct. His remains, with those of Frederick of Baden, lie in the church of the monastery of Santa Maria del Carmine at Naples, founded by his mother for the good of his soul; and here in 1847 Maximilian, crown prince of Bavaria, erected a marble statue by Thorvaldsen to his memory. In the 14th century Codex Manesse, a collection of medieval German lyrics, preserved at Heidelberg, there appear two songs written by Conradin, and his fate has formed the subject of several dramas. The Hohenstaufen were a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ... Naples (Italian Napoli, Neapolitan Napule, from Greek Νέα Πόλις - Néa Pólis - meaning New City; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of Campania Region and the Province of Naples. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... King Maximilian II of Bavaria Maximilian II of Bavaria (November 28, 1811 - March 10, 1864) was king of Bavaria from 1848 until 1864. ... Bertel Thorvaldsen, portrait by Karl Begas, c. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Folio 371r shows Johannes Hadlaub Folio 149v shows a portrait of Wolfram von Eschenbach The Manesse Codex or Grosse Heidelberger Liederhandschrift (Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg Library, Cod. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Heidelberg (halfway between Stuttgart and Frankfurt) is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ...


His hereditary kingdom of Jerusalem passed to the heirs of his great-great-grandmother Isabella I of Jerusalem, among whom a succession dispute arose. The senior heir in primogeniture was Hugh of Brienne, a second cousin of Conradin's father, but another second cousin Hugh III of Cyprus already held the office of regent and managed to keep the kingdom as Hugh I of Jerusalem. Conradin's grandmother's first cousin Mary of Antioch also staked her claim on basis of proximity of blood, which she later sold to Conradin's executioner Charles of Anjou. Isabella of Jerusalem (c. ... Hugh, Count of Brienne (b c 1240. ... Hugh III of Cyprus, Hugh I of Jerusalem, Hugh of Antioch or Hugh of Lusignan (died March 24, 1284), King of Cyprus 1267–1284 and King of Jerusalem 1268–1284, was the son of Henry of Antioch and Isabella of Cyprus, the daughter of Hugh I of Cyprus. ... Maria of Antioch pretended to the throne of Jerusalem from 1269 to 1277. ... Proximity or closeness in degree of kinship is one of the ways to determine succession based on genealogy. ...


The Kingdom of Sicily passed for the time being to Charles of Anjou, but the Sicilian Vespers in 1268 resulted in dual claims on the Kingdom; the Aragonese heirs of Manfred retaining the island of Sicily and the Angevin party retaining the southern part of Italy, popularly called the Kingdom of Naples. The Sicilian Vespers is the name given to a rebellion in Sicily, in 1282 against the rule of the Angevin king Charles I, who had taken control of the island with Papal support in 1266. ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... Sicilian disambiguates here; see also Sicilian language or Sicilian Defence. ... Angevin is the name applied to three distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Hungary and Poland (see Angevin Empire). ... The following is a list of monarchs of Naples and Sicily: See also: List of Counts of Apulia and Calabria Hauteville Counts of Sicily, 1071-1130 Roger I 1071-1101 Simon 1101-1105 Roger II 1105-1130 Hauteville Kings of Sicily, 1130-1198 Roger II 1130-1154 William I 1154...

Preceded by:
Conrad IV of Germany
as Conrad I of Sicily
Conrad II of Jerusalem
Conrad III of Swabia
King of Sicily
1254–1268 (1258)
Succeeded by:
Manfred or Charles I
King of Jerusalem
1254–1268
Succeeded by:
Hugh I
Duke of Swabia
1254–1268
Succeeded by:
none, dispersed
between local counts

Conrad IV, Conrad of Hohenstaufen (April 25, 1228 Andria, Italy – May 21, 1254, Lavello), was king of Jerusalem (as Conrad II) 1228–1254, of Germany 1237–1254, and of Sicily (as Conrad I) 1250–1254. ... The following is a list of monarchs of Naples and Sicily: See also: List of Counts of Apulia and Calabria Hauteville Counts of Sicily, 1071-1130 Roger I 1071-1101 Simon 1101-1105 Roger II 1105-1130 Hauteville Kings of Sicily, 1130-1198 Roger II 1130-1154 William I 1154... Manfred (c. ... Charles I (March 1227 (or 1226) - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous (or born ten months before fathers death: sources suggest two possible birth years) son of King Louis VIII of France by Blanche of Castile. ... This is a list of Kings of Jerusalem, from 1099 to 1291, as well as claimants to the title up to the present day. ... Hugh III of Cyprus, Hugh I of Jerusalem, Hugh of Antioch or Hugh of Lusignan (died March 24, 1284), King of Cyprus 1267–1284 and King of Jerusalem 1268–1284, was the son of Henry of Antioch and Isabella of Cyprus, the daughter of Hugh I of Cyprus. ... The following is a list of Dukes of Swabia, including the several holders of the title who were also Holy Roman Emperors. ...

References

  • F. W. Schirrmacher, Die letzten Hohenstaufen (Göttingen, 1871)
  • K. Hampe, Geschichte Konradins von Hohenstaufen (Berlin, 1893)
  • del Giudice, Il Giudizio e la condanna di Corradino (Naples, 1876)
  • G. Cattaneo, Federico II di Svevia (Rome, 1992)
  • E. Miller, Konradin von Hohenstaufen (Berlin, 1897)

This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, a publication in the public domain. This article incorporates text from the public domain 1907 edition of The Nuttall Encyclopaedia. Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910-1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Nuttall Encyclopaedia is an early 20th century encyclopedia, edited by Rev. ...


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Portrait of Conradin from the Codex Manesse (Folio 7r).
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