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Encyclopedia > Conrad Weiser
Conrad Weiser

Born November 2, 1696(1696-11-02)
Herrenberg, Württemberg
Died July 13, 1760 (aged 63)
Womelsdorf, Pennsylvania
Occupation Pennsylvania's interpreter and emissary to the Native Americans
Religion Lutheran
Spouse Anna Eve Feck
Signature

Johann Conrad Weiser (November 2, 1696July 13, 1760) was a German Pennsylvanian pioneer, farmer, monk, tanner, judge, and soldier. His most significant contributions, however, were as an interpreter and emissary in councils between Native Americans and the colonies, especially Pennsylvania. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 1696 had the earliest equinoxes and solstices for 400 years in the Gregorian calendar, because this year is a leap year and the Gregorian calendar would have behaved like the Julian calendar since March 1500 had it have been in use that long. ... The German article for Herrenberg is located here Herrenberg is a town in the middle of the federal state of Baden-Württemberg, about 30km south of Stuttgart and 20km from Tübingen. ... Arms of the Kingdom of Württemberg The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Wuerttemberg. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Womelsdorf, named after John Womelsdorff (with one F removed), is a borough in Berks County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Interpreter can mean one of the following: In communication, an interpreter is a person whose role is to facilitate dialogue between two parties that do not use the same language. ... Emissary was the first episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 1696 had the earliest equinoxes and solstices for 400 years in the Gregorian calendar, because this year is a leap year and the Gregorian calendar would have behaved like the Julian calendar since March 1500 had it have been in use that long. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...

Contents

Early years

He was born in 1696 in the small village of Affstätt in Herrenberg, in the Duchy of Württemberg (now part of Germany), where his father (also John Conrad Weiser), as a member of the Württemberg Blue Dragoons, was stationed. Soon after Conrad's birth, his father received a discharge from the Blue Dragoons and moved back to the family ancestral home of Gross Aspach. Fever claimed the life of his mother, Anna Magdalena, in 1709 after war, pestilence, and an unusually cold and long winter, ravaged the lands. Wallace notes that Conrad Weiser (senior) wrote for his children, "Buried beside Her Ancestors, she was a god-fearing woman and much loved by Her neighbors. Her motto was Jesus I live for thee, I die for thee, thine am I in life and death." The year 1696 had the earliest equinoxes and solstices for 400 years in the Gregorian calendar, because this year is a leap year and the Gregorian calendar would have behaved like the Julian calendar since March 1500 had it have been in use that long. ... The German article for Herrenberg is located here Herrenberg is a town in the middle of the federal state of Baden-Württemberg, about 30km south of Stuttgart and 20km from Tübingen. ... A duchy is a territory, fief, or domain ruled by a duke or duchess. ... Arms of the Kingdom of Württemberg The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Wuerttemberg. ... Arms of the Kingdom of Württemberg The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Wuerttemberg. ...


His family moved to the frontier town of Schochary, New York, by 1710 at the expense of Queen Anne. There the German immigrants were placed into indentured servitude, as per a signed agreement, to burn tar to pay for the journey. “NY” redirects here. ... // Events April 10 - The worlds first copyright legislation became effective, Britains Statute of Anne Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713) Births January 3 - Richard Gridley, American Revolutionary soldier (d. ...


When he was only 16, his father agreed to a chief's proposal for him to live with the Mohawks in the upper Schoharie Valley. During his stay with them in the winter and spring of 1712-1713, Weiser endured hardships of cold, hunger and homesickness, but he learned a great deal about the Mohawk language and the customs of the Iroquois. Conrad Weiser returned to his own people towards the end of July 1713. This article is about the people known as Mohawk. For other uses, see Mohawk. ... Mohawk is a Native American language spoken by the Mohawk nation in the United States and Canada. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ...


