FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Connie Mack (baseball)
Connie Mack baseball card, 1910
Connie Mack baseball card, 1910

Cornelius Alexander Mack (December 22, 1862February 8, 1956), born Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy, was an American professional baseball player, manager, and team owner. Widely considered one of the greatest managers in Major League Baseball history, he holds records for wins, losses, and games managed. Besides his five World Series wins and nine American League pennants, Mack's teams also finished last 17 times. Download high resolution version (365x640, 70 KB)Connie Mack baseball card, Nadja Caramel Company, 1910. ... Download high resolution version (365x640, 70 KB)Connie Mack baseball card, Nadja Caramel Company, 1910. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium II in St. ... In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager (or more formally, the field manager); this individual controls matters of team strategy on the field and team leadership. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in the world. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... A pennant is usually a narrow tapering flag most commonly flown by ships at sea. ...


Born in East Brookfield, Massachusetts to Irish immigrants, Mack was a journeyman catcher who played 11 seasons in the National League beginning in 1886, the last three as a player-manager with the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1894 to 1896. In 1901, he became manager, general manager and part owner of the fledgling American League's Philadelphia Athletics. When New York Giants manager John McGraw called the Athletics "a white elephant nobody wanted," Mack adopted a white elephant as the team's logo, which the Athletics have used for all but a few years since. However, he also cut a distinctive figure himself with his personal rejection of wearing a team uniform in favour of a business suit, tie and fedora. East Brookfield is a town located in Worcester County, Massachusetts. ... The position of the catcher Catcher is also a general term for a fielder who catches the ball in cricket. ... This article refers to the American baseball league. ... 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... Major league affiliations National League (1887-present) Central Division (1994-present) East Division (1969-1993) American Association (1882-1886) Major league titles World Series titles (5) 1979 â€¢ 1971 â€¢ 1960 â€¢ 1925 1909 NL Pennants (9) 1979 â€¢ 1971 â€¢ 1960 â€¢ 1927 1925 â€¢ 1909 â€¢ 1903 â€¢ 1902 1901 Central Division titles (0) None East Division... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901-present) West Division (1969-present) Major league titles World Series titles (9) 1989 â€¢ 1974 â€¢ 1973 â€¢ 1972 1930 â€¢ 1929 â€¢ 1913 â€¢ 1911 1910 AL Pennants (15) 1990 â€¢ 1989 â€¢ 1988 â€¢ 1974 1973 â€¢ 1972 â€¢ 1931 â€¢ 1930 1929 â€¢ 1914 â€¢ 1913 â€¢ 1911 1910 â€¢ 1905 â€¢ 1902 West Division titles (13) [1... Major league affiliations National League (1883-present) West Division (1969-present) Major league titles World Series titles (5) 1954 â€¢ 1933 â€¢ 1922 â€¢ 1921 1905  NL Pennants (20) 2002 â€¢ 1989 â€¢ 1962 â€¢ 1954 1951 â€¢ 1937 â€¢ 1936 â€¢ 1933 1924 â€¢ 1923 â€¢ 1922 â€¢ 1921 1917 â€¢ 1913 â€¢ 1912 â€¢ 1911 1905 â€¢ 1904 â€¢ 1889 â€¢ 1888 West Division titles (6... John McGraw on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ... A white elephant is a valuable possession whose upkeep is excessively expensive, and may be useless apart from its value to the gifter and giftee. ... A suit, also known as a business suit, comprises a collection of matching clothing consisting of: a coat (commonly known as a jacket) a waistcoat (optional) (USA vest) a pair of trousers (USA pants) Though not part of a suit, a shirt and tie very frequently accompany it. ... Fedora can mean: Fédora, a play by Victorien Sardou Fedora (hat), a hat named after the play Fedora (Giordano), an opera from 1898 by Umberto Giordano Fedora (movie), a 1978 movie Fedora Core, a Linux distribution spun off from Red Hat Linux and produced by the Fedora Project Fedora...