On November 22, 1720, at the age of 24, he married a young German girl, Anna Eve Feck (Faeg). In 1723 the couple followed the Susquehanna River south and settled their young family on a farm in Tulpehocken near present-day Reading, Pennsylvania. The couple had fourteen children, but only seven reached adulthood. is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 6 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings February 11 - Sweden and Prussia sign the (2nd Treaty of Stockholm) declaring peace. ... Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general (d. ... The Susquehanna River (originally Sasquesahanough per the 1612 John Smith map) is a river located in the northeastern United States. ... , Reading (IPA:) is the county seat of Berks County, Pennsylvania and the center of the Greater Reading Area. ...


Service

Weiser's colonial service began in 1731. The Iroquois sent Chief Shikellamy, an Oneida chief, as an emissary to other tribes and the British. Shikellamy lived on the Susquehanna River at Shamokin village, near present-day Sunbury, Pennsylvania. An oral tradition holds that Weiser met Shikellamy while hunting. In any case, the two became friends. When Shikellamy traveled to Philadelphia for a council with the province of Pennsylvania, he brought Weiser with him. The Iroquois trusted him and considered him an adopted son of the Mohawks. Weiser impressed the Pennsylvania governor and council, which thereafter relied heavily on his services. Weiser also interpreted in a follow-up council in Philadelphia in August, 1732. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (350x682, 46 KB) From the Weiser Family Association website http://www. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... Shikellamy (?- December 6, 1748), also known as Swatana, was an Oneida chief and overseer for the Iroquois confederacy. ... For other uses, see Onondaga. ... The Susquehanna River (originally Sasquesahanough per the 1612 John Smith map) is a river located in the northeastern United States. ... Shamokin was a multi-ethnic Native American trading village on the Susquehanna River, located near the site of the modern Sunbury, Pennsylvania. ... Map of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania highlighting Sunbury Sunbury is a city in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the people known as Mohawk. For other uses, see Mohawk. ...


During the treaty in Philadelphia of 1736, Shikellamy, Weiser and the Pennsylvanians negotiated a deed whereby the Iroquois sold the land drained by the Delaware River and south of the Blue Mountains. Since the Iroquois had never until then laid claim to this land, this purchase represented a significant swing in Pennsylvanian policy toward the Native Americans. William Penn had never taken sides in disputes between tribes, but by this purchase, the Pennsylvanians were favoring the Iroquois over the Lenape/Delawares. Along with the Walking Purchase of the following year, his treaty exacerbated Pennsylvania-Lenape relations. The results of this policy shift would help induce the Lenapes to side with the French during the French and Indian Wars, which would result in many colonial deaths. It did, however, help induce the Iroquois to continue to side with the British over the French. This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... For other uses, see William Penn (disambiguation). ... The Walking Purchase is the name given to an agreement in 1737 between the Penn family, the proprietors of Pennsylvania and the Lenape-Delaware tribe of Native American Indians. ... For the language, see Lenape language. ... The French and Indian Wars is a name used in the United States for a series of conflicts in North America that represented the actions there that accompanied the European dynastic wars. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ...


During the winter of 1737, Weiser attempted to broker a peace between southern tribes and the Iroquois. Having survived high snow, freezing temperatures and starvation rations during the six-week journey to the Iroquois capital of Onondago, he managed to convince the Iroquois not to send any war parties in the spring, but he failed to convince them to send emissaries to parlay with the southern tribes. Impressed with his fortitude in the pursuit of peace, the Iroquois named Weiser "Tarachiawagon", or "Holder of the Heavens." Spill-over violence from a war between the Iroquois and southern tribes such as the Catawba would have drawn first Virginia, and then Pennsylvania, into conflict with the Iroquois. Therefore this peace-brokering had a profound effect on Native American/colonial relations. For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Onondaga. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... Pre-contact distribution of the Catawba The Catawba (also known as Issa or Esaw) are a tribe of Native Americans, once considered one of the most powerful eastern Siouan tribes, that traditionally lived in the Southeast United States, along the border between North and South Carolina. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...