He later became a full partner with Athletics owner Ben Shibe. Under an agreement with Shibe, Mack had full control over baseball matters while Shibe handled the business side. When Shibe died in 1922, his sons took over management of the business side. When the last of Shibe's sons died in 1936, Mack became the full owner. Benjamin F. Shibe (1838 - January 14, 1922) was an American executive in Major League Baseball who was half-owner of the Philadelphia Athletics. ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

This person is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.
This person is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

On the field, Mack was quiet, even-tempered and gentlemanly, serving as a father figure to his players as much as a coach, and was universally addressed as "Mr. Mack". He always called his players by their given names. Chief Bender, for instance, was "Albert" to Mack. Veteran players welcomed the opportunity to play for Mack. The 1927 Athletics, though nowhere near as famous as the New York Yankees team of the same year, was probably one of the best second-place teams in history, featuring several future Hall of Fame players including veterans Ty Cobb, Zack Wheat and Eddie Collins as well as players such as Lefty Grove, Al Simmons and Mickey Cochrane in their prime and rookie Jimmie Foxx. Once, when he visited the mound to remove the notoriously hot-tempered pitcher Grove from a game, Grove said, "Go take a [expletive]", when Mack held out his hand for the ball. Mack looked Grove straight in the eye and calmly said, "You go take a [expletive], Robert." Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 915 KB) Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY, Feb. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 915 KB) Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY, Feb. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display... Bender in 1911 Charles Albert Chief Bender (May 5, 1884 - May 22, 1954) was one of the great pitchers in major league baseball in the first two decades of the 20th century, and is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901-present) East Division (1969-present) Major league titles World Series titles (26) 2000 â€¢ 1999 â€¢ 1998 â€¢ 1996 1978 â€¢ 1977 â€¢ 1962 â€¢ 1961 1958 â€¢ 1956 â€¢ 1953 â€¢ 1952 1951 â€¢ 1950 â€¢ 1949 â€¢ 1947 1943 â€¢ 1941 â€¢ 1939 â€¢ 1938 1937 â€¢ 1936 â€¢ 1932 â€¢ 1928 1927 â€¢ 1923 AL Pennants (39) 2003 â€¢ 2001 â€¢ 2000... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed the Georgia Peach, was an American baseball player generally considered to be the greatest player of the dead ball era (1900 – 1920). ... Zachary Davis Wheat (May 23, 1888 - March 11, 1972) was a left-handed Major League Baseball outfielder. ... Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. ... Robert Moses (Lefty) Grove (March 6, 1900 - May 22, 1975) was one of the greatest pitchers in Major League Baseball history. ... Aloysius Harry Simmons (May 22, 1902 - May 26, 1956), born Aloysius Szymanski in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was an American player in Major League Baseball over three decades. ... Gordon Stanley Mickey Cochrane (April 6, 1903-June 28, 1962) was a Scottish-American catcher and manager in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers. ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play...


Mack was also tight-fisted. Seeing baseball as a business, he once confided that it was more profitable to have a team get off to a hot start, then ultimately finish fourth. "A team like that will draw well enough during the first part of the season to show a profit for the year, and you don't have to give the players raises when they don't win," he said. The most famous example of Mack's tight-fistedness came on July 10, 1932, when the Athletics played a one-game series with the Cleveland Indians. To save train fare, Mack only brought two pitchers. The starting pitcher was knocked out of the game in the first inning, leaving only knuckleballing relief pitcher Eddie Rommel. Rommel pitched 17 innings and gave up 33 hits, but won the game, 18-17. July 10 is the 191st day (192nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 174 days remaining. ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901-present) Central Division (1994-present) East Division (1969-1993) Major league titles World Series titles (2) 1948 â€¢ 1920 AL Pennants (5) 1997 â€¢ 1995 â€¢ 1954 â€¢ 1948 1920 Central Division titles (6) [1] 2001 â€¢ 1999 â€¢ 1998 â€¢ 1997 1996 â€¢ 1995 Wild card berths (0) None [1] - In... A knuckleball (or knuckler for short) is a baseball pitch thrown so as to minimize the spin of the ball in flight. ... Edwin Americus Rommel (September 13, 1897 _ August 26, 1970) was an American right_handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Athletics from 1920 to 1932 who went on to have a successful second career as a major league umpire. ...


Mack also had his generous side for players in need. For instance, he kept Bender on the team payroll as a scout, minor league manager or coach from 1926 until Mack himself retired as owner-manager in 1950. Simmons was a coach for many years after his retirement as a player. 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Mack managed the Athletics through the 1950 season, when he retired at age 88. His 50-year tenure as Athletics manager is the most ever for a coach or manager in North American professional sports with just one team and has never been seriously threatened. He remained owner and president (though his sons took an increasing role during this time) until the Athletics moved to Kansas City, Missouri after the 1954 season. 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Fountains or Heart of America Location Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Through his unequalled 53 seasons as a manager, he won nine pennants, appeared in eight World Series and won five of them. He built two dynasties: from 1910-1914 (which featured Mack's famous "$100,000 infield" of Collins, Home Run Baker, Jack Barry and Stuffy McInnis); and again from 1929-1931 (which featured Hall of Famers Grove, Cochrane, Foxx and Simmons). His 1911 and 1929 teams are considered by many to be among the greatest baseball teams of all time, and his 3,776 lifetime wins are a major league record—as are his 4,025 losses and 7,878 games managed. For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Frank Home Run Baker (March 13, 1886 - June 28, 1963) was an American baseball player who played Major League Baseball from 1908 to 1922. ... John Joseph Jack Barry (April 26, 1887 - April 23, 1961) was an American shortstop, second baseman, and manager in Major League Baseball, and later a renowned college baseball coach. ... John Phalen (Stuffy) McInnis (September 19, 1890 - February 16, 1960) was a first baseman and manager in Major League Baseball. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Mack twice dismantled his dynasties. He broke up his first great team out of outrage when some of his star players started signing lucrative contracts with upstart Federal League teams. They reportedly "laid down" during the 1914 World Series, in which the heavily favored A's were swept by the Boston Braves, a team that had surged from last place on the Fourth of July to the National League pennant. Mack sold, traded or released most of the stars who didn't jump (Collins being one of the notable exceptions). The collapse was swift and total; the team crashed from 99 wins in 1914 to 43 wins in 1915 and last place. His 1916 team, with a 36-117 record, is often considered the worst team in American League history, and its .235 winning percentage is still the lowest ever for a modern (post-1900) big-league team. All told, the A's finished last seven years in a row from 1915 to 1921, and did not contend again until 1925. The Federal League was an attempt to establish a third major league in baseball in the United States. ... In the 1914 World Series, the Boston Braves beat the Philadelphia Athletics in 4 games. ... The Atlanta Braves are a Major League Baseball team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... These fireworks over the Washington Monument are typical of Fourth of July celebrations In the United States, Independence Day, also called the Fourth of July, is a federal holiday celebrating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. ... This article refers to the American baseball league. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


He broke up his second great team due to financial difficulties due to the Great Depression. He had every intention of building another winner, but he never invested any money in a farm system. While the Athletics finished second in 1932 and third in 1933, they fell into the cellar in 1935 and finished either last or next-to-last all but once through 1946. Aside from 1948 and 1949, Mack's teams were never again a factor past June. The Great Depression was known as a worldwide economic downturn, starting in 1929 and lasting through most of the 1930s. ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ...


Mack was also known by the nickname "The Tall Tactician" and, in his later years, the "Grand Old Man of Baseball."


Mack was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1937 as a charter member. See previous election: 1936 and next election: 1938 The 1937 process of selecting inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame was markedly different from the initial elections the previous year. ...


Mack's son Earle Mack played several games for the A's between 1910 and 1914, and also managed the team for parts of the 1937 and 1939 seasons when his father was too ill to do so. In more recent years, his descendents have taken to politics: Mack's grandson Connie Mack III was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Florida from 1983-1989 and the United States Senate from 1989-2001, and great-grandson Connie Mack IV was elected to the House from Florida's 14th Congressional District. 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy III (born October 29, 1940 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), known as Connie Mack for short, is a former Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from 1983 to 1989 and of the United States Senate from 1989 to 2001, all from Florida. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,794 sq. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Cornelius McGillicuddy IV (born August 12, 1967 in Fort Myers, Florida), known as Connie Mack IV, is a Republican from Florida, elected to the United States House of Representatives in 2004, representing the states 14th Congressional district (map). ...


External links

Preceded by:
Al Buckenberger
Pittsburgh Pirates Managers
1894–1896
Succeeded by:
Patsy Donovan
Preceded by:
First Manager
Philadelphia Athletics Manager
1901-1950
Succeeded by:
Jimmy Dykes

  Results from FactBites:
 
Connie Mack (baseball) Summary (2875 words)
Mack was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1937 as a charter member.
Mack's son Earle Mack played several games for the A's between 1910 and 1914, and also managed the team for parts of the 1937 and 1939 seasons when his father was too ill to do so.
In more recent years, his descendents have taken to politics: Mack's grandson Connie Mack III was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Florida from 1983-1989 and the United States Senate from 1989-2001, and great-grandson Connie Mack IV was elected to the House from Florida's 14th Congressional District.
Connie Mack | The BASEBALL Page (2229 words)
Mack played in an era when there were no uniform numbers, and when he managed he wore a business suit.
Mack was often described as the "grand old gentleman of the game," but he wasn't above stretching the rules to gain a competitive advantage.
Connie Mack pieced together a tremendous baseball team in the first decade of the 20th century, built in large part, around his famous "$100,000 Infield." At the time, Mack claimed that even that lofty dollar-amount would not pry the four star players away from him.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m