In 1742, he interpreted at a treaty with the Iroquois at Philadelphia, at which time they were paid for the land purchased in 1736. During this council, the Onondaga chief Canasatego castigated the Lenape/Delawares for engaging in land sales, and ordered them to remove their settlements to either Wyoming or Shamokin village. This accelerated the Lenape migration to the Ohio valley, which had begun as early as the 1720s. There, they would be positioned to trade with the French, and launch raids as far east as the Susquehanna River during the French and Indian Wars. // Events January 24 - Charles VII Albert becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Onondaga. ... For the language, see Lenape language. ... Shamokin was a multi-ethnic Native American trading village on the Susquehanna River, located near the site of the modern Sunbury, Pennsylvania. ... For the language, see Lenape language. ... The Susquehanna River (originally Sasquesahanough per the 1612 John Smith map) is a river located in the northeastern United States. ... The French and Indian Wars is a name used in the United States for a series of conflicts in North America that represented the actions there that accompanied the European dynastic wars. ...


In 1744, Weiser acted as the interpreter for the Treaty of Lancaster, between representatives of the Iroquois and the colonies of Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia. During the final day of the treaty, on 1744-07-04, Canasatego, the Onondaga chief, spoke of the Iroquois concepts of political unity: // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Onondaga. ...


"Our wise forefathers established Union and Amity between the Five Nations. This has made us formidable; this has given us great Weight and Authority with our neighboring Nations. We are a powerful Confederacy; and by your observing the same methods, our wise forefathers have taken, you will acquire such Strength and power. Therefore whatever befalls you, never fall out with one another."


Benjamin Franklin printed this speech, which influenced American concepts of political unity. Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ...


Significantly, after the Treaty of Lancaster, both Virginia and Pennsylvania acted as if the Iroquois had sold them the rights to the Ohio Valley, but the Iroquois did not believe they had done so. This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ...


In 1748, Pennsylvania sent Conrad Weiser to Logstown, a council and trade village on the Ohio. Here he held council with chiefs representing 10 tribes, including Delawares and Shawnees, and the Iroquois. He arrived at a treaty of friendship between Pennsylvania and these tribes. Threatened by this development and the continued activity of British traders in the Ohio valley, the French redoubled their diplomatic efforts and began to build a string of forts, culminating in Fort Duquesne at present-day Pittsburgh, in 1754. The village of Logstown (also Loggs Town) was a significant Native American settlement in Western Pennsylvania in the years leading to the French and Indian War. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... The Lenape or Lenni-Lenape (later named Delaware Indians by Europeans) were, in the 1600s, loosely organized bands of Native American people practicing small-scale agriculture to augment a largely mobile hunter-gatherer society in the region around the Delaware River, the lower Hudson River, and western Long Island Sound. ... Shawnee The Shawnee are a people native to North America. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... 19th century illustration of Fort Duquesne, by Alfred Waud. ... “Pittsburgh” redirects here. ...


In 1750, he traveled again to Onondaga, he found the political dynamics in the Six Nations had shifted. Canasatego, always pro-British, had died. Several Iroquois tribes were leaning toward the French, although the Mohawks remained pro-British. Onondaga is the name of some places in North America: Onondaga, Michigan Onondaga, New York Onondaga, Ontario Onondaga County, New York Onondaga Lake Onondaga Reservation, New York Onondaga Township, Michigan Other meanings: Onondaga Native American Iroquois First Nations group Onandaga Cave State Park in Leasburg, Missouri Onondaga Camp Minden,Ontario... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... This article is about the people known as Mohawk. For other uses, see Mohawk. ...


Early in the summer of 1754, on the eve of the French and Indian War, Weiser was a member of a Pennsylvania delegation to Albany. London had invoked the meeting, hoping to win assurances of Iroquois support in the looming war with the French. Present were representatives of the Iroquois and seven colonies. Because of divisions within both the British and Native American ranks, the council did not result in the treaty of support that the crown desired. Instead, each colony made the best deal it could with individual Iroquois leaders. Conrad Weiser was able to negotiate one of the more successful, in which some lower-level chiefs deeded to the colony most of the land remaining in present-day Pennsylvania, including the southerwestern part, still claimed by Virginia. Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,400 killed, wounded or captured The French and... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ...

Signature of Conrad Weiser.
Signature of Conrad Weiser.

In 1756, Weiser was appointed along with Ben Franklin to construct a series of forts between the Delaware River and the Susquehana River. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Portrait of Benjamin Franklin Dr. Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706–April 17, 1790) was an American journalist, publisher, author, philanthropist, abolitionist, public servant, scientist, librarian, diplomat, and inventor. ...


In the fall of 1758, Weiser attended a council at Easton, Pennsylvania. Representation included leaders from Pennsylvania, the Iroquois and other Native American tribes. Weiser helped smooth over the tense meeting. With the Treaty of Easton, the tribes in the Ohio Valley agreed to abandon the French. This collapse of Native American support was a factor in the French decision to demolish Fort Duquesne and withdraw from the Forks of the Ohio. Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Northampton Government  - Mayor Philip B. Mitman Area  - City  4. ... The Treaty of Easton was an colonial agreement in North America signed in October 1758 between the colonial British colonial government of the Province of Pennsylvania and the Native American tribes in the Ohio Country, including the Shawnee and Lenape. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... 19th century illustration of Fort Duquesne, by Alfred Waud. ...


Throughout this decades-long career, Weiser's knowledge of Native American languages and culture made him a key player in treaty negotiations, land purchases, and the formulation of Pennsylvania's policies towards Native Americans. Because of his early experiences with the Iroquois, Weiser was inclined to be sympathetic to their interpretation of events, as opposed to the Lenape, or Delaware or the Shawnees. This may have exacerbated Pennsylvanian-Lenape/Shawnee relations, with bloody consequences in the French and Indian Wars. Nevertheless, for many years, he helped to keep the powerful Iroquois, or Six Nations, allied with the British as opposed to the French. This important service contributed to the continued survival of the British colonies and the eventual victory of the British over the French in the French and Indian Wars. This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... For the language, see Lenape language. ... Shawnee The Shawnee are a people native to North America. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... For the language, see Lenape language. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... The French and Indian Wars is a name used in the United States for a series of conflicts in North America that represented the actions there that accompanied the European dynastic wars. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... The term Six Nations can refer to: The six nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, a union of Native American/First Nations tribes. ... The French and Indian Wars is a name used in the United States for a series of conflicts in North America that represented the actions there that accompanied the European dynastic wars. ...


Other careers

Between 1734 and 1741, Weiser became a follower of Conrad Beissel, a German Seventh Day Baptist preacher. For six years, he lived at the monastic settlement, Ephrata Cloister, in the Ephrata Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. His wife lived there only a few months before returning to their farm. Weiser would visit her frequently enough, however, to father four more children. In addition, he took leaves of absence for diplomatic duties, such as those in 1736 and 1737. Johann Conrad Beissel (April, 1690 - July 6, 1768) was the German-born religious leader who in 1732 founded the Ephrata Community in Pennsylvania. ... The Ephrata Cloister or Ephrata Community was a religious community established in 1732 by Johann Conrad Beissel at Ephrata, in what is now Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. ... Ephrata Township is a township located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. ... Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, known as the Garden Spot of America since the 18th century, is located in the southeastern part of the state of Pennsylvania, in the United States. ...


In addition, he followed a mixed career as a farmer, land owner and speculator, tanner, and merchant. He created the plan for the town of Reading in 1748, was a key figure in the creation of Berks County in 1752 and served as its chief judge until 1760. Conrad was also teacher and a lay minister of the Lutheran Church, and founded Trinity Church in Reading. Events April 24 - A congress assembles at Aix-la-Chapelle with the intent to conclude the struggle known as the War of Austrian Succession - at October 18 - The Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle is signed to end the war Adam Smith begins to deliver public lectures in Edinburgh Building of... Berks County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1756, during the French and Indian War, the Lenape began with raids into central Pennsylvania. As Pennsylvania organized a militia, Conrad was made a Lt. Colonel. Working with Benjamin Franklin, he planned and established a series of forts between the Delaware and Susquehanna Rivers. When General Forbes evicted the French from Fort Duquesne in 1758, the threat subsided. 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,400 killed, wounded or captured The French and... For the language, see Lenape language. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... For the Delaware River in Kansas, see Delaware River (Kansas) The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ... The Susquehanna River (originally Sasquesahanough per the 1612 John Smith map) is a river located in the northeastern United States. ... John Forbes (5 September 1707 – March 11, 1759) was a British general in the French and Indian War. ... 19th century illustration of Fort Duquesne, by Alfred Waud. ... Year 1758 (MDCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Death and Legacy

Weiser died on his farm on July 13, 1760. Upon his death, one Iroquois Indian noted to a group of colonists, "We are at a great loss and sit in darkness...as since his death we cannot so well understand one another." Indeed, shortly after Conrad Weiser's death, relations between the Colonists and the Native Americans began a rapid decline. is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...


His will bequeathed about 4,000 acres (16 km²) and part of his farm to Berks County. The Olmsted Brothers landscaped this park in 1928; it remains a State Park today. The original Conrad Weiser Homestead in western Berks County is being restored with help from the state of Pennsylvania. Frederick Law Olmsted (April 26, 1822 – August 28, 1903) was a United States landscape architect, famous for designing many well-known urban parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Conrad and Anna's daughter Maria married Henry Muhlenberg. Two of their grandsons had important roles in gaining independence for the United States. Peter Muhlenberg served as a Major General in the Continental Army and Frederick Muhlenberg was the first Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. Henry Melchior Muhlenberg (September 6, 1711, Einbeck, Germany – October 7, 1787) Trappe, Pennsylvania, originally Heinrich Melchior Mühlenberg, was a Lutheran clergyman who is viewed as the founder of the Lutheran Church in the United States. ... Peter Muhlenberg Statue John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg (October 1, 1746 - October 1, 1807) was a Clergyman, a Major General of the Continental Army, and a United States Senator and Congressman from Pennsylvania. ... Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg (January 1, 1750 – June 4, 1801), was an American minister and politician who was the first Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ...


His great-grandson, Peter M. Weiser (born 1781), was a member of the Corps of Discovery on the Lewis and Clark Expedition in 1804-1806. Peter M. Weiser (October 3, 1781 - c. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... “Lewis and Clark” redirects here. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Undoubtedly, however, Weiser's weightiest contribution to history was his service as an emissary between the British colonies and the Native Americans, especially the Iroquois. This service had direct and powerful influence over the histories of the French and British empires, the Native American peoples and the United States. This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ...


Places named for Conrad Weiser

  • "Camp Conrad Weiser" [1] is a 500 acre YMCA overnight camp in Berks County. Founded in 1948, it serves boys and girls aged six to sixteen.

An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ... Map of Berks County, Pennsylvania Public School Districts: Conrad Weiser Area School District is in pink in the western part of the county. ... South Heidelberg Township is a township located in Berks County, Pennsylvania. ... Heidelberg Township is a township located in Berks County, Pennsylvania. ... North Heidelberg Township is a township located in Berks County, Pennsylvania. ... Marion Township is a township located in Berks County, Pennsylvania. ... Wernersville is a borough in Berks County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Robesonia is a borough located in Berks County, Pennsylvania. ... Womelsdorf, named after John Womelsdorff (with one F removed), is a borough in Berks County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Weiser State Forest is a Pennsylvania State Forest in Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry District #18. ... Carbon County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... Columbia County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... Dauphin County is a county located in the state of Pennsylvania and is one of four counties comprising the greater Harrisburg metropolitan area. ... Northumberland County is a county located in the state of Pennsylvania. ... Schuylkill County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania on the Schuylkill River. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Conrad Weiser Homestead

Weiser's home in Womelsdorf is preserved as the Conrad Weiser Homestead, administered by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. The homestead is on Pennsylvania Route 422 in Berks County and contains original and historic buildings on a 26 acres (0.11 km²) site designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. Womelsdorf, named after John Womelsdorff (with one F removed), is a borough in Berks County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Conrad Weiser Homestead is a designated National Historic Landmark that is administered by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission near Womelsdorf, Berks County, Pennsylvania in the United States. ... The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) owns, operates and maintains numerous historical and cultural sites located throughout Pennsylvania. ... Berks County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... Frederick Law Olmsted (April 26, 1822 – August 28, 1903) was a United States landscape architect, famous for designing many well-known urban parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City. ...


Further reading

  • Wallace, Paul A. W. Conrad Weiser, 1696-1760, Friend of Colonist and Mohawk. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1945. Reprinted Wennawoods, 2001, ISBN 1-889037-06-0.
  • Walton, Joseph S. Conrad Weiser & the Indian Policy of Colonial Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: George W. Jacobs & Co., 1900. Reprinted New York: Arno Press, 1971, ISBN 0-405028-95-4.
  • Weiser, J. Conrad Early Western Journals, 1748-1765. 1904. Reprinted Wendawoods, 1998, ISBN 1-889037-12-5.
  • Weiser, C. Z. The life of (John) Conrad Weiser, the German pioneer, patriot, and patron of two races. Reading: D. Miller, 1899. Reprinted Whitefish: Kessinger Publishing, 2004, ISBN 1-417967-74-9

External links

  • "Conrad Weiser Homestead: Finding a Light Into the Forest", Philip E. Pendelton, Pennsylvania Heritage Magazine, Volume XXII, Number 3 - Summer 1996, etext available at The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission site.
  • Berks County site on Conrad Weiser
  • Conrad Weiser Area School District
  • The Homestead Park
  • The Ephrata Cloister site
  • Weiser in the Pennsylvania Archives
  • Transcript of the Last Day of the Lancaster Treaty Council
  • "Conrad Weiser and the Indian Policy of Colonial Pennsylvania," Joseph S. Walton, 1900. Text available at Historic Pittsburgh site. Weiser's importance in colonial relations with the Iroquois, pg. 13. The effect of the 1736 treaties, pgs. 27-29. His pro-Iroquois inclination, pg. 56.
Persondata
NAME Weiser, Conrad
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Weiser, John Conrad
SHORT DESCRIPTION Pennsylvania's interpreter and emissary to the Native Americans
DATE OF BIRTH November 2, 1696
PLACE OF BIRTH Herrenberg, Württemberg
DATE OF DEATH July 13, 1760
PLACE OF DEATH Wolmelsdorf, Pennsylvania

  Results from FactBites:
 
Conrad Weiser (343 words)
Conrad Weiser (1696-1760) was a German pioneer who flourished in Pennsylvania during the eighteenth century.
He was born to Johann Conrad Weiser in the German state of Württemberg on November 2, 1696.
Conrad and Anna's daughter Maria was married to Henry Muhlenberg, and two of their grandsons had important roles in gaining independence for the United States.
Conrad Weiser Biography (691 words)
Conrad Weiser was born November 2, 1696, in the German principality of Wurttemberg.
The Weiser family settled on the New York frontier and in the winter and spring of 1712-1713, young Conrad resided with neighboring Mohawks to learn the language of the Iroquois and serve as a go-between for the German community.
Movements to honor Weiser's considerable accomplishments culminated in the establishment of the Conrad Weiser Memorial Park by the Conrad Weiser Memorial Park Association in 1928.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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